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UNITED
NATIONS
A

      General Assembly
A/5214
30 June 1962

ANNUAL REPORT
OF THE COMMISSIONER-GENERAL
OF THE UNITED NATIONS RELIEF AND WORKS AGENCY FOR PALESTINE REFUGEES IN THE NEAR EAST
1 July 1961 - 30 June 1962

GENERAL ASSEMBLY
OFFICIAL RECORDS: SEVENTEENTH SESSION
SUPPLEMENT No. 14 (A/5214)

UNITED NATIONS
New York, 1962










TABLE OF CONTENTS
Page
Letter of transmittal
v
Letter from the Chairman of the Advisory Commission of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East
vi
INTRODUCTION
1
PART I. REPORT ON UNRWA OPERATIONS, 1 JULY 1961-30 JUNE 1962
7
Annex to part I
Tables
1-6
Statistics concerning registered population and camps
17
7
Basic rations
20
8-11
Social welfare
21
12-16
Health statistics
22
17-18
Supplementary feeding
24
19-23
General education and university scholarships
25
24-25
Vocational and teacher training
27
26-30
Finance
28
31
UNRWA personnel
34
PART II. BUDGET FOR THE CALENDAR YEAR 1963
35
Appendix. Location map of UNRWA activities at end of volume
LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL
Beirut, Lebanon
27 August 1962

Sir,

I have the honour to submit herewith my Annual Report to the General Assembly on the work of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East for the period 1 July 1961 to 30 June 1962, in compliance with the request contained in paragraph 21 of resolution 302 (IV) of 8 December 1949 and paragraph 8 of resolution 1315 (XIII) of 12 December 1958.

The report is presented in three main parts, as follows:

An Introduction, in which I have endeavoured to evaluate the present condition of the Palestine refugees and their need for continued international assistance in the light of certain factors which I consider relevant to any general review of the problem;

Part I, representing an account of the Agency's activities during the 12 montl1s ending 30 June 1962, to which are annexed a number of statistical tables relating to particular activities; and

Part II, a presentation of the Agency's budget for the calendar year 1963 for consideration by the General Assembly at its seventeenth session.

The Advisory Commission of the Agency has considered this report and its views are set forth in the letter of which I attach a copy.

As in previous years, I have attempted in the introduction to my report to sketch in the salient features of the Palestine refugee problem as they appear to me from my standpoint as the head of the United Nations agency which ministers to the needs of the Palestine refugees. I have done this because I feel it is a duty which I owe to the General Assembly, especially in a year when the Assembly has to decide whether international assistance to the refugees should be continued for a period beyond 30 June 1963.

In thus highlighting the main features of the refugee problem as they appear to me, I am pursuing a precedent long established in the annual reports submitted by those entrusted with the direction of this Agency. It is perhaps hardly necessary for me to emphasize that the assessment is my own and that I accept full and sole responsibility for it. Although in drafting this and other parts of the report I have had the benefit of comments and advice from the distinguished members of the Advisory Commission, it should not be thought that the report necessarily reflects the opinions of the Commission or that the Governments represented in the Commission necessarily subscribe to all the views I have expressed.

(Signed) John H. DAVIS
Commissioner-General
President of the General Assembly,
United Nations,
New York.

A LETTER FROM THE CHAIRMAN OF THE ADVISORY COMMISSION OF THE UNITED NATIONS RELIEF AND WORKS AGENCY FOR PALESTINE REFUGEES IN THE NEAR EAST

26 August 1962

Dear Dr. Davis,

At its meeting on 6 August 1962, the Advisory Commission of UNRWA reviewed with full consideration the annual report which you plan to submit to the seventeenth session of the General Assembly.

In the view of the Advisory Commission, the report accurately describes the valuable work carried out by the Agency during the period 1 July 1961 to 30 June 1962. It well reports progress on the three-year programme which you submitted to the General Assembly at its fifteenth session in 1960.

The Commission continues to consider the needs of the refugees as worthy of the most sympathetic attention of the world community. The Commission was also impressed by your diligence in securing additional contributions to the carrying out of UNRWA responsibilities, particularly with a view to supporting the vocational training programme.

Your proposed budget for the calendar year 1963 gives details of new expenditure in the event that the mandate of UNRWA is to be extended beyond 30 June, 1963. In their discussion of this and other aspects of the report, the members of the Commission reserved the position of their Governments.

In the view of the Commission your report will this year be of more than usual interest since the future of UNRWA and the general welfare of the refugees will be before the Assembly. My colleagues of the Advisory Commission join me in this expression of their views and in thanking you for your efforts in the preparation of this report.

Yours sincerely,
(Signed ) Amin HELMI EL TANI
Chairman, Advisory Commission
Dr. John H. Davis,
Commissioner-General ,
United Nations Relief and Work Agency,
Beirut
INTRODUCTION

1. This report by the Commissioner-General of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) follows the general pattern of previous annual reports.1 It contains a brief review of the main features of the Palestine refugee problem as they appear to the Commissioner-General, a summary of the Agency's activities during the year ending 30 June 1962, and the presentation of a budget for the year 1963.

2. This year the General Assembly of the United Nations, in addition to reviewing the Agency's activities during the past year and considering its budget for next year, must deliberate the fact that the mandate of UNRWA will expire as of 30 June 1963. To facilitate the work of the General Assembly in this respect and, at the same time, to hold this annual report to the traditional content and length, the Agency this year has undertaken background studies on each of the following subjects:

3. The purpose of these papers, which are being distributed to delegations as they are finished, is to set forth in concise form the record and experience of the Agency during the twelve-year period of its existence. In other words these studies, which review the material contained in successive annual reports, present a vertical picture of the Agency's operations through time on selected subjects, whereas each annual report presents a cross-section view for the period of a single year. Copies of these papers are available for distribution on request to other interested persons and organizations.
BACKGROUND

4. Looking back over the twelve years of UNRWA's existence (or for that matter, over the fourteen years which have passed since the conflict in Palestine), it now seems quite clear that the dominant forces responsible for the continuation of the refugee problem are the impasse in regard to the basic issues involved, resulting from the deep feelings of the peoples in the Middle East with respect to those issues; the general unemployable status of dependent refugees, and particularly of the maturing youth who are deficient in skills; and the over-all economic limitations of the host countries on absorbing refugees in addition to their own growing populations. While political considerations also have played a significant role, to a large degree they appear to have been an expression of the more basic factors just mentioned.

5. With respect to the feelings of the inhabitants of the Arab countries of the Middle East, it is, in the opinion of the Commissioner-General, the Arab people as a whole, and not just the million-odd displaced refugees, who feel deeply that an injustice has been committed against the Arabs of Palestine. As they view the situation, they see a country obliterated and a people uprooted and dispossessed, a majority of whom have been subjected to conditions which have deprived them of their means of livelihood and left them dependent for fourteen years on international charity. The physical privation the refugees have suffered is illustrated by the fact that the per capita assistance they have received has averaged less than $30 a year for each refugee. Perhaps even worse has been the psychological damage inflicted on them by their prolonged dependence on charity. As one would expect, such an experience inevitably has had a corroding effect on the personality, the outlook and the self-respect of the individuals involved. Looked at from any standpoint, the lot of the Palestine refugees during the past fourteen years constitutes a tragic page in human history.

6. In 1962, as in previous years, the Palestine refugees have continued to demand the implementation, as yet unrealized, of the provisions of paragraph 11 of General Assembly resolution 194 (III) of December 1948, which states:

7. Turning to the second of the factors previously noted, to understand the consequences of the unemployable status of refugees and particularly youth who lack skills, one needs to understand the nature and composition of the refugee population and the changes which are taking place through time. In 1948, the Arab population of Palestine was about 70 per cent rural and 30 per cent urban. Among the refugees a high percentage of the urban workers (approximately two-thirds) possessed skills needed in the Arab countries and, therefore, were able to find employment after their displacement. These and their dependents, in total about 20 per cent of those who were displaced, have never become dependent on UNRWA or other charity. The remainder, composed mostly of farmers and some small businessmen and unskilled workers, did become dependent on UNRWA (together with the sick and the old) because they found no opportunity for employment.

8. Currently, of the total refugee population served by UNRWA, about half are adults and half children, if one uses the age of seventeen as the point of differentiation. With respect to the future, for each year that the Palestine problem continues unresolved, another forty thousand babies will be born to refugee parents and about thirty thousand individuals will attain adulthood within the refugee community.

9. Traditionally in the Middle East, as in much of the world, the oncoming generation has acquired its skills by working with the parent or some other adult family member. Along with this experience comes the development of self-discipline and the acquiring of work habits and basic skills which anyone must possess to be productive and employable. The tragedy of the young refugee adults is that most of their parents have not been working, and therefore it has not been possible for them to acquire their parents' skills. Even worse, a high percentage have not learned the habits and self-discipline which are a prerequisite to working. The result is that these young persons are not just unemployed, but many are virtually unemployable as well. Furthermore, the task of rehabilitating a young man of twenty or twenty-five years of age thus handicapped is far more difficult and expensive than that of training a lad of fifteen or sixteen years. Moreover, when a choice between them has to be made, because funds for training both types of persons are not available, the decision will naturally fall to the younger person since training him puts the scarce funds to better use.

10. Therefore it would seem that a high percentage of the young refugees who have grown to adulthood during the past fourteen years are destined to be handicapped for life, even when they have placed before them what to persons with normal backgrounds would be challenging opportunities. In this connexion it should be remembered that, today, only two out of every five adults dependent on UNRWA were adults in Palestine, the remaining three-fifths having attained adulthood as refugees. By and large the generation of refugees now maturing will never be able to compete successfully for work as farmers against the competition of native rural sons who have had the advantage of working with their farmer fathers as they grew up, and particularly so in view of the fact that throughout the Middle East, as indeed throughout the world, the number of farmers relative to the total population is rapidly decreasing. Thus, the unemployable status of young refugee adults ,has been and is a major factor contributing to the plight of the Palestine refugees.

11. Finally, if for the sake of analysis, the political aspects of the Palestine problem and the lack of suitable skills on the part of the maturing refugee youth are put aside and if one looks specifically to the capacity of the host countries to absorb the refugee population, in addition to providing for their own rapidly growing native population, one cannot but be struck by the limitations of this capacity. In previous annual reports the head of the Agency has stated his considered judgement that a major proportion of the refugees must cross an international boundary if they are to find suitable employment without resort on the part of host countries to uneconomic investment of considerable magnitude. Events of the past year have merely served to strengthen this conclusion.

12. The frustrated attempts of UNRWA during its initial years in sponsoring work projects to settle refugees and the virtually fruitless outcome of past broader efforts, under other auspices, to negotiate a settlement of the Palestine problem, strongly suggest that these undertakings have failed because they have been unacceptable to the people (refugee and non-refugee) indigenous to the region and to the Governments which represent them. It is the considered opinion of the Commissioner-General that these feelings of the Arab people run as deep today as at any time in the past, and therefore that, at least for as long as there is no substantial progress towards the implementation of paragraph 11 of General Assembly resolution 194 (III), UNRWA should not again attempt works projects designed to settle the refugees. From this experience one should not conclude that economic development is not wanted by the people of the region. On the contrary, it is wanted and at an accelerated rate but not in the context of refugee resettlement.

13. No doubt in the future, as in the past, some degree of economic and social absorption of the refugees and their descendants into Arab countries may take place, despite the obstacles just described and even if the present stalemate over the Palestine problem persists. However, it would be a mistake, in the opinion of the Commissioner-General, to assume that such absorption, of itself, would dispose of the underlying more basic issues of the Palestine problem. It is the depth of feeling among the peoples of the Middle East on these issues and the resulting impasse, far more than the continued existence and dependent status of a million Palestine refugees, per se, that today continue to undermine peace and stability in the Middle East and in the world.
THE AGENCY’S THREE-YEAR PROGRAMME

14. Since the beginning of its three-year mandate on 1 July l960, the Agency has concentrated on assistance to young refugees for the purpose of giving as many of them as possible the training which will enable them to put to useful purpose the talents with which they have been richly endowed. The Agency considers this particular programme not only vital for these young people, but important as a contribution to regional technical and economic progress. To this end, the Agency has held relief assistance (in food, shelter welfare and health care) to the low per capita level of 1960 and concentrated all available resources on the expansion and improvement of its education programme. It has also continued to make some small grants and loans to assist qualified refugees who have sought to become self-employed, but the Agency has not undertaken any specific development projects.

15. UNRWA has striven to keep in harmony with the general educational trends in the host countries by providing facilities for an ever-increasing enrolment by recruiting and training better qualified teachers, and by extending by one year the period of schooling at the preparatory level. Even more fundamental has been the Agency's accelerated effort in the fields of vocational and teacher training, where it has expanded its four older institutions and now has, either completed or under preparation seven new training centres, one beyond the number originally contemplated. This last training centre is strategically important to the total vocational programme of the Agency in that it will provide training for vocational instructors and industrial foremen, and thus help to improve the quality of the teaching and practice of industrial skills generally. The total number of places available in the Agency's eleven training centres and in the courses subsidized by the Agency in other non-UNRWA training institutions will be 4,400 in 1963 and the number of graduates will in due course reach 2,200 a year.

16. Another phase of the Agency's education expansion and improvement programme is that of increasing the number of university scholarships to be awarded from the 1960 level of 350 to a new level of 500 per year. In effect, this enables UNRWA to assist about 125 beginner students per year in Middle East universities, in contrast to the 90 scholarships for the academic year 1959-1900. Largely by virtue of the students' own choice, there has been heavy concentration of these university students in the fields of engineering, medicine and the sciences.

17. The Commissioner-General is pleased to report that the programme for educational improvement and expansion is moving forward on schedule, both in its entirety and in its respective components, and that in some respects it is even ahead of schedule. By 30 June 1963 the total three-year programme to assist young refugee adults, as originally envisioned, will have been implemented and in addition the extra unit, already noted, for teaching vocational instructors and foremen will be ready for operation.
RELATIONS WITH HOST GOVERNMENTS AND UNITED NATIONS ORGANIZATIONS AND NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS


18. The Commissioner-General is pleased to report that relations between UNRWA and the host Governments have continued on the whole to be good. As in the past, the host Governments themselves have done much to help the refugees in terms of rendering direct assistance in health, education, welfare, administration and related services, and in providing the essential land, water and security protection. The direct financial burden of the host countries for these services during the past year has been in excess of $5.6 million. For the period from 1948 to the present the Arab countries and Arab voluntary organizations report a total expenditure in excess of $55 million in assistance to the refugees, of which more than $8 million has been provided to UNRWA and its predecessor, the United Nations Relief for Palestine Refugees, in the form of cash and services.

19. The cordial working relations between UNRWA and other United Nations bodies operating in the Middle East have continued over the past year. Particularly valuable has been the close co-operation with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization and the World Health Organization, both of which have seconded skilled personnel to the Agency and recently a similar arrangement has been started with the International Labour Organisation. Also, UNRWA has maintained its co-operative relations with the United Nations Emergency Force, the United Nations Truce Supervision Organization, and the United Nations Children's Fund. In addition, it has sought to facilitate the work of the Conciliation Commission for Palestine and stands ready to co-operate appropriately as provided for in paragraph 20 of General Assembly resolution 302 (IV).

20. During the past year, as in previous years, the voluntary agencies that function in the Middle East have administered effectively to the needs of the refugees, particularly in respect of clothing gifts and services related to health, education and welfare. These services, which are supplementary to the relief aid of UNRWA, have been invaluable in terms of adding to the well-being of the refugees and other claimants for relief. In total these agencies, as a group, report expenditure in excess of $17 million in direct aid to refugees and other claimants since 1948.
FINANCES

21. For technical reasons related to budget and financial control, the Commissioner-General m his annual reports has consistently projected the Agency's three-year programme, concerning the present mandate period, in terms of budgets based on UNRWA's fiscal year (calendar year), even though the mandate period itself extends from 1 July 1960 to 30 June 1963. In the discussion that follows occasional reference will be made to the period beyond 30 June 1963. This is done not to argue either for or against an extension, but in the interest of clarity and particularly to indicate the implications of the 1963 budget for the future should the mandate of UNRWA be extended. Should the General Assembly desire to deliberate in terms of a budget covering only the period from 1 January to 30 June 1963, this can be done, for general purposes, by dividing in two each item in the fiscal year budget herewith submitted.

