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UNITED
NATIONS
A

      General Assembly
A/4861
30 June 1961

UNITED NATIONS 
 
 

 
 
                                                                                                                                                                                                                                 
 
Annual Report of the Director
of the United Nations Relief and
Works Agency for Palestine Refugees
in the Near East

 
1 July 1960--30 June 1961

 
 
 
 
 
 
GENERAL ASSEMBLY 
OFFICIAL RECORDS : SIXTEENTH SESSION
SUPPLEMENT No. 14 (A/4861
 
 
 

 
 



NEW YORK























TABLE OF CONTENTS

Page
Beirut, Lebanon
26 August 1961
25 August 1961
Yours sincerely,
(Signed) Louis PANNIER
Chairman,
Advisory Commission
a The above statistics are based on the Agency's registration records which do not necessarily reflect the actual refugee population owing to factors such as the high rate of unreported deaths and undetected false registration (see paragraphs 8-10 of the report).
b Includes up to the year 1954 bedouin who received full rations thereafter and babies who are now issued with full rations after their first anniversary. Half rations are given at present only to frontier villagers in Jordan.
c Includes babies below one year of age and children who because of ration ceilings are not issued rations (139,987 in Jordan).
d Columns 5, 6 and 7 show the refugees whose entitlements to services have been reduced or cancelled according to their family income as known to the Agency and the income scale in force in their country of residence.
The members of "R" families receiving no rations (column 5) correspond to a level of income insufficient to cancel the whole family's entitlement to rations. Up to 1956, such refugees were reported together with families of the "N" category (column 7).
The "E" and "M" categories of entitlements (column 6) created in 1956 are applied in Lebanon only because it has not been possible to secure agreement for the introduction in other host countries of the income scales providing for the progressive
reduction or restoration of rations.
"N" category (column 7) includes refugees whose income is such as to disqualify them for rations or services, or who have received assistance to enable them to become self-supporting. The 1951-1956 statistics for that category have been adjusted since last year's report, which explains minor changes in the corresponding total population.
In general, it must be pointed out that the distribution of refugees by category of entitlement gives only a partial picture of the number of self-supporting refugees owing to the limitations faced by the Agency in determining their actual income or degree of need.
e The total population as at June 1952 included 19,616 refugees receiving relief in Israel who were UNRWA's responsibility up to 1 July 1952.
f Details not available.
Table 2
RECAPITULATION OF CHANGES IN COMPOSITION AND/OR ENTITLEMENT OF REFUGEE FAMILIES REGISTERED FOR RATIONSa JULY 1950-JUNE 1961
YearJuly 50
June 51b
July 51
June 52b
July 52
June 53
July 53
June 54
July 54
June 55
July 55
June 56
July 56
June 57
July 57
June 58
July 58
June 59
July 59
June 60
July 60
June 61
Total
Increases
Birthsa
New registrations
Loss of self-supportd
Return from absence
Miscellanceous
10,057
19,537
8,481
--
10,256
21,315
13,265
2,592
--
12,468
28,335
1,993
2,685
180
2,014
28,711
2,885
4,194
442
521
30,788
1,502
4,461
642
680
30,658
1,287
8,433
973
1,061
27,960
1,370
6,823
3,599
309
40,041
859
6,045
1,436
231
37,047
645
3,030
1,113
292
37,776
525
4,417
1,039
248
39,299
324
3,490
935
252
331,987
44,192
55,61
10,359
28,334
TOTAL
48,331
49,640
35,207
36,753
38,073
42,412
40,061
48,612
43,137
44,005
44,300
470,531
Decreases
Deaths
False registrations and duplications
Self-support
Absence
Miscellandeous
896

24,265
4,121
1,174
97,268
4,053

16,929
17,739
5,466
5,157
3,897

4,530
12,884
2,995
20,891
3,764

2,737
12,717
1,810
410
4,042

926
10,184
2,581
1,628
4,409

485
19,068
1,492
563
5,582

584
16,328
5,632
357
5,263

425
9,541
2,869
455
4,956

406
7,815
2,128
505
5,041

570
9,764
2,183
701
8,919

571
8,127
2,334
743
50,822

52,418
128,288
30,664
128,678
TOTAL
127,724
49,334
45,195
21,438
19,361
26,017
28,483
18,553
15,810
18,259
20,694
290,870
Total ration recipients, babiesand children at year end June 50 =960,021
879,667
882,673
871,748
887,058
905,986
922,279
933,356
963,958
990,181
1,016,006
1,039,996



aThis table recapitulates changes affecting the total number of rations recipients, their babies and children registered for services (column 4 of Table 1) over eleven years. Births, new registrations, deaths, false registrations and duplications result in additions to or deletions from the registration records. Self-support and absence reflect transfer to or from the lower categories of entitlement (shown in columns 5, 6 and 7 of Table 1). Transfers within or between host countries, as well as issue of rations to babies attaining one year of age are not shown in this table. includes changes effected during the 1950-1951 census operations. fluctuation of births from year to year derive to a large extent from delayed registration.
dCovers income, employment with the Agency, assistance towards self-support, etc. or the cessation thereof.
eMiscellaneous changes include up to June 1953 a number of additions to or deletions from the registration records as well as certain changes in entitlement. The deletion of
refugees in Israel from the Agency's records is also reported mainly under this heading (40,930 persons over the period July 1950-June 1953).
Table 3
DISTRIBUTION OF REGISTERED REFUGEES ACCORDING TO COUNTRY OF RESIDENCE,
FAMILY ENTITLEMENT AND AGE AS AT 30 JUNE 1961


Number of persons
Family Number
entitlement Below 1-15 years 15 years of
Country Categorya 1 yearb c and over Total families

Jordan.......{ R 11,452 218,375 361,612 591,439 109,619
{ N 244 10,031 29,011 39,286 7,969
Total 11,696 228,406 390,623 630,725 117,588
Gaza.........{ R 5,396 99,456 142,442 247,294 44,531
{ N 94 3,780 9,957 13,831 4,134

Total 5,490 103,236 152,399 261,125 48,665
R 1,596 46,654 68,217 116,467 24,609
Lebanon......{ E & M 68 2,410 6,719 8,657 1,621
{ N 78 2,437 12,562 15,077 4,50
Total 1,742 51,501 86,958 140,201 30,735
U.A.R. R 3,605 43,189 61,949 108,743 23,431
(Syrian {E & Md 6 238 614 858 129
Region)....{ N 32 1,751 7,589 9,372 3,280

Total 3,643 45,178 70,152 118,973 26,840
R 22,049 407,674 634,220 1,063,943 202,190
Agency total { E & M 74 2,648 6,793 9,515 1,750 { N 448 17,999 59,119 77,566 19,888

GRAND TOTAL 22,571 428,321 700,132 1,151,024 223,828



aSee table 1 for explanation of family entitlement.
bThe number of babies below one year of age is less than the number of births recorded during the preceding year, owing to delays in registration of births.
cA number of children born since 1950 in E, M and N families is not registered with the Agency.
dThese categories apply only to some UNRWA employees.
Table 4
NUMBER OF UNRWA CAMPS, TOTAL POPULATION SHELTERED AND TYPE OF SHELTER,
1950-1961a

Year Camp Populationb Tents Huts

June 1950.................... 267,598 30,580 10,930
June 1951.................... 71 276,294 29,989 15,760
June 1952.................... 63 281,128 22,055 30,988
June 1953.................... 64 282,263 18,059 39,745
June 1954.................... 59 305,630 15,180 51,363
June 1955..................... 57 335,752 14,212 62,794
June 1956..................... 58 358,681 12,989 82,934
June 1957..................... 58 360,598 8,328 82,595
June 1958 .................... 58 396,761 4,950 89,598
June 1959 ..................... 58 414,467 1,984 98,147
June 1960 ..................... 58 421,518 149 103,616
June 1961 ..................... 57 442,862 108,155

Table 5
NUMBER OF REFUGEES IN UNRWA CAMPS ACCORDING TO COUNTRY AS AT 30 JUNE 1961a


Number of Number of Percentage of the total
Country families personsb refugee population


Jordan................................. 38,334 204,544 32
Gaza................................... 28,104 156,738 60
Lebanon................................ 13,276 61,541 44
U.A.R. (Syrian Region)................. 4,352 20,039 17
TOTAL 84,066 442,862 38



aIn general, refugees not living in UNRWA camps live in the villages and cities of the host countries and are eligible for the same range of services except that the Agency provides for them no sanitation services. Their economic status differs little from that of refugees in camps (see paragraph 14 of the report).
bRefugees enumerated are all those officially registered in camps irrespective of their entitlement.
The figures do not include refugees in camps who are not given shelter by UNRWA but benefit from sanitation services only.

