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UNITED
NATIONS
A

      General Assembly
A/4478
30 June 1960

UNITED NATIONS


                                                                                                                                 
                                                                 
Annual Report of the Director
of the United Nations Relief and
Works Agency for Palestine Refugees
in the Near East


1 July 1959--30 June 1960 
 

 
GENERAL ASSEMBLY
OFFICIAL RECORDS : FIFTEENTH SESSION
SUPPLEMENT No. 14 (A/4478)
 
 
 
NEW YORK


NOTE

Symbols of United Nations documents are composed of capital letters combined with figures. Mention of such a symbol indicates a reference to a United Nations document.




TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page
Letter of transmittal.............................. v
Letter from the Chairman of the Advisory Commission
of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for
Palestine Refugees in the Near East vi

INTRODUCTION.................... 1
PART I. REPORT IN UNRWA OPERATIONS, 1 JULY 1959 30 JUNE 1960 6
Annex to part I
Tables
1-4 Statistics concerning refugees and camps......... 13
5-7 Basic rations and supplementary feeding........ 14
8-10 Health statistics................ 15
11-15 General education and university scholarships.. 17
16 Vocational training............... 19
17-19 Finance......................... 19
20-22 Social welfare................. 22
23 UNRWA personnel............... 23

PART II. BUDGET FOR THE CALENDAR YEAR 1961...... 24

PART III. SUMMARY OF THE AGENCY'S PROGRAMME FOR THE
THREE YEARS, 1961-1963................. 30
APPENDICES

1. Expenditure for 1959 and 1960, budget estimates for 1961
and projected budget estimates for 1962 and 1963.. 34

2. Location map of UNRWA activities........at end of volume

LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

Beirut, Lebanon
1 September 1960
Sir,

I have the honour to submit herewith my Annual Report to the General Assembly on the work of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East for the period 1 July 1959 to 30 June 1960, in compliance with the request contained in paragraph 21 of resolution 302 (IV) of 8 December 1949 and paragraph 8 of resolution 1315 (XIII) of 12 December 1958. The Advisory Commission of the Agency has carefully considered this report and its views are set forth in the letter of which I attach a copy.

The report is presented in four main parts, as follows:

An Introduction, in which I have endeavoured to evaluate major considerations of policy in the light of the experience of the past ten years, and to stress certain aspects of the Palestine refugee problem which I consider to be important to its proper understanding;

Part I, an account of the Agency's activities during the twelve months ending 30 June 1960, including an annex containing statistical tables relating to particular activities;

Part II, a presentation of the budget for the calendar year 1961 for consideration by the General Assembly at its fifteenth session;

Part III, a plan of operations for the three years ending in 1963.

There are also two general appendices to the report, a tabular presentation of the financial aspects of the Agency's operations and projected operations for the period 1959-1963, and a map of the areas of the Agency's principal operations.

I have included part III in the report in view of the decision taken by the General Assembly at its last session to extend the Agency's mandate for a period of three years until 1963. I believe that the information contained therein will assist delegates towards a better understanding of the current trends of the Agency's programmes and, in particular, of their financial implications for the future.
Sincerely yours,
(Signed) John H. DAVIS
Director

President of the General Assembly,
United Nations,
New York, New York




LETTER FROM THE CHAIRMAN OF THE ADVISORY COMMISSION
OF THE UNITED NATIONS RELIEF AND WORKS AGENCY FOR
PALESTINE REFUGEES IN THE NEAR EAST

29 August 1960
Dear Dr. Davis,

During its meetings of 19 and 29 August 1960, the Advisory Commission of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East carefully reviewed your annual report to the fifteenth session of the United Nations General Assembly.

In the view of the Advisory Commission, your report accurately sets forth the work of the Agency during the period of 1 July 1959-30 June 1960. It embodies a programme for the three-year mandate of the Agency, during 1960-1963, with an expansion of education and vocational training which appears to be sensible and forward-looking.

The report also outlines the financial needs of the Agency during the ensuing period, if the programme is to be fully met. In their discussion of this and other aspects of the report, the members of the Commission reserved the positions of their Governments.

Bearing in mind the continuing needs of the refugees, the Advisory Commission commends the report, in all its implications, to the earnest and serious consideration of the Members of the General Assembly.

All members of the Advisory Commission join me in this expression of their
views and in thanking you for your efforts in the preparation of this report.
Yours sincerely,
(Signed) Selim YAFI
Chairman
Advisory Commission

Dr. John H. Davis,
Director,
United Nations Relief and Works Agency,
Beirut



INTRODUCTION

1. Retrospect. The Palestine refugee problem came into being in 1948 when hundreds of thousands of Palestinians fled their homes and took refuge in the surrounding areas. After a period of emergency aid administered by voluntary agencies under United Nations auspices, the General Assembly in December 1949 established the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East to assist in the care of the refugees. The Agency's mandate, originally envisaged as covering a limited period of international assistance to the refugees, has been specifically extended on three occasions and presently runs until 30 June 1963.1

2. Historically, UNRWA has been required to carry out functions broadly identified as relief and rehabilitation. Contrary to what was intended in the early days of UNRWA's mandate, the relief function --the provision of food, shelter, and medical care--has continued to absorb most of the Agency's funds and efforts and has even grown in significance owing to the natural increase of the registered refugee population and cumulative needs for improved services. On the other hand, the rehabilitation function, which was intended to render a substantial number of refugees self-supporting and thereby achieve a gradual diminution of the burden of relief, has failed to achieve any appreciable results.

3. During the nine years which have elapsed since UNRWA established its own lists, the number of registered refugees has steadily increased owing principally to the excess of births over deaths; since June 1952 the total has risen by approximately 238,000 to a current total of 1,120,889--an average annual net increase of some 30,000.

4. The lot of the refugees during this long period of dependence on relief has been one of hardship and disappointment. The relief afforded by UNRWA, though indispensable, has been a strict minimum dictated by budgetary limitations beyond the Agency's control. Opportunities for living normal independent lives have been non-existent for the majority of the refugees, and their life of enforced idleness, now in its thirteenth year, has inevitably affected their outlook and morale. In their minds the promise made in para-
graph 11 of General Assembly resolution 194 (III), passed in December 1948 and reaffirmed annually thereafter, continues to be the one acceptable long-term solution to their problem and they are embittered because it still stands unfulfilled. This paragraph reads as follows:

"The General Assembly...

"Resolves that the refugees wishing to return to their homes and live at peace with their neighbours should be permitted to do so at the earliest practicable date, and that compensation should be paid for the property of those choosing not to return and for loss of or damage to property which, under principles of international law or in equity, should be made good by the Governments or authorities responsible".

5. In 1948, at the time the refugees fled from their homes, the population of Palestine was about 30 per cent urban and 70 per cent rural. Over two-thirds of the urban refugee population (i.e., 20 per cent of the total populace) almost immediately became self-supporting in other Arab countries because they possessed skills which were useful in those countries. The remaining 75 per cent to 80 per cent were farmers, unskilled workers, the children, the aged, and the sick. The farmers and unskilled workers, who were
the employable elements of this group, failed to find jobs because they moved into areas already saturated with farmers and unskilled labourers. There being no opportunity for them to use the talents they possessed, they congregated in the camps and villages, along with the aged and the sick, and it is these groups which now form the bulk of the older refugees dependent on UNRWA.

6. To sum up the situation, the refugees dependent on UNRWA have been denied rehabilitation through repatriation or compensation because paragraph 11 of the United Nations resolution 194 (III) has never been implemented; they have not found work where they reside because these countries already have an ample supply of farmers and unskilled workers; and they have not moved to other nearby countries because these already have an abundance of such workers. For the most part, maturing youth has not been able even to move into those skilled jobs for which demand has existed because they have had no opportunity to acquire the requisite skill.

7. While certain much emphasized political factors also have tended to retard progress on the refugee problem, in the Director's opinion economic and educational limitations have been dominant. Thus, many factors have contributed to the stagnation which characterizes the Palestine refugee problem-- factors over which the refugees have little control. This in turn has tended to colour almost every major decision made in the Middle East during the past twelve years.

8. Present outlook. Resolution 194 (III) has not been implemented and the outlook for the Palestine refugees is for a continuation of conditions similar to those of the past twelve years. The simple truth is that the jobs at which the refugees could be employed do not exist today within the host countries. Nor could any large number of jobs be created in these countries--except at an uneconomic level of investment--because of the limited local resources and scope for employment. The fact has to be faced that for the majority of the refugees--two-thirds of the total or more--the areas where they are presently located hold out almost no prospect of their absorption into satisfactory, self-supporting employment. It follows that if these refugees are ever to find suitable employment, they will have to move across an international frontier in one direction or another. Even if, for the sake of argument, one disregards all political implications, it seems unlikely that other nearby countries will accept large numbers of refugees who qualify as farmers and low-skilled workers, because these countries already have sufficient workers of these types. This is true because the same technological progress that brings higher total employment also brings a decrease in the relative need for such workers; which situation, in turn, will be reflected in the issuance of entry permits. In these circumstances, maturing youths will need special vocational training to fit them for whatever opportunities become available. Because the sons of farmers from Palestine now lack the training which a farm boy normally obtains by working with his father even those young men who have an opportunity to return to their former homes and take up the work of their fathers will need specialized training.

9. There are now almost one half million refugees whose age is sixteen years or under. In addition, another 35,000 are now being born per year. Their future in terms of skills and employability is yet to be determined. Presently, UNRWA is offering full vocational training to 300 refugee youths per year. The inadequacy of this rate of training is apparent when one considers that more than 15,000 refugee boys and 15,000 refugee girls now attain maturity each year and that during the past twelve years over 300,000 such persons have grown to adulthood. It is these young people whose plight is the most distressing of any. Intellectually they are as capable and as receptive to learning as are young people elsewhere in the world. The danger for the future inherent in the build up of an increasingly large body of unskilled and therefore unemployed, restless and frustrated youth needs no emphasis.

10. The above facts demonstrate that no quick solution to the Palestine refugee problem is in sight. n general, there is no reason to suppose that the conditions which have governed the lot of the refugees over the past twelve years will alter significantly during the next three. What, therefore, appears most probable for the period of the Agency's extended mandate is a continuation of present conditions and trends, altered only to the degree that young refugees are able to obtain skills which are made necessary by advancing technology. At best, it will not be possible to do more than get this type of programme well launched during the next three years.

11. UNRWA's role. UNRWA itself cannot solve the refugee problem. Any general solution to the complex Palestine problem, of which the refugee problem is a part, will be brought about largely by forces outside UNRWA--forces which will govern and shape the future of the Middle East. UNRWA can and should work in harmony with these forces. Ten years of UNRWA history bear out the fact that major development projects designed with the specific purpose of resettling refugees are unacceptable to refugees and host Governments alike. It is the Director's opinion that major development projects in the Middle East should proceed independently of UNRWA and without direct reference to the resettlement of refugees.

12. The broad lines governing the responsibilities and functions of UNRWA are set forth in the resolutions of the General Assembly. The latest resolution of the General Assembly, 1456 (XIV)-- of 9 December 1959, extends the Agency's mandate for a period of three years from 1 July 1960 and directs the Agency "to continue its programme of relief for the refugees and, in so far as financially possible, expand its programme of self-support and vocational training".

13. In the Director's opinion, the Agency should concentrate its efforts during the new mandate period on: (1) administering relief (including food, shelter assistance and health services); (2) providing general education, both elementary and secondary; (3) teaching vocational skills, and awarding university scholarships; and (4) offering small loans and grants to individual refugees who have skills and want to become self-employed. With respect to each of these functions UNRWA has demonstrated an ability to perform efficiently and effectively.

14. By performing these services for the refugees, the Agency will be alleviating human suffering, equipping young refugees to lead useful and productive lives irrespective of where they may live, and supporting the general stability of the Middle East. This, in turn, will be conducive to the creation of a climate that will enable the forces that shape the future of the Middle East to work in a more orderly manner.

15. In carrying out its role, UNRWA is joined by certain other organizations and groups which together contribute materially to the welfare of the refugees and the stability of the Middle East. The United Nations entities of the United Nations Emergency Force, the United Nations Truce Supervision Organization, the Conciliation Commission for Palestine and the Spinelli Mission are carrying out the specific duties assigned them by the General Assembly and/or the Secretary-General, all of which pertain to the Palestine problem and all of which are related in one way or another to the work of UNRWA. The Agency is continuing to maintain appropriate working relationships with each of these entities. Viewed as a whole, UNRWA and its sister United Nations organizations are contributing significantly towards the maintenance of stability and peace in the Middle East.

16. The host countries do much to help the refugees--both by direct assistance and by helping UNRWA. Currently they expend in excess of $5 million per year in providing land, water, security, medical assistance, education, and miscellaneous services. During the past eleven years they have spent in excess of $20 million in direct assistance and contributed about $6 million to the Agency. In addition, they bear all of the economic, social, and political inconveniences and repercussions of having the refugees within their borders. Most important of all, they have given them refuge within their countries. The host countries bear these burdens with patience and courage and have demonstrated deep fraternal sympathy for the refugees.

17. The several international voluntary agencies working in the Middle East also administer effectively to the material needs of the refugees by providing special services, including the gift of clothing. Particularly significant this year is the additional role they have played in raising funds on behalf of the World Refugee Year, a considerable amount of which will be used in the Middle East.

18. Future programme. The preceding analysis reveals that the Palestine refugee problem is being compounded by the fact that maturing refugees are being given so little opportunity adequately to develop the latent productive talents they possess and that this deficiency is a major contributing cause to the continuous increase in the number of refugees dependent on UNRWA. The tragedy of this situation, of course, is not accurately reflected in this rate of increase but must be evaluated in terms of idle hours, vanished hopes, wasted talents, and thwarted lives.

19. But the picture is not hopeless. Rather it is a challenge to be met. The talents of maturing refugee youths can be salvaged and put to constructive use by a well-planned and promptly executed programme for improving general education--both elementary and secondary--and for expanding specialized types of training that fit young people for employment in an era of technological progress. UNRWA with the cooperation of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, and with help from the host Governments in providing sites, has already laid the foundation and indeed set up and tested the pilot plant for such a programme in the shape of its schools, its university scholarships, its vocational and teacher-training centres and its schemes of individual self help. What remains is to launch an adequate, interrelated programme of education, vocational training, and individual assistance on the basis of such experience.

20. As the first phase of such an effort, the Director proposes the following:

(a) A general programme to improve elementary and secondary education through teacher training and expanded classroom facilities and to add to the depth of education by making general the now limited practice of providing a third year at the lower secondary level. This will involve, in addition to the regular budget level for 1960, an expenditure of about $2.5 million spread over the three-year period. This money will have to come from the regular UNRWA budget.

(b) The expansion of vocational training facilities as follows:

(I) A new vocational training centre for 232 boys to be opened in September 1960 at Wadi Seer, Jordan.
(ii) A new men's teacher-training centre for 200 men to be opened in September 1960 at Ramallah, Jordan.
(iii) A new vocational training centre for 224 boys, now under construction near Damascus in the Northern Region of the United Arab Republic, to be opened
for classes in September 1961.
(iv) A new vocational training-centre for 224 boys, now being built in Lebanon, to be ready for operation in September 1961.
(v) A combination vocational training and teacher-training school for 550 girls, now under construction in Jordan to be in operation in September 1962.
(vi) A vocational training school for 220 boys, the subjects yet to be determined, being planned for Gaza; the opening date to be September 1962.
(vii) A vocational training centre, the subjects and location yet to be determined, for 220 boys to begin operation in September 1962.

(c) A doubling of the number of university scholarships awarded by UNRWA per year. This will cost about $500,000 for the three-year period.
(d) The placing of the loans and grants programme, designed to help refugees become self-supporting, on a more consistent basis. This will be financed by World Refugee Year (WRY) funds in the amount of about $0.5 million; supplemented, if possible, by the regular budget.