22. Throughout the period of its current three-year plan the Agency seems destined to face a critical financial situation by reason of the fact that its needs for education and training are constantly increasing, whereas its regular income from government contributions and other sources is almost stationary. To facilitate analysis and comparisons the following table presents in summary form the Agency's actual financial operating statement for 1961 and its estimated operating budgets for 1962 and 1963 (see part II of the report for details of the 1963 budget) as well as totals covering the three years as a whole:

1961 Actual expenditures
1962
1963
Total for three years
Estimated budget
Expenditures (and commitments)
(In millions of dollars)
Relief services
26.2
26.3
26.3
78.8
Elementary and secondary education.
7.6
8.0
9.1
24.7
Vocational and university education
5.0
2.9
3.4
11.3
Individual assistance
0.2
0.2
0.4
TOTAL
39.0
37.4
38.8a
115.2a
Income
Regular income
Regular government pledges
33.5
33.6
33 6b
100.7
Other regular income
1.5
0.9
0.9
3.3
35.0
34.5
34.5
104.0
Special income
World Refugee Year and related income
4.1c
0.2
4.3
Vocational training centre and teacher-training centre training scholarships and related income
1.5
1.2
2.7
TOTAL
39.1
36.2
35.7
111.0
Excess of expenditure over income
(0.1)
1.2
3.1
4.2

a Excluding operational reserve of $0.8 million in the budget for 1963.
b For presentation Government pledges are assumed at same level as for 1962.
c $2.4 million of this was actually received in 1960 but was not used until 1961

23. As the table indicates, during this three-year period the Agency expects to expend about $11 million in excess of its anticipated receipts from regular income sources. The necessity of spending beyond current receipts from regular contributions in order to meet the urgent need to expand and improve educational and training programmes was, of course, explained at each of the last two sessions of the General Assembly by the Commissioner-General, and no objections were registered. The Commissioner-General also announced in the fifteenth session that he would undertake to raise at least $4 million from extra-budgetary sources and, after $4.5 million had actually been received, stated at the sixteenth session that he would undertake to raise a further $2 million from extra-budgetary sources before 30 June 1963. To date, about $5.5 million has been raised from extra-budgetary sources, most of it by taking advantage of the World Refugee Year and from donations for scholarships, and it is now the expectation of the Commissioner-General that he will be able to raise an additional $1.5 million before 30 June 1963. This means that the Agency is now committing itself to raise a total of $7 million from extra budgetary sources during the three-year mandate period instead of the $6.5 million set forth in last year's annual report. Parenthetically it should be noted that this amount equals substantially the total cost of the construction and operation of the expanded vocational and teacher training programme throughout the three-year mandate period, and that without this income such expansion would have been impossible. However, even if the goal of $7 million is attained in full, the Agency will still have spent by the end of 1963 approximately $4 million in excess of anticipated total receipts from all sources during the three-year mandate period. This deficit the Agency is having to cover by drawing down its limited working capital reserve. This course of action will have brought the working capital reserve to a critically low level by the end of 1963, which means that a policy of spending in excess of annual receipts could not be followed for long, if at all, beyond that date.

24. The Commissioner-General considers it unlikely that following 30 June 1963 he would be able to obtain funds for UNRWA from non-governmental organizations on the same scale as he has done in the past because the large donations received as a result of the World Refugee Year were of a one-time nature and no repetition of that effort is contemplated. This, then, means that UNRWA must look almost entirely to Governments for funds, it its mandate is extended.

25. For the Agency's 1963 fiscal year the Commissioner-General proposes to hold relief expenditures at the same aggregate level as for 1962, i.e. $26.3 million. While this will entail a tight relief policy, the Agency believes it can. be carried out without resort to any reduction in the per capita level of services to needy refugees or change in the basic definition of a refugee In the short run, at least, the Commissioner-General foresees little opportunity of significantly reducing the relief costs of UNRWA. Naturally, if substantial progress is made toward an over-all solution to the refugee problem, that would certainly open the way for a reduction in relief costs. The only relief items which run in excess of $1 million per year are food and health services. Looking first at food, which is by far the largest item, any savings made during the next year, at least, by eliminating the dead and false registrants from the rolls will be offset by adding to the rolls names from the waiting lists of eligible children who currently are denied rations owing to the ceilings which the Agency has had to impose on a country-by-country basis in order to keep expenditure on rations under control.

26. To attempt to cut health expenditures (including preventive and curative services, supplementary feeding and environmental sanitation), which currently are at the minimum rate of about 1/ U.S. cents per person per day, in the absence of progress towards a solution to the refugee problem, would run the serious risk of increased morbidity and mortality, especially among vulnerable groups such as children and pregnant and lactating women. Curative medical services. the largest component in the health budget, must continue to be given high priority, both on merit and because of the importance which public opinion today attaches to the treatment of the sick. Any cutback in preventive services would not only affect adversely the programme for maternal and child health, but force a relaxation in the control of communicable disease. Such a policy would be short-sighted in that it would increase the possibility of an epidemic, something which has hitherto been avoided.

27. For education, including training, the Agency proposes to expend a total of $12.5 million in 1963. Within this total, sufficient priority will be given to the vocational training and teacher-training centres to keep them operating at capacity. Actually, for the six-month period 1 January to 30 June 1963 most of the funds needed for this purpose are expected to come from donations for scholarships and other special contributions now being solicited, but for the latter half of the year (assuming the Agency's mandate is extended), UNRWA will have to look to Governments for the support of this function.

28. From the facts just stated it is apparent that the main impact of any substantial shortfall in the Agency's income during 1963 is bound to fall on general education which would have to be cut back in order to offset at least the greater part of the deficit. Should government contributions in 1963 be substantially the same as in 1962, then a shortfall of $3.1 million will occur which will force the Agency to cut general education by as much as one-third. To do this the Agency would of necessity, have to cut deepest into education at the preparatory and secondary levels. This, in turn, would dry up the source of candidates for vocational and teacher training for years beyond 1963, with the result that the Agency's whole programme to help young refugee adults would founder. Such a development would spell tragedy to the individuals to whom education was denied and would make still more difficult the whole refugee problem.

29. Therefore, in the opinion of the Commissioner-General, it is imperative that the full budget of UNRWA be covered for 1963. To do this will require contributions of nearly $37 million from Governments, as shown by the following table (see part II of the resort for details).

(In millions of U.S. dollars)
Total budget (including operational reserve of $0.8 million)
39.6
Deduct
Miscellaneous regular income
0.9
Special contributions expected
1.2
From working capital (in the event the operational reserve is required to be used)
0.8
2.9
Balance required to be contributed by Governments
36.7

This would represent an increase over 1962 of $3 million in regular contributions from Governments, or a relative increase of about 9 per cent.

30. Parenthetically, the Commissioner-General points out that, in considering this critically important question of UNRWA's budget needs, Governments should note an inherent difference in the nature of expenditures for relief and for education. Whereas significant progress towards a solution to the Palestine refugee problem should have the effect of correspondingly reducing the relief needs of refugees, the educational needs of these people would, even in those circumstances, still continue to exist. Therefore, a satisfactory solution to the problem would merely mean an ultimate shift of the burden of education to the Governments of the countries in which the refugees then reside rather than any reduction in such costs. Moreover, in line with the general educational trends of the region. it is logical to expect that, in the future, educational costs for refugees (or former refugees) will gradually increase rather than decline as a higher percentage of children go to school and as they remain in school for more years.

31. The Commissioner-General therefore appeals to Member Governments to contemplate the tragic consequences that would follow any policy that would force a cutback in the educational opportunities provided for Palestine refugee children. The countries where these refugees now reside are themselves confronted with an explosion of demand for educational facilities on behalf of their own native population, and already their resources are being severely strained as they strive to meet this demand. In these circumstances they have found it virtually impossible to provide sufficient educational opportunity for refugee children, and it is for this reason that UNRWA has found it necessary to engage in and support education for the refugee children. Actually, UNRWA has assumed this role with considerable reluctance and it is only recently that the educational opportunities provided for refugee children have even approached those provided for non-refugees in the same countries. If, therefore, UNRWA were compelled in 1963 to cut back drastically and suddenly its educational function, this would mean retrogression in terms of educational opportunities and would further complicate the refugee problem.

32. Already a few Governments, recognizing the critical financial needs of UNRWA, are supplementing their regular contributions by grants from their technical assistance funds in support of vocational training. These Governments have done so only after sending their own teams of experts to the Middle East in response to UNRWA's invitation to survey the Agency’s operations and needs. In extending such an invitation the agency requested that assistance be given only if, in the judgement of the survey experts, UNRWA's programme merited support in competition with other technical assistance projects already before the respective Governments. The Commissioner-General now urges any other Governments which have available funds for technical assistance to consider taking similar action.
CONCLUSION

33. UNRWA now performs the dual function of administering relief to Palestine refugees, in the form of food, health, welfare and shelter assistance, and of providing education for refugee children and young adults, including general education, vocational and teacher training and university scholarships. Its direct responsibility is to minister to the pressing needs of refugees and its by-product role, so to speak, is to contribute to the stability of the Middle East. It is not UNRWA's responsibility, as delineated by the General Assembly, to solve the Palestine problem in its broader aspects, and, in the opinion of the Commissioner-General, experience has indicated that, at least pending progress towards a general solution, UNRWA is not an appropriate agency to attempt works projects to provide rehabilitation. Currently, UNRWA faces a critical financial problem because its educational costs are increasing whereas its regular income has remained stationary.

34. During the present mandate period the Agency has struggled to meet this problem by holding relief costs to the low level of 1960; by raising funds from extra-budgetary sources for the construction and operation of the expanded vocational and teacher-training centres; and by drawing down its operating reserves by some $4 million to cover the expanding needs and costs of basic education. Only by resorting to these extraordinary measures has the Agency been able to carry forward its three-year programme to assist refugee children and young adults in preparing for useful lives. For reasons already explained, these extraordinary measures cannot be relied upon in the future as a means of supplementing the Agency's income.

35. With respect to the mandate of UNRWA, which expires as of 30 June 1963, it is the considered judgement of the Commissioner-General that both the relief and educational functions now performed by the Agency must be continued well beyond 30 June 1963 if deserving refugees are not to suffer physically or be denied much-needed educational opportunities and if reasonable stability is to exist in the region. Whether the General Assembly considers that these services can best be rendered by an extension of the Agency's mandate or by some other means, any significant cutback in the magnitude of these services must, of necessity, be related to progress towards a general solution of the refugee problem.

36. The Commissioner-General takes this opportunity to convey to the Member Governments which are represented in the General Assembly, and particularly those which have consistently contributed to the Agency's budget, his sincere appreciation for the support and co-operation which they have accorded. He also takes this opportunity to appeal to Member States who so far have not contributed to reconsider their position and accept a share of responsibility towards the Palestine refugees.
Part I
REPORT ON UNRWA OPERATIONS, 1 JULY 1961-30 JUNE 1962
A. The provision of relief

37. There has been no essential change in the Agency's relief services since 1950. The basic ration has remained virtually the same, and the supplementary feeding programme has assisted the same proportion of the refugees during the past seven years. The Agency's programme of operations, during its three-year mandate to 30 June 1963, as renewed in 1959,2 has presupposed the maintenance of existing per capita levels of relief services, with increases in total expenditure to cover only such factors as the natural increase in the refugee population.
BASIC RATIONS

38. Almost 40 per cent of the Agency's relief budget (of approximately $25.3 million a year) is devoted to the primary task of the supply and distribution of basic food commodities. During 1961-1962 the Agency imported some 111,000 tons of flour and 29,000 tons of other foodstuffs. The basic ration consists of flour, pulses, sugar, rice, and oils and fats. It provides 1,500 calories per day in summer and 1,600 in winter, and a total vegetable protein content of approximately 42 and 44 grammes respectively. This meagre and unvarying basic ration provides only a bare minimum of subsistence. Continued over a long period of years such a diet becomes scarcely tolerable unless it is supplemented or varied in some way. No fresh food items are supplied but refugees usually manage to supplement their rations with a little meat, fruit, vegetables, eggs, etc., either grown by themselves or bartered for part of their dry rations, or bought with their limited earnings.
NUMBERS, ELIGIBILITY AND REGISTRATION

39. During the past twelve months, the number of refugees registered with the Agency increased by about 24,000 to a total on 30 June 1962 of 1,174,760, of whom 877,888 were registered for full UNRWA assistance, including basic rations, and 296,872 were registered for various degrees of assistance but no basic rations. Table 1 of the annex contains the Agency's basic registration statistics for the entire period of June 1950 to June 1962. It may be observed that, while the Agency inherited ration rolls with some 960,000 ration beneficiaries in June 1950, by June 1962 the corresponding figure was 877,888. Table 2 indicates the distribution of refugees by country of residence, category of registration and age groups on 30 June 1962.

40. During 1961-1962 the following changes of entitlement were effected: 34,189 were removed from the rolls because of death, false and duplicate registration, self-support, absence, etc.; 48,545 were added to or re-instated on the rolls, including 42,470 children. Not all the changes in registration involved changes in entitlement to rations and the net increase in the number of ration beneficiaries as compared with 1960-1961 was 7,622. Table 3 of the annex gives a comprehensive picture of changes in the composition and entitlement of families registered for rations during the twelve-year period of July 1950 to June 1962. Table 4 gives information regarding the total registered population.

41. Since the beginning of its operations in May 1950, the Agency has recognized that its rolls have contained large inaccuracies with regard both to those ineligible for assistance who receive it and those who are eligible but who do not receive assistance. Many of these inaccuracies existed when the Agency took over the rolls of its predecessor organization, the United Nations Relief for Palestine Refugees. The Agency has reported to the Assembly on many occasions, notably in 1950-1951, at the very outset of the refugee problem and in 1954, 1955, 1959, 1960 and 1961, on the progress made through its routine processes in rectifying the ration rolls.3 Since 1950 these routine processes have resulted in the removal of more than 425,000 names from the Agency's ration rolls, as indicated in table 3 of the Annex.

42. As the Agency has pointed out on a number of occasions, with regard to this sensitive and complicated problem, the possibility of achieving substantial results in rectifying the rolls and placing relief on the basis of established individual need rather than on the basis of an assumption that anyone who has the status of a registered refugee is thereby both eligible for and in need of relief, depends on the co-operation of the refugees as well as of the host Governments. In resolution 1456 (XIV) of 9 December 1959, the General Assembly called upon the host Governments to co-operate more closely with the Agency in the rectification of the rolls. In 1960 the Agency reported some progress in this endeavor. During 1961 efforts were concentrated on eliminating the names of non-existent persons from the rolls, while at the same time issuing rations to children who had been registered for services but were not receiving them so far.

43. The Agency's current policy is to hold relief services at the current per capita level and at the aggregate expenditure level of 1962; and to concentrate, in accordance with resolution 1456 (XIV), on the three-year programme for expanding vocational training. UNRWA field directors, working' within the framework of this general policy and in co-operation with the host Governments, are striving to remove false and duplicated registrations and the names of the dead, and for each name so eliminated the name of a needy eligible refugee (usually that of a child) is being added. The problem of removing the names of those who have sufficient income to support themselves is more complex and only limited progress has been made up to this time.

44. During 1961-1962, the Agency's efforts to rectify the rolls in Jordan and Syria were somewhat delayed owing to political developments, involving administrative changes in the ministries concerned with refugee affairs in those countries. In Jordan, where some half of the refugees are living and the problem of rectification is largest numerically, there has been some increase in the rate of rectification, despite continued resistance brought about by suspicion of UNRWA's motives on the part of the refugees. During the period since the current efforts were started in October 1960, some 20,000 rations, representing dead, false and duplicate registrations and absentees were cancelled, with the simultaneous issue of rations to eligible refugee children who before were receiving only services.

45. In Lebanon the Government, with assistance from UNRWA, carried out during the year under review a complete census of the refugee population, dealing first with those living outside the Agency's camps and later with those living in camps. Although the problem of rectification of the rolls is numerically much smaller than in Jordan, the success of this special operation, together with the Agency's routine eligibility procedures, is producing significant results. While the complete data will be available only at the end of 1962, thus far some 3,200 rations have been cancelled, 1,500 of which were due to the census operation. In the Gaza Strip, joint action by the Government and the Agency to verify the existence of elderly refugees and the presence of refugees believed to be absent from the Strip has eliminated some 3,500 names from the rolls and allowed an approximately equivalent number of children on the waiting list to be inscribed. No special progress was made in Syria.

46. As noted above, on an over-all basis, the total deletion of ineligibles, including persons who had become self-supporting, has resulted in the removal of 34,189 names from the ration rolls in 1961-1962, as compared with 20,694 during 1960-1961.

47. It should be noted that in the past year the Agency has continued to be under pressure to provide assistance to the so-called "economic refugees" and to similar "other claimants for relief" (estimated at 317,000) who fail on technical grounds to satisfy the Agency's present relief criteria. Virtually the only assistance these people have received has been the services given to them in the fields of relief and education by the host Governments and voluntary agencies and, in particular, the distribution of United States surplus foodstuffs to them through the host Governments and voluntary agencies. There are, moreover, tens of thousands of eligible refugee children who are now denied relief as a result of budgetary limitations, which in turn necessitate a ceiling on the number of rations distributed in each country. Budgetary considerations have also necessitated a very strict limitation on providing assistance to refugees who, though originally self-supporting, have now become destitute, owing to age, sickness or lack of work.
CAMPS AND SHELTER

48. The steady increase in the population in the Agency's fifty-seven official camps, noted in annual reports since 1959, has continued.4 The number of refugees living in UNRWA camps by 30 June 1962 was i 456,400, or about 40 per cent of the total. The only substantial change in the numbers was due to the natural increase in the refugee population.