BASIC RATIONS AND SUPPLEMENTARY FEEDING
Table 6
BASIC RATIONS AND OTHER SUPPLIES DISTRIBUTED BY UNRWA



1. Basic dry rations
A monthly ration for one person consists of:
10,000 grammes of flour
600 grammes of pulses
600 grammes of sugar
500 grammes of rice
375 grammes of oils and fats
This ration provides about 1,500 calories per day per person. In winter the monthly ration is increased by:
300 grammes of pulses
500 grammes of dates or raisins
It then provides about 1,600 calories per day per person.
2. Other supplies distributed
1 piece of soap (150 grammes) per month to each ration beneficiary
1 blanket per ration beneficiary every three years
1.5 litres of kerosene to ration beneficiaries in camps during five winter months


Table 7
UNRWA SUPPLEMENTARY FEEDING PROGRAMME
AVERAGE NUMBER OF BENEFICIARIES, 1 JULY 1960-30 JUNE 1961

Daily cooked meal beneficiaries Monthly dry ration beneficiaries
Average for the year Average for the year
Number of 2-15 years
Feeding and special Pregnant Nursing TB-out
Country Centres 0-2 years cases Total women mothers patients Total Grand total

Lebanon ........... 22 517 3,935 4,452 1,231 3,494 239 4,964 9,416
UAR (Syrian Region) 18 404 3,647 4,051 553 1,225 190 1,968 6,019
Jordan ............. {47 1,681 17,882} 22,314 2,785 10,222 606 13,613 35,927
{24a 208 2,543}
Gaza ............. 16 1,304 10,275 11,579 2,573 7,786 372 10,731 22,310

127 4,114 38,282 42,396 7,142 22,727 1,407 31,276 73,672

a Centres operated by voluntary societies.





Table 8
UNRWA MILK PROGRAMME
AVERAGE NUMBER OF BENEFICIARIES, 1 JULY 1960-30 JUNE 1961


Daily number of beneficiaries
Number of milk centres Average for the year
Preparation Milk Orphans, medical
and Distribution distribution prescriptions
Country distribution only centres Schoolsa etc. Total

Lebanon ...... 23 11 39,343 3,719 540 43,602
UAR (Syrian Region) . 22 33,548 5,362 110 39,020
{82 4 72,346} 16,996 560 93,338
Jordan .............. {33b 3,436}
Gaza ................ 16 46,111 22,372 68,483
176 15 194,784 48,449 1,210 244,443


a Daily average during the scholastic year over nine months.
b Centres operated by voluntary societies.


HEALTH STATISTICS

Table 9

NUMBER OF VISITS TO UNRWA AND SUBSIDIZED CLINICS, 1 JULY 1960-30 JUNE 1961


UAR
(Syrian
Lebanon Region) Jordan Gaza Total

Population served by medical
services ............................ 124,320 108,552 589,363 246,027 1,068,262


General medical cases ................. 434,411 340,618 677,554 515,472 1,968,055
Dressings and skin .................... 231,279 145,178 816,720 491,076 1,684,253
Eye cases ............................. 196,271 75,910 968,997 594,159 1,835,337
Dental ................................ 36,336 16,827 77,337 18,281 148,781


GRAND TOTAL 898,297 578,533 2,540,608 1,618,988 5,636,426


Table 10
HOSPITAL FACILITIES AVAILABLE TO PALESTINE REFUGEES, 1960-1961
Hospital
Government and local authorities .......... 22
Voluntary societies or private ............ 46
UNRWA ..................................... 6


TOTAL 74
In addition there are 3 maternity centres in Jordan and 8 in Gaza

UAR
(Syrian
Number of beds available Lebanon Region) Jordan Gaza Total


General ...................... 135 80 640 287 1,142
Tuberculosis .................. 150 20 130 150 450
Maternity ................... 25 11 66 80 182
Paediatric ................... 31 18 140 17 206
Mental ...................... 50 50 100

TOTAL 391 129 1,026 534 2,080


Beds per 1,000 population ...... 3.15 1.19 1.74 2.17 1.95



Table 11
INFECTIOUS DISEASES RECORDED AMONG PALESTINE REFUGEE POPULATION,
1 JULY 1960-30 JUNE 1961

UAR
Lebanon (Syrian Region) Jordan Gaza Total

Population ............... 124,320 108,552 589,363 246,027 1,068,262

Plague ................. 0 0 0 0 0
Cholera ................ 0 0 0 0 0
Yellow fever ........... 0 0 0 0 0
Smallpox ............... 0 0 0 0 0
Typhus (louse borne) ...... 0 0 0 0 0
Typhus (endemic) ............ 0 0 0 0 0
Relapsing fever (louse borne) .. 0 0 0 0 0
Relapsing fever (endemic) ....... 0 0 10 0 10
Diphtheria ...................... 1 0 3 0 4
Measles ........................570 1,293 5,457 6,752 14,072
Whooping cough ............... 289 879 1,599 274 3,041
Chicken-pox .................. 673 637 1,263 1,472 4,045
Mumps ........................ 633 488 1,585 53 2,759
Meningitis (cerebro-spinal) .. 5 2 17 4 28
Poliomyelitis ............... 10 9 34 7 60
Enteric group fevers ........ 29 424 348 17 818
Dysentery ...................14,907 11,987 10,936 20,268 58,098
Malaria .................... 0 12 17 135 164
Bilharziasis ................ 0 0 0 122 122
Ancylostomiasis ............. 26 0 12 1,034 1,072
Trachoma .................... 2,188 697 22,748 19,221 44,854
Conjunctivitis ..............16,911 10,520 68,033 20,522 115,986
Tuberculosis .............. 124 90 193 230 637
Syphilis .................. 35 32 27 96 190
Gonorrhoea ................ 7 2 10 4 23
Scarlet fever ............. 0 0 12 0 12
Rabies .................... 0 0 0 0 0
Tetanus ................... 4 0 4 11 19
Brucellosis ............... 0 0 0 0 0
Infectious hepatitis ...... 72 109 180 137 498
Leishmaniasis ............. 2 0 3 0 5
GENERAL EDUCATION AND UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS
Table 12
UNRWA/UNESCO SCHOOLS
NUMBER OF ELEMENTARY AND PREPARATORY PUPILS 1951-1961

Country 1951 1952 1953 195419551956 19571958 1959 1960 1961
GAZA
Elementary
Preparatory
19,543
61
22,551
164

25,702
675

31,107
1,781
34,016
3,339
35,087
4,937

34,876
6,410
35,163
7,495
34,806
8,244
36,633
8,481
36,591
9,841
TOTAL
19,604
22,715
26,377
32,888
37,355
40,024
41,286
42,658
43,050
45,114
46,432
JORDAN
Elementary
Preparatory
16,345
--
15,882
--
30,118
87
39,188
812
42,144
1,694
43,649
3,062
42,431
4,608
41,600
5,852
39,519
7,292
38,223
7510
38,309
8,035
TOTAL
16,345
15,882
30,205
40,000
43,838
46,711
47,039
47,452
46,811
45,733
46,344
LEBANON
Elementary
Preparatory
4,564
--
6,291
--
9,332
86
11,695
384
12,567
620
12,983
948
13,155
1,003
13,936
996
14,881
1,325
15,422
1,668
16,292
2,159
TOTAL
4,564
6,291
9,418
12,079
13,187
13,931
14,158
14,932
16,206
17,090
18,451
UAR(Syrian Region)
Elementary
Preparatory
2,599
---
2,895
--
5,410
166
8,758
864
9,700
671
10,288
936
11,042
1,180
11,332
1,562
12,256
1,916
13,354
2,592
13,685
3,589
TOTAL
2,599
2,895
5,576
9,622
10,371
11,224
12,222
12,894
14,172
15,946
17,274
GRAND TOTAL:
Elementary
Preparatory
43,051
61
47,619
164
70,562
1,014
90,748
3,841
98,427
6,324
102,007
9,883
101,504
13,201
102,031
15,905
101,462
18,777
103,632
20,251
104,877
23,624
TOTAL
43,112
47,783
71,576
94,589
104,751
111,890
114,705
120,239
123,883
128,501

Table 13
NUMBER OF REFUGEE PUPILS IN UNRWA, GOVERNMENT, AND PRIVATE PREPARATORY AND
SECONDARY SCHOOLS, AND NUMBER ATTENDING GOVERNMENT AND PRIVATE PREPARATORY
AND SECONDARY FOR WHOM UNRWA PAYS SUBSIDY, AS AT 31ST MAY 1961
Number of pupils Number of pupils in Number of pupils
Country in agency schools government schoolsa in private schoolsa Total

Gaza ..................... 9,841 5,770 (3,400) ( ) 15,611 (13,241)
Jordan ................... 8,035 8,643 (5,000) 1,695 ( 400) 18,373 (13,435)
Lebanon .................. 2,159 142 ( 66) 3,228 (2,343) 5,529 ( 4,568)
U.A.R. (Syrian Region) ... 3,589 1,651 (1,651) 1,687 (1,687) 6,927 ( 6,927)


TOTAL 23,624 16,206 (10,117) 6,610 (4,430) 46,440 (38,171)

a The government and private schools accept a number of refugee pupils in excess of those for whom grants are made by UNRWA. The number of refugee pupils in government and private schools for whom UNRWA pays subsidy is shown in parentheses.