21. The first two centres listed (i.e. (I) and (ii), at Wadi Seer and at Ramallah in Jordan) have already been constructed on the regular budget of UNRWA in past years and the operating costs will be borne by the regular budget in the future. At least four of the five new vocational training schools (items iii-vii), the expansion of university scholarships and a limited loans and grants programme will be financed during the new mandate period from World Refugee Year contributions, provided the $4 million WRY goal set by UNRWA is attained. This includes construction, equipment, and operating costs of the Vocational Training Centres (VTCs) enumerated, to 30 June 1963. Beyond this date, operating costs will have to be provided for in the regular budget of UNRWA or its successor or by some special arrangement.

22. A second phase of the programme to assist refugee youth is also being planned now; the implementation of this second phase can and should be finished during the period of UNRWA's current mandate. This phase consists of doubling the capacity of all the five VTCs listed in phase 1 except for the centre for girls (item (v)). Each of these units has been located and planned with such expansion in mind. In expanding these units, careful consideration should be given to adding specialized training for administrative and business personnel in selected skills and techniques needed in the Middle East, provided a survey at the time shows the need for such activity. All such expansion will have to be financed by contributions to UNRWA's regular budget during the period of its mandate. The aggregate cost, including operation from September 1962, will be approximately $1.5 million. From a practical standpoint, all units can be expanded to full capacity by 30 June 1963 if the decision to do so, with the necessary pledges of increased contributions to UNRWA, are made at this session of the General Assembly.

23. The full implementation of phase 1 of the Vocational Training and Teacher Training Programmes will raise the number of trainees graduating each year from UNRWA centres from about 500 (excluding certain other courses) to about 1,500 (most courses are for two years but some are for one year or less), and the number of university scholarships from ninety to 180 per year. When phase 2 of the programme is fully implemented, the annual number of graduates will stand at between 2,000 and 2,500. In addition to these formalized training courses, the Agency provides experience to refugees through its own employment and it is currently releasing about 250 persons per year for jobs outside the Agency--jobs which offer better terms of employment.

24. The Director recommends that both phases of the programme to assist refugee youth be implemented by June 1963. In planning all aspects of this programme, the Agency has kept in mind the basic trends and needs of the Middle East. Also, it has tried to plan in such a way as to facilitate the eventual phasing in of the Agency's programme with its counterpart in each country once a solution to the refugee problem has been finalized.

25. Financial needs. In the light of the previous analysis, it is advantageous to consider the Agency's budgetary needs far the period covered by the extended mandate in two parts, i.e., (1) the relief requirements and (2) the requirements for the programmes of education, training and individual assistance.

26. During this period, it is anticipated, total relief requirements will average about $1.5 million per year above the 1960 figure of $26.75 million. Cumulative for the period, this will involve a sum of $4.5 million above the expenditure level of 1960 and will cover the ration costs of any net increase there may be in the number of recipients as the result of the rectification of ration rolls (see paragraph 52 below), adjusted area staff salaries, and other rising costs, including those resulting from refugee population growth.

27. During the same three-year period, the continuation of the existing pattern of education, training and individual assistance will aggregate about $3.7 million over and above the 1960 figure of $8.25 million. This increase is mainly due to the natural increase in the school population.

28. For the proposed expansion and improvement of education, training and individual assistance, a total of $8.1 million will be required over the three years. Of this $4 million will be supplied from World Refugee Year sources. This means that $4.1 million must be borne by the regular budget at the average rate of about $1.4 million per year. This, of course, will make possible the implementation of both phases 1 and 2 of the programmes for training refugee youth, as recommended by the Director.

29. The total cumulative expenditure of UNRWA (including both relief and youth assistance) for the three-year period will be $16.3 million in excess of the estimated level of 1960, of which $4 million will be met by contributions from the World Refugee Year, and $12.3 million from contributions to UNRWA's regular budget. This $16.3 million is composed of $4.5 million for relief, $3.7 million for continuing the existing pattern of education, etc., and $8.1 million for the expansion of education, training and individual assistance.

30. In tabular form the proposed distribution of expenditure is as follows:
1961 1962 1963 expressed in $ U.S. million
rounded to the nearest $50,000
A. Relief:
(I) Current (1960) costs......... 26.75 26.75 26.75
(ii) Unavoidable increases........ 1.15 1.50 1.75
B. Education, technical training
and individual Assistance:
(I) Current (1960) costs........ 8.25 8.25 8.25
(ii) Unavoidable increases....... 0.35 1.20 2.15
(iii) Proposed expansion........ 4.10 1.70 2.30
TOTAL 40.60 39.40 41.20


31. The distribution of expenditure between WRY sources and the regular budget in regard to the proposed expansion of education, training and individual assistance (item B (iii) above) is:

1961 1962 1963
(expressed in $ U.S. million
rounded to the nearest $10,000)
WRY.................................. 2.38 0.67 0.95
Regular budget....................... 1.70 1.00 1.38

TOTAL 4.08 1.67 2.33


32. This is a tight budget and therefore one that must be met in full if the full programme is to be implemented. In addition to the funds mentioned here, the host Governments are contributing the land and certain utilities and services for all of the new educational and training units.

33. As explained earlier in the report, the Director is now submitting a budget for the fiscal year 1961 in accordance with established procedure. The summary budgets for the years 1962 and 1963 are in the form of estimates for general guidance. It is contemplated that a working budget will be submitted for each of the two remaining years in accordance with the same established annual procedures.

34. An expenditure for education by UNRWA should not be regarded as relief any more than is a similar expenditure by any Government or by UNESCO. On the contrary, it is an investment for the purpose of developing the potential of a human being, which in the last analysis is the most valuable and most priceless asset possessed by any country.

35. Beyond 1963. To plan or recommend a programme or policy with respect to the Palestine refugees extending beyond July 1963 is outside the scope of this report. However, as already indicated, the three-year programme here outlined does not anticipate any significant reduction of services to refugees during that interval. On the contrary, it is contemplated that relief operations as at July 1963 will be at more or less present levels and that programmes designed to help refugee youth, i.e., educational and individual self-support programmes, will have become considerably larger.

36. This is true for a number of reasons. Almost all who have studied the problem have emphasized the strong desire on the part of the refugees to return to their homeland and to accept no other answer. This feeling, which continues to be as strong as ever, is generally supported by the people and the Governments of the host countries. Less emphasized, but no doubt equally important in the long run, is the fact that the refugees in their present condition of training, skill and education are not readily employable in an era characterized by technological progress. As explained earlier, most of the employable adults who originally were aided by UNRWA were farmers or low-skilled workers. The countries in which the refugees have taken refuge were already amply supplied with persons possessing such abilities. In fact, the world generally tends to be saturated with such persons because, as already pointed out, advancing technology is constantly reducing the ratio of farmers and low-skilled workers to the total working forces. The young refugees who mature within the camps are even less readily employable unless they receive technical training because, in general, they have had virtually no opportunity to learn skills by working or even to acquire work habits as they were growing up. During the past twelve years, as already indicated, more than 300,000 young persons (150,000 boys and 150,000 girls) have grown to maturity in the refugee camps and villages.

37. This means that even if a political settlement of the Palestine issue were to be achieved soon, which seems improbable, a large proportion of the refugees would still find it very difficult to obtain employment. As mentioned earlier, the young men returning to their former homes or the homes of their parents would lack the skills and working habits necessary to enable them to take up the work of their fathers. Each year, in present circumstances, an additional 30,000 maturing refugee youths are added to this disadvantaged group.

38. With the passage of time, the task of solving the refugee problem grows ever more complex. The total number of refugees steadily increases in relation to the number of jobs available; beyond this, even for those jobs which will become available there is an increasing need for special training. In general, those who receive no special training will be virtually unemployable in the kind of labor market that accompanies an era of technological progress.

39. Fortunately, refugee youths generally are ambitious and eager to acquire skills and learning at the time they approach maturity. However, if they fail to receive specialized training at the time they are ready for it, i.e., on completion of their preparatory education, they probably have missed the opportunity for life-particularly if, in the meantime, they marry and start a family. For years to come throughout the Middle East, candidates for entry to training centres and other institutions of higher education will continue to outnumber the places available several times over, and in the scramble for admission the older youths whose education has been interrupted will be at a disadvantage. This means that most of the 950,000 boys who have attained full maturity during the past twelve years will find it very difficult to adapt themselves to employment opportunities, even when the Palestine issue is resolved. These, together with the aged and the physically unfit, constitute perhaps a half of the adult males among the refugees today. Wherever they may live in the future, these unfortunate people will constitute more of a drag than an asset to the economy--many of them probably becoming welfare cases for much of the remainder of their lives. To what extent these older youths might be made employable by specialized training, not now contemplated by UNRWA, is a question which merits careful study.

40. It is with this complex of factors in mind pertaining to the Palestine refugee problem that the Director draws the conclusion that the refugee problem will continue well beyond the three-year extended mandate of the Agency. When one adds to this picture the complex of other problems confronting the host Governments in their own strenuous efforts to achieve technological progress, it is apparent that these Governments are already struggling against great odds. It is with this further fact in mind that the Director cautions against facile assumptions that it rests with the host Governments to solve the refugee problem.

41. Finally, it is with this total picture in mind that the Director strongly urges the consideration and approval by the General Assembly of the three-year programme here presented. Regardless of how or when the refugee problem is solved, the necessity to train refugee youth for jobs in an era of technological progress will exist, and the longer the solution to the refugee problem takes, the greater will become this need. Such training in no way prejudices the ultimate rights of refugees under resolution 194 (III). On the other hand, the longer the delay in initiating a youth assistance programme, of the type here outlined, the greater will become the number of mature youths for whom the appropriate age for training has passed. This indeed is serious.

42. The programme here presented should be considered with full recognition of the financial responsibilities that will extend beyond 1963. To operate at capacity, the new vocational facilities built during the extended mandate period (both the original and the expanded phases) will require an expenditure in 1964 and in each successive year of about $2 million. This will have to be provided for in the future budgets of UNRWA or its successor or by some other special arrangement worked out mutually with the host Governments.

43. Whether UNRWA will continue to exist beyond June 1963 and what, if any, responsibility any United Nations entity will perform in behalf of the Palestine refugees will be for the General Assembly to determine as that date approaches. No doubt this will depend mainly on developments that take place in the meantime.

44. To the Director it appears certain that some responsibility for international assistance will continue for a decade or longer. Not to recognize this fact and act accordingly would without doubt prove far more expensive than to provide such assistance in an appropriate and timely manner. The Palestine refugee problem has a bearing on the stability and peace of the Middle East and hence on the stability and peace of the world. It is in this broad context that the Director requests the General Assembly to make its decision.
Part I
REPORT ON UNRWA OPERATIONS, 1 JULY 1959--30 JUNE 1960


A. The provision of relief

45. In resolution 1456 (XIV), of 9 December 1959, the General Assembly directed the Agency to "continue its programme of relief for the refugees". This the Agency has done, throughout the period under review, without interruption or major change as compared with previous years. That these relief services are minimal is illustrated by the fact that they involve the expenditure of no more than seven U.S. cents per refugee per day--a cost which it is obvious can maintain an indigent population at only the barest subsistence level.

46. As a consequence of the continued increase of the refugee population owing to the excess of births over deaths, the Agency's relief services were made available to a larger number of persons than during the previous year. As at 30 June 1960, 1,047,437 refugees received either rations or other services or both, while the number of refugees registered with the Agency increased over the past twelve months by 33,000 to a total of 1,120,889. Statistics concerning the refugees are to be found in tables 1-4 in the annex to this part of the present report.

47. Information concerning each of the Agency's relief operations, and developments with regard to them during the past twelve months, are contained in the following paragraphs.
BASIC RELIEF AND SUPPLEMENTARY FEEDING

48. Over one third of the Agency's total budget is devoted to the purchase and distribution of basic food commodities which provide each beneficiary with
about 1,500 calories per day in summer and 1,600 in winter. This basic ration was distributed in the same form and quantity as in previous years, and to the same categories of beneficiaries. It involved the importation by the Agency into the area, for consumption during the twelve-month period, of 107,000 tons of flour and 30,000 tons of other foodstuffs.

49. In recognition of the fact that the basic ration does not in itself constitute an adequately balanced diet, the Agency continued its programme of supplementary feeding and milk distribution designed to protect the most vulnerable groups--children, pregnant and nursing women, tuberculosis patients etc.--against possible malnutrition.

50. Tables 5, 6 and 7 in the annex contain details of the basic ration and statistical information concerning the supplementary feeding and milk programmes.
ELIGIBILITY AND REGISTRATION

51. During the past year, the Agency continued to investigate cases where there were specific grounds for re-examining the eligibility of particular refugee families. The total number of cases investigated was 9,757. As a result of these investigations, some 9,000 ration recipients were removed from the rolls and some 5,000 were added to, or reinstated on, the rolls. These investigations are a necessary, continuing part of the Agency's operations. It is clear, however, that they have only a marginal impact on the general problem of correcting the known inaccuracies in the ration rolls. Some more comprehensive action is required if this problem is to be dealt with effectively.

52. A plan has therefore been worked out for a new approach to this problem and is now ready for discussion with the host Governments concerned. It envisages a gradual approach dealing with only a limited area and a limited number of refugees at any one time. The aim will be to concentrate on eliminating the names of non-existent persons from the rolls while at the same time admitting on to the rolls the children who have been registered for medical and health services but who have not so far been receiving rations. On balance, the outcome should be much to the advantage of the refugees in general since the number of children considerably exceeds the estimated number of non-existent persons. The success of this new approach will depend on the extent to which the host Governments are in a position to co-operate in carrying it out. Meanwhile, funds have been earmarked in 1961 and succeeding years on the assumption that this co-operation will be forthcoming.
HEALTH CARE
General

53. There were no important changes during the period under review in the level of the Agency's health services, a detailed description of which was contained in last year's annual report. The state of health of the refugee population has been well maintained and no major epidemics have occurred.

54. The Agency provides a comprehensive health service to a population of approximately a million refugees in the four host countries. Over the last decade, this health programme has been developed into a well-balanced health promotion service working in close co-ordination with the health services of the host countries. Increasing emphasis has been laid on the preventive aspects of the programme and on the value of health education. The following paragraphs contain a summary of the broad lines of the current health programme and of developments during the year; and the annex contains tables (8 to 10) of statistics relevant to the operation of the Agency's health services during the year.
Clinics, hospitals and laboratories

55. The Agency operates or subsidizes 89 health centres and 13 mobile clinics, the latter covering 41 41 points of service. On an average, each refugee makes some use of the clinic services five times a year.

56. Wherever possible, the Agency uses the services of existing hospitals in the area on a subsidy basis rather than establishing institutions of its own. The Agency does maintain six hospitals in areas where no other facility is available. The number of hospital beds maintained by or reserved for the Agency is 2,084, or 2.00 per 1,000 population served.

57. Laboratory services are provided in Agency-operated, university, governmental or subsidized private laboratories. Under an agreement concluded during the year, the Government of Jordan has agreed to provide, against an annual subsidy paid by the Agency, a laboratory service for refugees throughout Jordan covering both public health and clinical laboratory examinations.
Maternal and child health

58. An active maternal and child health programme has continued to be operated. This includes not only pre-natal services, which the majority of pregnant women attend, but also a programme of child care, including prophylactic immunization against smallpox, enteric group fevers, diphtheria, whooping-cough and tetanus, from which over 85 per cent of the infants benefit.