49. The fact that some 60 per cent of the refugees do not live in UNRWA official camps does not imply that, as a group, these particular refugees are self-supporting. The primary reason they do not live in the UNRWA camps is that they were not brought into them immediately after their displacement from Palestine and that they found such shelter as was available in other places. If some had small reserves, long since exhausted, they often may have preferred to rent a room or accept the hospitality of friends or relatives rather than face the rigours of the primitive arid overcrowded refugee camps in the earlier years. These people have been dependent on rations and other Agency services from the beginning, and the constant pressure for admissions into Agency official camps which, for physical and financial reasons cannot be met, speaks for itself. Nor in general is there any evident distinction in regard to well-being or employment opportunities between those who do live in Agency camps and those who do not.

50. The Agency continued to maintain 57 camps during 1961-1962, as noted above, with 25 in Jordan, 16 in Lebanon, and 8 each in the Gaza Strip and the Syrian Arab Republic. In Lebanon, land was obtained for the extension of one camp, which has long been needed, and plans for construction are in progress. Because of the need of assurances that refugees will not reoccupy vacated areas, construction of a new camp to house the refugees living in deplorable conditions in the old Jewish quarter of Jerusalem has not begun. In the Gaza Strip, construction to reduce overcrowding in two camps has continued.

51. The amount of construction during the year has continued to decrease, and over the three-year period of 1959-1962, it may be observed, construction costs, including maintenance and road works, have averaged $550,000, as compared with an average expenditure of $625,000 for 1958. The decrease has occurred, despite the increase in the population of the camps, largely because the tent replacement programme was completed at the beginning of 1960.

52. In general most older camps are becoming seriously crowded due to the establishment of new family units at time of marriage and the tendency of squatters to crowd into and around camps - particularly those located near larger villages and cities.
CLOTHING

53. During the second year of the new clothing programme, designed to minimize omissions and duplications, under which each refugee received 1.7 kilogrammes of clothing, a further saving of $50,000 was achieved in the transportation of clothing made available by voluntary agencies. Used shoes and other articles for which there was no demand were eliminated from the issues of clothing and refugees suffering special hardship are being given shoes made by refugee shoemakers, the cost being met from savings on the overseas freight of clothing. The voluntary agencies, moreover, have been most helpful in obtaining from contributors better quality clothing more suitable items, and a larger proportion of men's garments. While this programme has thus been much improved, particularly in regard to quality, there still is need for more clothing of certain types and UNRWA is working with the contributing agencies to this end. In Syria the distribution of clothing which had been interrupted in 1959, but resumed in 1960, was restricted to refugees suffering special hardship.
SOCIAL WELFARE

54. Over the years, the Agency's social welfare services have been primarily concerned with helping refugees suffering special hardship. The Agency has also encouraged a revival of effort and self-help on a community basis through co-operatives, sewing and carpentry centres and youth activities centres. The field welfare staff have acted both as case workers and community development advisers. The primary welfare programmes are outlined below.
Youth activities programme

55. During the past two years the Agency has helped to promote youth activities in order to give young people something constructive to do in their idle hours. Now almost 800 younger men have benefited from courses in the Leadership Training Centre at Broumana Lebanon, established in 1960 with the co-operation of the World Alliance of YMCA's. Much of the cost of this effort has been borne by the YMCA Alliance and other donors. While originally these courses were conducted entirely at Broumana they are now being de-centralized. For example, in 1961, two-week sports training camps were conducted in Jordan, Lebanon and the Gaza Strip and in 1962 one-month training courses were held in Jordan and the Gaza Strip, at reduced cost despite an increase in the number of trainees. More than 400 trained and active volunteer leaders help to supervise 5,300 centre members, and there are 176 committees responsible for various activities, and 740 teams and interest groups. There are now 38 youth activities centres as compared with 26 in April, 1960, and those with adequate facilities have grown from 6 to 24. Twenty-one of these centres are under the direction of volunteer leaders.

56. The programme has proved increasingly effective in combating idleness, lethargy and low morale among refugee youth. In Jordan particularly, service committees have fostered a programme of practical service to fellow refugees, including door-to-door surveys of handicapped refugees, tree planting, laying out of small gardens, clearing drainage facilities after heavy rain, registering people for emergency inoculations, soliciting funds for camp road improvement, delivering mail, and visiting the old and sick. In the summer of 1962 the youth of twelve centres will carry out summer recreation programmes for more than 1,000 younger boys. There has also been a noticeable increase in membership initiative in improving centre facilities.
Adult training courses

57. From the very beginning of its work in 1950, the Agency has maintained, at comparatively small cost, short training courses in sewing for young women and in woodwork for young men which, although not sufficient to achieve self-support, train the women to sew clothes for themselves and their families and take orders for their neighbours, and the men to do odd jobs in the camps or the nearest town, or to get work as carpenter apprentices. Most applicants for woodwork training were those who lacked the qualifications for admission to the Agency's vocational training centres.

58. In response to popular demand, the number of courses has increased from year to year. During 1961-1962 the number of sewing centres grew to 37, and the first carpentry centre outside the Gaza Strip was opened at Karameh, Jordan. The sewing centres conduct a six-month course and accommodate 30 trainees, and the woodwork centres accommodate 20 trainees for a one-year course. During the year, 1,748 women completed the sewing courses, and 101 Gaza refugees completed the course in woodwork. In almost all these centres there is a long waiting list for future courses. In the Gaza Strip, it may be noted, the Near East Christian Council has established a professional dressmaking course for 20 trainees of the sewing centres.
Refugee co-operatives

59. In 1958 the Agency first introduced the co-operative concept to refugees as a concrete example of the possibilities of community effort. Sixteen registered co-operatives were in operation up to 1961. While two of these failed during the year, two new co-operatives were organized in Jordan, one in handicrafts and the other a bakery. The Agency particularly stressed the organization of small co-operatives (which have a value both from the educational and the practical point of view) in the schools and youth activities centres. Ten school savings co-operatives and four youth centre co-operatives were organized in Jordan and one school canteen each in Lebanon and the Gaza Strip. A list of currently operating co-operatives is contained in table 8 of the annex.
Hardship cases

60. Both within and outside the Agency's camps there are thousands of refugees who are incapable, owing to age, infirmity or some other disability, of helping themselves in any way. With $42,150, the Agency was able to assist 10,984 of the most needy families, while some 34,000 were given special distributions of clothing, blankets and firewood. Agency welfare workers assisted many other refugees through consultation on personal problems and helped to arrange the reunion of families still separated fourteen years after the Palestine conflict. An Agency survey is now being made to determine by category and by degree of need the number of those suffering special hardship or privation.
Small grants to individuals

61. Many refugees, who had minor trades before the Palestine conflict, have been unable to pursue them since that time because of lack of tools or equipment. During 1961-1962, with an expenditure of $8,850, some 200 refugees have been enabled to resume work and earn small sums.
Handicapped youth

62. This programme, which was inaugurated in 1958, is designed to assist blind, dumb, deaf and crippled refugee youth. During the past year funds for this purpose have been limited but, with the held of outside donations, it proved possible to continue the training of 96 refugees from previous years and to initiate the training of a further 29 new entrants.

63. Twenty-two of these handicapped refugees completed their training during the past year, and 14 are already at work. The cost of the average course of six years is $1,800. Eleven Middle East institutions have co-operated in the programme. The most important development in this field during the past year was the grant of the Pontifical Mission for Palestine of $60,000 for the construction and equipment of a Centre for the Blind in Gaza, with provision for the first two years' operation. The Centre, which is to be opened in October 1962, will provide education and vocational training for 60 blind children, refugees and non-refugees, and operate a home service for adult blind throughout the Gaza Strip.
B. Health services

64. During 1961-1962, there was no major change in the nature of the Agency's health services. Work was continued in the preventive and curative medical fields, on milk and supplementary feeding programmes, and on environmental sanitation, at a total cost of $5.5 million. Three priorities were established for 1962, i.e., (a) streamlining of medical care services; (b) studies and review of the nutritional status of the refugees; and (c) training and professional stimulation of the health staff. The World Health Organization continued to assist the Agency through technical advice and the secondment of personnel, one of whom served as the Agency's Director of Health. Implementation of the health programme, as in the past, was almost entirely effected by a staff recruited from among the Palestine refugees.

65. The success of the health programme has been materially enhanced by the generous and substantial special assistance of Governments, universities, voluntary agencies, United Nations agencies (particularly WHO), private firms and individuals. Such assistance has taken the form of personnel, free hospital beds, services in out-patient clinics, maternal and child health centres, assistance in immunization campaigns, medical supplies, vaccines, layettes and supplementary food supplies. Some funds have also been provided in this manner for the construction of clinics and maternal and child health centres. The programme of medical rehabilitation through the physical training of crippled children is made possible only through donations received for this specific purpose. Similarly, two voluntary societies have made available the skills of a group of orthopaedic surgeons on a carefully planned basis which permitted doctors to come to the area in rotation. Donations have also helped to provide scholarships for a number of refugee students, particularly in basic training as nurses.

66. Throughout this period the Agency purchased most of its medical supplies through UNICEF on a world tender basis. The system of decentralization of supplies, introduced in 1961, is now working smoothly. Direct shipment of supplies to the various fields has eliminated the need for storage at the Beirut base warehouse and made possible considerable savings to the Agency.
CURATIVE AND PREVENTIVE MEDICAL SERVICES

Clinics, hospitals and laboratories

67. The Agency now maintains 99 static health centres and 12 mobile clinics. These centres provide in both curative and preventive services, including doctor's consultations, dressings, injections, eye treatments, dispensing of medicines, maternal and child health care, dental attention and health education. During 1961-1962 certain improvements were achieved in the system of medical consultation. A standard staffing pattern has been drawn up and is now being implemented. Out of savings already achieved in the health programme, some additional medical and paramedical posts have been established which will enable the Agency to raise the over-all quality of its services. Moreover, through the clinic construction programme, several older structures have been replaced by better-planned and more efficient buildings. As indicated in table 12 of the annex refugees averaged six visits per person to the health centres during the year.

68. The number of hospital beds maintained by or reserved for the Agency was reduced slightly from 2,080 in 1961 to 2,035 in 1962, primarily as the result of the closure of the Agency's hospital at Salt (Jordan) and the reduction in the number of beds subsidized in the Bhannes Tuberculosis Sanatorium (Lebanon) from 150 to 100. In general the Agency has continued its basic policy of using local resources, where possible, subsidizing beds for refugees in hospitals operated by Governments, local authorities, voluntary agencies or private concerns. The Agency now operates only two small camp hospitals, one cottage hospital and two tuberculosis sanatoria (one in conjunction with the Government authorities). After closure of the UNRWA hospital at Salt, redistribution of the Agency subsidized beds was made for the purpose of providing a wider and more efficient allocation of facilities, taking into account the needs and geographical distribution of the refugee problem. In the Syrian Arab Republic a new agreement was reached with the administration of the Mouassat Hospital in Damascus under which the Agency reserves 25 beds. Currently the ratio of hospital beds per 1,000 persons stands at 1.88.

69. The Agency continues to rely heavily on laboratories operated by Governments, universities and private organizations, depending on circumstances and the type of examination required. The Agency operates its own units only where necessary and currently this includes two small clinical laboratories in Lebanon, one in the Tuberculosis Hospital in Nablus (Jordan) and a central unit in the Gaza Strip.
Control of communicable diseases

70. There were no major epidemics during the past year and not a single case of any of the six "Convention" diseases - smallpox, plague, cholera, yellow fever, epidemic typhus, and louse-borne relapsing fever - among the refugee population. There was a small, very localized outbreak of malaria in the Jordan Valley and an increase in its incidence in the Gaza Strip, where, however, the source of infection was mostly exogenous. In the latter area also 13 cases of tetanus neonatorum occurred. The incidence of diphtheria (19 cases) was slightly higher than in the previous year, while that of poliomyelitis continued to be low in all countries, and there was a considerable decrease in the reported number of enteric group fever cases. Measles incidence showed a 32 per cent decrease and the number of cases of whooping cough also fell. During warm weather the prevalent diseases continued to be diarrhea, dysentery and infective eye conditions, such as acute conjunctivitis and trachoma.

71. The Agency; has continued its active immunization programmes against the enteric group fevers, small-pox, whooping cough, diphtheria and tetanus. The Agency has also carried out immunization of the age group 4 months-5 years in the Gaza Strip with oral 9 poliomyelitis vaccine.
Tuberculosis control

72. The Agency has continued to provide facilities for the treatment of refugee patients suffering from tuberculosis in hospitals and through out-patient services. In this treatment there has been very close co-operation with the corresponding services of the host countries, particularly in the Syrian Arab Republic, Jordan and Gaza. Adequate medical supplies have been provided and, in addition, out-patients under treatment are given double basic rations, on the recommendation of the supervising medical specialist.
Maternal and child health

73. Special care for expectant mothers, infants, pre-school children and the school population generally has been one of the major activities of the Agency's health programme since 1950. Supervision, advice and guidance are given to mothers, before and after delivery, in 84 maternal and child health centres. Layettes are issued, supplementary rations authorized, and prophylactic immunization schedules suitable for infants and young children implemented. Since gastroenteritis is a common condition among the young during warm weather, a special regime for its treatment has been evolved, based on the maintenance or restoration of the body fluids and electrolyte balance, appropriate medication, and special diet (at the supplementary feeding centres). In addition, two rehydration units have been equipped in the Gaza Strip for the treatment of infants and young children suffering from this condition with an associated mild or moderate dehydration. The results are very encouraging in the terms of the number of lives saved.
Nursing services

74. The Agency directly employs a staff of 127 nurses and 333 nursing auxiliaries in preventive and curative services, in addition to the considerable nursing staff employed in clinics and hospitals subsidized by UNRWA. While UNRWA nursing staff participates in virtually every aspect of the Agency's health programme, they have particular responsibilities in those activities related to maternal and child health, home visiting, school health, health education and tuberculosis control.
Health education

75. The programme of health education, which dates almost from the inception of the Agency, uses various methods and media to disseminate information, create interest and stimulate a better understanding of good health practices. These include health films, flannel-graphs, health calendars, and specific seasonal programmes on the prevention of infectious diseases and nutritional subjects. In schools, health education is promoted through health committees. In addition to its medical, nursing, pare-medical and teaching staff members, the Agency also employs 25 health education workers who maintain close contacts with the various communities and groups, especially in camps and villages, and utilize every opportunity to spread ideas for healthier living.
NUTRITION AND MILK AND SUPPLEMENTARY FEEDING PROGRAMME

76. Since the basic ration is dietetically inadequate, the protection of such vulnerable groups as infants, young children and expectant and nursing mothers is of paramount importance. The Agency provides a daily issue of whole milk to infants (aged 0-1 years), skim milk to children (2-15 years), and to mothers from the fifth month of pregnancy to the end of the twelfth month after delivery. It also provides a nutritionally balanced hot meal! six days per week, to medically selected beneficiaries (mainly in the age group 0-6 years) and special diets for severely under-nourished infants and those suffering from diarrhea. It provides vitamin A and D capsules to those receiving supplementary feeding and to children in elementary schools. Through the school milk programme, it gives a daily issue of skim milk to all children up to the age of 12 years.

77. In order to obtain the optimum results from the supplementary feeding and milk programmes, certain changes in the procedures for supplementary feeding and milk distribution were introduced in the spring of 1962. The main changes were: (a) the issue of a whole milk/skim milk mixture for babies aged 6-12 months, and for non-breast fed babies under 6 months, in place of the whole milk previously issued for babies ~12 months; and (b) the provision, on an experimental basis in certain camps, of a daily hot meal to all children aged 2-6 and to certain older, under-nourished children. Previously all beneficiaries over 2 years of age of the latter part of the programme were subject to medical selection, but in future only those over 6 years wil1 be.