Table 14
UNRWA/UNESCO SCHOOLS SHOWING NUMBER OF PUPILS BY GRADES AT END O F MAY 1961
ELEMENTARY

1st Elementary 2nd Elementary 3rd Elementary 4th Elementary 5th Elementary 6th Elementary Totals
Country Boys Girls Boys Girls Boys Girls Boys Girls Boys Girls Boys Girls Boys Girls

Gaza .................. 3,240 3,292 3,316 3,290 3,116 2,881 3,010 2,680 2,807 2,381 4,068 2,510 19,557 17,034
Jordan ................ 4,389 4,307 4,392 3,52 2 3,582 2,641 3,647 2,333 3,257 1,624 3,259 1,356 22,526 15,783
Lebanon ............... 1,915 1,533 1,672 1,357 1,756 1,322 1,623 1,064 1 ,444 823 1,212 571 9,622 6,670
UAR (Syrian
Region) .............. 1,764 1,348 1,549 1,160 1,459 1,062 1,221 777 1,156 667 1,058 464 8,207 5,478


TOTAL 11,308 10,480 10,929 9,329 9,913 7,906 9,501 6,854 8,664 5,495 9,597 4,901 59,912 44,965

GRAND TOTAL 21,788 20,258 17,819 16,355 14,159 14,498 104,877



PREPARATORY AND SECONDARY

Preparatory II Preparatory III Preparatory I Secondary II Secondary Totals
Country Boys Girls Boys Girls Boys Girls Boys Girls Boys Girls Boys Girls

Gaza .....2,894 1,827 1,814 1,010 1,798 498 -- --- -- -- 6,506 3,335 Jordan . .2,709 956 2,026 658 1,041 47 346 -- 252 -- 6,374 1,661
Lebanon 977 335 564 158 59 7 58 1 1,658 501
UAR (Syrian
Region) . 1,146 422 778 268 766 209 -- -- --- --- 2,690 899

TOTAL 7,726 3,540 5,182 2,094 3,664 761 404 1 252 17,228 6,396
GRAND TOTAL 11,266 7,276 4,425 405 252 23,624
================================================================================================


Table 15
DISTRIBUTION OF PALESTINE REFUGEE CHILDREN RECEIVING EDUCATION AS AT 31ST MAY 1961
_____________

Number of pupils in elementary Number of pupils in preparatory Number of refugee
classes of UNRWA/UNESCO and secondary classes of pupils in government Total
Number of schools UNRWA/UNESCO schools and private schools number of
UNRWA/ refugees UNESCO Government Private receiving
Country schools Boys Girls Total Boys Girls Total schools schools education

Gaza ..................... 82 19,557 17,034 36,591 6,506 3,335 9,841 5,770 52,202
Jordan .................. 170 22,526 15,783 38,309 6,374 1,661 8,035 25,533 8,987 80,864
Lebanon ............... 61 9,622 6,670 16,292 1,658 501 2,159 819 9,247 28,517
U.A.R. (Syrian
Region) ........... 77 8,207 5,478 13,685 690 899 3,589 6,496 2,327 26,097

TOTAL 390 59,912 44,965 104,877 17,228 6,396 23,624 38,618 20,561 187,680


Table 16
DISTRIBUTION OF UNRWA UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIP-HOLDERS BY FACULTIES 1960-1961
Teacher
Arts and training
Pre- Sciences and
Country of origin university Agriculture freshman Commerce education Engineering Dentistry Medicine Pharmacy Total

Gaza ........ -- 3 25 -- 3 34 -- 42 7 114(a)
Jordan ....... 26 2 46 3 2 43 3 42 2 169(b)
Lebanon ..... -- -- 31 -- -- 19 -- 14 1 65(c)
U.A.R.
(Syrian Region) -- 1 8 3 -- 19 3 15 5 54(d)
TOTAL 26 6 110 6 5 115 6 113 15 402


a Includes 6 ARAMCO scholarships and 8 additional scholarships made possible by exemptions awarded by the Government
of the United Arab Republic to outstandingly successful scholars.
b Includes 9 ARAMCO scholarships.
c Includes 3 ARAMCO scholarships.
d Includes 4 ARAMCO scholarships.


VOCATIONAL AND TEACHER TRAINING
Table 17
VOCATIONAL AND TEACHER-TRAINING FACILITIES, 1960-1961
_
Annual output
Capacity (year 1961)

vocational Training Centre for men at Kalandia, Jordan ............ 392 169
vocational Training Centre for men (Gaza) ......................... 192 48
Vocational Training Centre for men at Wadi Seer, Jordan ........... 404 72
Commercial and secretarial evening courses in Beirut and Tripoli,
Lebanon .......................................................... 150 90
Teacher-Training Centre for men in Ramallah, Jordan ............... 200
Teacher-Training Centre for women in Nablus, Jordan ............... 84 19

1,422 398



FINANCE
Table 18
SUMMARY STATEMENT OF INCOME, EXPENDITURE AND WORKING CAPITAL OF UNRWA,
1 MAY 1950-30 JUNE 1961a
(In U.S. dollars)


Income
Contributions Working
from Other Total capital at
For the period Governments income income Expenditure period end

1 May 1950 to 30 June 1951 ........................ 38,781,617 1,346,325 40,127,942 33,383,180b 6,744,762
1 July 1951 to 30 June 1952 ....................... 42,808,698 1,092,107 43,900,805 28,054,838 22,590,729
1 July 1952 to 30 June 1953 ....................... 49,087,227 440,419 49,527,646 26,936,198 45,182,177
1 July 1953 to 30 June 1954 ....................... 22,983,899 559,188 23,543,087 29,290,393 39,434,871
1 July 1954 to 30 June 1955 ....................... 24,554,930 605,641 25,160,571 29,387,519 35,207,923
1 July 1955 to 30 June 1956 ....................... 23,646,275 571,866 24,218,141 31,999,975 27,426,089
1 July 1956 to 31 December 1957 ................... 42,452,880 1,072,872 43,525,752 52,009,113 18,942,728
1 January 1958 to 31 December 1958 ............... 33,928,466 1,104,793 35,033,259 31,665,379 22,310,608
1 January 1959 to 31 December 1959 ................ 32,553,673 1,405,205 33,958,878 34,041,427 22,228,059
1 January 1960 to 31 December 1960 ................ 32,852,870 2,629,135 35,482,005 34,584,432 23,125,632
1 January 1961 to 30 June 1961 .................... 12,973,799 1,324,211 14,298,010 17,073,387 20,350,255c

TOTAL INCOME AND EXPENDITURE 356,624,334 12,151,762 368,776,096 348,425,841


a Based on Agency's audited statements but reflecting for each year audited adjustments made through working capital in
subsequent years.
b Includes $2,646,909 deficit of United Nations Relief for Palestine Refugees paid by UNRWA.
c Excluding $413,562 temporary adjustment for unallocated price variances on supply costs which will be allocated to operations
1 July to 31 December 1961.




Contributor
1/5/50 to 30/6/51
30/6/52
30/6/53
30/6/54
30/6/55
30/6/56
18 months ended 31/12/57
12 months
ended 31/12/58
12 months ended 31/12/59
12 months ended 31/12/60
6 months ended 30/6/61
total contributions
Australia
Austrria
Bahrein
Belgium
Bolivia
Brazil
Burma
Cambodia
Canada
Ceylon
Cuba
Denmark
Dominican Republic
El Salvador
Ethiopia
Federal Republic of Germany
Federation of Malaya
Finland
France
Gambia
Gaza Authorities
Ghana
Greece
Haiti
Honduras
Holy See
India
Indonesia
Iran
Ireland
Israel
Italy
Japan
Jodran
Korea
Kuwait
Laos
Lebanon
Liberia
Libya
Luxembourg
Mexico
Monaco
Morocco
Netherlands
New Zealand
Norway
Pakistan
Philippines
Qatar
Rhodesia and
Nyasaland
Saudi Arabia
Spain
Sudan
Sweden
Switzerland
Thailand
Turkey
United Arab Republic
Egyptian Region
Syrian Region
USA
UK and N.Ireland
Uruguay
Viet Nam
Yugoslavia
--
--
--
6,000
--
--
--
--
1,400,313
--
--
--
5,000
--
25,500

--
--
--
2,285,714
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
114,354
--
--
229804
--
--
--
225,800
--
--
2,000
--
--
--
--
--
60,000
90,000
--
--