59. School health teams periodically review the state of health of the school population, perform routine medical examinations (especially of new entrants) and refer for treatment any children found to be suffering from remediable defects. They also select school children in need of supplementary feeding and carry out prophylactic immunization campaigns.
Communicable diseases control

60. A list of infectious diseases recorded among the refugee population during the past twelve months is given in table 10 of the annex. It will be noted that, once again, no case from the six "Convention" diseases occurred among the refugees, and that dysentery and eye diseases were still the most prevalent infections.
Tuberculosis control

61. The Agency's anti-tuberculosis programme, in accordance with modern concepts, has been giving increased emphasis to domiciliary treatment. A sufficient number of beds (455 in all) is, however, reserved in the four host countries to meet the requirements of tuberculosis patients requiring hospital treatment. An agreement with the Government of Jordan came into effect on 1 July 1959 whereby the Government provides an out-patient service at the Government Tuberculosis Centre, Jerusalem, for all tuberculous refugees living in the Jerusalem and Hebron areas (a similar service already exists in East Jordan).
Malaria control

62. Information has been given in previous reports concerning the operations carried out by UNRWA in the control and eradication of malaria. Responsibility for this function has now been transferred to the National Malaria Eradication Programme authorities of the countries concerned. The Agency has, however, continued to co-operate by forwarding to these authorities information concerning cases of malaria diagnosed among the refugee population by the Agency's medical officers (there were 235 such cases during the twelve months under review), and by assisting the National Eradication Programme staff in control activities within the Agency camp areas.
Health education

63. The Agency has continued to operate an active health education programme among the refugee population and Agency employees (mostly refugees themselves) to foster an understanding of what they can contribute towards raising the standard of health of the community.
Rehabilitation of crippled children

64. The programme for the rehabilitation of crippled children, originally limited to Lebanon, was extended to include a number of cases in the Northern
Region of the United Arab Republic.
Medical education and training

65. The in-service training of medical and paramedical personnel has continued as usual.
ENVIRONMENTAL SANITATION

66. Water supplies have in general been satisfactorily maintained and in some cases improved. For the second consecutive winter, however, there has been a serious drought in the area as a whole, and this has necessitated the introduction of emergency measures in Jordan. In particular, Hebron area camps are the most affected, and water is being transported to these from Jerusalem.

67. The Agency also has continued effectively to provide other normal services in the field of environmental sanitation, viz. water drainage, sewage and refuse disposal, insect and rodent control, slaughter houses, incinerators, bathhouses, etc.
SHELTER

68. The Agency has maintained fifty-eight camps in the four host countries. The steady increase in camp population, to which attention was drawn in last years' report, has continued; during the twelve months under review, the total number of refugees accommodated in official UNRWA camps rose to approximately 421,500. In the Northern Region of the United Arab Republic, the Agency continued during the period under review to assist in the provision of shelter and this will be continued during the coming year. No new camps were established during the past year, but some new camp construction in Lebanon,
and a new camp in Jordan, is envisaged for 1961.

69. The Agency's expenditure on the construction and maintenance of shelters has averaged $675,000 per annum in recent years and has resulted in the elimination of all tents from Agency camps as well as many sub-standard shelters.

70. Table 3 of the annex contains camp statistics over the period 1950-1960, and table 4 presents breakdown of refugees in camps in each of the host countries.
CLOTHING

71. UNRWA does not provide the refugees with clothing. Its role is limited to the not inconsiderable one of paying the ocean freight on donations of used clothing collected overseas by voluntary agencies. The efforts of these organizations during the past year resulted in record shipments for which the Agency paid about $300,000 in freight. In all, nearly 3,000 tons of clothing and shoes were provided. A list of the organizations concerned is given in table 21 in the annex; once more, UNRWA wishes to acknowledge its grateful thanks for their efforts.
SOCIAL WELFARE

72. The Agency's social welfare services supplement the basic relief programme by seeking to mitigate the effects of two major ills which cannot be overlooked: special hardship--which, in a community where hardship is the general rule, is bound to be such as to claim attention--and the problem of low refugee morale arising from twelve years of enforced idleness in the camps. A total of $755,000 was devoted to these purposes in 1959.
HARDSHIP CASES

73. Financial considerations prevent all but the neediest and most urgent of hardship cases from receiving extra help from the Agency's welfare services. Nevertheless, during the year, cash assistance totalling $45,302 was given to 9,637 refugees, and extra blankets, clothing and fuel were given to 34,324 others. These cases arose chiefly in the Gaza Strip and Jordan camps, where there are the least opportunities for casual employment and hardship arises in its acutest form. In addition, the Agency's case-workers gave many others help and guidance on a variety of personal problems.

74. Another category suffering from special hard-ship--the blind, deaf and dumb and physically-handicapped among refugee youth--has continued to receive special attention. By placing youths in local institutions, the Agency enables them to pursue a specialized training designed to enable them to support themselves. During the year, forty-two new cases were taken on, while sixty others continued their training. The average cost per person of six years' training is $1,800; lack of funds at present limits the Agency's ability to accept all applicants, and additional assistance is needed from voluntary agencies to help these tragic cases.
Community development

75. This programme, now in its third year, is aimed at encouraging refugees to take the initiative to better their own lot within the camps. In addition to the ten co-operatives already in operation, seven new ones were developed during the year--two poultry, two consumer, one transport, one mat-making and two bakery co-operatives. One of these, a bakery cooperative for over 100 families, was established in the Northern Region of the United Arab Republic, where the Government had not previously authorized the development of co-operatives. These co-operatives are financed by an initial contribution from UNRWA, by money raised by their members, and by loans and gifts from outside sources. They do not render their members self-supporting but do enable them to earn a small amount of money with which to supplement their rations; and, perhaps most important, they provide work. In all cases the initiative for their establishment comes from the refugees. A full list of
co-operatives established with Agency help may be found in table 20 of the annex.
Small grants to individuals

76. During the year, small grants averaging $36 were made to 243 persons, such as bicycle repairers, fishermen, painters, or barbers, to enable them to supplement their rations by pursuing a once-familiar trade. Small contributions to the Agency are used directly in this programme.
Sewing centres

77. A total of 1,732 girls graduated from the Agency's thirty-three sewing centres during the past year. Each girl receives six months of training and, on leaving, is able to earn small amounts of money. There are waiting lists for these courses and new centres are planned for the future if funds permit.
Activities for men

78. The Agency has continued to operate five carpentry courses in the Gaza Strip. Training lasts a year and successful trainees receive a certificate. The success of these courses has prompted consideration of extending them next year to other host countries.
Youth activities programme

79. The Agency's growing concern at the problem of idle refugee youth (see paragraph 6 of annex C to last year's report)2 resulted in the introduction early in 1960 of a new Youth Leadership Training Programme in co-operation with the YMCA. At a Youth Leadership Training Centre established by the YMCA in Lebanon, young refugee men and women drawn from the camps of each of the host countries undergo courses as leaders of youth activities in their camps. It is hoped that this will lead to the establishment of youth activity centres in all the camps, directed by trained supervisors and led by trained volunteers. This programme should not only alleviate the immediate problem of idleness but should prove of value in the formation of responsible citizens of the future.
B. Education, technical training and
individual assistance

80. In operative paragraph 6 of resolution 1456 (XIV), the General Assembly directed the Agency "in so far as financially possible, [to] expand its programme of self-support and vocational training". Limitation of funds and the continued absence of conditions favourable to the implementation of projects capable of supporting substantial numbers of refugees have again been influential factors in the execution of this directive. No major projects have been contemplated. A limited agricultural grants programme has been carried out in Jordan. General education, the basis of future self-support for the young, has been expanded and to some extent improved. And, thanks in large measure to World Refugee Year contributions, the basis has been laid for a greatly expanded vocational training programme. Finally, the Agency has found jobs for a number of refugees and has assisted a number of others to emigrate to jobs abroad.
GENERAL AND UNIVERSITY EDUCATION

81. With the encouragement of successive General Assembly directives, the Agency's education programme has greatly expanded from the small beginnings of a decade ago, when the general education budget totalled only $398,000 (1950-1951). It has now reached a stage in which upwards of $6 million is expended annually on a system which offers elementary education to all refugee children, secondary education to a gradually growing proportion of them (roughly equal to the proportion of the indigenous school population receiving it in the host countries), and university education to a few of the most gifted students. Not only is the provision of such an education system essential in itself if the younger generation of refugees is not to find itself severely handicapped in future life in relation to the other population of the Middle East, but it provides an indispensable basis for any programme of vocational training. In this respect, improvement of the quality of elementary and secondary education is of paramount importance for the future.

82. In the school year 1959-1960, this development continued. A total of 180,078 refugee pupils benefited from the Agency's elementary and secondary education programme, as compared with 176,332 in 1958-1959. Of this total, 123,883 pupils received their education in the 382 Agency elementary and secondary schools, the balance of 56,195 being assisted by the Agency in government or private schools under a grants-in-aid system.

83. Apart from finance, the main obstacle in the way of the satisfactory development of the educational system has continued to be the lack of qualified teachers. The total number of teachers employed by the Agency increased during the year from 3,287 to 3,494, but the great majority of them are unqualified. Some measure of improvement in the quality of teaching has been achieved in recent years by means of in-service summer and refresher courses; and the experimental teacher-training centre for girls at Nablus (Jordan), reopened in 1958-1959, has been developing satisfactorily but suffers from the lack of competent instructors. The construction of a teacher-training centre for men at Ramallah (Jordan) with a capacity of 200 trainees was completed, and the centre will open on 1 September 1960. The effects of these various measures for raising the standard of teaching will gradually make themselves felt.

84. Agency-run schools are still subject to excessive overcrowding, and in Gaza, double-shifts have not yet been wholly eliminated (though it is satisfactory to record that, of the 467 class-rooms needed to abolish the double-shift, 401 were completed during the year). These factors, along with lack of equipment, have continued to play some part in lowering educational standards.

85. Despite the increasing pressure for university education which has inevitably resulted from the extension of secondary education, financial limitations again prevented any increase in the number of university scholarships granted by the Agency. This number consequently remained at 375 for the fourth consecutive year.

86. Statistical details concerning the Agency's education system are to be found in the annex (tables 11-15).
VOCATIONAL TRAINING

87. In response to the directive of the General Assembly, steps have been taken to expand the Agency's programme of vocational training during the past year. These steps represent the basis of a planned development over the next three years which is also dealt with, as regards its future implications, in part III of the present report.

88. The principal events of the year have been:
(a) The extension of the Vocational Training Centre at Kalandia (Jordan) to accommodate a further 120 trainees;
(b) The completion of a new Vocational Training Centre at Wadi Seer (Jordan), with a capacity of 230 trainees, which will start operating in September 1960;
(c) The extension of Gaza Vocational Training Centre to accommodate 200 trainees; and
(d) The completion of the Teacher Training Centre for men at Ramallah for 200 trainees which will start operating in September 1960. In addition, agreement was reached in principle with the authorities of the United Arab Republic for the construction of a vocational training centre near Damascus for 224 trainees, with the Jordan Government for the establishment of a combined vocational training centre and teacher-training centre for 550 girls, and with the Lebanese Government for the construction of a vocational training centre for 224 trainees in the Lebanon. Funds contributed under World Refugee Year campaigns have played a major part in enabling the Agency to proceed with these last three projects.

89. Encouraging as these recent developments in the field of vocational training have been, it has been recognized to be of the greatest importance for the future of this programme not to allow a disproportion to develop between what is provided for vocational training and for general education, the latter being the basis on which any vocational training programme necessarily depends for its effectiveness.

90. Details of the Agency's present vocational and teacher-training programme may be found in table 16 of the annex.
PROJECTS AND SPECIAL ACTIVITIES
Individual grants

91. Between 1954 and 1957, the Agency carried out a programme of individual grants--agricultural, housing, industrial and commercial--which had to be discontinued at the time of the 1957 crisis in the Agency's finances. A second programme, limited to agricultural grants in Jordan, was started when the financial situation allowed early in 1959. This programme was itself temporarily halted in the second half of 1959, but was resumed early in 1960 when a special opportunity occurred to buy land in the East Ghor of the Jordan Valley for limited refugee resettlement. In the result, eighty-four new projects were established on 4,061 dunums of land to the benefit of 773 persons and at the cost of $319,833. This brought the total number of agricultural grants under the second programme, i.e., over the period January 1950 to April 1960, to 195 (1,671 beneficiaries), at a cost of $694,759. The future of the grants programme is now under review.
Development Bank of Jordan

92. The Development Bank of Jordan was established in 1951 with substantial Agency capital participation, with the object of encouraging economic development and of raising the standard of living of the inhabitants of Jordan, including the refugees. One of the conditions under which the Bank grants loans is that applicants should undertake to employ an agreed number of refugees. The total number of refugees benefiting from projects established with the aid of the Bank's loans amounts to approximately 10,000.

93. During the year ending 31 March 1960--the most successful in its history--the Bank's operations continued to be connected mainly with agricultural loans, notable exceptions being two sizable loans for a new foundry and a precision engineering works. Twice as many loans were made as in the same period for 1958-1959, the number in operation at 31 March 1960 being 491 agricultural, 34 industrial, and 25 building, i.e., a total of 550 for a sum of $806,940. The authorized capital of the Bank was increased to $2,800,000 and the issued and paid-up capital to $1,694,034.
PLACEMENT IN JOBS

94. The Agency's Placement Service is an indispensable element in finding employment for qualified refugees, including graduates from the vocational training centres. But what can be accomplished in this direction is unfortunately limited in comparison with the scope of the problem. During the past year, the number of refugees applying for jobs through the Placement Service totalled some 12,000--a marked increase compared with previous years. The Agency was able to place 691 of them in jobs, while a number of others were engaged directly by employers as a result of vacancy notices circulated by the Agency.

95. The Agency also helps a limited number of refugees to become self-supporting by paying all or part of the ocean passages of those who wish to emigrate to take up employment overseas but who, although in possession of all necessary government clearances, could not leave without this financial
assistance. During the year, a total of 404 refugees (60 (families and 168 single individuals, all of them recipients of UNRWA relief) were helped to emigrate: 162 to the United States of America, 210 to Latin American countries (mostly Brazil), 18 to Canada, 4 to Australia and 10 to Europe. The average cost to the Agency of this assistance was $257 per person. The Agency, it should be added, takes no initiative in encouraging emigration overseas.
C. Relations with host Governments

96. Resolution 1456 (XIV) of 9 December 1959 in its last preambular paragraph recalled "that the Agency, as a subsidiary organ of the United Nations, enjoys the benefits of the Convention on the Privileges and Immunities of the United Nations". Operative paragraph 3 of the same resolution "requests the Director of the Agency to arrange with the host
Governments the best means of giving effect to the proposals contained in paragraph 47 of his report" which were:

(a) Recognition and understanding of UNRWA's juridical status as a subsidiary organ of the United Nations by every unit of Government dealing with the Agency;

(b) The conclusion of revised and, so far as possible, uniform agreements supplementing the Charter and Convention on the Privileges and Immunities of the United Nations;

(c) Settlement of outstanding claims and establishment of procedures for the settlement of future issues;

(d) Close co-operation at all levels on the basis of a common interest in the welfare of the refugees.

In addition, on 16 December 1959, the Secretary-General sent letters to the three host Governments expressing his confidence that the first of the suggestions made by the Director would not be automatically implemented and explaining his own attitude, in connexion with the conclusion of revised agreements, regarding any relevant discretion vested in him.

97. The problems and difficulties facing the Agency and the host Governments have been sufficiently set out in previous reports by the Director. The period since the adoption of resolution 1456 (XIV) has not been sufficient for implementation of all of the proposals of the Director set out above and this section is therefore an interim report.

98. The Director is pleased to report that progress is being made over the entire field covered by the proposals set out above. There is developing a deeper understanding by both UNRWA and the Governments (including their subsidiary units) of the complex interrelationships that exist between them. Representatives of all three host Governments have met with the Director, both separately and as a group, and general agreement on principles and procedures was established looking towards the conclusion, as soon as possible, of a basic agreement between the Agency and the three Governments concerned. This, in addition to establishing common basic principles which pertain to all host countries, will facilitate the conclusion of subsidiary agreements dealing with matters peculiar to each country.