78. Two full-scale nutrition surveys were carried out by the United States Interdepartmental Committee on Nutrition for National Defence (one in Lebanon and one in Jordan in the spring of 1961 and 1962 respectively), involving both the refugee and non-refugee population in these two countries. Senior members of the Agency's Health Department participated in these surveys. The resulting information obtained has proved to be most valuable. In general it can be stated that the nutritional status of the refugee population has been found to be approximate to the standard of nutrition of the other sections of the local population.
ENVIRONMENTAL SANITATION

79. The essential environmental sanitation programme, which provides for water supply, sewage and refuse disposal, insect control measures and drainage, was implemented satisfactorily. Overcrowding and inadequate control of hut construction continue to impair environmental sanitation in many camps, particularly in suburban areas. Although the rainfall during 1961 was within the normal range, in Jordan an emergency water supply programme costing $45,000 had to be implemented to meet water shortages, especially in camps near municipalities. With regard to waste disposal, it is noteworthy and encouraging that more and more refugee families are accepting and participating in the construction of family latrines. The use of these latrines is promoted and subsidized by the Agency.
MEDICAL EDUCATION AND TRAINING

80. The Agency programme of professional training in the medical sciences at the university level, through the granting of 168 scholarships, is described elsewhere in the report. During the past year a subsidy was granted to the School of Nursing at the Augusta Victoria Hospital, Jerusalem, where there are 17 students following courses in basic nursing. For the in-service training of Agency medical and pare-medical staff, there are facilities for attendance at scientific assemblies, such as the annual Middle East Medical Assembly in Beirut, lectures by distinguished specialists and various courses for nurses and midwives. In May 1962, Agency medical officers attended a one-day symposium in Beirut on the practical aspects of management with respect to diarrhoea and malnutrition treatments in childhood. Contributors to this symposium included not only senior UNRWA staff members but the Professor of Paediatrics of the American University of Beirut and the UNICEF Professor of Child Health at the Makerere Medical School, Kampala, Uganda. A Health Department Bulletin has been created for circulation to the staff. Plans are now being developed for the inclusion next year of a training course in environmental sanitation in one of the Agency's vocational training courses
C. Education and vocational training

81. The General Assembly has recognized that increased emphasis on general education and vocational training, including teacher training, is indispensable for refugee children and young adults if they are to face the future with confidence and self-reliance; and that this is true regardless of where they may ultimately live. The Assembly's recent resolutions endorsed the Agency's proposals to maximize the effort to provide assistance to young refugees to enable them to develop their innate abilities. During the past year the Agency has moved forward according to plan in implementing its three-year programme, particularly in the expansion of vocational training facilities. The Agency now faces the important problem of improving the quality of general education, which lies at the base of the vocational training programme and which, to a large extent, determines the level of knowledge and skill which trainees can attain. During the past year the Agency's education and vocational training programme continued to have the valuable benefit of technical guidance and leadership from the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization, which made available to UNRWA twenty-one international specialists, one of whom serves as Director of the Educational Department

GENERAL AND UNIVERSITY EDUCATION

82. The steady growth of the Agency's programme of general education is reflected in the fact that its annual budget for this purpose has increased from $400,000 a decade ago to nearly $7 million in 1960-1961. The refugee child today has considerably greater educational opportunities than his parents had. In Palestine, under the Mandate, a little over half of the children of school age were receiving some form of education and the rate of illiteracy was approximately 58 per cent. Today the Agency, with the co-operation of the host Governments, is offering six years of elementary education to all refugee children and three years of preparatory education to all who satisfactorily complete their elementary education. It is also offering secondary education to a rapidly growing number of pupils through grants to Government and private schools. In addition, a limited number of the most gifted students are given university scholarships. One striking feature of this movement towards a comprehensive education system has been the increasing participation of girls at all stages. Another is the regular school programme of manual training, developed since 1955, covering technical drawing, woodwork and metal work; under this programme there are now 64 centres with 22,400 pupils. The educational facilities provided by the Agency are comparable with those available to the national population of the host countries.

83. In the school year 1961-1962, out of a total of 196,300 refugee pupils, 137,137 pupils received their education in the Agency's elementary, preparatory and secondary schools. The Agency assisted 48,635 pupils in Government or private schools under a grants-in-aid system, and these schools also received 10,528 pupils without subsidy.

84. The fact that the majority of the teachers employed by the Agency (4,023 in 1961-1962) are, by normal standards, inadequately qualified continues to be a major obstacle in the way of development of a satisfactory education programme. This deficiency is still serious despite the improvement in teaching standards which has been achieved in recent years through the operation of summer and in-training courses and the establishment of demonstration schools connected with the teacher training centres. The first qualified teachers to be trained at the Agency's Centre for men in Ramallah, Jordan, which opened in 1960, will begin teaching in UNRWA schools in the autumn of 1962. They will be of a considerably higher standard than the majority of new teachers in the past.

85. The improvement of general education, as envisaged in the Agency's three-year plan, has only partially been achieved. Overcrowding in the classrooms is less than in former years, the elimination of double shifting continues as planned and certain much needed improvements in educational teaching materials and textbooks have been achieved. There have not been sufficient funds, however, to permit the introduction of science teaching, home economics and physical training or to put into general application the experience gained in the demonstration schools.

86. With an increasing number of refugee students completing their secondary education, more and more applicants continue to present themselves for university scholarships. Through a further contribution from the Arabian American Oil Company (ARAMCO) it has been possible to sponsor 14 additional students in the year under review, thus bringing the total number of ARAMCO scholarships to 36. Furthermore, UNRWA has been able to award 39 other new university scholarships which were financed from funds obtained during the World Refugee Year. The total number of university scholarships made available has increased from 402 in the previous year to 469 in the year under review. Since the end of June 1961, 66 UNRWA-sponsored scholars graduated from the various universities of the Middle East, of whom 55 received their degrees in medicine, engineering and sciences. The graduation of these scholars has released an equal number of scholarships for re-allocation to new scholars. In addition, an estimated average of three scholarships becomes vacant each year owing to the holders dropping out of their courses. The scholarships thus vacated, together with the newly created scholarships just described, have sufficed to permit a total of 152 new awards to be made during the past year. Considering the number of applicants with high academic records, this rate of new awards still falls far short of meeting the real need. Fortunately, as in previous years, refugee students continue to be sponsored in appreciable numbers by the Governments of the host countries, particularly the United Arab Republic. The French Government also awards 35 scholarships for refugees for university education, in addition to those given for secondary education and for vocational training.

87. Statistical details concerning the Agency's educational system are to be found in tables 19-23 of the annex.
VOCATIONAL TRAINING (INCLUDING TEACHER TRAINING)

88. There has been considerable progress during the year in expanding the facilities for vocational and teacher training, which, by September 1962, will have an enrolment of 2,800 trainees. This figure brings the Agency within easy reach of the 1963 target of a total capacity of 4,400. The implementation of the programme is proceeding in accordance with the planned schedule, as will be seen from the following summary:

(a) The extension to the Vocational Training Centre at Wadi Seer (Jordan) has been completed. The capacity is now 404 trainees.

(b) The first phase of the extension to the Vocational Training Centre in Gaza has been completed; the second will be completed in September 1962. The capacity will then be 368 trainees.

(c) The first phase of the construction of the Vocational Training Centre near Damascus (Syrian Arab Republic) was completed in September 1961. The second will be completed by September 1962. The capacity is now 404 trainees.

(d) Both the first and second phases of the construction of the Vocational Training Centre at Siblin (Lebanon) will be completed before September 1962 and the capacity will then be 396 trainees.

(e) An extension to the Teacher Training Centre for men at Ramallah (Jordan) has been completed; the total capacity of the Centre will be 400 in September 1963.

(f) The combined Teacher Training and Vocational Training Centre for girls at Ramallah (Jordan) will be completed and opened in October 1962 with a total capacity for 633 trainees. By September 1964 the Centre will be working at full capacity.

(g) 150 students are attending teacher-training institutions in the Gaza Strip and the United Arab Republic, a number which will be increased to 300 in September 1962.

(h) The first phase of the construction of the Home Vocational Training Centre in the Syrian Arab Republic for 192 trainees will be completed by September 1962, and it is planned that further extension to bring the total capacity up to 384 will have been completed by September 1963.

89. The construction of one and possibly two new centres will begin this year. A donation from the Swedish Government will cover the cost of a centre to be established in Lebanon with residential accommodation for 264 trainees. The curriculum will include the training of 150 teachers of general subjects for day schools 32 handicraft teachers, 32 telecommunication technicians, and 50 instructors and foremen for technical schools and industry. Selected trainees from the Agency's vocational centres will be sent to Sweden for a year's industrial and technical training and on their return they will be given a further one-year course to become instructors and foremen. The Swedish donation will cover the cost of construction and equipment, the salaries of necessary specialists and two years of running costs. The second new centre will be at Khan Yunis in the Gaza Strip and will have accommodation for 80 non-residential trainees. The subjects to be taught at this centre are now under discussion with the authorities in Gaza.

90. Arrangements have been made with the authorities in Gaza to send graduates from the Vocational Training Centre in Gaza town to the United Arab Republic for a year's training in industry.

91. Two UNRWA instructors were sent at the Agency's expense to the United Kingdom for short courses of further training as specialists, and they will be returning to teach and supervise in the autumn of 1962. During the coming school year, 13 more instructors are to attend courses in the United Kingdom and the United Arab Republic. These instructors have accepted an obligation to return to UNRWA and teach for a stipulated minimum period.

92. A counselling programme has been introduced to assist in the recruitment of trainees and to guide them in the selection of courses. A counsellor is to be attached to each centre.

93. Arrangements have been made with the ILO to conduct a man-power survey to determine trends within the expanding Middle East economies so that the Agency can better relate its training programme to the needs of these countries. The Agency has developed its training programme with flexibility so that it can adapt its programme to changes in the pattern of demand as they occur by modifying or dropping courses and by adding new ones.

94. During the past year, distinguished representatives of many countries, including vocational training experts, have visited the Agency's vocational training centres. They have commented favourably on the work, the purposeful atmosphere, the suitability of premises and equipment, and the low capital and operational costs. Without doubt such visits have contributed to the progressively favourable response the Agency has received from Governments, organizations and individuals, in the form of donations both for construction of centres and for the sponsoring of scholarships for vocationa1 students in training.

95. Statistical details of the Agency's present vocational and teacher-training programme will be found in tables 24 and 25 of the annex.
D. Self-support activities

96. By 1956 experience had shown that large-scale development projects, directly associated with the refugee problem, such as had been projected in the earlier years of the Agency's operation, were in principle unacceptable to the refugees and Arab opinion generally. It was also clear that the economic and social obstacles in the way of implementing such projects were greater than had been realized. In recent years therefore the Agency, with the approval of the General Assembly and the support of the host Governments, has concentrated on the development of general education and the expansion of vocational training facilities to enable younger refugees to play a useful and productive role in the rapidly changing society of the Middle East. Since 1956 the Agency has also stressed smaller, individual self-support projects and, under its three-year plan, made provision for individual assistance in the amount of $500,000 and received some $343,000 from World Refugee Year sources designated for this purpose.
DEVELOPMENT BANK OF JORDAN

97. Since its establishment in 1951, with substantial Agency participation, the Development Bank of Jordan has granted loans to encourage economic development and raise living standards. The total number of refugees employed on projects established with the aid of the Bank amounts to some 13,000, as compared with 12,000 last year. Only 28 loans, totalling $102,000, were made during the year ending 31 March 1962, as compared with 107, in the amount of $466,000, during the previous period. This reflects the slow development in the Bank's operations because of the lack of fresh capital.
PLACEMENT SERVICES

98. The Agency's placement service provides a link between potential Middle East employers and refugees with suitable qualifications, including graduates of the vocational training centres. During the year 300 requests were received from various employers regarding more than 1,100 vacancies; over 1,500 applications were processed and 835 applicants, the majority of them teachers, were placed in employment.
E. Financial operations

99. As explained in the introduction to this report, the Agency's fiscal period is the calendar year, whereas the present report covers the period 1 July 1961 to 30 June 1962. (The summary accounts of the Agency are published in separate documents, together with the related Auditors' Report).5 To facilitate comparison this section presents a resume of the financial operations in fiscal year 1961 and a revised estimate of operations in fiscal year 1962. Part II of the Report presents the budget for the year 1963 and discusses the problems of financing it.

100. The financial operations for 1961 may be summarized as in the table in the next column.

101. The Agency's original budget for 1961 as submitted to the General Assembly was $40.6 million, of which, as noted above, $39 million was actually expended or committed by the end of that year. The saving of $1.6 million is accounted for by two factors, viz $0.8 million which represents an operational reserve not required and the balance which arises from basic commodity prices being more favourable than anticipated.

102. During 1961, the Agency's working capital (not including that reserved for 1960 commitments carried forward to 1961) was reduced by $2.1 million. In fact, however, this depletion of capital represented no more than the expenditure of special, one-time income received in 1960 from the World Refugee Year and other special sources which was utilized in 1961 for the expansion of vocational and teacher training facilities and

Budget items brought forward from 1960
Budget for 1961
Total
(In million of U.S. dollars)
Working capital at 1 January 1961
2.3
22.1.
24.4
Income for 1961:
Regular Government pledges
33.5
33.5
Other regular income
1.6
1.6
World Refugee Year and related special income
1.8
1.8
36.9
36.9
Total funds available in 1961
2.3
59.0
61.3
Expenditure and commitments in 1961:
Relief services
1.6
26.2
27.8
Elementary and secondary educa-tion:
0.3
7.6
7.9
Vocational and university education
0.1
5.0
5.1
Projects and special activities
0.3
0.2
0.5
2.3
39.0
41.3
Working capital at 31 December 1961.
20.0
20.0b

a. Including $2.4 million of World Refugee Year and related special income for the three-year plan of expansion of vocational training, and $1.4 million of unpaid pledges largely paid in 1961.

b. excluding provision for SS million of commitments carried forward to 1962 and including $1.1 million unpaid pledges expected to be paid in 1962.

related items included in the Agency's three-year programme. In the "normal" budget sector (covering food, shelter, health and welfare assistance) the Agency's in-come just equalled expenditure and commitments for the year.

103. However, these relatively favourable financial. results, as noted above, were achieved only because basic commodity prices proved to be considerably lower than in 1960 and because the Agency did not find it necessary to utilize any of its $0.8 million operationa1 reserve set up for contingencies. Similar favourable circumstances cannot be expected to recur in future.

104. During 1961, financial operations for relief services were largely routine, and the amount of work in progress but not completed at year end ($1.5 million) was about equal to that at the start of the year in financial terms. In elementary and secondary education a considerable part (some $0.6 million) of the budget for capital facilities also was not implemented by year end and had to be carried forward into 1962.

105. Efforts were concentrated during 1961 on the implementation of the Agency's three-year plan to expand vocational training facilities—some $3.7 million having been expended or committeed for this purpose. At the end of the year a considerable proportion of this work was still in progress, so that some $2.5 million was carried forward into 1962.

106. During the year, the programme for loans and grants for individual assistance was being re-appropriated and the funds available for this programme, amounting to $0.4 million, were carried forward to 1962 for use in that year.

107. In general, in most recent years the implementation of the Agency's budget for capital items (construction and equipment), other than for vocational and teacher training, has tended to lag behind schedule some six to eight months because of the uncertainty of avail-able funds until well into the budget year.

108. For 1962, the Agency's budget was originally set at $39.2 million. However, this has now been revised to $37.4 million due to the decline in basic commodity prices (about $1 million below budget estimates) and the likelihood that the Agency will not now be forced to use its operational reserve of $0.8 million.

109. The following table summarizes the Agency's revised estimated financial operations in 1962:

Budget items brought forward from 1961
Budget for 1962
Total
(In millions of U.S. Dollars)
Working capital at 1 January 1962
5.0
20.0
25.0
Estimated income for 1962:
Regular Government pledges
33.6
33.6
Other regular income
0.9
0.9
World Refugee Year and related special income
0.2
0.2
Vocational training centre and teacher-training centre scholarships and related special income
1.5
1.5
36.2
36.2
Total estimated funds available in 1962
5.0
56.2
61.2
Budget items brought forward from 1961
Budget for 1962
Total
(In millions of U.S. dollars)
Estimated expenditure in 1962:
Relief services
1.5
26.3
27.8
Elementary and secondary education
0.6
8.0
8.6
Vocational and university education
2.5
2.9
5.4
Projects and special activities
0.4
0.2
0.6
5.0
37.4
42.4
Estimated working capital at 31 December 1962
18.8
18.8

110. During the year 1962 the Agency expects to complete most of the vocational and teacher training and other items carried forward from the 1961 budget, as well as implementing its programme for 1962. How-ever, certain construction works will not have been completed by the end of 1962 and provision for them will similarly have to be carried forward into 1963.

111. The estimated income for 1962 is $1.2 million less than the estimated expenditure, despite the expectation of some $1.7 million of income from special sources for the vocational and teacher-training programmes. The shortfall in 1962 can be met from working capital, leaving a balance of $18.8 million at the end of the year. As shown in part II of this report, a deficit in income for 1963 of $3 million is expected if the regular contributions from Governments for that year remain at the 1962 level. Such a deficit would reduce working capital by the end of 1963 to about $15.7 mil-lion. This seems to be about the bare minimum of working capital required in relation to a budget of approximately $40 million per year.

112.Further details of the Agency's financial operations in 1961 and 1962 (and earlier years) may be obtained from tables 26 to 30 annexed hereto.
F. Relations with host Governments and organizations

113. On the whole, the Agency's relations with the host Governments were maintained during the year on terms of co-operation and cordiality. It is probably not generally appreciated that the Agency's operations come into contact with the interests of the Governments at many points, ranging through the entire scale of these operations. Some aspects of its programme are of major concern to the Governments. These matters, as well as those of a routine character, have been fully and frankly discussed with the authorities in an attempt to maintain the mutual understanding required for the efficient and effective operation of the Agency's programme. No serious new difficulties were encountered as a result of local political developments. Matters regarding the status of the Agency, its privileges and immunities and those of its staff have been approached on the basis that the special position of the Agency and its staff in the host countries should be regarded not so much as a matter of principle but rather as a matter of practical administrative convenience, the purpose and justification being related to specific functions which the Agency could not otherwise discharge with proper efficiency. A few outstanding questions which, in the past, have proved resistant to solution have been the subject of further review and discussion, and progress has been made toward their settlement.