--
37,650
--
--
--
--
--
--

478,219
171,263
27,450,000
6,200,000
--
--
--
328,715
--
--
--
5,000
--
--
--
--
--
--
58,000
--
--
--

--
--
--
2,571,429
--
--
--
56,287
--
2,500
--
--
30,000
--
--
5,207
--
--
184,996
--
--
--
--
--
--
2,000
--
--
--
25,000
210,000
14,000
90,000
10,000
--

19,600
115,000
--
144,000
19310
--
--
--

718,280
125,673
30,000,000
8,000,000
--
5,000
68,700
712,088
1,400
--
30,000
--
--
--
2,000
600,000
--
--
43,478
--
--
--

23,810
--
1,000
954,079
--
--
--
--
2,000
--
--
--
60,000
--
--
1,029
--
--
154,000
2,000
--
1,207
14,385
--
--
1,000
--
285
--
--
140,000
42,097
--
--
--

--
40,000
--
--
44,788
--
--
--

546,633
63,948
36,000,000
9,6000,000
--
6,000
--
112,500
700
--
30,000
--
--
2,000
2,000
515,000
--
--
--
--
500
--
--

--
--
1,485,790
--
--
--
21,000
2,000
--
--
--
60,000
--
--
--
--
10,000
--
--
--
--
13,689
--
--
3,000
75,482
286
--
25,000
140,000
42,000
82,764
--
--

--
40,000
--
--
71,127
--
--
--

219,858
29,204
15,000,000
5,000,000
--
--
--
112,500
700
--
30,000
--
--
--
--
515,000
--
--
86,956
--
--
--
--

--
--
1,657,219
--
--
--
2,730
2,000
--
--
1-4,000
--
--
--
--
20,000
10,000
--
--
--
-
13,689
--
--
--
28,800
--
-
25,000
112,000
42,135
67,991
--
--

--
40,000
--
--
57,915
26,733
--
--

277,143
82,419
16,700,000
4,500,000
--
--
40,000
112,500
700
--
30,000
--
--
3,528
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
--
16,603

--
--
368,276
--
--
--
6,000
--
--
--
52,500
30,000
5,138
--
--
--
10,000
--
--
--
--
12,652
--
--
4,000
11,409
286
--
57,895
168,000
42,135
--
--
--

19,600
40,000
--
--
57,915
12,444
--
5,357

224,924
74,900
16,700,000
5,500,001
--
--
80,000
212,000
1,050
1960
50,000
--
--
2,972
--
1,208,125
1,400
--
80,956
--
--
10,000
24,997

1,500
2,000
700,810
--
19,157
--
11,000
--
--
--
17,967
60,000
3,350
--
135,957
--
20,000
174,403
2,000
--
--
11,652
--
--
2,000
--
572
5,714
64,474
210,000
53,202
62,964
1,250
10,500

--
114,668
--
--
86,872
11,809
--
5,000

182,182
110,415
30,622,000
8,100,002
--
--
40,000
195,200
1,400

--
20,000
--
--
--
--
2,138,750
--
--
50,680
--
--
--

190,476
--
--
745,162
--
22,986
--
16,500
--
--
--
3,847
--
5,333
--
--
39,953
10,000
100,935
--
--
7,788
5,000
--
2,000
--
2,381
4,762
32,895
168,000
49,000
20,964
--
--

--
174,046
--
4,200
96,873
77,516
--
10,402

228,850
76,498
23,746,069
5,600,00
--
--
80,000
190,400
2,000
--
30,000
--
--
--
857
2,075,000
--
5,000
43,440
--
--
--
238,095

3,000
--
264,002
30
129,592
3,000
39,000
--
--
1,000
25,441
--
8,332
2,814
--
--
10,000
99,045
--
--
1,000
23,844
6,500
10,000
2,000
--
203
4796
65,790
140,000
21,000
20,964
--
--

--
138,833
--
--
57,915
35,047
--
5,000

326,324
81,90
23,000,000
5,400,000
--
2,500
40,000
196,000
2,000
--
20,000
--
25,000
1,046
--
2,060,000
--
--
43,440
--
--
--
238,095

1,500
--
182,757
--
130,045
--
17,500
--
--
--
23,739
--
3,000
7,000
--
--
12,500
98,550
--
--
500
23,844
5,000
--
--
--
204
--
65,790
168,000
63,000
22,014
--
--

--
85,618
16,667
--
57,915
35,046
3,125
5,000

339,083
83,474
22,147,418
5,624,000
5,000
--
40,000
100,800
--
--
--
--
--
--
571
--
--
--
43,440
--
--
--
--

--
--
32,260
--
65,022
3,000
15,000
--
--
10,965
--
--
--
--
--
120,518
--
49,140
1,500
131,250
--
20,202
--
--
2,000
--
--
36,750
--
140,000
--
--
--
--

--
--
--
--
--
--
--

248,067
36,908
9,213,906
2,700,000
--
2,500
--
2,272,703
9,950
1,960
246,000
5,000
25,000
9,546
5,428
11,512,188
1,400
5,000
456,390
5,000
500
35,500
732,076

6,000
3,000
11,247,498
30
366,802
6,000
185,017
6,000
2,500
11,965
227,494
240,000
25,153
9,814
256,547
180,471
82,500
1,090,873
5,500
131,205
2,707
367,057
16,500
10,000
20,000
115,691
4,217
52,022
361,844
1,596,000
438,569
457,661
11,250
10,500

39,200
825,815
16,667
148,200
550,630
198,595
3,125
30,759

3,789,563
936,610
250,579,393
66,224,004
5,000
16,000
388,700
Total Government contributions
38,718,617
42,808,698
49,087,227
22,983,899
24,4554,930
23,646,275
42,452
880
33,928,466
32,553,673
32,852,870
12,973,799
356,624,334
UNESCO
WHO
Sundry donors
83,393
42,857
781,200
25,425
--
671,969
105,000
42,857
54,022
35,000
42,857
83,091
55,535
42,857
55,386
102,140
58,706
39,976
160,372
82,268
33,029
142,075
114,916
33,610
254,392
164,121
25,254
1,118,428
85,190
16,172
688,393
1,013,363
391,349
3,977,455
Total contributions from others

Misc. income and exchange adjustments
907,453


438,872
697,394


394,713
201,879


238,540
160,948


398,240
153,778


451,863
200,882


371,044
301,945


770,927
257,372


847,421
402,918


1,002,287
1,307,903


1,321,232
789,755


534,456
5,382,167


6,769,595
Total income
40,127,942
43,900,805
49,527,646
23,543,087
25,160,571
24,218,141
43,525,752
35,033,259
33,958,878
35,482,005
14,298,010
368,776,096







Table 20
STATEMENT OF EXTRA-BUDGETARY FUNDS RECEIVED OR PLEDGED FOREXPANSION OF EDUCATION, TRAINING AND INDIVIDUAL
ASSISTANCE, FROM 1 JULY 1959 TO 30 JUNE 1961a
(In U.S. dollars)
Other extra-budgetary Total extra-budgetary
World Refugee Year funds funds


Contributor Contributions Pledges Contributions Pledges Contributions Pledges

Governments
Burma........................................ 1,046 1,046
Cambodia..................................... 286 286
Canada....................................... 1,020,000 1,020,000
Cuba......................................... 5,000 5,000
Federation of Malaya......................... 1,500 1,500
Gambia....................................... 30 30
Greece....................................... 2,500 -- 2,500
Holy See..................................... 11,965 11,965
Japan........................................ 2,500 2,500
Kuwait....................................... -- 131,250 131,250
Liberia...................................... 1,500 1,500
Morocco...................................... 36,750 36,750
New Zealand.................................. 28,000 28,000
Pakistan..................................... 1,050 1,050
Thailand..................................... 3,125 3,125
United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern
Irelandb................................... 224,000 224,000
United States of Americac.................... 500,000 500,000 Viet-Nam..................................... 2,500 2,500