99. As to the settlement of outstanding claims3 and disputes, negotiations are in progress with all host Governments, and various procedures for the consideration of claims have been established. Furthermore, in the case of Lebanon, the Government has agreed to refund certain port charges and in Jordan, all outstanding claims, with one exception, have been approved for payment by the Government. Although questions involving restrictions on the Agency's freedom of movement for its supplies and its staff are still under discussion, special mention must also be made of reductions of rail rates announced during the period under review in Lebanon, Jordan and the Northern Region of the United Arab Republic which have decreased the gap between rail and road costs to the Agency.

100. The Director is therefore pleased to report that relations with the host Governments are good and improving. The severe strain which the refugee problem places on the whole structure--political, economic and social--of the host countries, and their natural concern with the scope and complexity of the Agency's operations, must be borne in mind. However, the factors making for co-operation and understanding are becoming stronger and, if the progress so far achieved is maintained and negotiations continued in the same spirit, the Director hopes at an early date to be able to report mutually satisfactory solutions to other outstanding problems.
D. The problem of finance

101. The Agency's fiscal period is the calendar year, whereas the present report covers the period 1 July 1959 to 30 June 1960. The accounts of the Agency for 1959 and for 1960 are therefore each published separately, together with the related auditors' reports. This section will present a summary of financial operations in 1959 and a preliminary view of operations in 1960, a brief report on the contributions made direct to refugees by Governments and from non-governmental sources. Part II of this report contains the budget for 1961 and discusses the problems of financing it, while part III projects a longer-range programme of expenditure to the end of 1963 and discusses the financial implications.

102. In spite of certain additional contributions--largely from private sources--now being made as a result of the World Refugee Year, the Agency's financial situation remains fundamentally precarious because it cannot count on a regular supply of funds adequate to cover both the inescapable commitments for basic relief and the growing cost of providing the education and training which the younger refugees must have if they are to find employment and become useful citizens. A list of WRY contributions so far received or promised is given in table 19 of the annex and a summary of what might be called regular pledges and contributions is shown in table 18. It is earnestly hoped that the new interest in refugee problems aroused by the World Refugee Year will result in an increase in regular annual contributions. With regard to normal contributions (all of which, it will be recalled, are entirely voluntary) some 93 per cent of these are currently made by three Governments alone--the United States, the United Kingdom and Canada--the balance of 7 per cent being pledged by some forty other Governments. The United States contribution alone constitutes no less than 70 per cent of the total. It is evident that the Agency does not yet enjoy that degree of broadly-based support from States Members of the United Nations which would seem to be commensurate with the importance of its activities and for which the General Assembly has frequently appealed. And as a practical matter of daily operational concern, the application of the principle by which the United States contribution is subject to matching on a 70:30 ratio with contributions from other sources means that until the end of each twelve-month period ending 30 June, the Agency is to a considerable degree unable to predict what its actual income will be for that year. If working capital were large, the effects of this uncertainty could be mitigated, but unfortunately it is not. Consequently the need for more support, and from a wider range of sources, is fully as urgent as ever.

103. To put matters in perspective, it should be recalled that the Agency passed through a grave financial crisis in 1957. This was occasioned mainly by the exhaustion of certain relatively large reserves of contributions that had been made in earlier years for programmes of rehabilitation and which, in agreement with contributors, had been primarily used to finance the Agency's programmes of general education, vocational training and individual self-support grants. The effect of exhausting these reserves was that, if these programmes were to be continued, the general level of contributions had to be raised. In the absence of assurances that this would be done, the Agency was obliged to bring the grants programme to a halt, to stop the construction of new vocational and other technical training centres, to postpone certain essential improvements in the general educational programme and to introduce various economies in the relief programme itself. Fortunately, the immediate crisis did not last long owing to a combination of factors--a decline in basic food commodity prices, the receipt in 1958 of the last of contributions outstanding from prior years, and a moderate increase in the rate of contributions over that of previous years; however, the difficulties of 1957 left behind them a legacy of lost time and lost momentum in the vocational training and self-support programme.

104. The improvement of the Agency's finances during 1958 not only remedied the effects of the crisis in the preceding year but also produced by the end of 1958 a temporary excess of income over expenditure of $3.2 million, which was carried forward in 1959 as an addition to working capital. It should be noted, however, that this excess of income was largely due to two factors of a one-time nature, i.e., the decline in food prices and the receipt of outstanding contributions for previous years. Only the moderate increase in the rate of contributions was of recurrent benefit to the Agency.

105. At the beginning of 1959, the Agency needed $33-34 million to maintain its basic minimum programmes of relief and general education-programmes which could not be curtailed without severe hardship to the refugees. Additional funds were needed for an expansion of the self-support activities, such as vocational training and individual grants. On the income side, the pledge of the United States had been increased to $23 million and pledges of a few other countries had also been increased so that, on certain favourable assumptions as to the timing of payment, it was possible to foresee a total normal income of about $34 million. Fortunately temporary excess of income accumulated in 1958 (i.e., the $3.2 million referred to above) was available to be used to restore standards in the relief and education programmes and to resume the self-support programme on a modest basis; however, because of the time required to recruit staff and to resume construction, not all of the
expenditure provided for in the 1959 budget was actually spent in 1959 and commitments in the amount of $2.4 million were carried forward into 1960.

106. For 1960, the main lines of the financial situation are much the same as those of 1959 and, again on certain favourable assumptions as to the receipt of pledges and payment from the Agency's regular contributors, normal income can again be foreseen at about $34 million. In addition, the Agency expects to receive about $4 million in contributions from World Refugee Year funds. These are being earmarked for the vocational training, cholarships and the self-support programme. They constitute an addition to working capital to be committed and spent over the three-year mandate period.

107. The financial operations for 1959 can be summarized as follows:

In $U.S. millions
Budget
Commitments carried forward from 1958.... 1.4
Estimated 1959 budget.................... 37.5 38.9

Income
Contributions by Governments............. 32.6
Contributions by others.................. .4
Miscellaneous income..................... .4
Exchange adjustments..................... .6 34.0

Expenditure and commitments
Expenditure.............................. 34.1
Commitments carried forward into 1960.... 2.4 36.5


108. For 1960 estimated financial operations are as follows:

In $U.S. millions
Budget
Commitments carried forward from 1959.... 2.4|
Estimated 1960 budget.................... 38.7 41.1

Income
Contributions by Governments............. 34.1
Contributions by others.................. .7
Miscellaneous income..................... .5
Exchange adjustments..................... .7 36.0

Expenditure and commitments
Expenditure.............................. 35.0
Commitments carried forward into 1961.... 1.5 36.5


109. Working capital as at 31 December 1957 had been reduced to $18.9 million which, in the Agency's judgment, is as low as safety permits. That level represents the very minimum funds necessary for the pipe-line of supplies (approximately $9 million) and for about three months of operations ($10 million) to accommodate the present schedule of contributions by the principal contributors. By 31 December 1958, working capital had risen to $22.3 million as a result of the excess of income over expenditure already noted. As at 31 December 1959, working capital stood at $22.2 million; there were, however, commitments totalling $2.4 million carried forward into 1960. It is estimated that working capital (exclusive of WRY funds, all of which are earmarked for specific purposes) will amount to $23.2 million as at 31 December 1960. assuming that the rate of expenditure, particularly for non-WRY financed construction, can be maintained as foreseen in the present budget.

110. To sum up, normal income over the past few years has amounted to about $34 million--the minimum needed for the relief and general education programmes. But this amount will not be sufficient for the years ahead, as is shown in part III. The "windfall" of 1958 and, more recently, World Refugee Year contributions have permitted a modest expansion in the self-support programmes. However, these are from non-repetitive sources, and the present level of activities of these programmes falls far short of meeting the much greater demand which now exists among the refugees for training and for opportunities to become self-supporting.

111. It would not be appropriate to conclude this section without reference to the very significant contributions that are made directly to refugees in the form of facilities, general services, medical care, and education by the host Governments--and by many non-governmental bodies, including especially the voluntary agencies.
E. World Refugee Year

112. The period covered by this report coincides approximately with the period of World Refugee Year as observed in most countries.

113. The General Assembly noted, in resolution 1285 (XIII) that World Refugee Year had two aims, namely,

"(a) To focus interest on the refugee problem and to encourage additional financial contributions from Governments, voluntary agencies and the general public for its solution; and

"(b) To encourage additional opportunities for permanent refugee solutions, through voluntary repatriation, resettlement or integration, on a purely humanitarian basis and in accordance with the freely expressed wishes of the refugees themselves."

114. No single effort such as this, necessarily limited to humanitarian considerations, could be expected to resolve such a complex problem as that of the Palestine refugees. Nevertheless, it was hoped that the refugees would benefit from increased financial support both for UNRWA and for the voluntary agencies working among the refugees in the Middle East, and that the Year would help to bring about a better understanding of the problem.

115. UNRWA co-operated closely with the Secretary-General's Special Representative for World Refugee Year and seconded to his staff, for the period of the Year, two professional officers and two secretaries.

116. The Agency has also had direct contact with the national committee of many countries, providing them with special information material, and the Director has personally visited some of those countries in connexion with World Refugee Year.

117. Additional financial support for the Agency has already been forthcoming as a result of World Refugee Year. As at 30 June 1960, the Agency had received over a $1 million in pledges and promises of a further $1 million; table 19 of the annex shows the sources of these funds. The Agency has a minimum goal of $4 million, and it is therefore encouraging that activity in support of the Year is still going on in a number of countries. Moreover, a number of national committees have yet to allocate their funds.

118. Specifically, UNRWA hopes to receive financial support from World Refugee Year sources for expenditure as follows:

(a) $3 million for six vocational training centres and their equipment;
(b) $0.5 million for about 100 additional university scholarships; and
(c) $0.5 million for a small grants and loans fund.

119. If these plans are realized, the Agency would be able to equip up to 1,500 young refugees per annum with technical skills which would give them the opportunity of becoming self-supporting.

120. The Director welcomes this opportunity to convey his sincere appreciation to the Governments, voluntary agencies and private individuals who have contributed financially and otherwise to this special effort. He would also urge that no opportunity be lost to maintain this new level of comprehension and financial support. As has already been said by others
in connexion with World Refugee Year, if it is to be remembered as a truly helpful endeavour, it must be seen not as an end but as a beginning.
Annex to part I
STATISTICS CONCERNING REFUGEES AND CAMPS
Table 1
REFUGEE STATISTICS
TOTAL REGISTERED REFUGEE POPULATION ACCORDING TO ENTITLEMENT, 1950-1960a

Members of families registered for rations "R" category E & M category N Category
A Bb Cc Dd E Fe G Hf
Year
Full ration receipient
Half ration receipient
Babies and child-
ren registered
for services
Other members receiving no rations
Total
A+B+C+D
Members of families receiving Education and;or madical services
Members of families receiving no rations or services
Grand total
E+F+G
June 1950
June 1951
June 1952
June 1953
June 1954
June 1955
June 1956
June 1957
June 1958
June 1959
June 1950
g
826,459
805,593
772,166
820,486
828,531
840,266
830,611
836,781
843,739
849,634
g
51,034
58,733
64,817
17,340
17,228
16,987
16,733
16,577
16,350
16,202
g
2,174
18,347
34,765
49,232
60,167
75,026
86,212
110,600
130,092
150,170
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
18,203
19,776
21,548
22,639
960,021
979,667
882,673
871,748
887,058
905,986
922,279
951,759
983,734
1,011,729
1,038,645
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
4,462
5,901
6,977
8,792
--
31,789
41,915
44,741
54,526
62,920
74,678
62,980
63,713
68,922
73,452
960,021
911,456
924,588
916,489
941,584
968,906
996,967
1,019,201
1,053,348
1,087,628
1,120,889


aThe above statistics are based on the Agency's registrationrecords which do not necessarily reflect the ac tual refugee population owing to factors such as the high rate of unreported deaths,undetected false registrations, etc.
bIncludes up to 1954 Bedouin who received full rations thereafter and babies who are now issued with full rations upon their first anniversary.
Half rations are given at present only to frontier villagers in Jordan.
cIncludes babies below one year of age and children who because of ration ceilings are not issued rations (123,565 in Jordan).
dCovers members of "R" category families who, depending on their family's income and the income scale in force in their country of residence, are entitled to all, certain, or no services.
Up to 1956, such refugees were reported together with members of families receiving no rations or services (column G).
eThese categories of entitlement created in 1956 are applied practically in Lebanon only because the corresponding income scale for the progressive reduction or restoration of rations and services could not be introduced in other host countries.
fThe total population as at June 1952 included 27,674 refugees
residing in Israel who were UNRWA's responsibility up to 1 July 1952.
gDetails not available.

Table 2
DISTRIBUTION OF REGISTERED REFUGEES ACCORDING TO COUNTRY OF RESIDENCE, FAMILY ENTITLEMENT AND AGE AS AT 30 JUNE 1960
Number of Persons
Family Entitle- Number of Country menta category Below 1 year 1-15 years 15 years and over Total families

Jordan........{ R 9,316 225,604 341,236 576,156 107,838
{ N 236 9,923 27,428 37,587 7,649

9,552 235,527 368,664 613,743 115,487

Gaza..........{ R 5,854 103,328 133,574 242,756 43,534
{ N 42 3,706 9,038 12,786 3,841

5,896 107,034 142,612 255,542 47,375

{ R 1,792 45,868 66,419 114,079 24,404
Lebanon.......{ E & M 89 2,449 5,829 8,367 1,608
{ N 63 2,506 11,546 14,115 4,234

1,944 50,823 83,794 136,561 30,246

{ R 3,231 42,445 59,978 105,654 23,100
UAR (Syrian Region) E & M 4 80 341 425 68
N 43 1,909 7,012 8,964 3,147

3,278 44,434 67,331 115,043 26,315

{ R 20,193 417,245 601,207 1,038,645 198,876
Agency total. { E & M 93 2,529 6,170 8,792 1,676
{ N 384 18,044 55,024 73,452 18,871

GRAND TOTAL 20,670 437,818 662,401 1,120,889 219,423
aFor explanation of family entitlements, see table 1.


Table 3
NUMBER OF CAMPS, TOTAL POPULATION SHELTERED AND TYPES OF SHELTER,a 1950-1960

Year Camps Population Tents Huts

June 1950..... -- 267,598 30,580 10,930
June 1951....... 71 276,294 29,989 15,760
June 1952....... 63 281,128 22,055 30,988
June 1953....... 64 282,263 18,059 39,745
June 1954....... 59 305,630 15,180 51,363
June 1955....... 57 335,752 14,212 62,794
June 1956....... 58 358,681 12,989 82,934
June 1957....... 58 360,598 8,328 82,595
June 1958....... 58 396,761 4,950 89,598
June 1959....... 58 414,467 1,984 98,147
June 1960....... 58 421,518 149 103,616

aRefugees enumerated are all those officially registered in camps irrespective of their entitlements.
The figures do not include refugees in camps who are not sheltered by UNRWA but benefit from sanitation services.
Table 4
NUMBER OF REFUGEES IN CAMPS ACCORDING TO COUNTRY AS AT 30 JUNE 1960

Number Number Percentage of the total
Country of families of persons refugee population

Jordan................. 36,001 192,406 31
Gaza................... 26,707 150,144 59
Lebanon................ 12,884 58,944 43
UAR (Syrian Region).... 4,450 20,024 17

80,042 421,518 38 _______________________________________________________________________________

BASIC RATIONS AND SUPPLEMENTARY FEEDING
Table 5
BASIC RATIONS AND OTHER SUPPLIES DISTRIBUTED BY UNRWA

1. Basic dry rations
A monthly ration for one person consists of:
10,000 grammes of flour
600 grammes of pulses
600 grammes of sugar
500 grammes of rice and/or burghol
375 grammes of oils and fats
This ration provides about 1,500 calories a day per person. In winter the basic monthly ration is increased by:
300 grammes of pulses
500 grammes of dates or raisins
It then provides about 1,600 calories a day per person.
2. Other supplies distributed
1 blanket per ration recipient every three years
1 piece of soap (150 grammes) per month to each ration recipient
1 ½ litres of kerosene to ration recipients in camps during five winter months
____


Table 6
UNRWA SUPPLEMENTARY FEEDING PROGRAMME
AVERAGE NUMBER OF BENEFICIARIES, 1 JULY 1959--30 JUNE 1960
__________________________________________________________________________________________ Daily cooked mean beneficiaries Monthly dry ration beneficiaries
Average for the year Average of the year

No. of 2-15 years
Feeding and Special Pregnant Nursing TB-out
Country centres 0-2 years cases Total women mothers patients Total Grand Total

Lebanon.......... 22 333 4,195 4,528 1,275 3,239 276 4,790 9,318
UAR (Syrian Region).. 18 253 3,351 3,604 581 1,146 226 1,953 5,557
Jordan.............{ 48 2,220 18,516 } 23,906 2,917 8,450 636 12,003 35,909
{ 25a 197 2,973 }
Gaza.............. 16 1,213 10,481 11,694 2,749 7,997 420 11,166 22,860
129 4,216 39,516 43,732 7,522 20,832 1,558 29,912 73,644

aCentres operated by voluntary societies.