114. Special note should be taken of the provision by Governments of substantial tracts of land for the construction of the vocational and teacher-training centres which constitute a major feature of the Agency's programme. Such action provides concrete evidence of their basic interest in this programme and their desire to encourage its implementation and development. The Governments have also continued their contribution to the Agency's relief operations by rendering direct as-sistance in health, education, welfare and related services and by providing land, water and security protection for Agency installations. The direct burden to the host Governments during the past year has amounted to more than $5.6 million.

115. The many voluntary agencies operating in the Middle East have continued their assistance to the refugees in fields supplementary to the Agency's programme, especially in gifts of clothing and the provision of health, education and welfare services. These activities are closely co-ordinated with those of the Agency. In addition, many of these agencies contribute directly to the Agency. Examples of such contributions are a substantial gift during the year for the construction of a Centre for the Blind in the Gaza Strip and the growing number of scholarships made available for students in the Agency's vocational and teacher-training centres. The voluntary agencies which have made direct contributions during the year to the UNRWA programme are listed in table 10 of the annex.

116. Final1y, the Agency wishes to acknowledge the co-operation and assistance of other United Nations organs during the past year. UNESCO and WHO provided technical assistance as well as personnel to supervise and implement the Agency's education and health programme. Similarly, the Food and Agriculture Organization provided technical advice. The Agency carried on extensive consu1tations with United Nations Headquarters in New York, particularly with rezard to administrative matters. The Agency benefits from sharing communications, and transport facilities with the United Nations Truce Supervision Organization and the United Nations Emergency Force and from making use of the purchasing facilities of UNICEF. The Agency itself assisted the United Nations Conciliation Commission for Palestine, at its request, in certain arrangements for the release of Arab assets still held in banks located in Israel.


Endnotes

1. Information concerning the origin of the Agency and its mission and work prior to 1 July 1961 will be found in the following annual reports and other United Nations documents:
A. Final report of the United Nations Economics Survey Mission for the Middle East (28 December 1949) (A/AC.25/6, parts I and II).
B. Report of the Secretary-General on Assistance to Palestine Refugees: Official Records of the General Assembly, Fourth Session, Ad Hoc Political Committee, Annexes, vol. II, p. 14 (A/1060).
C. Reports of the Director of UNRWA and special reports of the Director and Advisory Commission to the General Assembly:
(a) Official Records of The General assembly, Fifth Session, Supplement No. 19 (A/1451/Rev.l)
(b) Ibid., Sixth Session, Supplements Nos. 16 and 16A (A/1905 arid Add.l);
(c) Ibid., Seventh Session, Supplements Nos. 13 and 13A (A/2171 and Add.l);
(d) Ibid., Eighth Session, Supplements Nos. 12 and 12A (A/2470 and Add.l);
(e) Ibid., Ninth Session, Supplements Nos. 17 and 17A (A/2717 and Add.l)
(f) Ibid., Tenth Session, Supplements Nos. 15 and 15A (A/2978 and Add.l);
(g) Ibid., Eleventh Session, Supplements Nos. 14 and 14A (A/3212 and Add.1)
(h) Ibid., Twelfth Session, Supplement No. 14 (A/3686 and A/3735)
(i) Ibid., Thirteenth Session, Supplement No. 14 (A/3931 and A/3948);
(j) Ibid., Fourteenth Session, Supplement No. 14 (A/4213);
(k) Ibid., Fifteenth Session, Supplement No. 14 (A/4478)
(l) Ibid., Sixteenth Session, Supplement No. 14 (A/4861).
D. Pertinent General Assembly resolutions:
194 (III) of 11 December 1948, 212 (III) of 19 November 1948 302 (IV) of 8 December 1949, 393 (V) of 2 December 1950; 513 (VI) of 26 January 1952; 614 (VII) of 6 November 1952; 720 (VIII) of 27 November 1953; 818 (IX) of 4 December 1954; 916 (X) of 3 December 1955; 1018 (XI) of 8 February 1957; 1191 (XII) of 12 December 1957, 1315 (XIII) of 12 December 1958, 1456 (XIV) of 9 December 1959; 1604 (XV) of 21 April 1961; 1725 (XVI) of 20 Decem-ber 1961.
2. General Assembly resolution 1456 (XIV) 0f 9 December 1959.
3. See Official Records of the General Assembly, Fifth Session, Supplement No. 19 (A/1451/Rev.1), paras. 13-19; ibid, Sixth Session, Supplement No. 16 (a/1905), paras. 15-24; ibid., Ninth Session Supplement No 17 (A/2717), paras. 10-12; ibid., Tenth Session Supplement No. 15 (A/2978), paras. 8-10 and Supplement No. 15A (A/2978/Add.1); ibid., Fourteenth session, Supplement No. 14 (A/4478), paras. 51-52 and ibid., Sixteenth Session, Supplement No. 14 (A/4861), paras. 38-42
4. A/4214, paras. 20-21; A/4478, paras. 68-70; and a/4861, paras. 43-46
5. For the Year 1961, see Official Records of the General Assembly, Seventeenth Session, Supplement No. 6B (A/5206/Add.2).

Annex to part I
STATISTICS CONCERNING REGISTERED POPULATION AND CAMPS
Table 1
TOTAL REGISTERED POPULATION ACCORDING TO CATEGORY OF REGISTRATION,
1950 - 1962
Members of families registered for rations “R” category
E & M categories
“N” category
1
2b
3c
4
5d
6d
7d
8e
Full ration recipients
Half-ration recipients
Babies and children registered for services
Total
1+2+3
Other members receiving no rations
Members of families receiving education and/or medical services
Members of families receiving no rations or services
Grand total
4+5+6+7
June 1950
f
f
f
960,021
960021
June 1951
826,459
51,034
2,174
879,667
24,455
904 122
June 1952
805,593
58,733
18,347
882,673
32,738
915,411
June 1953
772,166
64,817
34,765
871,748
45 013
916,761
June 1954
820,486
17 340
49,232
887 058
54 793
941 851
June 1955
828,531
17 228
60,227
905 986
63,403
969 389
June 1956
830,266
16,987
75,026
922,279
74 059
996,338
June 1957
830 611
16 733
86,212
933 556
18,203
4 462
62 980
1 019 201
June 1958
836 781
16 577
110,600
963 958
19,776
5 901
63,713
1 053 348
June 1959
843,739
16,350
130,092
990 181
21,548
6,977
68,922
1,087 628
June 1960
849 634
16 202
150,170
1 016 006
22 639
8 792
73,452
1 120 889
June 1961
854 268
15 998
169,730
1 039,996
23 947
9 515
77,566
1 151,024
June 1962
862,083
15,805
176,772
1,054,660
20,004
9,027
91,069
1,174,760
a The above statistics are based on the Agency's registration records which do not necessarily reflect the actual refugee population owing to factors such as the high rate of unreported deaths and undetected false registration.
b Includes up to the year 1954 Bedouins who thereafter received full rations and babies who are now issued with full rations after their first anniversary. Half rations are given at present only to frontier villagers in Jordan.
c Includes babies below one year of age and children who because of ration ceilings are not issued rations (145,042 in Jordan).
d Columns 5, 6 and 7 show the refugees whose registration for services has been reduced or cancelled according to their family income as known to the Agency and the income scale in force in their country of residence.
The members of "R" families receiving no rations (column 5) correspond to a level of income insufficient to cancel the whole family's entitlement to rations. Up to 1956, such refugees were reported together with families of the "N" category (column 7).
The "E" and "M" categories of registration (column 6) created in 1956 are applied in Lebanon only because it has not been possible to secure agreement for the introduction in other host countries of the income scales providing for the progressive reduction or restoration of rations.
"N" category (column 7) includes refugees whose income is such as to disqualify them for rations or normal services, or who have received assistance to enable them to become self-supporting.
In general, it must be pointed out that the distribution of refugees by category of registration gives only a partial picture of the number of self-supporting refugees owing to the limitations faced by the Agency in determining their actual income or degree of need.
e The total population as at June 1952 included 19,616 refugees receiving relief in Israel who were UNRWA's responsibility up to 1 July 1952.
f Details not available.

Table 2
DISTRIBUTION OF REGISTERED REFUGEE POPULATION ACCORDING TO COUNTRY OF RESIDENCE,
CATEGORY OF REGISTRATION AND AGE AS AT 30 JUNE 1962
Number
of persons
Country
Category of registration a
Below one year b
1-15 years c
15 years and over
Total
Number of families
R
10,750
230,968
352,530
594,248
110,500
Jordan
N
271
9,744
34,882
441897
10,985
Total
11,021
240,712
387,412
639,145
121,485
R
6,481
106,202
140,398
253 081
45,572
Gaza
N
76
3,891
11,566
15 533
4,944
Total
6,557
110,093
151,964
268,614
50,516
R
1,845
47,336
68,558
117,739
24 721
Lebanon
E M
73
2,163
5,428
7 664
1 414
N
93
2,742
16,536
19 371
6,686
Total
2,011
52,241
90,522
144,774
32,821
R
3,342
43,855
62,399
109 596
23,569
Syrian Arab
E M d
12
413
938
1,363
193
Republic
N
27
1,556
9,685
11,268
4,662
Total
3,381
45,824
73,022
122,227
28,424
R
22,418
428,361
623,885
1,074,664
204,362
Agency
E M
85
2,576
6,366
9,027
1,607
total
N
467
17,933
72,669
91,069
27,277
Grand Total
22,970
448,870
702,920
1,174,760
233,246

a See table 1 for explanation of category of registration.
b The number of babies below one year of age is less than the number of births recorded during the preceding year, owing to delays in registration of births.
c A number of children born since 1950 in E & M and N families is not registered with the Agency.
d These categories apply only to some UNRWA employees.


RECAPITULATION OF CHANGES IN COMPOSITION AND/OR ENTITLEMENT OF REFUGEE FAMILIES REGISTERED FOR RATIONS JULY 1950—JUNE 1962 a

Year
July 50
June 51 b
July 51
June 52 b
July 52
June 53
July 53
June 54
July 54
June 55
July 55
June 56
July 56
June 57
July 59
June 58
July 58
June 59
July 59
June 60
July 60
June 61
July 61
June 62
Total
July 50
June 62
Increases
Births c
10,057
21,315
28,335
28,711
30,788
30,658
27,960
40,041
37,047
37,776
39,299
42,470
374,457
New registration
19 537
13 265
1,993
2 885
1 502
1 287
1 459
859
645
525
324
514
44,795
Loss of self-support d
8 481
2 592
2,685
4 194
4 461
8 433
6 823
6,045
4,040
4 417
3,490
3,394
59 055
Returned from absence
180
442
642
973
3,510
1,436
1,113
1 039
935
1,457
11 727
Miscellaneous e
10,256
12,468
2,014
521
680
1,061
309
231
292
248
252
710
29,042
TOTAL
48,331
49,640
35,207
36,753
38,073
42,412
40,061
48,612
43,137
44,005
44,300
48,545
519,076
Decreases
Deaths
896
4053
3,897
3 764
4,042
4,409
5,582
5,263
4,956
5,041
8,919
18,660
69,482
False registration and duplication
24,265
16 919
4,530
2 737
926
485
584
425
406
570
571
852
53,270
Self-support d
4,121
17,739
12,884
12,717
10,184
19,086
16,328
9 541
7,815
9 764
8,127
8 628
136 916
Absence
1,174
5,466
2,995
1,810
2,581
1,492
5,632
2 869
2,128
2 183
2,334
4 301
34 965
Miscellaneous e
97,268
5,157
20,891
410
1,628
563
357
455
505
701
743
1,748
130,426
TOTAL
127,724
49,334
45,197
21,438
19,361
26,017
28,483
18,553
15,810
18,259
20,694
34,189
425,059
Total ration recipients,
June 50
babies and children at year end
960,021
879,667
882,673
871,748
887,058
905,986
922,279
933,556
963,958
990,181
1,016,006
1,039,996
1,054,660
a This table recapitulates changes affecting the total number of ration recipients, their babies and children registered for services (column 4 of table 1) over twelve years. Births, new registrations, deaths, false registrations and duplications result in additions to or deletions from the registration records. Self-support and absence reflect transfers to or from the lower categories of registration (shown in columns 5, 6 and 7 of table 1).
Transfers within or between host countries, as well as issue of rations to babies attaining one year of age, are not shown in this table.
b Includes changes effected during the 1950-1951 census operation.
c Fluctuation of births from year to year derives to a large extent from delayed registration.
d Covers mcome, employment witl1 the Agency, asslstance towards self-support, etc. or the cessation thereof
e Miscellaneous changes include up to June 1953 a number of additions to or deletions from the registration records as well as certain changes in category of registration. The deletion of refugees in Israel from the Agency's records is also reported mainly under this heading (40,930 persons over the period July 1950-June 1953).
Table 4
RECAPITULATION OF CHANGES IN COMPOSITION OF TOTAL REGISTERED REFUGEE POPULATION, JULY 1950—JUNE 1962 a
Year
July 50
June 51
July 51
June 52
July 52
June 53
July 53
June 54
July 54
June 55
July 55
June 56
July 56
June 57
July 59
June 58
July 58
June 59
July 59
June 60
July 60
June 61
July 61
June 62
Total
July 50
June 62
Additions
Births
10,057
21,315
28,335
28,711
30,788
30,658
27,960
40,157
37,555
38,481
39,953
43,325
377,295
New registration
19,537
13,265
1,993
2,885
1,502
1,287
1,459
894
661
684
419
992
45,578
Miscellaneous.:
5,159 b
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
5,159
TOTAL
34,753
34,580
30,328
31,596
32,290
31,945
29,419
41,051
38,216
39,165
40,372
44,317
428,032
Deletions
Deaths
896
4,053
3,897
3,764
4,042
4,409
5,582
5,446
5,188
5,235
9,213
19,515
71,240
False and duplicate registration
24,265
16,919
4,530
2,737
926
485
584
497
515
683
841
1,384
54,366
Miscellaneous
64,530 b
5,019 b
19,616 c
89,165
TOTAL
89,691
25,991
28,043
6,501
4,968
4,894
6,166
5,943
5,703
5,918
10,054
20,899
214,771
Total
June 50
registered population
960,021
904,122
915,411
916,761
941,851
969,389
996,338
1,019,201
1,053,348
1,087,628
1,120,889
1,151,024
1,174,760
a This table recapitulates changes affecting the total number of registered population (column 8 of table 1) over twelve years Transfers within or between host countries are not shown herein.
In comparing the figures m this table with those in table 3 it should be borne in mind that deletions from the ration rolls do not necessarily entail deletions from the total registered population. Refugees ceasing to draw rations because of absence or self-support continue to be registered within the total population. On the other hand some deaths and false and duplicate registrations are reported among persons registered but not receiving rations, and this accounts for the minor differences under these headings in the two tables. In the earlier years of the Agency's history the distinction between ration recipients and registered population was incompletely recorded.
b Nature of changes reported under "Miscellaneous" was not specified during the census operations. Figures reflect those amendments which resulted ill addition or deletion in the total registered population.
c Removal of refugees in Israel from UNRWA registration records.

a In general, refugees not living in UNRWA camps live in the villages and cities of the host countries and are eligible for the same range of services except that the Agency Drovides for them no sanitation services. Their economic status differs little from that of refugees in camps.
b Refugees enumerated are all those officially registered in camps irrespective of their category of registration.
The figures do not include refugees in camps who are not given shelter by UNRWA but bene fit from sanitation services only.
BASIC RATIONS
Table 7
BASIC RATIONS AND OTHER SUPPLIES DISTRIBUTED BY UNRWA