TOTAL FROM GOVERNMENTS 1,305,002 168,000 500,000 1,473,002 500,000
Others
Arabian American Oil Company................. 20,000 30,000 20,000 30,000
Australian World Refugee Year Committee..... 83,000 83,000
Canadian Committee for World Refugee Year.... 156,436 156,436
Children of Canada........................... 71,400 71,400
CORSO, New Zealand........................... 61,272 11,680 61,272 11,680
Danish World Refugee Year Committee.......... 145,000 145,000
Farnsworth, Ann Labouisse, U.S.A............. 14,400 14,400
Furse, William, U.K.......................... 500 500
German National World Refugee Year
Committee.................................. 212,500 25,000 212,500 25,000
Iranian World Refugee Year Committee......... 9,000 9,000
Irish Red Cross Society...................... 42,005 42,005
Netherlands Committee for World Refugee Year 30,676 30,676
Norwegian World Refugee Year Committee....... 90,000 90,000
Order of St. John of Jerusalem, U.K.......... 2,380 2,380
Oxford University Committee for World Refugee
Year....................................... 840 840
Swedish Broadcasting Relief Committee........ 25,697 25,697
Swedish Red Cross............................ 20,000 20,000
Uganda World Refugee Year Appeal............. 7,096 7,096
United Kingdom Committee for World Refugee
Year....................................... 1,015,000 1,015,000
United Nations Secretariat staffs............ 10,241 10,241
Viet-Nam Committee for World Refugee Year... 28,283 28,283
World Refugee Year Stamp Plan................ 100,000 150,000 100,000 150,000
World Refugee Year television and film show.. 8,030 8,030
Sundry donors and interest earned............ 75,212 75,212

TOTAL OTHERS 1,850,871 550,377 14,400 30,000 1,865,271 580,377

TOTAL CONTRIBUTIONS RECEIVED
OR PLEDGED 3,155,873 550,377 182,400 530,000 3,338,273 1,080,377


aThe contributions shown in this table are included in tables 18 and 19 and are not additional thereto.
bThe contributions of the United Kingdom were received through the United Kingdom Committee for World Refugee Year.
cThe United States of America pledge is subject to the usual matching principle; that is, the total amount contributed to UNRWA by the United States for any one year (July to June) must not exceed 70 percent of the total contributed by all Governments for the same period.



Table 21a
DIRECT CONTRIBUTIONS FROM GOVERNMENTS TO REFUGEESb
(In U.S. dollars)
Social
Contributor and period of Education welfare Medical Security Miscellaneous Administration
contribution services services services Housing services services costs Total

Jordan
1 July 1959 to 30 June 1960....... 1,301,362 213,452 562,341 169,680 42,280 2,289,115
1 July 1960 to 30 June 1961....... 1,191,389 234,517 410,315 93,030 44,940 1,974,191
Lebanon
1 July 1959 to 30 June 1960....... 3,266 10,984 105,500 119,750
1 July 1960 to 30 June 1961....... 187,500 63,125 157,812 105,500 513,937
United Arab Republic
(Syrian Region)
1 July 1959 to 30 June 1960....... 393,056 390,618 9,707 527,777 163,611 1,484,769
1 July 1960 to 30 June 1961....... 416,667 410,640 8,908 555,554 184,344 1,576,113
United Arab Republic
(Egyptian Region)
1 July 1959 to 30 June 1960....... 721,059 139,873 32,584 43,303 270,360 58,460 1,265,639
1 July 1960 to 30 June 1961....... 725,757 349,758 64,621 78,463 37,336 62,393 1,318,328
France
1 July 1958 to 30 June 1959....... 17,281 17,281
1 July 1959 to 30 June 1960....... 16,686 16,686
1 July 1960 to 30 June 1961....... 19,503 19,503


aDelay in receipt of information in 1960 prevented inclusion of a similar table in the Director's report for 1959-1960. The present table therefore covers, for each Government, the period beyond that covered by the Director's report for 1958-1959, to
30 June 1961. All data shown are based upon information provided by the Governments concerned, and are expressed in dollars computed by applying the Agency's accounting rates of exchange, which are based on official or free market rates as appropriate.
bIn addition to the foregoing contributions direct to the refugees all Governments listed also made contributions to UNRWA for the latter's budget. These contributions are reported in the Agency's own accounts and are set out in tables 18 and 19. It is also to be noted that UNRWA (and, in some cases, voluntary agencies working with the refugees) enjoy exemption from customs duties and taxes. In addition, the cost of the normal services provided by the host Governments is increased by reason of utilization of these services by refugees.

SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 22
CO-OPERATIVES IN REFUGEE CAMPS, JULY 1961

Number of UNRWA
Type of families initial Outside Loan from
Co-operative Camp benefiting assistance donation Government

$ $
Lebanon
Consumer........ Mar Elias 54 925 -- --
Wool-kntting...... Ein-el-Hilweh 25 300
and wool
Jordan
Poultry........ Deir Ammar 16 420 16,000 chicks 1,680
and incubator (Heifer
and brooder Project)
Poultry........ Nuweimeh 20 1,008 16,000 chicks 700
(Heifer Project)
Agricultural.. Karameh 49 1,400 -- 24,000 Saving and credit
(agricultural)..... Nuweimeh 18 560 -- --
Handicraft.......... Kalandia 20 350 $2,044 --
Mat-making......... Akabat-Jaber 42 1,568
Bakery......... . Jalazone 28 560 -- --
Bakery......... . Fawwar 80 -- -- --
School........... Irbed -- -- -- --
Gaza
Consumer......... Nuseirat 273 346 --- --
Consumer......... Bureij 131 346 -- --
Poultry.......... Maghazi 7 1,038 1,000 chicks --
(Heifer Project)
Soap-making...... Maghazi 7 754 $173 (NECC) --
Carpentry....... Khan Younis 8 1,830 $1,120 (CORSO) --
United Arab Republic
(Syrian Region)
Bakery........... Khan Dannoun 73 1,125 -- --
851 12,530



Table 23
VOLUNTARY AGENCIES DONATING CLOTHING TO PALESTINE REFUGEES, 1960-1961

American Friends Service Committee
American Middle East Relief Association
Canadian Lutheran World Relief
Catholic Relief Services (United States)
Church of Denmark Inter-Church Aid Committee
Church of Scotland
Church World Service (United States)
Inomeuropeisk Mission (Sweden)
Lutheran World Relief, Inc.
Mennonite Central Committee (United States)
New Zealand Council of Organizations for Relief Services Overseas, Inc. (CORSO)
Norwegian Church
Oxford Committee for Famine Relief (United Kingdom)
Red Cross Societies (United Kingdom and New Zealand)
Red Cross Society (Canada)
Swedish Red Cross
Unitarian Service Committee of Canada
United Church of Canada
Vastkustens Efterkrigshjalp, (Sweden)
Women's Voluntary Services (United Kingdom)

Table 24
VOLUNTARY AGENCIES IN THE AREA OF UNRWA OPERATIONS GIVING ACTIVE HELP
TO PALESTINE REFUGEES

CARE (Co-operative for American Relief Everywhere, Inc.)
The Church Missionary Society (in Jordan)
Jamiat al Islam (in Jordan)
The Lutheran World Federation (in Jordan and the Syrian Region of the United Arab
Republic)
The Mennonite Central Committee (in Jordan)
The Near East Christian Council Committee (in Gaza, in Lebanon through the Joint
ChristianCommittee, in Jordan directly and through the International Church Committee)
The Pontifical Mission (in Lebanon, Jordan and Gaza)
The Southern Baptist Mission U.S. (hospital in Gaza)
UNRWA Women's Auxiliary
The World Council of Churches
The Young Men's Christian Association (in Jordan, Gaza and Lebanon)
The Young Women's Christian Association (in Jordan)

Table 25
REFUGEES WHO EMIGRATED WITH UNRWA ASSISTANCE DURING THE FOUR YEARS
ENDING JUNE 1961
United States Venezuela Brazil Colombia Canada Others Total

1957-1958....... 80 170 137 1 11 34 433
1958-1959....... 273 75 84 - 1 44 477
1959-1960...... 167 9 166 8 18 39 407
1960-1961...... 75 12 121 77 14 49 348

595 266 508 86 44 166 1,665



UNRWA PERSONNEL
Table 26
STAFF EMPLOYED BY UNRWA AT 31 DECEMBER 1960

Locally Inter-
recruited national
Function staffa staffb Total

Medical, nutrition and sanitation........... 3,618 17 3,635
Education and training..................... 4,565 29 4,594
Supply, transport and distribution.......... 1,353 15 1,368
Other functions (placement,
welfare, administration, etc.) 1,167 85 1,252
TOTAL 10,703 146 10,849


aThe apparent increase of 611 locally recruited employees since 31 December 1959 is
mostly accounted for by formerly daily paid labourers now brought on to the manning table.
includes 22 UNESCO, WHO and other loaned or seconded staff.

Part II

BUDGET FOR THE CALENDAR YEAR 1962

A. Introduction

101. In his report for 1959-1960, the Director of UNRWA presented a three-year plan of expenditure (1961 through 1963) covering the entire period of the Agency's renewed mandate; i.e. to 30 June 1963. The estimates for 1962 and 1963 were, of course, only tentative; the estimates for 1962 are now presented in final form and total $39,204,000.