Table 7
UNRWA MILK PROGRAMME
AVERAGE NUMBER OF BENEFICIARIES, 1 JULY 1959-30 JUNE 1960

Daily number of beneficiaries
Number of milk centres Average for the year

Preparation Milk Schools,a or phans,
and Distribution distribution medical
Country distribution only centres prescriptions, etc. Total

Lebanon......... 23 11 44,975 3,775 48,750
UAR (Syrian Region).. 22 34,102 4,392 38,494
Jordan............... { 81 6 66,192 16,780}} 89,688
{ 38b 6,716 } Gaza................. 15 45,526 20,912} 66,438



Table 10
INFECTIOUS DISEASES RECORDED AMONG PALESTINE REFUGEE POPULATION,
1 JULY 1959-30 JUNE 1960







GENERAL EDUCATION AND UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS
Table 11
UNRWA/UNESCO SCHOOLS
NUMBER OF ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY PUPILS 1951-1960
Country
1951
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
GFaza
Elementary
Secondary
19,543
61
22,551
164
25,702
675
31,107
1,781
34,016
3,339
35,087
4,937
34,876
6,410
35,163
7,495
34,806
8,244
36,633
8,481
TOTAL
19,604
22,715
26,377
32,888
37,355
40,024
41,286
42,658
43,050
45,114
Jordan
Elementary
Secondary
16,345
--
15882
--
30,118
87
39,188
812
42,144
1,694
43,649
3,062
42,431
4,608
41,600
5,852
39,519
7,292
38,223
7,510
TOTAL
16,345
15,882
30,205
40,000
43,838
46,711
47,039
47,452
46,811
45,733
Lebanon
Elementary
Secondary
4,564
--
6,291
--
9,332
86
11,695
384
12,567
620
12,983
948
13,155
1,003
13,936
996
14,881
1,325
15,422
1,668
TOTAL
4,564
6,291
9,418
12,079
13,187
13,931
14,158
14,932
16,206
17,090
UER (Syrian Region)
Elementary
Secondary
2,599
--
2,895
--
5,410
166
8,758
864
9,700
671
10,288
936
11,042
1,180
11,332
1,562
12,256
1,916
13,354
2,492
TOTAL
2,599
2,895
5,576
9,622
10,371
11,224
12,222
12,894
14,172
15,946
GRAND TOTAL
Elementary
Secondary
42,671
61
47,619
164
70,562
1,014
90,748
3,841
98,427
6,324
102,007
9,883
101,504
13,201
102,031
15,905
101,462
18,777
103,632
20,251
TOTAL
43,112
47,783
71,576
94,589
104,751
111,890
114,705
117,936
120,239
123,883


Table 12
NUMBER OF REFUGEE PUPILS IN UNRWA SECONDARY SCHOOLS AND NUMBER IN ATTENDANCE AT GOVERNMENT
AND PRIVATE SECONDARY SCHOOLS FOR WHOM UNRWA PAYS SUBSIDY

Number of Number of pupils subsidized by Agencya
pupils in Country Agency schools Government schools Private schools Total

Gaza............. 8,481 4,200 ( 5,350) --- (---) 12,681 (13,831)
Jordan........... 7,510 5,000 ( 8,877) 400 (1,431) 12,910 (17,818) Lebanon.......... 1,668 70 ( 126) 2,403 (4,108) 4,141 ( 5,902) UAR (Syrian Region). 2,592 1,514 ( 1,514) 1,325 (1,325) 5,431 ( 5,431)

TOTAL 20,251 10,784 (15,867) 4,128 (6,864) 35,163 (42,982)

aThe Government and private schools accept a number of refugee pupils in excess of those for whom grants are made by UNRWA. The total numbers of refugee pupils in these schools are shown in parentheses.
Table 13
UNRWA/UNESCO SCHOOLS SHOWING NUMBER OF PUPILS PER CLASS AT THE END OF MAY 1960

ELEMENTARY CLASSES
I II III IV V VI TOTAL
Country
Boys
Girls
Boys
Girls
Boys
Girls
Boys
Girls
Boys
Girls
Boys
Girls
Boys
Girls
Gaza
Jordan
Lebanon
UAR (Syrian Region)
3254
4638
1703

1635
3428
4203
1447

1233
3071
3565
1675

1478
3019
3002
1224

1110
2977
2461
1682

1242
2900
2701
1206

807
2881
3371
1445

1155
2433
2042
923

768
2841
3730
1667

1118
2255
2036
816

586
5173
3925
1150

1683
2401
1549
484

539
20197
22690
9322

8311
16436
15533
6100

5043
TOTAL
11230
10311
9789
8355
9362
7614
8852
6166
9356
5693
11931
4973
60520
43112
GRAND TOTAL
21,541
18,144
16,976
15,018
15,049
16,904
103,632


SECONDARY CLASSES


Gaza
Jordan
Lebanon
UAR (Syrian Region
2016
2587
770

804
1136
788
218

284
4230
2018
498

647
1099
501
116

165
--
961
66

5636
--
43
--

129
--
433
--

--
--
--
--

--
--
179
--

--
--
--
--

--
6246
6178
1334

2014
2235
1332
334

478
TOTAL
6177
2326
7393
1881
1590
172
433
--
179
--
15772
4479
GRAND TOTAL
8,603
9,274
1,762
433
179
20,251



Table 14
DISTRIBUTION OF PALESTINE REFUGEE CHILDREN RECEIVING EDUCATION AS AT 31ST MAY 1960



CountryNo. of
UNRWA/
No of pupils in Elementary
classes of UNRWA/UNESCO
Schools
No of pupils in secondary
classes of UNRWA/UNESCO
Schools
Total NO. of assisted refugee pupils inelementary and secondary classesaTotal No. of refugees
receiving education
UNESCO
schools
Boys
Girls
Total
Boys
Girls
Total
Government schoolsPrivate schools
Gaza
Jordan
Lebanon
UAR (Syrian Region)
81
171
56

74
20197
22690
9322

8311
16436
15533
6100

5043
36633
38223
15422

13354
6246
6178
1334

2014
2235
1332
334

578
8481
7510
1668

2592
4200 (5350) 23648 (27525)
798 (969)
6670 (6670)
-- (--)
7917 (8948)
8948 (12572)

1910 (1910)
49314 (50464)
77298 (82206)
26936 (30631)

24526 (24526)
TOTAL
382
60520
43112
103632
15772
4479
20251
35316 (40514)
18775 (23430)
177974 (187827)


aFigures in parentheses show the total number of refugee pupils in attendance.


Table 15
DISTRIBUTION OF UNRWA UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIP-HOLDERS BY FACULTIES, 1959/1960

Pre-
University
Agricu-
lture
ArtsCommerceBusiness
administration
DentisrtyEngineering Medicine PharamcyScinecesTotal
Gaza students






Jordan students
lebanon students
UAR (Syrian Region) students
--






14
--

--
3






11
1

--
17






13
9

--
--






5
--

6
--






--
2

--
2






3
1

--
26






39
18

7
43






34
9

12
5






3
--

2
9






36
22

11
105






158
62

46
This includes additional scholarships from funds earned by students exempted from school fees
TOTAL
14
15
43
11
2
10
90
98
10
78
371

VOCATIONAL TRAINING
Table 16
VOCATIONAL AND TEACHER TRAINING, 1959-1960

aA twelve-week course. The figure shows the capacity at any one time.
Contributor
1/5/50 to 30/6/51
30/6/51
30/6/53
30/6/54
30/6/55
30/6/56
18 months ended 31/12/57
12 months ended 31/12/58
12 months ended 31/12/59
6 months ended 30/6/60
Total contributions
Australia
Austria
Bahrein
Belgium
Bolivia
Burma
Cambodia
Canada
Ceylon
Cuba
Denmark
Dominican Republic
Ethiopia
El Salavador
Federal Republic of Germany
Federation of Malaya
Finland
France
Gambia
Ghana
Greece
Gaza Authorities
Haiti
Honduras
Holy Sea
India
Indonesia
Iran
Ireland
Israel
Italy
Japan
Jordan
Laos
Lebanon
Liberia
Libya
Luxembourg
Mexico
Monaco
Morocco
Netherlands
New Zealand
Norway
Pakistan
Philippines
Qatar
Republic of Korea
Rodesia and Nyasaland
Saudi Arabia
Spain
Sudan
Sweden
Switzerland
Thailand
Turkey
United Arab Republic:
Egyptian Region
Syrian Region
USA
UK and Northern Ireland
Viet-Nam
Yugoslavia
--
--
--
6,000
--
--
--
1400313
--
--
--
5000
25500
--

--
--
--
2285714
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
114354
--
--
229804
--
225800
--
--
2000
--
--
--
--
--
60000
90000
--
--
--

37650
--
--
--
--
--
--

478219
171263
27450000
6200000
--
--
328715
--
--
--
5000
--
--
--
--
--
58000
--
--
--

--
--
--
2571429
--
--
56287
--
--
2500
--
--
30000
--
--
5207
--
--
184996
--
--
--
--
2000
--
--
--
25000
210000
14000
90000
10000
--
--
19600
115000
--
144000
19310
--
--
--

718280
125280
30000000
8000001
5000
68700
712088
1400
--
30,000
--
--
2000
600000
--
--
43478
--
--
--

23810
--
1000
954079
--
--
--
--
2000
--
--
--
60000
--
--
1029
--
--
154000
1207
143885
--
--
1000
--
285
--
--
140000
42097
--
--
--
2000
--
40000
--
--
44788
--
--
--

546633
63948
36000000
9600000
6000
--
112500
700
--
300,000
--
2000
2000
515000
--
--
--
--
--
500

--
--
--
1485790
--
--
21000
--
2000
--
--
--
60000
--
--
--
--
10000
--
--
13689
--
--
3000
75482
286
--
25000
140000
42000
82764
--
--
--
--
40000
--
--
71127
--
--
--

219858
29203
15000000
5000000
--
--
112500
700
--
30,000
--
--
--
515000
--
--
86956
--
--

--
--
--
--
1657219
--
--
2730
--
2000
--
--
104000
--
--
--
--
20000
10000
--
--
13689
--
--
--
28800
--
--
25000
112000
42135
67991
--
--
--
--
40000
--
--
57915
26733
--
--

277143
82419
167000004500000
--
40000
1125000
700
--
30000
--
3528
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--

16603
--
--
368276
--
--
6000
--
--
--
--
52500
30000
5138
--
--
--
10000
--
--
12164
--
--
4000
11409
286
--
57895
168000
42135
--
--
--
--
19600
40000
--
--
57915
12444
--
5357

224924
74900
16700000
5500001
--
80000
212000
1050
1960
50000
--
2972
--
1208125
1400
--
86956
--
10000
--

24997
1500
2000
700810
--
--
11000
19157
--
--
--
17967
60000
3350
--
135957
--
20000
174403
--
11652
--
--
2000
--
572
5714
64474
210000
63202
62964
1250
10500
2000
--
114668
--
--
86872
11809
--
5000

182182
110415
30622000
8100002

40000
195200
1400
--
20000
--
--
--
2138750
--
--
50680
--
--
--

190476
--
--
745162
--
--
16500
22986
--
--
--
3847
--
5333
--
--
39953
10000
100935
--
7788
5000
--
2000
--
2381
4762
32895
168000
49000
20964
--
--
--
--
174046
--
4200
96873
77516
--
10402

228850
76496
23746069
56000000
--
80000
190400
2000
--
30000
--
--
857
2075000
--
5000
43440
--
--
--

238095
3000
--
264002
30
3000
39000
129592
--
--
1000
25441
--
8332
2814
--
--
10000
99045
1000
23844
6500
10000
2000
--
203
4796
65790
140000
21000
20964
--
--
--
--
138833
--
--
57915
35047
--
5000

326324
81909
23000000
5400000
2500
40000
95200
--
--
--
--
--
--
458333
--
--
43440
--
--
--

238095
1500
--
149950
--
--
15000
65022
--
--
--
--
--
3000
7000
--
--
2500
49410
--
11922
5000
--
--
--
204
--
65790
168000
42000
22014
--
--
--
--
--
16667
--
--
35046
3125
5000

195524
42680
3073120
2840000
--
40000
2071103
7950
1960
226000
5000
8500
4857
8910521
1400
5000
412950
5000
35500
500

732076
6000
3000
11182431
30
3000
167517
236757
6000
2500
1000
203755
240000
25153
9814
256547
59953
72500
992593
2207
334933
16500
10000
18000
115691
4217
15273
361841
1456000
417567
457664
11250
10500
4000
39200
740197
16667
148200
492715
198596
3125
30759

3397930
858900
222291189
60740000
13500
388700
Total Government contributions
38781617
42808698
49087227
22983899
24554930
23646275
42452880
33928466
32553673
7694542
318492200
Table 19
STATEMENT OF WORLD REFUGEE YEAR CONTRIBUTIONS, RECEIVED BY UNRWA UP TO 30 JUNE 1960 AND UNPAID PLEDGES AT THAT DATE
(In U.S. dollars)

Unpaid
Contributora Use required by contributor Contribution pledge


Canada........................................................ 1,020,000
United Kingdom Committee for World Refu-
gee Year..................................................... Building new vocational training centres 494,200
United Kingdom of Great Britain and
Northern Ireland............................................. Building new vocational training centres 140,000b 84,000
CORSO, New Zealand.................................... Building of huts and establishing courses in sewing
and carpentry 30,892
New Zealand................................................... 28,000
Netherlands Committee for World Refugee
Year......................................................... Training and rehabilitation of handicapped children 15,076
Cuba.......................................................... 5,000
United Nations Secretariat.......................... . 3,238
Thailand...................................................... 3,125
Japan......................................................... 2,500
Viet-Nam................................ ..................... 2,500
Greece........................................................ -- 2,500
Federation of Malaya.................................... 1,500
Liberia....................................................... 1,500
Pakistan...................................................... 1,050
Burma......................................................... -- 1,050
Holy See...................................................... 1,000
Oxford University Committee for World
Refugee Year................................................. 840
United Nations Staff, Geneva.......................... 467
United Nations Korean Reconstruction
Agency (UNKRA) staff....................................... 305
Cambodia...................................................... 286
Gambia........................................................ 30
Sundry donors................................................. 3,792


TOTAL 735,301c 1,107,550


aContributions are from the Governments of the countries named unless stated otherwise.
bReceived through the United Kingdom Committee for World
Refugee Year.
cOf thisamount $136,105 was received in 1959.


SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 20
CO-OPERATIVES IN REFUGEE CAMPS, JULY 1960


No. of
families UNRWA initial Loan from
Country Type of Co-operative Camp benefiting assistance Outside donation Government
$ $
Lebanon...................................Consumer Mar Elias 46 925
Lebanon...................................Poultry Ein El-Hilweh 19 375 1,000 chicks
(Heifer Projecta)
Lebanon...................................Wool-knitting Ein El-Hilweh 25 300
and wool
$
UAR (Syrian Region)..............Bakery Khan Dannoun 63 1,125
Jordan....................................Poultry Deir Ammar 16 420 1,600 chicks 1,680
and incubator (Heifer Projecta)
and brooder
$
Jordan....................................Poultry Nuweimeh 20 1,008 1,600 chicks 700
(Heifer Projecta)
Jordan....................................Agricultural Karameh 49 1,400 24,000
Jordan....................................Saving and credit Nuweimeh 18 560
(agricultural)
Jordan....................................Handicraft Kalandia 20 350 $2,044
Jordan....................................Transport Deir Ammar 116 1,568
Jordan....................................Mat-making Akabat-Jaber 60 1,568
Jordan....................................Bakery Jalazone 24 560
Gaza......................................Consumer Nuseirat 360 346
Gaza................................ Consumer Bureij 115 346
Gaza............................... .Poultry Maghazi 7 1,038 1,000 chicks
(Heifer Projecta)
Gaza................................Soap making Maghazi 7 754 $173
(N.E.C.C.b)
Gaza................................Carpentry Khan Younis 15 1,830 $1,120
(CORSOc)


TOTAL 980 14,473


a An American voluntary agency which contributes high c New Zealand Council of Organization for Relief Services
quality live-stock and poultry to undeveloped areas. Overseas.
b The Near East Christian Council Committee.
Table 21
VOLUNTARY AGENCIES DONATING CLOTHING TO PALESTINE REFUGEES, 1959-1960

American Friends Service Committee
American Middle East Relief Association
Arabian-American Oil Company (ARAMCO), Saudi Arabia
CARE (Cooperative for American Relief Everywhere, Inc.)
Catholic Relief Services (United States)
Church of Denmark Inter-Church Aid Committee
Church of Scotland
Church World Service (United States)
Lutheran World Relief, Inc.
Mennonite Central Committee (United States)
New Zealand Council of Organizations for Relief Services Overseas, Inc. (CORSO)
Oxford Committee for Famine Relief (United Kingdom)
Red Cross Societies (United Kingdom and New Zealand)
Red Cross Society, (Canada) (new clothing only)
Unitarian Service Committee of Canada
United Church of Canada
Vastkustens Efterkrigshjalp, (Sweden)
Women's Voluntary Services (United Kingdom)
Table 22
VOLUNTARY AGENCIES IN THE AREA OF UNRWA OPERATIONS GIVING ACTIVE HELP
TO PALESTINE REFUGEES

CARE (Cooperative for American Relief Everywhere, Inc.)
The Church Missionary Society (in Jordan)
Jamiat al Islam (in Jordan)
The Lutheran World Federation (in Jordan and the Syrian Region of the United Arab Republic)
The Mennonite Central Committee (in Jordan)
The Near East Christian Council Committee (in Gaza, in Lebanon through the Joint Christian
Committee, in Jordan directly and through the International Church Committee)
The Pontifical Mission (in Lebanon, Jordan and the Syrian Region of the United Arab Republic)
The Southern Baptist Mission U.S. (Gaza Hospital)
UNRWA Women's Auxiliary
The World Council of Churches
The Young Men's Christian Association (in Jordan, Gaza and Lebanon)
The Young Women's Christian Association (in Jordan)

UNRWA PERSONNEL
Table 23
STAFF EMPLOYED BY UNRWA AT 31 DECEMBER 1959

Area International
Function staff staff Total

Medical, nutrition and sanitation.... 3,411 17 3,428
Education............................ 4,304 27 4,331
Supply, transport and distribution.... 1,276 17 1,293
Other functions (placement, welfare,
administration, etc.).. 1,101 67 1,168

TOTAL 10,092 128 10,220


Part II
BUDGET FOR THE CALENDAR YEAR 1961

A. Introduction

121. As already indicated, the budget estimates for 1961 are presented in two sections, the first dealing with relief and related activities and the second dealing with education, technical training and individual assistance.

122. The budget estimates for 1961 are based on the most realistic assessment which the Agency is capable of making in regard to the requirements of the refugees, to the Agency's own administrative, planning and constructional capacity and to the funds actually expected to be received from the regular contributing Governments and from World Refugee Year donations during the coming twelve months. This means that the budget is truly a tight estimate of what can and should be done with the funds likely to be available. It can only be reduced at the cost of cutting relief services or impairing the training of refugee youth and other selfsupport activities.

123. The Agency's level of actual income over several years past has been in the vicinity of $34 million. Concurrently, the cost of maintaining the established level of relief services has steadily increased by reason of rising world prices for food, supplies and equipment, by the natural increase in the numbers of refugees to be maintained, by the additional pupils admitted to elementary and secondary education, by the improved qualifications of teachers in Agency schools (resulting in grading and salary increases) and by the cost of essential services to the additional population sheltered in official UNRWA camps. There is also the annual increase in salary costs due to the normal service increments (approximately 1 per cent for international staff and 3 per cent for area staff members). To this must now be added, for area staff in 1961, the cost of implementing the independent Staff Salary Survey.

124. Apart from provision for unavoidable increases in the Agency's going rate of expenditure, there is no provision in the budget figures for 1961 either for expansion or for improvement of relief services. The funds expected from World Refugee Year sources are all assigned for use in education, in technical training and in individual assistance towards self-support. The proposed expenditure in 1961 for these latter activities should be considered as the first phase of the three-year programme described in part III of this report. In years subsequent to 1961, these expanded activities will require additional income beyond that budgeted for 1961.

125. For its revenue the Agency is almost entirely dependent upon the contributions of Governments. The problem of financing the budget for 1961 is examined in paragraphs 168 to 171 below.
B. Estimates of expenditure
GENERAL

126. A summary of the Agency's estimates of expenditure in 1961 is set out in the schedule immediately below, separated into:
Section I. Relief (and related activities);
Section II. Education, technical training and individual assistance.
In other respects, the activities are listed in the same order as in the budget presentations in previous years. In the respective columns are shown those items which are for continuing programmes and those for expanding programmes.
BUDGET ESTIMATES FOR 1961
(Expressed in thousands of U.S. dollars)

1961 budget estimates

Estimated Estimated
expenditure expenditure Total 1961
for continuing for expanded budget
Activity programmes programmes estimates

Section I. Relief
Basic subsistence............ 13,826 13,826
Supplementary feeding........ 1,575 1,575
Environmental sanitationa... 1,058 1,058
Health care.................. 3,074 3,074
Sheltera..................... 768 768
Social welfare............. 898 898
Placement services........... 174 174
Registration and eligibility. 235 235
Transport within UNRWA area.. 1,799 1,799
Stores control and warehousing. 688 688
General administration........ 674 674
General internal services.... 1,896 1,896
Operations administration and
services.......... 466 466
Operational reserve.......... 800 800

TOTAL OF SECTION I 27,931 27,931



BUDGET ESTIMATES FOR 1961 (continued)
(Expressed in thousands of U.S. dollars)


1961 budget estimates
Estimated Estimated
expenditure expenditure Total 1961
for continuing for expanded budget
Activity programmes programmes estimates


Section II. Education, technical training
and individual assistance
Vocational and university education.... 1,401 -- 1,401
University scholarship increases....... -- 99b 99
Technical training expansion........... -- 2,209b 2,209
Doubling capacity of vocational training centres.. -- 905 905
Projects (continuing)............... 115 15 130
Projects (individual assistance).... -- 167b 167
Elementary and secondary education.. 7,072 686 7,758

TOTAL OF SECTION II 8,588 4,081 12,669

GRAND TOTAL OF BUDGET 36,519 4,081 40,600
====== ===== ====== a These two activities were combined in prior years as "Shelter and Camps".
b Proposed to be funded mainly from World Refugee Year funds.


127. As shown in the foregoing table, the total continuing programme expenditure in 1961 amounts to $36.5 million compared with an estimated $35 million of expenditure for the same purposes in 1960. These estimates are based upon the continuation of all essential activities such as feeding, health care, shelter, education and welfare at present levels and standards, with provision added for increased number of beneficiaries due to natural population growth and for other unavoidable items, as explained in paragraph 123 above. It is also proposed that the cost of technical training, individual assistance and elementary and secondary education at the present levels of these activities (i.e., excluding any expansion) should be funded from regular contributions.

128. As to the column related to estimated expenditure for expansion, it is intended that the whole of these amounts in 1961 be applied to expansion of
technical training and to individual assistance by doubling the capacity of existing vocational training centres in Jordan and Gaza, by establishing new vocational training centres in Lebanon and Syria, by doubling the number of University scholarships awarded and by making a modest provision for reactivation of individual assistance.

129. Salary scales have a significant and direct effect on the over-all cost of operations. The salaries for an area staff of approximately 10,000 members have been adjusted as noted in paragraph 123 above as the result of an independent economic survey. International salaries, however, have remained static since 1952; in fact, the mission allowance is now only half of the rate initially established, and only half of that paid to international staff of other United Nations agencies in the Area. Moreover, UNRWA staff do not have the security extended to other United Nations staff under the United Nations pension plan. Except for vocational and teacher-training specialists (including fourteen posts seconded from UNESCO) the international staff are substantially fewer than in 1952. No further reductions can be contemplated without seriously prejudicing the efficiency of the Agency. There is already a considerable turnover of key staff and this is no doubt largely due to the fact that UNRWA conditions for recruitment and retention of key staff are less attractive than those of other United Nations Agencies. However, no provision has been included in the 1961 estimates for improving the terms of service of the Agency's international staff.
BASIC SUBSISTENCE
1961: $13,826,000

130. Basic subsistence is the most costly of all UNRWA operations, accounting for almost 40 per cent of normal expenditure. Included in the budget estimates under this heading are the purchase price, port costs and incidental charges, control of their quality (by comparison with approved specifications), transportation to the individual field offices and the costs of distribution to entitled recipients.
131. The basic ration comprises:


Type of ration Quantity

(I) Basic food ration (consisting 1500 calories per day in
of dryfood commodities-- summer and 1600 calories
flour, rice, pulses, sugar, per day in winter
cooking oil, dates, etc.)
(ii) Soap 150 grammes per month
(iii) Blankets One per year per three
beneficiaries
(iv) Kerosene 1 litre per month for five
winter months in Gaza
(all basic ration recipi-
ents)
1.5 litres per month for five
winter months in Leba-
non, Syria, Jordan (camp
residents only)


132. Included in the estimates is provision for additional beneficiaries owing to natural population in-ease and for additions to the ration rolls arising from the proposed gradual rectification of the rolls. These estimates are based on an assumption that prevailing prices in 1961 will not exceed the actual prices in 1960. However, many of the items in the diet, especially flour, sugar and pulses, are subject to wide fluctuations on world markets. In the event that a political or economic crisis in 1961 markedly affected food prices, this could require either additional contributions or a fundamental recasting of the entire budget.

133. The estimates provide also for a slight expected increase in the cost of kerosene and for normal maintenance of facilities and replacement of worn out equipment. There is no provision for construction or additional equipment.
SUPPLEMENTARY FEEDING
1961: $1,575,000

134. Provision is made for continuation in 1961 of supplements to the basic ration of the items specified for the vulnerable categories listed below:



Calories
Type of ration per day Type of beneficiary

(I) Whole milk 194 Babies 0-1 year
(ii) Skim milk 125 Children aged 1-15
Nursing mothers
Pregnant women
Special medical cases
(iii) One hot meal six days per week 600/700 Special cases medically certified to be in need of extra food
(iv)Special ration of rice, flour, etc. 500 Nursing mothers Pregnant women
(v) Special ration of flour, rice, etc. 1500/1600 Non-hospitalised tuberculosis cases
(vi) Vitamin capsules School and other children




135. The supplemental feeding costs include not only warehousing and transport (in the same manner as those for basic commodities--see paragraph 130 above) but also the cost of sterile reconstituting of dried milk powder and distribution of the milk and the cost of preparing and serving the hot supplementary meals.

136. A minor provision ($19,000) is included to cover the constantly rising costs of the fresh food items comprised in the diet and the cost of population increases in the categories of beneficiaries entitled to certain of the supplementary rations.

137. Apart from a small estimated ($15,000) for construction, the increases are all unavoidable.
HEALTH CARE
1961: $3,074,000

138. The health care programmes are extensive, including services to almost a million people in general clinics, hospitals, laboratories and pharmacies, as well as dental treatment, maternal and child health care, tuberculosis control, mental health care, school health service, health education, epidemiological measures, preventive medicine service and other necessary health measures and precautions. Although the total budget under this heading appears large, it represents only 25 US cents per person per month for the population served, and the efficacy of the service may be inferred from the refugees' freedom from serious epidemics or other health catastrophe, during eight years, in spite of the conditions under which they have been living.

139. The estimates include provisions for a minor increase in costs of fresh food items in hospital diets, for staff increases at the Bureij (Gaza) Tuberculosis Colony ($6,000), for essential replacement of unsatisfactory clinic buildings ($20,000), for replacement of five unserviceable ambulances ($15,000) and for essential replacement of unserviceable equipment ($10,000).
ENVIRONMENTAL SANITATION
1961: $1,058,000

140. In previous years this heading was combined with the other heading "Shelter" under the former title of "Shelter and camps". The change has been introduced to separate public utility and other services from capital and maintenance costs of shelters and roads (see paragraphs 143 and 144 below).

141. "Environmental sanitation" includes drainage, refuse and sewage disposal, water supply, insect and rodent control, ancillary camp facilities (such as bathhouses, incinerators, slaughter houses and other camp facilities) and certain sanitation services in those villages of the Gaza Strip where refugees comprise the predominant proportion of the inhabitants. These services extend to approximately 420,000 refugees officially quartered in camps and to a further 40,000 "squatters" on the outskirts of organized UNRWA camps.

142. The estimates include $10,000 for a vacuum tanker for voiding of septic tanks, $50,000 for essential improvements to water supply systems in Lebanon, Jordan and Gaza, and $50,000 for miscellaneous capital works (principally latrines) in all four countries.
SHELTER
1961: $768,000

143. As noted in paragraph 140 above, activities under this heading have been separated from those under "Environmental sanitation". "Shelter" now includes all costs of construction, repair and maintenance of shelter provided for refugees whether or not the premises are located within organized camps, including cash grants for roofing to refugees who construct their own shelter and including also the costs of allocating and controlling the use of shelter and administering the programme. Similarly included under this heading are construction, repair and maintenance costs for roads and paths in camps.

144. The major item included in the estimates is $517,000 for the construction of new shelters, principally to provide for new families, population increases and social changes within established camps and partly to provide for "squatters" living under sub-standard and unsanitary conditions on the outskirts of established camps. The balance is required to cover normal recurring costs, principally for routine repair and maintenance of camp shelter and roads.
SOCIAL WELFARE
1961: $898,000

145. The estimates under this heading cover the costs of welfare activities, including case work and welfare grants, welfare and community centres, sewing
and craft centres, burial grants, aid to religious institutions, freight and distribution costs of non-programme donations (mainly clothing), liaison with
voluntary societies which assist refugees in the UNRWA area, clothing of children and the administrative costs of these activities. It should be noted that arts and crafts activities may be considered as self-supporting.

146. The largest item is $266,000 to cover freight (at a slightly increased rate) and port charges on donated clothing. It should be noted that the current standard of issue is 1.7 kilogrammes of clothing per annum per refugee, that the only significant source of clothing is voluntary donations and that the only costs incurred by the Agency are for freight, port charges and distribution costs.
PLACEMENT SERVICES
1961: $174,000

147. This service assists qualified refugees to find suitable employment and assists with grants and travel costs for refugees who have themselves both obtained valid travel documents and found opportunities for work in other localities.
ELIGIBILITY AND REGISTRATION
1961: $235,000

148. The investigation of entitlement to UNRWA assistance and the registration of qualified refugees is provided for under this heading including changes in status by reason of births, marriage, death, change of location and modifications to categories of refugees (whether entitled to receive rations or only certain limited benefits) and continuous verification of continued eligibility to receive assistance. The new approach to the problem of the rectification of the ration rolls which is mentioned in paragraphs 51 and 52 of this report need not necessarily entail considerably increased expenditure on investigations into eligibility during 1961. If, however, additional funds are required for this purpose over and above those shown in the present estimates, it is intended to meet the additional cost from the Operational Reserve (see paragraph 157 below).
TRANSPORT WITHIN THE UNRWA AREA
1961: $1,799,000

149. This budget heading provides for all costs of operating the Agency's transport system for both passenger and freight movements by road, rail, sea or air within the UNRWA area (whether by Agency-owned vehicles or by hired transport), including related costs for loading, unloading and insurance. Included also are costs of port operations and the costs of maintenance and essential replacement of vehicles.