1. Basic dry rations
2. Other supplies distributed
SOCIAL WELFARE
Table 8
CO-OPERATIVES IN REFUGEE CAMPS AND INSTALLATIONS, JULY 1962
Type of co-operative
Camp
Number of families benefiting
UNRWA initial assistance
(U.S. dollars)
Outside donation
Loan from Government
(U.S. dollars)
Lebanon
    Consume
Mar Elias
48
925
    School canteen
Ba'labaq
130
Jordan
    Agricultural
Karameh
50
1,400
24,000
    Savings and credit (agricultural)
Nuweimeh
17
560
    Poultry
Deir Ammar
16
420
1,600 chicks
1,680
Incubator and brooder
(Heifer project)
    Handicraft
Kalandia
48
350
2,044—
    Handicraft
Tulkarem
22
462—
    Mat-making
Akabat Jaber
42
1,568
    BaLery
Jalazone
30
560
    Bakery
Fawwar
81
977 and tons fuel oil
    Bakery
Balata
124
980 and tons fuel oil
    10 school savings schemes
Irbed, Hebron and Nablus areas
1,157
    4 school canteens
Youth activities
117
Syrian Arab Republic
    Bakery
Khan Dannoun
72
1,125
Gaza
    Consumer
Nuseirat
360
346
    Consumer
Bureij
115
346
    Soap-making
Maghazi
7
754
    School canteen
Gaza Town
520
Table 9
VOLUNTARY AGENCIES DONATING CLOTHING TO PALESTINE REFUGEES, 1961 - 1962
Table 10
VOLUNTARY AGENCIES IN THE AREA OF UNRWA OPERATIONS GIVING ACTIVE nELP TO
PALESTINE REFUGEES, 1961 - 1962
Table 11
REFUGEES WllO EYIGRATED WITH UNRWA ASSISTANCE DURING TEE FIVE YEARS
ENDING JUNE 1962
United States of America
Venezuela
Brazil
Colombia
Canada
Others
Total
1957-1958
80
170
137
1
11
34
433
1958-1959
273
75
84
1
44
477
1959-1960
167
9
166
8
18
39
407
1960-1961
75
12
121
77
14
49
348
1961-1962
82
6
27
79
1
25
220
677
272
535
166
45
181
1,885
HEALTH STATISTICS
Tablc 12
NUMBER OF VISITS TO UNRWA AND SUBSIDIZED CLINICS, 1 JULY 1961 - 30 JUNE 1962
Lebanon
Syrian Arab Republic
Jordan
Gaza
Total
Population served by medical services
126,863
110,323
592,708
252,130
1,082,024
General medical cases
404,165
435,634
648,192
482,106
1,970,097
Injections
289,009
244,724
506,992
355,942
1,396,667
Dressings and skin
262,638
157,862
732,622
505,634
1,658,756
Eye cases
196,079
89,711
856,632
577,169
1,719,591
Dental
36,321
17,319
30,784
17,268
101,692
TOTAL
1,188,212
945,250
2,775,222
1,938,119
6,846,803
Table 13
HOSPITAL FACILITIES AVAILABLE TO PALESTINE REFUGEES, 1961 - 1962
Hospitals
Government and local authorities
27
Voluntary societies or private
45
UNRWA
5
TOTAL
77
In addition there are 3 maternity cen es in Jordan and 7 in Gaza.
No. of beds availabie
Lebanon
Syrian Arab Republic
Jordan
Gaza
Total
General
160
81
610
294
1,145
Tuberculosis
100
20
110
150
380
Maternity
24
11
61
80
176
Paediatrics
27
18
166
17
228
Mental
53
3
50
0
106
TOTAL
364
133
997
541
2,035
Beds per 1,000 population
2.87
1.21
1.68
2.15
1.88
Table 14
LABORATORY SERVICES
During the year 1 July 1961-30 June 1962, 71,904 tests were carried out. The most significant of these were as follows.

Services
No. examined
No. positive
Blood
Films for malaria and relapsing fever
5,793
    Malaria
124
    Relapsing fever
3
Widal
1,605
459
Weil Felix
334
1
S.T.S
19,753
373
Stools
Ova and Parasites
39,425
    Ascaris
8,720
    Taenia
895
    Ankylostoma
943
    Trichiuris Trichiura
2,802
    Amoebae Hist. (Cysts. or Troph)
3,713
Smears and cultures
Coryn. Diphtheria
277
6
Neisser. Gonorrhoea
110
21
Mycobact. Tuberculosis
4,607
803

Table 15
INFECTIOUS DISEASES RECORDED AMONG PALESTINE REFUGEE POPULATION,
1 JULY 1961 - 30 JUNE 1962

Lebanon
Syrian Arab Republic
Jordan
Gaza
Total
Population
126,863
110,323
592,708
252,130
1,082,024
Plague
0
0
0
0
0
Cholera
0
0
0
0
0
Yellow fever
0
0
0
0
0
Smallpax
0
0
0
0
0
Typhus (louse borne)
0
0
0
0
0
Relapsing fever (louse borne)
0
0
0
0
0
Relapsing fever (endemic)
0
0
3
0
3
Diphtheria
1
6
12
0
19
Measles
2,356
1,344
2,394
3,418
9,512
Whoopingcough
1,118
312
826
457
2,713
Chickenpox
1,178
1,084
3,034
2,249
7,545
Mumps
1,421
725
1,549
77
3,772
Meningitis (cerebro-spinal)
0
6
6
5
17
Poliomyelitis
11
6
27
3
47
Enteric group fevers
16
396
174
31
617
Malaria
0
3
63
72
138
Bilharziasis
0
0
0
61
61
Ancylostomiasis
28
0
6
552
586
Tuberculosis
102
49
187
285
623
Syphilis
34
18
5
152
209
Gonorrhoea
1
0
5
6
12
Scarlet fever
0
0
0
0
0
Rabies
0
0
0
0
0
Tetanus
2
0
5
13
20
Brucellosis
0
0
0
0
0
Infective hepatitis
35
92
162
147
436
Leishmaniasis
0
13
1
0
14
The following statistics show the number of clinic attendances in respect of the diseases indicated:
Dysentery
12,637
7,685
7,160
15,616
43 098
Trachoma
1,453
112
19,895
21,950
43 410
Conjunctivitis
14,268
9,905
64,720
25,575
114,468
Table 16
MATERNAL AND CHILD PEALTH
Ante-natal services
Lebanon
Syrian Arab Republic
Jordan
Gaza
Total
Number of ante-natal clinics
20
24
27
9
80
Number of pregnant women registered
4,562
2,284
11,354
11,856
30,056
Average monthly attendance
1,444
687
3,330
3,257
8,718
Number of STS performed
1,633
1,630
6,291
11,173
20,727
Number of cases positive serology
51
35
7
109
202
Number of home visits (ante-natal care)
1,807
1,083
3,412
118
6,420
Infant health Care
Number of infant health centres
20
24
31
9
84
Number reg. 0-1 year monthly average
3,925
2,174
7,591
9,474
23,164
Number attended 0-1 year monthly average
3,536
1 978
5,961
8,535
20 010
Number reg. 1-2 years monthly average
3,068
2 298
6,144
7,628
19 138
Number attended 1-2 years monthly average.
1,414
730
4,241
2,535
8,920
Number of smallpox vaccinations a
5 714
3 567
1,447
4,530
15,258
Number of TAB immunizations completed a
2 919
1 540
4,012
4,438
12,909
Number of triple vaccine immunizations completed a
3 629
2 629
6,255
3 811
16,324
Number of home visits (infant care)
10 025
7 928
29,830
1,104
48 887
School health service
Number of school teams
1
1
2
1
5
Number of children examined
3,163
14,798
31,809
15,372
65,142
Number of schools inspected
188
122
194
200
704
Number of TAB boosters given a
788
0
8,076
91,710
100,574
Number of diphtheria boosters given a
3,741
0
1,796
5,631
11,168
a In addition to vaccinations carried out in infant health centres and in schools there are periodic vaccination campaigns referred to in the text of the report.
SUPPLEMENTARY FEEDING
Table 17
UNRWA SUPPLEMENTARY FEEDING PROGRAMME
Average number of beneficiaries, 1 July 1961-30 June 1962
Daily cooked meal beneficiaries
Monthly dry ration beneficiaries
Averagc for the year
Averagc for the year
Country
No. of feeding centres
0-2 years
2-15 yrs and special cases
Total
Pregnant women
Nursing mothers
TB out patients
Total
Grand total
Lebanon
22
566
4,261
4,827
1,120
3,198
253
4,571
9,398
Syrian Arab Republic
18
373
4,059
4,432
618
1,651
192
2,461
6,893
Jordan
48
26a
1,597
176
16,474
2,010
20 257
2,721
9,975
555
13,251
33 508
Gaza
16
1,205
9,755
10,960
3,128
8,196
433
11,757
22,717
130
3,917
36,559
40,476
7,587
23,020
1,433
32,040
72,516
a Centres operated by voluntary societies.
Table 18
UNRWA MILK PROGRAMME
Average number of beneficiaries, 1 July 1961-30 June 1962
Number of milk centres
Daily number of beneficiaries
Average for the year
Country
Preparation and distribution
Distribution only
Milk distribution centres
Schools
Orphanages, medical prescriptions etc.
Total
Lebanon
23
11
34,629
5,966
371
40,966
Syrian Arab Republic
22
0
34,032
5,947
112
40,091
Jordan
84
34a
6
66,325
2,824
21,054
643
90,846
Gaza
16
0
40,196
29,613
0
69,809
179
17
178,006
62,580b
1,126
241,712
a Centres operated by voluntary societies.
b Average for the scholastic year.

GENERAL EDUCATION AND UNIVERSITY SCHOLARSHIPS
Table 19
UNRWA/UNESCO SCHOOLS
Number of elementary, preparatory and secondary pupils, 1951-1962
Country
1951
/952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
1902
Gaza
Elementary
19,543
22,551
25,702
31,107
34,016
35,087
34,876
35,163
34,806
36,633
36,591
37,885
Preparatory
61
164
675
1,781
3,339
4,937
6,410
7,495
8,244
8,481
9,841
10,641
Secondary
TOTAL
19,604
22,715
26,377
32,888
37,355
40,024
41,286
42,658
43,050
45,114
46,432
48,526
Jordan
Elementary
16,345
15,882
30,118
39,188
42,144
43,649
42,431
41,600
39,519
38,223
38,309
41,000
Preparatory
87
790
1,612
2,862
4,274
5,357
6,714
6,898
7,437
8,384
Secondary
22
82
200
334
495
578
612
598
875
TOTAL
15,882
30,207
40,000
43,838
46,711
47,039
47,452
46,811
45,733
46,344
50,259
16,345
Lebanon
    Elementary
4,564
6,291
9,332
11,695
12,567
12,983
13,155
13,936
14,881
15,422
16,292
17,124
    Preparatory
86
384
620
948
1,003
996
1,325
1,668
2,159
2,676
    Secondary
TOTAL
4,564
6,291
9,418
12,079
13,187
13,931
14,158
14,932
16,206
17,090
18,451
19,800
Syrian Arab Republic
Elementary
2,599
2,895
5,410
8,758
9,700
10,288
11,042
11,332
12,256
13,354
13,685
14,430
Preparatory
166
864
671
936
1,180
1,562
1,916
2,592
3,589
4,122
Secondary
TOTAL
2,599
2,895
5,576
9,622
10,371
11,224
12,222
12,894
14,172
15,946
17,274
18,552
GRAND TOTAL
Elementary
43,051
47,619
70,562
90,748
98,427
102,007
101,504
102,031
101,462
103,632
104,877
110,439
Preparatory
61
164
1,014
3,819
6,242
9,683
12,867
15,410
18,199
19,639
23,026
25,823
Secondary
22
82
200
334
495
578
612
598
875
TOTAL
43,112
47,783
71,576
94,589
104,751
111,890
114,705
117,936
120,239
123,883
128,501
137,137

Table 20
NUMBER OF REFUGEE PUPILS ATTENDING GOVERNMENT AND PRIVATE SCHOOLS AS AT
31 MAY 1962 SHOWING NUMBER FOR WHOM UNRWA PAYS SUBSIDY
Elementary
Preparatory
Secondary
Counlry
Government schools
Private schools
Government schools
Private schools
Government schools
Private schools
Total
Gaza
-
(- )
-
(- )
-
(- )
-
(- )
6,234
(3,400)
-
(- )
6,234
(3,400)
Jordan
16,258
(16,258)
7,423
(7,423)
5,266
(3,600)b
1,170
(199)
4,047
(2,400)b
858
(199)
35,022
(30,079)
Lebanon
574
(416)
5,520
(3,846)
122
(60)
2,141
(1,427)
8
(7)
1,190
(1,048)
9,555
(6,804)
Syrian Arab Republic
4,596
(4,596)
359
(359)
827
(827)
863
(863)
900
(900)
807
(807)
8,352
(8,352)
TOTAL
21,428
(21,270)
13,302
(11,628)
6,215
(4,487)
4,174
(2,489)
11,189
(6,707)
2,855
(2,054)
59,163
(48,635)
Table 21
UNRWA/UNESCO SCHOOLS SHOWING NUMBER OF PUPILS BY CRADES AS AT 31 MAY 1962
ELEMENTARY
I Elementary
II Elementary
III Elementary
IV Elementary
V Elementary
VI Elementary
Total Elementary
Country
Boys
Girls
Boys
Girls
Boys
Girls
Boys
Girls
Boys
Girls
Boys
Girls
Boys
Girls
Gaza
3,428
3,131
3,247
3,234
3,365
3,304
3,122
2,839
2,948
2,568
4,036
2,663
20,146
17,739
Jordan
5,006
4,769
4,186
3,845
4,247
3,233
3,829
2,513
3,414
1,998
2,780
1,180
23 462
17,538
Lebanon
1,804
1,509
1,861
1,469
1,751
1,399
1,647
1,226
1,567
995
1,259
637
9 889
7,235
Syrian Arab Republic
1,596
1,379
1,603
1,240
1,537
1,108
1,404
958
1,200
717
1,104
584
8,444
5,986
TOTAL
11,834
10,788
10,897
9,788
10,900
.9,044
10,002
7,536
9,129
6,278
9,179
5,064
61,941
48,498
GRAND TOTAL
22,622
20,685
19,944
17,538
15,407
14,243
110,439
PREPARATORY AND SECONDARY
I Preparatory
II Preparatory
III Preparatory
IV Preparatory
Total Preparatory
I Secondary
II Secondary
III Secondary
Total Secondary
Country
Boys
Girls
Boys
Girls
Boys
Girls
Boys
Girls
Boys
Girls
Boys
Girls
Boys
Girls
Boys
Girls
Boys
Girls
Gaza
1573
1,625
2,719
1,739
2,040
945
-
-
6,332
4,309
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Jordan
2 580
990
2,168
699
1,423
524
-
-
6,171
2,213
451
-
202
-
222
-
875
-
Lebanon
856
379
746
268
279
40
101
7
1,982
694
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Syrian Arab Republic
1,085
458
999
378
919
283
-
-
3,003
1,119
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
TOTAL
6,094
3,452
6,632
3,084
4,661
1,792
101
7
17,488
8,335
451
-
202
-
222
-
875
-
GRAND TOTAL
9,546
9,716
6,453
108
25,823
451
202
222
875
Table 22
DISTRIBUTION OF REFUGEE PUPILS RECEIVING EDUCATION AS AT 31 MAY 1962
Number of UNRWA/ UNESCO schools
Number of pupils in elementary classes of UNRWA/ UNESCO schools
Number of pupils in praparatory classes of UNRWA/ UNESCO schools
Number of pupils in secondary classes of UNRWA/ UNESCO schools
Number of pupils in government and private schools
Total number of refugee pupils receiving education
Country
Boys
Girls
Total
Boys
Girls
Total
Boys
Girls
Total
Govern-ment schools
Private schools
Gaza
85
20,146
11,739
37,885
6,332
4,309
10,641
-
-
-
6,234
-
54,760
Jordan
173
23,462
17538
41,000
6,171
2,213
8,384
875
-
875
25,571a
9,451a
85,281
Lebanon
62
9,889
7235
17 124
1,982
694
2,676
-
-
-
704
8,851
29,355
Syrian Arab Republic
78
8,444
5,986
14430
3,003
1,119
4,122
-
-
-
6,323
2,029
26,904
TOTAL
398
61,941
48,498
110,439
17,488
8,335
25,823
875
-
815
38,832
20,331
196,300
a Figures are provosional
Table 23
DISTRIBUTION OF UNRWA SCHOLARSHIP-HOLDERS BY FACULTIES, 1961 - 1962
Country
Agri-
culture
Arts and sciences
Com-
merce
Dentis-
try
Engine-
ering
Forestry
Medicine
Phar- macy
Sani-
tation
Total
Vacan- cies
Gaza
2
26
1
1
40
-
45
10
1
126a
-
Jordan
1
55
1
3
57
1
65
5
1
189b
1
Lebanon
-
37
-
1
25
-
12
-
1
76c
4
Syrian Arab Republic
2
9
2
1
31
2
17
6
-
70d
3
TOTAL
5
127
4
6
153
3
139
21
3
461
8
a Including 9 ARAMCO scholarships and 7 additional scholarships made possible by exemptions awarded by the Government of the united Arab Republic to Outstandingly successful scholars.
b Including 14 ARAMCO scholarships.
c Including 7 ARAMCO scholarships.
d Including 6 ARAMCO scholarships and 12 additional scholarships made available from savings which accrued on account of the delay in starting the academic year.