102. There are several significant changes from the original estimates for 1962, as contained in the presentation to the fifteenth session of the General Assembly, the most important of which results from a decision in 1961 to advance by a year or more those parts of the vocational training expansion programme originally scheduled for 1962 and 1963. A second important change, of a technical type, follows the decision of the Agency to alter its accounting rate for the Egyptian pound from the official rate of ŁE1 = $2.88 to the effective rate of ŁE1 = $2.25; the financial effect of which is to reduce the estimates of expenditure by some $0.8 million and imultaneously to reduce estimated income (gain on exchange) by the same amount.

103. The estimates for 1962 represent the most realistic predictions the Agency can make with respect to cost factors relating to (1) maintaining essential services to an ever-increasing number of refugees (including such minor improvements and capital replacements as are unavoidable) and, (2) implementing the Agency's three year plan for expansion of vocational training, improvement of general education, increasing university scholarships and provision of loans and grants in 1962. The budget here submitted is minimal, reflecting only what the Agency believes can and should be done
in 1962.

104. Each year, two important influences continue to increase the Agency's budget for its existing programmes: first, the steady increase in the number of beneficiaries of the Agency's services and, second, the gradual increase in the unit costs of nearly everything the Agency buys. The budget figures for 1962 reflect the anticipated effects of these two unavoidable factors. In addition, certain capital replacements must be made as equipment wears out and buildings become unsafe or inadequate, and a minimum amount of adjustment and adaptation is necessary, particularly in health and sanitation services and in shelter.

105. In 1961, the budgetary effect of the Agency's three-year plan (of expansion of vocational training, improvement of general education, increase in number of university scholarships and provision of individual assistance) was primarily in the area of non-recurring costs, i.e. construction and equipment of new centres. In 1962, however, in addition to a continued, although much smaller, capital construction programme, recurring costs will increase sharply as the new centres are completed and commence operations.


106. Paragraphs 109 to 153 present the Agency's expenditure estimates for 1962 in detail. As in 1961 these estimates are presented in two parts, the first dealing with relief services and related activities, the second dealing with education, technical training, and indiviual assistance.

107. Paragraphs 154 to 159 deal with the problem of financing the Agency's requirements. This problem grows more serious each year, as regular income remains virtually unchanged while the Agency's expenditures unavoidably increase, quite apart from the increase resulting from the programme of expansion of vocational training, improvement in general education, increase in university scholarships and provision for the individual assistance scheme.

108. The heavy expansion programme in vocational training facilities during 1961 has been financed almost entirely from the extra-budgetary amounts derived from gifts (mostly World Refugee Year donations) and from the drawing down of working capital. These sources are of course non-repetitive, which means that the Agency will have to look entirely to contributing Governments, during fiscal years 1962 and 1963, except for the $1 million per year which the Director will attempt to raise from other sources.
B. Estimates of expenditure
GENERAL

109. The Agency's estimates for expenditure in 1962 are summarized in the following table:
BUDGET ESTIMATES FOR 1962
(Expressed in thousands of U.S. dollars)



1962 budget estimates
Improve-
ments
Existing and Activity operations expansions Total


Part I. Relief services
Basic subsistence................. 12,439 15 12,454
Supplementary feeding............. 1,545 2 1,547
Health care....................... 3,022 185 3,207
Environmental sanitation.......... 896 108 1,004
Shelter........................... 253 550 803
Social welfare.................... 732 179 911
Placement services................ 180 180
Eligibility and registration...... 239 8 247
Transport within UNRWA area....... 2,799 2,799
Supply control and warehousing.... 695 80 775
General administration and in-....
ternal services.................. 3,421 66 3,487
Operational reserve............... 800 800

TOTAL OF PART I 27,021 1,193 28,214
Part II. Education, technical train-
ing and individual assistance
Elementary and secondary edu-
cation.......................... 8,063 465 8,528
Vocational and university edu-
cation.......................... 1,496 800 2,296
Projects and individual assistance 166 166

TOTAL OF PART II 9,559 1,431 10,990

GRAND TOTAL OF 1962 BUDGET 36,580 2,624 39,204


110. Under the heading "Relief services" (part I of the preceding table), $28.2 million will be required, including $27 million for providing relief services at existing per capita levels to the refugees, plus $1.2 million for improvements and expansion of such services. The latter figure is composed of $500,000 for providing shelter to those additional refugees whose need for shelter has become the most urgent; $293,000 for adjustments in medical and sanitation services to ensure their continuation at a minimum level; $179,000 for expansion of youth activities to combat the debilitating effects of idleness; and $221,000 for essential improvements in the Agency's facilities.

111. Under the heading "Education, technical training and individual assistance" (part II of the table), $11 million will be required, including $9.5 million for continuing the existing programme, $0.5 million for the expansion of general education and essential improvements in existing educational facilities, and $1 million for the expansion of vocational training and individual assistance under the three-year plan previously mentioned.

BASIC SUBSISTENCE
1962 estimates: Existing operations .$12,439,000
Essential
improvements .... 15,000

Total budget $12,454,000


112. Basic subsistence continues to be the most costly of all Agency operations. Included in the estimates are the costs of basic food commodities CIF Agency area ports of entry, the cost of quality control, and the cost
of field distribution to the entitled beneficiaries. (In 1961 and prior years, port costs and the cost of transport from ports of entry to field warehouses, approximately $1.5 million, were also included under this heading. In 1962, however, these costs will be included under "Transport within UNRWA area" which is set out in paragraphs 132 to 135 below. It is believed that the inclusion of all internal transport costs under the one heading will more accurately reflect the true nature of the expenditure.)

113. The basic ration will be distributed to an estimated 877,000 beneficiaries during 1962 (including approximately 16,500 half-ration beneficiaries) and will comprise:

Type of ration Quantity
(i) Basic food ration (consisting 1,500 calories per day in
of dry food commodities summer and 1,600 calories
--flour, rice, pulses, sugar, per day in winter
cooking oil, etc.)
(ii) Soap 150 grammes per month
(iii) Blankets One per benef iciary every
three years
(iv) Kerosene 1 litre per month for five winter months in Gaza
1.5 litres per month for five winter months in Lebanon,
UAR (Syrian Re-
gion), Jordan (camp resi-
dents only)

114. Provision has had to be made in the estimates for assisting the additional beneficiaries who become eligible through the natural increase of population. Food prices have been based on the best forecasts which the Agency can make; although certain commodities are expected to cost less in 1962, the aggregate of all food supplies is estimated to cost $0.1 million more than in 1961. Moreover, many items in the diet, especially flour, pulses and sugar, are notoriously subject to wide fluctuations on world markets. In the event that a political or economic crisis in 1962 should markedly affect food prices, this aspect of the budget could prove to be understated to a degree requiring fundamental recasting of the entire budget.

115. There is no provision for expansion of facilities for ration distribution of any kind, but $15,000 has been provided for replacement of the most sub-standard distribution centres in order to improve efficiency and reduce distribution costs.

SUPPLEMENTARY FEEDING
1962 estimates: Existing operations .. $1,545,000
Essential improvements 2,000

Total budget $1,547,000



116. Provisions in 1962 are limited to providing the following supplements to the basic ration for the vulnerable categories of refugee population listed below:
117. Costs include the provision of the necessary food items and the costs of preparing and serving the supplementary meals. Included under the milk programme item are the costs of reconstitution of dried milk powder and distribution of the liquid milk.

118. Consistent with the explanation in paragraph 112, the internal transport of basic food commodities will be charged to the heading "Transport within UNRWA area", and not to this activity. Provision has had to be made to meet the continual rise in the prices of fresh food, for increasing attendance by entitled beneficiaries, and for major increases in the expected cost of milk.

119. No expansions in supplemental feeding facilities are proposed, but $2,000 is provided for the replacement of those distribution centres in Gaza which are considered to be sub-standard from a health point of view.



HEALTH CARE

1962 estimates: Existing operations ... $3,022,000
Essential improvements 185,000

Total budget $3,207,000


120. The health care programmes are extensive, providing services for almost a million people through the operation of general clinics, hospitals, laboratories and pharmacies, as well as providing dental treatment, maternal and child health care, tuberculosis control, mental health care, school health service, health education, epidemiological measures, preventive medicine services and carrying out other necessary health measures and precautions. Although the total budget under this heading appears large, it only represents about $0.26 per person per month. The efficacy of the service may be inferred from the refugees' freedom from serious epidemics or other health catastrophe during nearly twelve years, despite the adverse conditions under which they have been living.

121. In order to maintain even the minimum standards set by the Agency, certain expenditures must be increased, including $112,000 for staff to meet the increasing number of refugees, and $73,000 for buildings and equipment to replace facilities whose condition has ceased to meet even minimum standards of safety, sanitation or usefulness, or which have become seriously overcrowded and inadequate.