150. A small provision ($9,000) is included for continuance, as necessary, of emergency water services in Jordan during the early part of 1961 owing to the extraordinary drought conditions. Included also is a minimum provision for essential replacement of passenger-carrying vehicles and for replacement engines in freight-carrying vehicles. In common with other users of hired transport in the area, the Agency is faced with the progressive increase in rates.

151. All transportation charges for basic commodities to the point of first laying-down of supplies in a field office warehouse are charged directly to the basic commodity activity. This exception avoids apparent fluctuations in the cost of commodities which would otherwise arise when purchases are made at one time locally and another time overseas.
STORES CONTROL AND WAREHOUSING
1961: $688,000

152. Stores, after receipt within the UNRWA area, are charged to this activity for warehousing and for the administrative control of inventories (at an average level of $5 million) for receipts and for issues up to the point of delivery to the consuming or user divisions. Insurance administration is also provided for here.

153. No improvements are contemplated in the present estimates but a minimum provision is made for replacement of essential equipment.
GENERAL ADMINISTRATION
1961: $674,000

154. Provisions under this heading include all costs of general administration not particularly chargeable in another activity, for the offices of the Director and Deputy Director, the country representatives, public information services, area office administration, camp administration, the Advisory Commission and the New York liaison offices. The estimates are based on the current operating levels.
GENERAL INTERNAL SERVICES
1961: $1,896,000

155. Estimated under this heading are provisions for a variety of activities throughout the Agency including the Office of the Assistant Director in charge
of Administration, the Office of the Comptroller and finance services, the Office of the General Counsel and legal services, the personnel, procurement translation, communications and travel services, and general office facilities and services. Only the current level of operations is provided for in 1961.
OPERATIONS ADMINISTRATION AND SERVICES
1961: $466,000

156. Estimated under this heading are provisions for all direct costs of administration and senior management of operations (as distinct from general services under paragraph 155 above) including the Office of the Assistant Director in charge of Operations, together with certain other technical services in engineering, architecture and economics. The estimates are based on current operational levels.
OPERATIONAL RESERVE
1961: $800,000

157. For operational contingencies such as have been constantly encountered in UNRWA activities and for any emergency of such a nature as the Agency has suffered at least once in each year, a provision of $800,000 has been included again in 1961. This is little more than 2 per cent of the total budget and is considered an absolute minimum margin for safety. The operational reserve may not in fact be adequate in the event of a significant rise in the cost of basic commodities.
VOCATIONAL AND UNIVERSITY EDUCATION

1961
$
Regular programme................ 1,401,000
Expanded activity................ 173,000


1,574,000
Construction and equipment 3,040,000


TOTAL 4,614,000

158. This budget heading provides for industrial, commercial and agricultural vocational training for limited numbers of students, for teacher training and for university training for carefully selected young men and women in professions such as medicine, dentistry, and engineering-professions for which there is a demand in the Middle East. Vocational and
teacher training is largely conducted in the Agency's own centres, while university scholarships are awarded in most of the universities in the Agency's area of operation.

159. The 1961 estimates provide for the following:

Activity Normal Expanded
$ $
Operating (recurring) costs
(I) University scholarships for pro-
fessional training.............. 276,000 99,000
(ii) Operation of three vocational
training centres in Jordan and
Gaza............................ 512,000
(iii) Operation of vocational training
centres in Lebanon and the
UAR (Syrian Region)............ 74,000
(iv) Operation of teacher training
centres........................ 199,000
(v) Miscellaneous courses and con-
tingencies in all countries.... 150,000
(vi) Common instruction costs and
administration.................. 264,000

TOTAL OPERATING COSTS 1,401,000 173,000

Construction and equipment costs
(i) Construction equipment and op-
erating costs of two vocational
training centres in Lebanon
and the UAR (Syrian Region),
of a vocational training centre
and teacher-training centre in
Jordan, of a combined training
centre in Gaza and profession-
al training centres in the UAR
(Syrian Region)................. 2,135,000
(ii) Doubling of capacity of voca-
tional training centres in Jor-
dan, Gaza and the UAR (Syr-
ian Region)..................... 905,000


TOTAL 3,040,000


TOTAL COSTS 1,401,000 3,213,000


GRAND TOTAL 4,614,000


160. The estimates for normal activities provide only for operations in 1961 of university scholarships at the present level and of vocational and teacher
training courses presently operating or already provided for in construction and equipment.

161. The estimates for expanded activities comprise part of the planning for the use of funds deriving from World Refugee Year contributions. It is proposed to double the number of university scholarships. The proposals to construct and equip vocational and teacher-training centres conform with the Agency's current policy and with General Assembly resolution 1315 (XIII) of 12 December 1958 which requested the Agency to "plan and carry out projects capable of supporting substantial numbers of refugees and, in particular, programmes relating to education and vocational training".
PROJECTS

1961 $
Continuing projects .. 130,000
Individual assistance. 167,000


TOTAL 297,000

162. The budget heading provides under "Continuing projects" only for liquidation of commitments on projects in operation (principally for training and treatment of handicapped youth) and includes $15,000 specifically designated from World Refugee Year contributions.

163. The provision for individual assistance at $167,000 in 1961 is the first phase of a three-year proposal for utilizing an aggregate of $0.5 million from World Refugee Year sources in a limited reactivation of a programme of individual assistance towards self-support, mainly agricultural, industrial and commercial undertakings.
ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION

1961 $
Normal activities........... 7,072,000
Expanded programme.......... 686,000


TOTAL 7,758,000

164. Provisions are made for elementary education for practically all refugee children whose parents or guardian present them for enrolment. Secondary education is provided for a limited proportion of the elementary school population in each of the host countries. The normal school curriculum includes handicraft training in those localities where the Agency has been able to provide this facility. Wherever Agency-operated schools are not available, eligible refugee children may be admitted to Government or approved privately-operated schools on an agreed subsidy basis.

165. The budget estimates for education are somewhat complicated by the overlapping of two separate academic years within the Agency's fiscal (and calendar) year. The 1961 budget estimates include the second half of the school-year 1960-1961 and the first half of the school-year 1961-1962.

166. The only additional provision in the estimates for normal activities cover, first, addition to school population by reason of general population increases and of a gradually increasing number of girl pupils enrolled, with the corresponding additional costs for teaching staff, premises and consumable supplies, and, secondly, increases in staff costs due to the steady improvement in the qualification of the teaching staff (though the average standard is still significantly below the minimum qualifications recommended by UNESCO).

167. Under the proposals for the expanded programme are included estimates aggregating $686,000 to provide for; (1), capital costs including as the
principal items construction of school rooms to reduce the maximum number of pupils per class to 50, extension of handicraft facilities, the gradual introduction of science and home economics to the UNRWA curricula and the extension from two to three years of the preparatory classes; and (2), recurring costs mostly related to staff and supplies for the foregoing expansions.
C. Financing the 1961 budget

168. The total estimated expenditures for 1961 amount to $40,600,000. Of this it is expected that the following items will be financed with World Refugee Year contributions:

1961
$
University scholarship increases.............. 99,000
Technical training expansion.................. 2,113,000
Project individual assistance................. 167,000
TOTAL 2,379,000


Deducting this total of $2,379,000 from the total estimated expenditures of $40,600,000 leaves a remainder of $38,221,000 to be financed with regular contributions. If regular contributions do not exceed the figure of about $34 million estimated for 1960, there will be a shortfall of some $4 million.

169. The Agency has no longer any expectation of income from former unpaid pledges (as has hitherto been the case) nor would it be safe to envisage a reduction of working capital beyond the stable figure of $18 million. By 30 June 1960, the working capital had shrunk to $14.4 million, significantly below the safe level at $18 million. However, with expected pledges still to be received and also matching contributions, the working capital fund should be restored before the year-end.

170. The Agency earnestly hopes that the States which are Members of United Nations will find it possible to pledge the $38,221,000 required to enable the Agency to carry out the programme for 1961 outlined above. Contributors are reminded of the ever-increasing costs merely of maintaining minimal services whose recurring expenditures leave the Agency a constantly diminishing margin between recurrent costs and actual income. It is only that narrow margin of funds which may be effectively applied towards self-support projects.

171. It is emphasized that the Agency operates, especially in the early part of each year, under a severe handicap both in planning and in executing approved programmes, by reason of inability to assess until much later in the budget year the actual amount of income it can expect to receive. For this reason it is particularly hoped that the General Assembly and contributing Governments may find it possible to establish a firmer basis of UNRWA income in 1961 and also in 1962 and 1963.



Part III
SUMMARY OF THE AGENCY'S PROGRAMME FOR THE THREE YEARS, 1961-1963

A. General

172. The following table contains the budget estimates for 1961, as set out in part II above, and the projected budget estimates for 1962 and 1963. The estimates are again presented in two parts: "Relief" and, "Education, technical training and individual assistance".
ESTIMATED EXPENDITURES OF UNRWA FOR 1961, 1962 AND 1963
(Expressed in thousands of U.S. dollars)


1961 1962 1963
ACTIVITIES
Estimated expenditure for continuing programme
Estimate expenditure for expansion
Total estimated expenditure
Estimated expenditure for continuing programme
Estimated expenditure for expansion
Total estimated expenditure
Estimated expenditure for continuing programme
Estimated expenditure for expansion
Total estimated expenditure
Part I. Relief
Basic subsistance
Supplementary feeding
Environmental sanitation
Helath care
Shelter
Social welfare
Placement services
Registration and eligibility
Transport within UNRWA area
Supply control and warehousing
General administration
General internal services
Operations administration and services
Operational reserve
13,826
1,575
1,058
3,074
768
898
174
235
1,799
688
674
1,896

466
800
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--

--
--
13,826
1,575
1,058
3,074
768
898
174
235
1,799
688
674
1,896

466
800
14,002
1,629
1,032
3,159
502
904
176
245
1,913
709
698
1,968

487
800
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--

--
--
14,002
1,629
1,032
3,159
502
904
176
245
1,913
709
698
1,968

487
800
14,141
1,643
1,053
3,200
503
913
178
255
1,908
731
712
1,991

492
800
-
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--

--
--
14,141
1,643
1,053
3,200
503
913
178
255
1,908
731
712
1,991

492
800
TOTAL PART I.
27,931
--
27,931
28,224
--
28,224
28,520
--
28,520
Part II. Education, technical training and individual assistance

Vocational and university education
University scholarship increases
Technical training expansion

Doubling capacity of vocational training centres
Pojects (continuing)
Projects (individual assistance)
Elementary and Secondary Education
1,401
--
--


--
115
--

7,072
--
99a
2,135a
74a

905
15
167a

686
1401
99
2,209


905
130
167

7,758
1,416
--
--


--
105
--

7,921
--
198a
306a


175
--
166a

823
1,416
198
306


175
105
166

8,744
1,431
--
--


--
95
--

8,860
--
298a
586a


362
--
167a

1,021
1,431
198
586


362
95
167

9,881
TOTAL PART II.
8,588
4,081
12,669
9,442
1,668
11,110
10,386
2,334
12,720
GRAND TOTAL
36,519
4,081
40,600
37,666
1,668
39,334
38,906
2,334
41,240


aTo be financed from anticipated $4 million of World Refugee Year contributions.
B. Relief

173. The projected budget estimates for 1962 and 1963 include, with respect to "Relief", the unavoidable increases involved in continuing operations at the same level as in 1961, without any provision for expansion. The effect of these unavoidable increases is that the provision for "Relief" rises from $27,931,000 in 1961 to $28,224,000 in 1962 and to $28,520,000 in 1963.

174. No detailed commentary on the "Relief" items would appear to be called for since the intention is to maintain the same level of services in 1962 and 1963 as in 1961. Generally, the explanatory comments included in part II of the report regarding the items in the "Relief" section of the budget esti-
mates apply also to the years 1962 and 1963.
C. Education, technical training and
individual assistance

175. Under "Education, technical training and individual assistance," the projected budget estimates for 1962 and 1963 reflect not only the unavoidable normal increases involved in continuing the established pattern of activities, but also the increases arising from the implementation of the expansion planned for 1961. The distribution of projected expenditure between continuing programmes and new expansion is as follows:
1961-1963 ESTIMATED EXPENDITURES ON EDUCATION,
TECHNICAL TRAINING AND INDIVIDUAL ASSISTANCE
(Expressed in thousands of U.S. dollars)
1961 1962 1963

Continuing programmes............ 8,588 9,442 10,386
Expansion........................ 4,081 1,668 2,334

TOTAL 12,669 11,110 12,720

176. Again it would not appear necessary to provide detailed commentary on the items of expenditure included for the continuation of existing programmes in the fields of education, technical training and individual assistance since the commentary already provided in part II of the report in regard to 1961 also applies in general to the Agency's plans for 1962 and 1963.

177. The general background against which the Agency has planned its expansion of education, technical training and individual assistance is explained in the section "Future programme" contained in the introduction to this report. During 1962 and 1963 it is intended that the expansion of the Agency's activities in these fields should proceed on the same lines as indicated in the detailed budget for 1961. The following paragraphs provide further explanation of what the Agency hopes to achieve in these fields over the coming three years.
General education

178. The basic policy of the Agency in this field has been to follow the standards and curricula of the host countries. In addition and where consistent with this policy, the Agency has also tried to introduce improvements under the technical guidance of UNESCO. At present the over-all objectives of the Agency are: to increase the number of students receiving university education; to assist a reasonable proportion of refugee children to receive upper secondary education (10th, 11th and 12th grades) on a selective basis of merit; to expand greatly vocational training as an alternative to academic higher secondary education; to improve the quality of elementary education; and to make three years of preparatory (lower secondary) education available to all refugee children who are educationally and intellectually capable of benefiting from it.

179. The Agency's plan over the three-year period for this essential expansion and improvement in general education is set forth in the table below:

1961 1962 1963
Activity (expressed in 1000s of U.S.$)

Cost of maintaining existing programme........... 7,072 7,921 8,860
Cost of offering 3rd secondary (9th grade)
to all qualified... 175 218 298
Cost of reducing overcrowding (by
constructing classrooms to split classes
over 50)................................... 226 100 192
Introduction of home economics............... 76 106 215
Introduction of science training and equipment... 12 183 112
Extension of handicraft teaching in rural centres.. 149 144 101
Headquarters research and statistics.............. 25 25 25
Training local employees as counterparts for
international staff.............................. 23 47 59
Equipping of libraries............................... -- --- 19

TOTAL 7,758 8,744 9,881
======= ===== =====

University scholarships

180. The Agency also plans, with funds available as a result of the World Refugee Year, to double the number of university scholarships from the present
figure of about 90 awarded per year to 180 per year, over the three-year period. Clearly, even with this increase, only the very best of the 30,000 refugees reaching maturity each year will be able to secure a university education.

Vocational training

181. As already set forth in this report and in earlier reports of the Director, vocational training has more than proved its worth. Virtually all of the graduates from the Agency's existing centres obtain good jobs and the qualification "Kalandia Certificate" or "Kalandia Standard" has become a password to good employment throughout the area (Kalandia being the location of the Agency's first vocational training centre near Jerusalem). Statistics alone do not show the significance of this training. The opportunity opened to the individual can be seen from the case histories of the graduates. Here are four, taken at random from the records at Kalandia:

(a) A seventeen year old refugee, admitted to the first radio mechanics course, was given a tool kit upon graduation. With this he started in radio repair work; five years later, he is now the owner of an electric firm. His father having died in 1949, he acts as the head of his family.