VOCATIONAL AND TEACHER TRAINING
Table 24
VOCATIONAL AND TEACHER TRAINING FACILITIES AND OUTPUT, 1952 - 1962
Initial date of operation
Annual output 1952-1962
(Provisio- nal)1962
Cumulative output 1952-1962
1952
1953
1954
1955
1956
1957
1958
1959
1960
1961
Vocational Training Centre, Kalandia, JordanFebruary 1954
-
-
-
136
39
37
130
79
193
157
194
965
Vocational Training Centre, Wadi Seer, JordanSeptember 1960
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
64
183
247
Vocational Training Centre, GazaSeptember 1954
-
-
-
29
144
-
122
32
139
45
124
635
Vocational Training Centre, Damascus, Syrian Arab RepublicNovember 1961
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
16
16
Rural Training Centre, Beit Hanoun, GazaSeptember 1961
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Teacher-training Centre for men, Ramallah JordanSeptember 1960
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
99
99
Teacher-training Centre for women, RamallahJanuary 1959
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
11
25
19
46
101
Teacher-training courses, GazaSeptember 1961
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Teacher-training courses, CairoSeptember 1961
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
Secretarial evening courses, Beirut and Tripoli, LebanonJanuary 1952
30
29
-
74
64
14
18
30
28
30
30
347
TOTAL
30
29
-
239
247
51
270
152
385
315
692
2,410
Table 25
FORECAST OF CAPACITY AND OUTPUT OF VOCATIONAL AND TEACEIER-TRAINING CENTRES PROGRAMME, 1962 - 1963 AND 1963 - 1964
Capacity: Total number of trainee places
Enrolment: Number of trainee places available in current year
Graduates: Assuming 100 per cent enrolment
1962-1963
1963-1964
Centre
Capacity
Enrolment
Graduates
Capacity
Enrolment
Graduates
Kalandia Vocational Training Centre
392
344
272
392
392
184
Wadi Seer Vocational Training Centre
404
404
200
396
396
264
Ramallah Men's Teacher-Training Centre
400
300
100
400
400
100
Ramallah Girls' Vocational Training Centre /Teacher-Training Centre
633
294
50
633
538
-
Gaza Vocational Training Centre
368
276
128
368
368
80
Beit Hanoun Rural Training Centre
75
50
75
75
Khan Younis Vocational Training Centre
80
48
Damascus Vocational Training Centre
392
376
16
392
392
196
HomsVocationalTrainingCenter/Teacher- Training Centre
192
144
384
276
72
Siblin Vocational Training Centre
396
288
-
396
396
88
Siblin Technical and Teacher-Training Institute
264
157
Teacher Training U A R
120
60
-
120
90
Teacher Training Gaza
480
240
-
480
360
YWCA - Lebanon
30
30
30
30
30
30
GRAND TOTAL
3,882
2,806
796
4,410
3,918
1,014
FINANCE
Table 26
SUMMARY STATEMENT OF INCOME EXPENDITURE AND WORKING CAPITAL OF UNRWA
1 MAY 1950 - 31 DECEMBER 1962
(in U.S. dollars)
Income
Adjustments to working capital e increase (decrease)
For the period
Contributions from the Governments
Other income
Total income
Expenditure
Free working capital at programme end
1 May 1950 to 30 June 1951
39,477,279
1,346,325
40,823,604
33,598,972b
-
7,224,632
1 July 1951 to 30 June 1952
67,686,495
1,018,785
68,705,280
28,573,058
215,792
47,572,646
1 July 1952 to 30 June 1953
26,867,673
440,419
27,308,092
26,778,934
518,220
48,620,024
1 July 1953 to 30 June 1954
22684,330
575,024
23,259,354
29,192,012
(157,264)
42,530,102
1 July 1954 to 30 June 1955
23,673,500
594,161
24,267,661
29,222,705
(114,217)
37,460,841
1 July 1955 to 30 June 1956
23,345,073
571,866
23,916,939
32,198,550
(164,814)
29,014,416
1 July 1956 to 31 December 1957
42,373,871
1,072,872
43,446,743
52,464,139
198,575
20,195,595
1 January 1958 to 31 December 1958
32,626,867
1,104,793
33,731,660
32,777,564
36,519
21,186,210
1 January 1959 to 31 December 1959
32,719,880
1,405,205d
34,125,085d
35,015,817
110,688
20,406,166
1 January 1960 to 31 December 1960
33,731,109d
2,629,135d
33,360,244d
34,674,460
150084
22,242,034
1 January 1961 to 31 December 1961
34,385,495d
2,306,293d
36,691,788d
39,051,521
194,943
20,077,244
1 January 1962 to 31 December 1962
33,905,188d e
2,300,000e
36,205,188e
37,435,000e
-
18,847,432.
413,476,760
15,364,878
428,841,638
410,982,732
988,526
a,There has been a change this year in the basis of the figures in this table. Previously they were based on the Agency's audited statements but this year are modified as follows in order to relate to each year income intended for that year (regardless of when received) and expenditure against that year's budget (regardless of when actually incurred):
(i) The figures of income for each year consist of government pledges for that year (regardless of when actually paid) and other income when actually received.
(ii) The figures of expenditure for each year include all commitments against that year's budget (even if actual expenditures were made in a subsequent year) and exclude any expenditure against a prior year's budget.
b Includes $2,646,909 deficit of United Nations Relief for Palestine Refugees paid by UNRWA.
c Adjustments to working capital are those reflected in the audited statements and consist principally of expenditure adjustments made in subsequent years, usually the year following the year to which the adjustment applies.
d Includes special contributions for World Refugee Year or Vocational /Teacher-Training scholarships and related purposes.
e Estimated figures.

Table 27
DETAILED STATEMENT OF INCOME TO UNRWA, 1 MAY 1950 - 31 DECEMBER 1962
(In U.S. dollars)
For the period
1/5/50 to
12 months ended
18 month ended
12 months ended
Contributor
30/6/51
30/6/52
30/6/53
30/6/54
30/6/55
30/6/56
31/12/57
31/12/58
31/12/59
31/12/60
31/12/61
31/12/62e
Total income
I CONTRIBUTIONS FROM GOVERNMENTS
Australia
600,000
440,803
112,500
112,500
112,500
212,000
195,200
190,400
196,000
201,600
201,600
2,575,103
Austria
1,400
700
700
700
1,050
1,400
2,000
2,000
2,000
2,000
13,950
Bahrein
20,927
980
1,960
23,867
Belgium
6,000
30,000
30,000
30,000
30,000
50,000
20,000
30,000
20,000
30,000
30,000
306,000
Bolivia
5,000
5,000
Brazil
25,000
25,000
Burma
2,000
3,528
2,972
1,046
9,546
Cambodia
2,000
2,000
857
571
571
571
6,570
Canada
1,400,313
600,000
515,000
515,000
500,000
771,875
2,075,000
2,075,000
3,060,000
2,069,500
925,000
14,506,688
Ceylon
1,400
1,000
1,000
3,400
Cyprus
560
563
1,123
Cuba
5,000
5,000
Denmark
14,500
43,500
43,478
43,478
43,478
43,478
43,478
72,400
43,440
43,440
43,440
50,680
528,790
Dominican Republic
5,000
5,000
El Salvador
500
500
Ethiopia
25,500
10,000
35,500
Finland
1,000
2,000
10,000
13,000
France
2,857,143
2,571,428
2,075,506
1,233,411
871,504
599,133
308,049
252,305
264,002
1S2,757
182,209
192,195
11,589,642
Gambia
30
30
Gaza Authorities
19,157
22,986
129,592
130,045
124,721
93,280
519,781
Germany, Federal Republic of
23,810
16,603
24,997
190,476
238,095
238,095
250,000
625,000
1,607,076
Ghana
3,000
3,000
3,000
3,000
12,000
Greece
56,287
21,000
2,730
6,000
11,000
16,500
39,000
15,000
17,500
15,000
15,000
215,017
Haiti
2,000
2,000
2,000
6,000
Honduras
2,500
2,500
Holy See
1,000
10,965
1,000
12,965
India
104,000
52,500
31,499
15,756
10,504
13,235
21,008
21,008
269,510
Indonesia
30,000
60,000
60,000
30,000
30,000
30,000
240,000
Iran
5,138
3,350
2,666
5,333
5,666
6,000
6,000
6,000
40,153
Ireland
2,814
7,000
14,062
20,000
43,876
Israel
114,354
5,207
1,029
171,573
292,163
Italy
20,000
39,953
120,518
80,000
80,000
S0,000
420,471
Japan
10,000
10,000
10,000
20,000
10,000
10,000
12,500
10,000
tO,OOO
102,500
Jordan
229,804
184,996
154,000
174,403
100,935
99,045
98,550
98,280
98,280
1,238,293
Korea
2,000
2,000
1,500
1,000
6,500
Kuwait
31,500
131,250
220,000
382,750
Laos
1,000
500
2,707
Lebanon
335,533
14,385
13,689
13,689
12,164
11,652
7,788
23,844
23,844
40,125
41,126
537,839
Liberia
5,000
6,500
5,000
5,000
5,000
26,500
Libya
14,000
10,000
24,000
Luxembourg
2,000
2,000
2,000
2,000
2,000
2,000
2,000
2,000
2,000
2,000
2,000
2,000
24,000
Malaya
1,500
3,000
1,500
1,500
1,500
9,000
Mexico
115,691
115,691
Monaco
285
286
286
286
286
2,381
203
204
1,224
204
5,645
Morocco
5,714
4,762
4,796
4,000
40,750
19,763
79,785
Netherlands
25,000
25,000
25,000
25,000
32,895
64,474
32,895
65,790
65,790
69,061
110,497
541,402
New Zealand
210,000
140,000
140,000
140,000
140,000
238,000
140,000
140,000
168,000
140,000
139,800
1,735,800
Norway
60,000
14,000
42,097
42,000
42,135
42,135
63,202
49,000
42,000
42,000
42,000
49,000
529,569
Pakistan
90,000
90,000
90,453
30,151
30,151
21,000
41,964
20,964
20,964
22,014
20,953
20,964
499,578
Philippines
10,000
1,250
11,250
Qatar
20,895
10,500
10,500
41,895
Rhodesia and Nyasaland
19,600
19,600
39,200
Saudi Arabia
37,650
115,000
40,000
40,000
40,000
94,706
172,421
171,038
200,000
100,000
100,000
100,000
1,210,815
Spain
16,667
16,667
Sudan
144,000
4,200
2,870
2,870
153,940
Sweden
19,310
58,000
57,915
57,915
57,915
86,872
96,873
57,915
57,915
57,915
57,915
666,460
Switzerland
58,409
70,093
35,045
35,046
34,884
216,116
449,595
Syrian Arab Republic
171,263
125,673
63,948
29,203
82,419
74,900
110,415
76,498
81,909
83,474
74,439
78,000
1,052,141
Thailand
3,125
3,125
Tunisia
2,000
2,000
2,000
2,000
8,000
Turkey
10,357
5,357
5,045
5,000
5,000
5,000
8,000
43,759
United Arab Republic
418,219
718,280
546,633
219,858
277,143
224,924
182,182
228,850
326,324
339,083
418,397
292,756
4,252,649
United Kingdom Of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
6,200,000
12,400,001
6,200,001
5,000,000
4,500,000
4,500,000
8,100,002
5,600,000
5,400,000
5,624,000
5,400,000
5,400,000
74,324,004
United States Of America.
27,450,000
50,000,000
16,000,000
15,000,000
16,700,000
16,700,000
31,372,000
22,996,069
23,000,000
23,000,000
24,350,000
24,700,000
291,268,069
Uruguay
5,000
_
_
_
_
_
_
5,000
Viet-Nam
5,000
6,000
_
2,500
2,500
2,500
18,500
Yugoslavia
68,700
40,000
40,000
40,000
40,000
40,000
40,000
40,000
40,000
40,000
40,000
468,700
Sundry Governments through World Refugee Year Stamp Plan
238,211
8,000
246,211
TOTAL GOVERN5SENT CONTRIBUTIONS
39,477,279
67,686,495
26,867,673
22,684,330
23,673,500
23,345,073
42,373,871
32,626,867
32,719,880
33,731,109b
34,385,495b
33,905,188b
413,476,760
IL CONTRIBUTIONS FROM OTHERS
UNESCO
83,396
25,425
105,000
35,000
55,535
102,140
160,372
82,268
114,916
164,121
186,703
268,000
1,382,876
WHO
42,857
42,857
42,857
42,857
58,706
53,150
33,029
33,610
25,251
27,582
54,000
456,759
Sundry donors
781,200
598,647
54,022
83,091
43,906
39,976
88,423
142,075
254,392
1,118,52X
986,243
1,478,000
5,668,503
TOTAL CONTRIBUTION FROM OTHERS
907,453
624,072
201,879
160,948
142,298
200,822
301,945
257,372
402,918
1,307,903
1,200,528
1,800,000
7,508,138
III. MISCELLANEOUS INCOME AND EXCHANGE ADJUSTMENTS
438,872
394,713
238,540
414,076
451,863
371,044
770,927
847,421
1,002,287
1,321,232
1,105,765
500,000
7,856,740
TOTAL INCOME
40,823,604
68,705,280
27,308,092
23,259,354
24,267,661
23,916,939
43,446,743
33,731,660
34,125,085
36,360,244
36,691,788
36,205,188
428,841,638
a There has been a change this year in the basis of the figures in this table as described in note a to table 26.
b Includes special contributions for World Refugee Year or vocational/teacher-training scholarships and belated purposes as wcii as regular contributions.
c Estimated figures.

Table 28
STATEMENT OF EXTRA-BUDGETARY FUNDS RECEIVED OR PLEDGED FOR EXPANSION OF EDUCATION, TRAINING AND INDIVIDUAL ASSISTANCE FROM WORLD REFUGEE YEAR AND RELATED SOURCES FOR THE PERIOD 1 JULY 1959 TO 31 DECEMBER 1961 a
(In U.S. dollars)
Contributor
World Refugee Year
Related sources
Total
Governments
    Burma
1,046
1,046
    Cambodia
286
286
    Canada
1,020,000
1,020,000
    Cuba
5000
5000
    Federation of Malaya
1,500
1,500
    Gambia
30
30
    Greece
2,500
2,500
    Holy See
11,965
11,965
    Japan
2,500
2,500
    Kuwait
131,250
131250
    Liberia
1,500
1,500
    Morocco
36,750
36,750
    New Zealand
28,000
28000
    Pakistan
1,050
1,050
    Thailand
3,125
3,125
    United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland b
224,000
224,000
    United States of America d
500,000
500,000
    Viet-Nam
2,500
2,500
    Sundry Governments through World Refugee Year Stamp Plan
246,211
246,211
TOTAL FROM GOVERNMENTS
1,551,213
668,000
2,219,213
Others
    Arabian American Oil Company
20,000
30,000
50,000
    Australian World Refugee Year Committee
82,875
82,875
    Canadian Committee for World Refugee Year
156,198
156,198
    Children of Canada
71400
71,400
    CORSO, New Zealand
91,093
91,093
    Danish World Refugee Year Committee
144,839
144,839
    Farnsworth, Ann Labouisse, U.S.A
14,400
14,400
    Furse, William, U.K
500
500
    German National World Refugee Year Committee
237,500
231500
    Iranian World Refugee Year Committee
9,000
9,000
    Jamaican National Refugee Council
3,050
3,050
    Irish Red Cross
42,005
42,005
    Netherlands Committee for World Refugee Year
30,676
30,676
    Norwegian World Refugee Year Committee
79,632
79,632
    Philippine National Committee for World Refugee Year
6,368
6,368
    Order of St. John of Jerusalem, U.K
2,380
2,380
    Oxford University Committee for World Refugee Year
840
840
    Swedish Broadcasting Relief Committee
25,697
25,697
    Swedish Red Cross
20,000
20,COO
    Uganda World Refugee Year Appeal
7,096
7,096
    United Kingdom Committee for World Refugee Year
1,015,000
1,015,000
    United Nations Secretariat staffs
10.241
10,241
    Viet-Nam Committee for World Refugee Year
28,282
28,282
    World Refugee Year television and film show
9,231
9,251
    Sundry donors through World Refugee Year Stamp Plan
28,389
28,389
    Sundry donors and interest earned
86,872
86,872
TOTAL FROM OTHERS
2,209,184
44,400
2,253,584
GRAND TOTAL
3,760,397c
712,400
4,472,797c

a The contributions shown in this table are included in tables 26 and 27 and are not additional
b The contributions of the United Kingdom were received through the United Kingdom Committee for World Refugee Year.
c Includes $48,641 of pledges still unpaid at 31 July 1962.
d Apart from this special contribution of 5500,000, the United States Government has in-creased Its regular contribution for its fiscal year ended 30 June 1962 by $1,700 000, the increase being earmarked by it for the Agency's vocational training programme. A similar increase is intended for the fiscal year ending 30 June 1963.