ENVIRONMENTAL SANITATION

1962 estimates: Existing operations ...$ 896,000
Essential improvements 108,000

Total budget $1,004,000


122. "Environmental sanitation" includes surface water drainage, refuse and sewage disposal, water supply, insect and rodent control, ancillary camp facilities (such as bath-houses, incinerators and slaughter houses) and basic sanitation services in villages of the Gaza Strip where refugees comprise the predominant proportion of the inhabitants. These services extend to approximately 460,000 refugees officially quartered in camps and to a further 25,000 "squatters" on the outskirts of organized UNRWA camps.

123. The estimates include $108,000 for essential improvements within the existing programmes: $63,000 for sewage and refuse disposal facilities, $33,000 for water supply systems and $12,000 for miscellaneous items such as staff training. Because of the importance of adequate water supply and sewage disposal to good health, such improvements must be made promptly when needed.

SHELTER
1962 estimates: Existing operations ....$253,000
Essential improvements . 50,000
Proposed expansions .. 500,000
Total budget $803,000

124. This heading includes all costs of construction, repair and maintenance of shelter provided for refugees by the Agency (including cash grants for roofing to refugees who construct their own shelter), regardless of whether the premises are located in organized camps or elsewhere, the costs of allocating and controlling the use of shelter and otherwise administering the programme, and expenditures for the construction, repair and maintenance of roads and paths and for associated drainage facilities.

125. Provision of $50,000 has been made for providing or improving roads and paths, principally to permit easier access to camps by Agency vehicles in bad weather, and other minor improvements in camps.

126. Construction costs for new shelter are estimated at $500,000 to provide for growing family needs within existing camps, for replacement of sub-standard shelter, for admission of a limited number of pressing cases from new applicants and shelter for "refugee squatters" in a few localities where their present living conditions present a hazard to the community.

SOCIAL WELFARE

1962 estimates: Existing operations ....$732,000
Essential improvements .
Proposed expansions .. 179,000
Total budget costs $911,000


127. Estimates under this heading include the costs of all welfare activities. The largest single item under this heading is for ocean freight and distribution of used clothing for refugees, but welfare activities also include case work among individuals, burial grants, aid to religious institutions and community development activities.

128. During the past two years, there has been increasing importance attached to community development, particularly in the form of youth activities centres, craft training centres for adults and assistance to co-operatives and small grants to enable individual refugees to become more self-reliant and, where possible, self-supporting. The estimates therefore include $179,-000 for expansion of adult craft training and youth activities centres. Both the adult craft training and the youth activities centres contribute materially towards developing initiative and otherwise combating the effects of idleness at relatively low per capita cost.

PLACEMENT SERVICES

1962 estimates: Existing operations ....$180,000
Essential improvements .
Proposed expansions ..

$180,000


129. This service assists those qualified refugees who apply for help to find suitable employment and, in the case of refugees who, themselves, have obtained valid travel documents and employment in other localities, provides grants for subsistence and travel. No expansion or improvement in the level of these services is provided in this budget.


EIGIBILITY AND REGISTRATION

1962 estimates: Existing operations ....$239,000
Essential improvements .
Proposed expansions ... 8,000

Total budget $247,000

29

130. The cost of all eligibility and registration activities is encompassed under this heading, including investigations to determine eligibility and maintenance of records with respect to changes in family status by reason of births, marriages, or deaths; changes of location; transfers to other categories of entitlement with respect to rations or service benefits; and the carrying out of systematic checks on eligibility rolls as a means of keeping them as accurate as possible.

131. The progressive steps towards rectification of the ration rolls, which are treated more fully in part I of this report, require a staff increase of $8,000 for 1962.
TRANSPORT WITHIN THE UNRWA AREA

1962 estimates: Existing operations ..$2,799,000
Essential improvements
Proposed expansion ..

Total budget $2,799,000


132. This budget heading provides for all costs of operating the Agency's transport system for both passenger and freight movements by road, rail, sea or air within the UNRWA area (whether by Agency-owned vehicles or by hired transport), including related costs for loading, unloading and insurance. Included also are costs of port operations and the essential replacement of vehicles.

133. As noted under paragraphs 112 and 118 above, commencing in 1962 transport costs of food supplies within the Agency's area will be charged to this heading and not to the Basic subsistence and supplementary feeding activities, as heretofore. This change is being made to facilitate a more accurate description of the use of funds.

134. In common with other users of freight transport in the area, the Agency is faced with rising freight rates for hired services and with rising costs for the operation of its own vehicles, both with respect to original price and to maintenance. On the other hand, by the adoption of much more rigorous criteria for the replacement of passenger-carrying vehicles and of replacement of engines only for freight-carrying vehicles, the cost of vehicle replacements is expected to be greatly reduced in 1962.

135. There has been a perceptible increase in the mileage required to be run by passenger vehicles owing to a combination of the expansion of the vocational training programmes, extension of protective services, more effective control of premises and closer supervision of field office operations. While this is reflected in terms of higher costs in this heading, such expenditure is expected to bring more than offsetting benefits in terms of efficiency and savings.
SUPPLY CONTROL AND WAREHOUSING

1962 estimates: Existing operations ....$695,000
Essential improvements . 80,000
Proposed expansions ..

Total budget $775,000


136. This heading covers the activities of receiving, warehousing, issuing of all Agency supplies, and the administrative procedures necessary to the control of inventories.


137. In the interest of efficiency, the following essential improvements are proposed, all within the scope of current activities: $60,000 to build a field office warehouse in the Syrian Region of the United Arab Republic, where rented warehousing facilities have proved to be expensive and inadequate; $13,000 for steel shelving in the field warehouses in Lebanon and Gaza; $6,000 for a weighbridge at the Lebanon field warehouse, to facilitate better control of supplies, and $1,000 for other necessary improvements in facilities.
GENERAL ADMINISTRATION AND INTERNAL SERVICES

1962 estimates: Existing operations ..$3,421,000
Essential improvements 66,000
Proposed expansions..

Total budget $3,487,000


138. This heading provides for the general administration and direction of the Agency and for the internal service activities essential to the proper functioning of the Agency. Included in general administration are the Agency's headquarters, five country and field office headquarters, 22 area offices, 50 camp offices, liaison offices in New York, Geneva and Baghdad, and the Advisory Commission. Included in internal services are administrative and office facilities and services; financial and audit services; legal, personnel, procurement, translation and communications services; engineering and architectural services and public information services.

139. The provision of $66,000 for improvements consists principally of $53,000 to provide office facilities for the increased staff necessary for the expansion of vocational training and improvement of education, to gether with $13,000 for other miscellaneous improve ments considered essential to proper working conditions.

140. In previous years the estimates under this heading were presented under three separate headings (General administration, General internal services and Operations administration and services). It is believed that presentation under a single heading of these essentially related activities simplifies the format of the budget and facilitates its understanding.
OPERATIONAL RESERVE

1962 estimates .......................$800,000

141. For operational contingencies which are inherent in UNRWA activities and for emergencies such as the Agency has suffered at least once per year dur-
ing its history, a provision has been made in 1962 of $800,000 (the same figure as in former years). This is almost precisely 2 per cent of the total budget and is considered the absolute minimum margin of safety.
ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION

1962 estimates: Existing operations ..$8,063,000
Essential improvements 284,000
Proposed expansions . 181,000

Total budgets $8,528,000


142. The estimates under this heading cover the cost of elementary schooling (six years), preparatory school ing (3 or 4 years depending on the country) and three years of secondary schooling, to the extent that the Agency is able to provide such education.

143. For some years the Agency has succeeded in providing elementary education for virtually all refugee children, and preparatory (lower secondary) and secondary education for an increasing percentage of children in these age groups. In 1960-1961, preparatory education was made available in Gaza to all children who qualified for admission to the preparatory cycle, and in 1961-1962 this policy will be essentially applied in Lebanon, the Syrian Region of the United Arab Republic, and Jordan, while some increase in secondary facilities will also be provided.

144. The estimates for existing operations therefore cover the cost of the programme as it existed in 1961, after making allowance for natural population increase in elementary schools. The cost ($181,000) in 1962 of expanding preparatory and secondary education, however, is shown separately as an expansion, in keeping with the Agency's three-year plan of expanding vocational training and improving general education.

145. The provision of $284,000 for improvements is to permit the replacement of a large number of old classrooms (principally of mud brick construction) which were built or rented in the early days of the Agency and which are now so overcrowded and unsatisfactory that the quality of education offered in them is seriously impaired.

VOCATIONAL AND UNIVERSITY EDUCATION

1962 estimates: Existing operations ..$1,496,000
Essential improvements
Proposed expansions . 800,000

Total budget $2,296,000


146. This heading provides for industrial, commercial and agricultural vocational training for limited numbers of students, for teacher training and for university training for carefully selected and qualified young men and women in professions such as medicine, dentistry, and categories of engineering for which there is a demand in the Middle East. Vocational and teacher training is largely conducted in the Agency's own centres, while university scholarships are awarded in universities within the Agency's area of operations.