(b) A Bedouin refugee, who graduated first in his class, is now employed in a government public works department.

(c) A graduate of the course in blacksmithing and sheet metal work, employed in Kuwait, has advanced to the top of his grade and now supervises the work of
ten other Kalandia graduates.

(d) After a two-year course as a fitter machinist, a refugee graduate secured an apprenticeship in Germany with a firm which he now represents in one of the countries of the Middle East. He is the head of a family of twelve persons.

182. In view of the evident success of this type of training as a means of helping young men to develop and put to use their latent abilities, the Agency has particularly emphasized this as an activity to be supported by special contributions on the occasion of the World Refugee Year. As a target figure, the Agency suggested $4 million, of which the major portion would be for vocational training, the balance for university scholarships and for individual assistance. These $4 million are now virtually in sight and, in agreement with contributors, the following plans have been made for the construction of new vocational and other training centres and for doubling the capacity of both the existing vocational training centres (except that at Kalandia which has already been doubled) and of the proposed new vocational training centres (except that for girls at Ramallah). These plans are set out in the table below which, for easy reference, also shows the existing facilities:


Number of Average number of
places graduates annually

Existing facilities
Vocational Training Centre for men in Kalandia
(Jordan) (capacity already doubled)....................... 392 222
Vocational Training Centre for men in Gaza................ 192 112
Arc welding course in Tripoli (Lebanon) (approximately
three months' duration)................................... 27 116
Commercial and Secretarial evening courses in Beirut
and Tripoli (Lebanon)..................................... 147 120
Teacher-Training Centre for women in Nablus (Jordan)...... 47 27
Vocational Training Centre for men in Wadi Seer (Jordan)... 232 152
Teacher Training Centre for men in Ramallah (Jordan)....... 200 100
---- -----
SUB-TOTAL 1,237 849

Proposed new vocational training centres 1961, 1962 and 1963 (phase I)

A vocational training centre for boys in Damascus
(Syrian Region of the UAR) opening September 1961.......... 224 120
A vocational training centre for boys in Lebanon,
opening September 1961................................... 192 124
A combined vocational training centre and a teacher-
training centre for girls in Jordan opening September 1962.. 550 200
A training centre for boys in Gaza opening September
1962 (the subjects yet to be determined).................. 200 100
A vocational training centre for boys opening September
1962 (the subjects and location yet to be determined)...... 200 100
---- ----
SUB-TOTAL 1,366 644
Proposed doubling capacity of vocational training
centres (phase II)
Vocational training centres, Gaza......................... 192 112
Vocational training centres, Wadi Seer, Jordan........... 232 116
Vocational training centres, Damascus.................... 224 120
Vocational training centres, Lebanon..................... 192 124
Second vocational training centre, Gaza.................. 220 110
Vocational training centres (yet to be located).......... 220 110
--- -----
SUB-TOTAL 1,280 692
----- -----
GRAND TOTAL 3,888 2,185

183. In addition, the Agency will operate a number of shorter courses and will give special training during the summer to selected upper elementary and secondary teachers to enable them to teach wood working, metal working and mechanical drawing. With respect to these teachers, the Agency is rapidly moving towards providing such instruction for all of its elementary and secondary students.
Projects

184. The expenditures foreseen under this heading are mainly for individual assistance to enable selected adult refugees and their families to become selfsupporting. This programme, which has in the past been known as "Individual grants", has had some success, and is now much in demand from the refugees, especially in Jordan. No large-scale assistance of this kind is feasible, but it is possible to help selected refugees to regain their dignity and self-respect by becoming self-supporting. Two or three times the amount shown ($500,000 over the three years) could easily be used in the same constructive fashion. The administration of the programme is currently under review with the intention to include a loan as well as a grant feature.
D. Summary

185. The effect of carrying out in full the programme envisaged in these estimates for the years 1961, 1962 and 1963 will be:
(a) To continue at their present level the basic relief services provided by the Agency;
(b) To take care of natural increases in the population and other unavoidable increases in the cost of these basic relief services;
(c) To maintain the existing UNRWA educational system and to meet the cost of predicted increases in the school population;
(d) To improve the existing UNRWA educational system by reducing overcrowding, by raising the quality of the teachers, by improving the content of the teaching and by ensuring that a three-year cycle of preparatory (lower secondary) education is available for all refugee children who have completed their six years of elementary education and who are capable of benefiting from a further three years' schooling;
(e) To increase the capacity of the vocational training centres from 584 to 3,566;
(f) To increase the capacity of the Teacher-Training Centre for women from 7 to 300;
(g) To double the number of university scholarships awarded each year from 90 to 180;
(h) To expend over the three years a sum of $500,000 on a new programme of individual loans and grants to assist selected refugee families in becoming selfsupporting.

186. In preparing this programme, the Director has taken as his basic guide paragraph 6 of General Assembly resolution 1456 (XIV) which "Directs the Agency to continue its programme of relief for the refugees and, in so far as is financially possible, expand its pro-gramme of self-support and vocational training".


Appendix 1
EXPENDITURE FOR 1959 AND 1960, BUDGET ESTIMATES FOR 1961 AND PROJECTED BUDGET ESTIMATES FOR 1962 AND 1963
(Expressed in thousands of U.S. dollars)
aTo be financed from anticipated $4 million of World Refugee Year contributions.

SALES AGENTS FOR UNITED NATIONS PUBLICATIONS

ARGENTINA
Editorial Sudamericana, S.A., Alsina 500, Buenos Aires.
AUSTRALIA
Melbourne University Press, 369/71 Lonsdale Street, Melbourne C. 1.
AUSTRIA
Gerold & Co., Graben 31, Wien, 1.B. Wüllerstorff, Markus Sittikusstrasse 10,
Salzburg.
BELGIUM
Agence et Messageries de la Presse, S.A., 14-22, rue du Persil, Bruxelles.
BOLIVIA
Librería Selecciones, Casilla 972, La Paz.
BRAZIL
Livraria Agir, Rua Mexico 98-B, Caixa Postal 3291, Rio de Janeiro.
BURMA
Curator, Govt. Book Depot, Rangoon.
CAMBODIA
Entreprise khmère de librairie, PhnomPenh.
CANADA
The Queen's Printer, Ottawa, Ontario.
CEYLON
Lake House Bookshop, Assoc. Newspapers of Ceylon, P.O. Box 244, Colombo.
CHILE
Editorial del Pacífico, Ahumada 57, Santiago.
Librería Ivens, Casilla 205, Santiago.
CHINA
The World Book Co., Ltd., 99 Chung King Road, 1st Section, Taipeh, Taiwan.
The Commercial Press, Ltd., 211 Honan Rd., Shanghai.
COLOMBIA
Librería Buchholz, Bogotá.
Librería América, Medellín.
Librería Nacional, Ltda., Barranquilla.
COSTA RICA
Imprenta y Librería Trejos, Apartado 1313, San José.
CUBA
La Casa Belga, O'Reilly 455, La Habana.
CZECHOSLOVAKIA
Ceskoslovenský Spisovatel, Národní Trída
9, Praha 1.
DENMARK
Einar Munksgaard, Ltd., NØrregade 6,
KØbenhavn, K.
DOMINICAN REPUBLIC
Librería Dominicana, Mercedes 49, Ciudad Trujillo.
ECUADOR
Librería Científica, Guayaquil and Quito.
EL SALVADOR
Manuel Navas y Cía., la. Avenida sur 37, San Salvador.
ETHIOPIA
International Press Agency, P.O. Box 120, Addis Ababa.
FINLAND
Akateeminen Kirjakauppa, 2 Keskuskatu, Helsinki.
FRANCE
Editions A. Pédone, 13, rue Soufflot, Paris (Ve).
GERMANY
R. Eisenschmidt, Schwanthaler Strasse 59, Frankfurt/Main.
Elwert & Meurer, Hauptstrasse 101, Berlin-Schöneberg.
Alexander Horn, Spiegelgasse 9, Wiesbaden.
W. E. Saarbach, Gertrudenstrasse 30, Köln (1).
GHANA
University Bookshop, University College of Ghana, P.O. Box Legon.
GREECE
Kauffmann Bookshop, 28 Stadion Street, Athènes.
GUATEMALA
Sociedad Económico-Financiera, 6a Av. 14-33, Guatemala City.
HAITI
Librairie "A la Caravelle", Port-au-Prince.
HONDURAS
Librería Panamericana, Tegucigalpa.
HONG KONG
The Swindon Book Co., 25 Nathan Road, Kowloon.
ICELAND
Bokaverzlun Sigfusar Eymundssonar H.
F., Austurstraeti 18, Reykjavik.
INDIA
Orient Longmans, Calcutta, Bombay, Madras, New Delhi and Hyderabad.
Oxford Book & Stationery Co., New Delhi and Calcutta.
P. Varadachary & Co., Madras.
INDONESIA
Pembangunan, Ltd., Gunung Sahari 84, Djakarta.
IRAN
"Guity", 482 Ferdowsi Avenue, Teheran.
IRAQ
Mackenzie's Bookshop, Baghdad.
IRELAND
Stationery Office, Dublin.
ISRAEL
Blumstein's Bookstores, 35 Allenby Rd.
and 48 Nachlat Benjamin St., Tel Aviv.
ITALY
Libreria Commissionaria Sansoni, Via
Gino Capponi 26, Firenze, and Via D. A.
Azuni .15/A, Roma.
JAPAN
Maruzen Company, Ltd., 6 Tori-Nichome,
Nihonbashi, Tokyo.
JORDAN
Joseph 1. Bahous & Co., Dar-ul-Kutub,
Box 66, Amman.
KOREA
Eul-Yoo Publishing Co., Ltd., 5, 2-KA,
Chongno, Seoul.
LEBANON
Khayat's College Book Cooperative,
92-94, rue Bliss, Beirut.
LIBERIA
J. Momolu Kamara, Monrovia.
LUXEMBOURG
Librairie J. Schummer, Luxembourg.
MEXICO
Editorial Hermes, S.A., Ignacio Mariscal 41, México, D.F.
MOROCCO
Bureau d'études et de participations industrielles, 8, rue Michaux-Bellaire,
Rabat.
NETHERLANDS
N.V. Martinus Nijhoff, Lange Voorhout 9, 's-Gravenhage.
NEW ZEALAND
United Nations Association of New Zealand, C.P.O., 1011, Wellington.
NORWAY
Johan Grundt Tanum Forlag, Kr. Augustsgt 7A, Oslo.
PAKISTAN
The Pakistan Co-operative Book Society, Dacca, East Pakistan.
Publishers United, Ltd., Lahore.
Thomas & Thomas, Karachi, 3.
PANAMA
José Menéndez, Apartado 2052, Av.
8A, sur 21-58, Panamá.
PARAGUAY
Agencia de Librerías de Salvador Nizza,
Calle Pte. Franco No. 39-43, Asunción.
PERU
Librería Internacional del Perú, S.A.,
Lima.
PHILIPPINES
Alemar's Book Store, 769 Rizal Avenue,
Manila.
PORTUGAL
Livraria Rodrigues, 186 Rua Aurea, Lisboa.
SINGAPORE
The City Book Store, Ltd., Collyer Quay.
SPAIN
Librería Bosch, 11 Ronda Universidad, Barcelona.
Librería Mundi-Prensa, Castello 37, Madrid.
SWEDEN
C. E. Fritze's Kungl. Hovbokhandel A-B,
Fredsgatan 2, Stockholm.
SWITZERLAND
Librairie Payot, S.A., Lausanne, Genève.
Hans Raunhardt, Kirchgasse 17, Zürich 1.
THAILAND
Pramuan Mit, Ltd., 55 Chakrawat Road,
Wat Tuk, Bangkok.
TURKEY
Librairie Hachette, 469 Istiklal Caddesi,
Beyoglu, Istanbul.
UNION OF SOUTH AFRICA
Van Schaik's Bookstore (Pty.), Ltd., Box
724, Pretoria.
UNION OF SOVIET SOCIALIST
REPUBLICS
Mezhdunarodnaya Knyiga, Smolenskaya
Ploshchad, Moskva.
UNITED ARAB REPUBLIC
Librairie "La Renaissance d'Egypte", 9
Sh. Adly Pasha, Cairo.
UNITED KINGDOM
H. M. Stationery Office, P.O. Box 569,
London, S.E. 1.
UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
International Documents Service, Columbia University Press, 2960 Broadway,
New York 27, N. Y.
URUGUAY
Representación de Editoriales, Prof. H.
D'Elía, Plaza Cagancha 1342, 1° piso,
Montevideo.
VENEZUELA
Librería del Este, Av. Miranda, No. 52,
Edf. Galipán, Caracas.
VIET-NAM
Librairie-Papeterie Xuân Thu, 185, rue
Tu-Do, B.P. 283, Saïgon.
YUGOSLAVIA
Cankarjeva Zalozba, Ljubljana, Slovenia.
Drzavno Preduzece, Jugoslovenska
Knjiga, Terazije 27/11, Beograd.
Prosvjeta, 5, Trg Bratstva i Jedinstva,
Zagreb.
[60E1]

Orders and inquiries from countries where sales agents have not yet been appointed may be sent to: Sales and Circulation Section, United Nations, New York, U.S.A.; or Sales Section, United Nations, Palais des Nations, Geneva, Switzerland.


Printed in U.S.A. Price: $U.S. 0.50; 3/6 stg.; Sw. fr. 2.00 21906--October 1960--4,225
(or equivalent in other currencies)




Footnote


1Information concerning the origin of the Agency and its mis-
sion and work prior to 1 July 1959 will be found in the following
annual reports and other United Nations documents:
A. Final report of the United Nations Economic Survey Mis-
sion for the Middle East (28 December 1949) (A/AC.25/6, parts
I and II).
B. Report of the Secretary-General on Assistance to Palestine
Refugees: Official Records of the General Assembly, Fourth Session,
Ad Hoc Political Committee, Annexes, vol. II, p. 14 (A/1060).
C. Reports of the Director of UNRWA and special reports of
the Director and Advisory Commission to the General Assembly:
(a) Official Records of the General Assembly, Fifth Session, Sup-
plement No. 19 (A/1451/Rev.1):
(b) Ibid., Sixth Session, Supplements Nos. 16 and 16A (A/1905
and Add.1);
(c) Ibid., Seventh Session, Supplements Nos. 13 and 13A
(A/2171 and Add.1);
(d) Ibid., Eighth Session, Supplements Nos. 12 and 12A
(A/24 70 and Add.1);
(e) Ibid., Ninth Session, Supplements Nos. 17 and 17A (A/2717
and Add.1);
(f) Ibid., Tenth Session, Supplements Nos. 15, 15A and 15B
(A/2978 and Add.1);
(g) Ibid., Eleventh Session, Supplements Nos. 14 and 14A
(A/3212 and Add.1);
(h) Ibid., Twelfth Session, Supplement No. 14 (A/3686 and
A/3735);
(i) Ibid., Thirteenth Session, Supplement No. 14 (A/3931 and
A/3948);
(j) Ibid., Fourteenth Session, Supplement No. 14 (A/4213).
D. Pertinent General Assembly resolutions:
194 (III) of 11 December 1948; 212 (III) of 19 November 1948;
302 (IV) of 8 December 1949; 393 (V) of 2 December 1950; 513
(VI) of 26 January 1952; 614 (VII) of 6 November 1952; 720
(VIII) of 27 November 1953; 818 (IX) of 4 December 1954;
916 (X) of 3 December 1955; 1018 (XI) of 28 February 1957;
1191 (XII) of 12 December 1957; 1315 (XIII) of 12 December
1958; 1456 (XIV) of 9 December 1959.

2Official Records of the General Assembly, Fourteenth Session,
Supplement No. 14 (A/4213), p. 18.

3Settlement of outstanding claims against Israel is also now
under consideration.



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