147. As noted in paragraph 102 above, the entire schedule of vocational training expansion envisaged in the three year plan has been advanced by a year or more, by transferring the construction originally scheduled for 1962 and 1963 into the 1961 programme of works. No expansions are therefore planned for initiation in 1962. However, the estimates for 1962 reflect the effect of the expansions started in 1961, and these are shown separately as such in this budget.

148. For Vocational training administration and common costs an increase of $25,000 was made in 1961 and a further increase of $213,000 must be provided in 1962 to cover the cost of hiring a total of twenty eight International vocational training specialists, to cope with the expanded programmes.

149. In University scholarships it is proposed to proceed with increasing the approved number of scholarships, as planned in the three-year plan for the activity, but only, in 1962, to the extent of $44,000 above the 1961 level.

150. For all vocational training and teacher-training centres, estimates are based on the normal level of activity for all approved courses, for a full year's operation of those centres now completed or to be completed by the beginning of 1962, and for a proportional part of the year for those centres where construction will be completed during 1962. An exception is at the Siblin Vocational Training Centre (Lebanon) where for the first seven months of 1962, the whole centre will be used for conducting a specialized course for vocational training instructors for subsequent employment at the new centres to be operated by the Agency.

151. The following table gives the detail of cost estimates for each unit of Agency activity in the field of specialized education:

_ _________________________ (In thousands of U.S. dollars)

Existing Expanded Total
Activity title operations operations costs


1. Vocational education administra-
tion and common costs............ 373 213 586
2. Teacher-training administration
and common costs................. 105 105
3. In-service instructor training.... 10 10
4. Kalandia Vocational Training
Centre, Jordan.................. 210 210
5. Wadi Seer Vocational Training
Centre, Jordan................... 176 60 236
6. Gaza Vocational Training Centre,
Gaza............................ 112 21 133
7. Siblin Vocational Training Centre,
Lebanon......................... 151 151
8. Damascus Vocational Training
Syrian Region of the Centre,
United Arab Republic.............. 56 100 156
9. Homs Vocational Training Centre,
Syrian Region of the United
Arab Republic..................... 40 40
10. Ramallah Men's Teacher-Training
Centre, Jordan.................... 100 48 148
11. Ramallah Girls' Teacher-Training
Centre / Vocational Training
Centre, Jordan.................... 95 95
12. Nablus Girls' Teacher-Training
Centre, Jordana................... 34 34
13. Teacher Training, Gazab............ 7 14 21
14. Beit Hanoun Training Centre,
Gaza.............................. 7 14 21
15. Miscellaneous minor courses in all
host countriesc................... 6 6
16. University scholarships............ 300 44 344

AGENCY TOTALS 1,496 800 2,296


a The Nablus Girls' Teacher-Training Centre, Jordan, will operate only for the first half of 1962, thereafter it will be combined with the Ramallah Girls TTC/VTC.
b Teacher training in Gaza will be conducted for 120 first-year trainees and 120 second-year trainees on a subsidy basis at the government Teacher-Training Centre in Gaza town.
c These minor courses comprise a variety of nursing, maternity and midwifery courses, some trades training, a pharmacy course and various courses in the English language and commercial and secretarial training. For some of these courses,
which are on a limited or fixed-term basis, no estimates are included in the 1962 budget since the total cost was funded on a project reservation basis at the initiation of the course.
PROJECTS AND INDIVIDUAL ASSISTANCE

1962 estimates: Existing operations ...
Essential improvements .
Proposed expansions ..$166,000

Total budget $166,000


152. The only item under this heading is the second year's instalment of the three-year plan of $0.5 million for individual assistance towards self-support through loans and grants.

153. All other projects have either been concluded or are dormant except two: Training of handicapped youth and Treatment of handicapped youth; for both of these the total expected expenditure has already been funded on a project reservation basis in prior years.
C. Financing the 1962 budget

154. Judging by the experience of recent years, the Agency can expect a "normal" income in 1962 of only about $33.6 million, made up as follows:

Contributions by Governments. $32.6 million
Other income ................ 1.0 million

$33.6 million


(When computed on the accounting basis which applied prior to 1962 this figure would be $34.4 million; but as explained in paragraph 102 above, the use of a revised exchange rate for the Egyptian pound will reduce expenditure and income equally by some $0.8 million per year.)

155. Expenditure for 1962, however, is estimated at $39.2 million, or $5.6 million in excess of estimated income. As explained in the introduction to this report, the Agency's three-year plan of expanding vocational training, improving education, increasing university scholarships and providing assistance to self-support is in a residual position with respect to funds available, i.e. the existing basic relief and education services must be provided for first. Consequently, any considerable deficit in income in 1962 would force the Agency to halt the implementation of its three-year plan, and possibly even to close training centres now being constructed. In the opinion of the Director this would be a tragedy in terms of the thwarted hopes of young refugees and in terms of wasted effort.

156. But the problem is even more serious than this. The cost of existing relief and education operations is already, at $36.6 million, well beyond the figure of $33.6 million estimated income. Failure of contributions in 1962 to cover all or a major part of the presently estimated deficit of $5.6 million could force the Agency to curtail some of its existing operations, at great risk of disturbing the peace and stability of the area in which the Agency operates.

157. During 1961, income has failed to cover the Agency's expenditure on existing operations and working capital has had to be drawn on heavily to cover the deficit. At the end of 1961, working capital will stand at the estimated figure of only $17.3 million. This represents roughly the cost of six months' operation of existing services and, in the Director's opinion, is the bare minimum required below which it would not be prudent to go. It will therefore be impossible to continue to draw down working capital to cover any deficit of income in 1962.

158. As stated in the introduction to this report, the Director will undertake to obtain further contributions from extra-budgetary sources of $1 million per year for the vocational training programme for each of the years 1962 and 1963. This amount, added to the $1 million the Agency expects to receive from usual sources other than governmental contributions, leaves a total of $37.2 million to come from ontributions by Governments, an increase of $4.6 million above the current level of such contributions.

159. The Agency therefore trusts that the General Assembly will, if it approves the budget presented in the preceding paragraphs, endeavour to provide the Agency with contributions totalling at least $37.2 million in 1962. This amount should enable the Agency to cover its budget for 1962, with respect both to the continuation of existing relief and education services and to the implementation of the three-year plan so auspiciously commenced in 1961.

Footnotes


1Information concerning the origin of the Agency and its mission and work prior to 1 July 1960 will be found in the following annual reports and other United Nations documents:

A. Final report of the United Nations Economic Survey Mission for the Middle East (28 December 1949) (A/AC.25/6, parts I and II).

B. Report of the Secretary-General on Assistance to Palestine Refugees: Official Records of the General Assembly, Fourth Session. Ad Hoc Political Committee, Annexes, vol. II, p. 14 (A/1060).
C. Reports of the Director of UNRWA and special reports of the Director and Advisory Commission to the General Assembly:
(a) Official Records of the General Assembly, Fifth Session, Supplement No. 19 (A/1451/Rev. 1);
(b) Ibid., Sixth Session, Supplements Nos. 16 and 16A (A/1905 and Add.1);
(c) Ibid., Seventh Session, Supplements Nos. 13 and 13A (A/2171 and Add.1);
(d) Ibid., Eighth Session, Supplements Nos. 12 and 12A (A/2470 and Add.1);
(e) Ibid., Ninth Session, Supplements Nos. 17 and 17A (A/2717 and Add.1);
(f) Ibid., Tenth Session, Supplements Nos. 15, 15A and 15B (A/2978 and Add.1);
(g) Ibid., Eleventh Session, Supplements Nos. 14 and 14A (A/3212 and Add.1);
(h) Ibid., Twelfth Session, Supplement No. 14 (A/3686 and A/3735);
(i) Ibid., Thirteenth Session, Supplement No. 14 (A/3931 and A/3948);
(j) Ibid., Fourteenth Session, Supplement No. 14 (A/4213);
(k) Ibid., Fifteenth Session, Supplement No. 14 (A/4478).
D. Pertinent General Assembly resolutions:
194 (III) of 11 December 1948; 212 (III) of 19 November 1948; 302 (IV) of 8 December 1949; 393 (V) of 2 December 1950; 513 (VI) of 26 January 1952; 614 (VII) of 6 November 1952; 720 (VIII) of 27 November 1953; 818 (IX) of 4 December 1954; 916 (X) of 3 December 1955; 1018 (XI) of 28 February 1957; 1191 (XII) of 12 December 1957; 1315 (XIII) of 12 December 1958; 1456 (XIV) of 9 December 1959; 1604 (XV) of 21 April 1961.

2See Official Records of the General Assembly, Fifteenth Session, Supplement No. 14 (A/4478), part III.

3 Ibid.
4 Ibid., para. 22.

5 See General Assembly resolution 1315 (XIII) and previous resolutions.




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