Table 29
STATEMENT OF EXTRA-BUDGETARY FENDS RECEIVED OR PLEDGED FOR THE VOCATIONAL TRAINING SCHOLARSHIP FUND AND RELATED PURPOSES AS AT 30 JUNE 1962 a
(In U.S. dollars)
Received in 1961 and prior years
For 1962
For 1963
Contributor
Description
Receipts
Pledges
Total
Receipts
Pledges
Total
Governments
FinlandU.S. dollars
10,000
10,000
10,000
10,000
KuwaitU.S. dollars
100,000
100,000
NorwayNorwegian crowns, 50,000
7,000
7,000
Saudi Arabia U.S. dollars
100,000
SwedenbCash
700,000
700,000
SwitzerlandSwiss francs, 173,000
40,232
40,232
SwitzerlandSwiss francs, 173,000
8,047
32,185
40,232
Switzerland300 tons of whole milk Powder
49,224
83,816
133,040
Switzerland14 tons of cheese
7,960
7,960
Others
American Federation of Labor and Congress of Industrial Organizations, U.S.A.U.S. dollars
5,000
5,000
American Machine and Foundry (AMF) U.S.A.Athletic supplies
5,000
5,000
American Middle East Relief (AMER) U.S.A.Aspirin
2,897
2,897
American Middle East Relief (AMER) U.S.A.Medical supplies
4,818
— —
American Middle East Relief (AMER) U.S.A.Vaseline
3,056
3,056
American Middle East Relief (AMER), U.S.Medical supplies
1,662
1,662
American Middle East Relief (AMER), U.S.A.Medical supplies
3,170
3,170
Arabian American Oil Co., Saudi Arabia, U.S. dollars
10,000
10,000
Viscount Astor, U.K.Pounds sterling, 800
2,240
2,240
The Australian National Committee for W.R.YAustralian pounds, 5,400
12,096
12,096
British Council of ChurchesPounds sterling, 15,000
28,000
14,000
42,000
Canadian Junior Red CrossCanadian dollars, 50,000
23,125
23,125
46,250
CARITAS, AustriaAustrian schillings, 100,000
3,905
3,905
Catholic Women's League, U.KPounds sterling, 5,000
14,000
14,000
Christian Women's Fellowship of First Christian Church, U.S.AU.S. dollars
1,000
Christian Women's Fellowship of the National Christian Church, U.S.AU.S. dollars
1,500
1,000
1,000
Leslie H. Colls, U.KPounds sterling. 200
560
560
Co-operative for American Remittances to Everywhere (C.A.R.E.) Tool kits
11,224
11,224
Michael E. Dawe, U.KPounds sterling, 175
490
490
Dhahran Women's Group, Saudi ArabiaU.S. dollars
500
500
Finnish Association of Girl GuidesFinnish marks, 1,000,000
3,125
3,125
Freedom from Hunger Campaign, U.KPounds Sterling, 31,680
88,704
88,704
Futures for Children, U.S.AU.S. dollars
68
236
236
Mr. and Mrs. F. M. Gilliat, U.S.AU.S. dollars
500
500
500
500
W. E. Golcher, U.KPounds sterling, 180
504
504
Miss M. Elizabeth Gow, U.KPounds sterling, 360
1,008
1,008
Mr. and Mrs. D. C. Henderson, CanadaCanadian dollars, 2,500
2,376
2,376
Alan Henderson, CanadaCanadian dollars, 1.000
951
951
International Confederation of Free Trade Unions, BelgiumU.S. dollars
1,000
1,000
Irish Red CrossU.S. dollars
626
Lady Knight, U.KPounds sterling, 5.5.-
15
15
Dr. Joseph E. Johnson, U.S.AU.S. dollars
400
400
W. S. May, U.KPounds sterling, 180
504
504
MISEREOR, Federal Republic of GermanyGerman marks, 200,000
50,000
50,000
Mount Holyoke College, U.S.AU.S. dollars
150
350
350
NAJDA, American Women for the Middle EastU.S. dollars
500
500
1,000
New Zealand Council of Organizations for Relief Overseas (CORSO) Pounds sterling, 2,265
6,342
Ottinger Foundation, Inc., U.S.AU.S. dollars
1,000
1,000
Oxford Committee for Famine Relief, U.KPounds sterling, 12,000
33,600
33,600
Oxford University Refugee Committee, U.KPounds sterling, 50
140
140
David Rockefeller, U.S.AU.S. dollars
10,075
10,075
Miss M. Rogers, U.KPounds sterling, 180
504
504
Swedish Red Cross Sulfamides and vitamins
1,323
1,323
Swedish Save the Children FundSwedish crowns, 41,500
8,012
8,012
Miss Catherine Symonds, U.KPounds sterling, 180
504
504
Theosophical Order of Service, U.KPounds sterling, 360
504
504
504
504
Trustees of Princeton University, U.S.A.U.S. dollars
196
196
United Nations Association of Great Britain and Northern IrelandPounds sterling, 5,535
14,000
1,498
1,498
United Nations Staff Fund for Refugees, Switzerland Swiss francs, 4,320 and U.S. dollars 1,000
1,005
1,000
2,005
United Steel Workers of AmericaU.S. dollars
1,000
1,000
U.S. Omen, U.S.A.Medical supplies
1
1
Victorian Division of the United Nations Association of AustraliaAustralian pounds, 450
1,008
1,008
War on Want, U.KPounds sterling, 500
1,400
1,400
Zonta Clubs, North European AreaU.S. dollars
500
500
500
500
128,504
244,264
432,961
677,225
8,047
743,689
751,736
a The contributions shown in this table are included in tables 26 and 27 and are not additional thereto.
b Negotiations are in progress with the Swedish Government which will result in a contribution to the Vocational Training programme of at least $700,000.
c Nominal value only.
d In addition to these special contributions, the United States Government has increased its regular contribution for its fiscal year ended 30 June 1962, by 51,700,000, the increase being earmarked by it for the Agency's vocational training programme. A similar increase is intended for the fiscal year ending 30 June 1963.

Table 30
DIRECT CONTRIBUTIONS FROM GOVERNMENTS TO REFUGEES a FOR THE YEAR ENDED 30 JUNE 1962
(In U.S. dollars)
Contributor
Education services
Social welfare services
Medical services
Housing
Security services
Miscellaneous services
Administrative costs
Total
Jordan
1,016,387
228,093
489,154
94,500
42,000
1,870,134
Lebanon
33,333
25,000
150,000
208,333
Syrian Arab Republic
430,556
254,167
198,906
951,389
277,778
93,512
283,333
2,489,641
United Arab Republic
627,176
248,801
44,037
104,512
20,871
1,045,397
France
19,304
19,304
2,126,756
731,061
757,097
951,389
476,790
156,383
433,333
5,632,809

a In addition to the foregoing contributions direct to the refugees all Governments listed also made contributions to UNRWA for the latter's budget. These contributions are reported in the Agency's own accounts and are set out in tables 26 and 27. It is also to be noted that UNRWA (and, in some cases, voluntary agencies working with the refugees) enjoy exemption from customs duties and taxes. In addition, the cost of the normal services provided by the host Governments is increased by reason of utilization of these services by refugees.

All data shown are based upon information provided by the Governments concerned, and are expressed in dollars computed by applying the Agency's accounting rates of exchange, which are based on official or free market rates as appropriate.
UNRWA PERSONNEL
Table 31
STAFF EMPLOYED BY UNRWA AT 31 DECEMBER 1960 AND AT 31 DECEMBER 1961



Locally recruited staff
International staff
Year
Monthly paid
Daily paid
Total
UNRWA
Seconded and loaned from other United Nations organs
Total
Grand total
31 December 1960
6,958
3,745
10,703
126
20
146
10,849
31 December 1961
7,388
3,907
11,295
136
28
164
11,459

Notes: (1) Virtually all locally recruited staff are refugees. (2). The over-all increase of about 5.5 per cent between 1960 and 1961 is almost entirely due to the expansion of the Agency's vocational training programme, including the construction of vocational training centres.

Part II
BUDGET FOR THE CALENDAR YEAR 1963
A. Introduction

117. The Agency's 1963 budget covers the final year of the three-year plan set forth by the Commissioner-General in his report for 1959-1960.5 Since the General Assembly has not yet resolved the question of an extension of the Agency's mandate, the estimates have been divided into tuo to show the estimated cost of the Agency's planned operations for the first half of the year (i.e. to 30 June 1963) and again similarly for the second half (from 1 Julv to 31 December 1963). For the year the total estimated expenditure is $39,633,000, of which $26,300,000 are for relief services, $12,533,000 for the expanded programme in education and technical training and $0.8 million for operational reserve. In the event that the Agency's mandate is not extended beyond 30 June 1963, only the first half-year estimates would apply

118. In preparing its 1963 budget, the Agency has had to recognize that little or no progress has been made in solving the political aspects of the Palestine refugee problem, and that the total relief needs of the refugees will probably be about the same as in 1962, while the requirements for education and technical training will be considerably greater. The Agency proposes to hold relief expenditures at the same level as in 1961, while "providing for increased enrolment in elementary and secondary schools and the completion of its three-year plan of expansion in technical education.

119. The revised estimates of expenditure for 1962 are also given in this presentation of the Agency's 1963 budget to provide a realistic basis of comparison. The original 1962 budget called for $39.2 million, including $27.4 million for relief services, $11 million for education, technical training and individual assistance and $0.8 million for operational reserve. Unexpectedly favourable basic commodity prices, however, now promise to save the Agency more than $1 million under relief services, and certain other minor items have been reduced or deferred within the relief programme to permit further savings. Total estimated expenditure in education, technical training and individual assistance for 1962 is about the same as in the original budget.

120. The Agency does not intend to reduce the per capita relief for eligible and needy refugees, although it does propose to hold total relief expenditure in 1963 to the 1962 level ($26.3 million), provided basic commodity prices remain substantially at 1962 levels. 121. In the programme of general (elementary and secondary) education, there will be continued expansion in 1963, as increasing numbers of children remain in school throughout the elementary and preparatory cycles. Because of lack of funds few improvements are provided for, although many ought to be made, particularly in classroom occupancy, expansion of the manual skills programme, the development of home economics training and the provision of facilities for science laboratory training.

122. The 1963 budget provides for only limited expansion of technical training facilities (one new unit to cover operating costs necessitated by the increased utilization of the training capacity of established centres as second-year classes are added. The programme of university scholarships will also remain at about the 1962 level

123. Since progress in utilizing funds for individual assistance or special projects has been slow during the past year, there is no provision for increasing the amount available for this purpose.

124. Paragraphs 125 to 159 below present by general categories the 1963 estimates of expenditure, as well as the revised estimates for 1962. The problem of financing the 1963 budget is discussed in paragraphs 160 to 164. Taking into account expected income from other sources, the Commissioner-General urges contributing Governments, in the event that the Agency's mandate is extended beyond 30 June 1963, to increase their contributions from the estimated 1962 level of $33.6 million to $36.7 million for 1963. The Agency emphasizes that this level of contributions is essential if the programme Of general and technical education, so necessary to the future of the refugees, is to be maintained.

__________________
5/ A/4478, pares. 18-44.
B. Estimates of expenditure
GENERAL

125. The Agency's estimates for expenditure in 1963, divided between the two half years as explained above are summarized in the following table:

BUDGET ESTIMATES FOR 1963
(Expressed in thousa1rds of U.S. dollars)
1963 budget
1962 estimated expenditure
Activity
1st half-year
2nd half-year
Total
Part I. Relief services
Basic subsistence
5,761
5,762
11,523
114,20
Supplementary feeding
726
727
1,453
1,461
Health care
1,561
1,561
3,122
3,099
Environmental sanitation
476
477
953
961
Shelter (including roads and camp improvements)
348
348
696
734
Social welfare
357
.358
715
708
Placement and registration
165
166
3351
295
Transport within the UNRWA area
1,480
1,480
2,960
2,971
Supply control and warehousing
349
350
699
752
Internal services
1,255
1,255
2,510
2,522
General administration and liaison
591
592
1,183
1,175
TOTAL OF PART I
13,146
13,154
26,300
26,300
Part II. Education, technical training and individual assistance
Elementary and secondary education
4,565
4,565
9,130
7,989
Vocational and university education
1,701
1,702
3,403
2,968
Projects and special activities
178
TOTAL OF PART II
6,266
6,267
12,533
11,135
SUB TOTAL OF PARTS I AND II
19,412
19,421
38,833
37,435
Part III. Operational Reserve
400
400
800
GRAND TOTAL
19,812
19,821
39 633
37,435
BASIC SUBSISTENCE
1st half-year
2nd half-year
Total
1963 Budget
$5,761,500
$5,761,500
$11,523,000
1962 Estimated expenditure
$11,420,000

126. Basic subsistence continues to require the largest appropriation of Agency funds. The budget covers costs of basic commodities CIF Agency ports of entry, quality control, and distribution at all distribution centres. Transport within the area and warehousing, however, are budgeted separately. The per capita scale of distribution, which remains unchanged from that of 1962, comprises:

Type of rationQuantity
(i)
Basic food ration (consisting of dry food commodities—flour, rice, pulses, sugar, cooking oil etc.)1,500 calories per day in summer and l,600calories per day in winter
(ii)
Soap150 grammes per month
(iii)
BlanketsOne per beneficiary every three years
(iv)
Kerosene1 litre per month for five winter months in Gaza.
1.5 litres per month for five winter months in Lebanon, Syrian Arab Republic and Jordan

127. Basic commodity expenditures in 1963 have been estimated as carefully as possible, using prices only slightly higher than the unusually low prices which have prevailed in the first half of 1962. Normal salary increases and related adjustments also tend to increase the pressure on costs. Certain economies in quality control and ration distribution are expected to offset part of these increased costs, leaving a net estimate for basic subsistence that is $103,000 above the revised estimate for 1962.
SUPPLEMENTARY FEEDING
1st half-year
2nd half-year
Total
1963 Budget
$ 726,500
$ 726,500
$ 1,453,000
1962 Estimated expenditure
$ 1,461,000

128. Provisions in 1963 are limited to providing the following supplements to the basic ration for vulnerable categories:

Type of ration
Calories per day
Type of beneficiary
(i)
Combined whole/skim milk
256
Babies 6 months to one year, and certain others
(ii)
Skim milk
125
Children aged 1-15
Nursing mothers
Pregnant women
Special medical cases
(iii)
One hot meal six days per week
600/700
Special cases medically certified to be in need of extra food
(iv)
Special ration of flour, rice, etc
500
Nursing mothers
Pregnant women
(v)
Special ration of flour, rice, etc
1,500/1,600
Non-hospitalized tuberculosis cases
(vi)
Vitamin capsules
School and other children

These estimates include the costs of the necessary food items, preparing and serving the supplementary hot meals, reconstituting the dried milk powder and distributing the liquid milk. (Transport within the area and warehousing, however, are budgeted separately.)

129. Formerly only whole milk was provided for all babies up to one year of age. Following a study of the nutrition needs of this age group. it was decided during 1962 to alter this ration to a mixture of whole and skim milk and to provide it only for babies aged 6 months to one year and to babies under 6 months who are not breast-fed. The new ration provides slightly less fat and considerably more calcium and protein than the old ration and costs considerably less.

130. Economies resulting from this modification of the milk programme are estimated at approximately $60 000 in 1963. Part of this saving is to be utilized for increasing the number of recipients of the supplementary hot meal from 47,400 to 50,000 and part to improve sub-standard feeding centres. Even allowing for normal staff cost increases and other adjustment, the budget for this item is slightly smaller for 1963 than for 1962.
HEALTH CARE
1st half-year
2nd half-year
Total
1963 Budget
$1,561,000
$1,561,000
$3,122,000
1962 Estimated expenditure
$3,099,000

131. The total health care programme provides extensive services for almost a million persons through the operation of general clinics, hospitals and laboratories and dental treatment, maternal and child care, tuberculosis control, mental health care, school health service, health education, epidemiological measures, preventive medicine services and other necessary health measures and precautions. Although the health care budget is large, it represents only about 26 U.S. cents per person per month; even when the costs of the supplementary feeding programme and of environmental sanitation have been added, the total budget for health services only reaches 45 cents per person per month The efficacy of the service may be inferred from the freedom from serious epidemics or other health catastrophes which has prevailed during more than twelve years, despite the adverse conditions under which the refugees live.

132. The net increase of 23 000 in the total health in the total health care budget for 1963 includes only normal staff cost increases and essential in-service training to maintain reasonably efficient service. The increase is partially offset by the omission of provision for either construction or replacement of clinics or maternity centres.
ENVIRONMENTAL SANITATION
1st half-year
2nd half-year
Total
1963 Budget
$ 476,500
$ 476,500
$ 953,000
1962 Estimated expenditure
$ 961,000
133. "Environmental sanitation" includes surface water drainage, refuse and sewage disposal, water supply, insect and rodent control, ancillary camp facilities (such as bath-houses, incinerators and slaughter houses) and basic sanitation services in villages of the Gaza Strip, where refugees comprise 70 per cent of the inhabitants. These services will be provided for approximately 478,000 refugees officially accommodated in camps and for a further 40,000 "squatters" on the outskirts of organized UNRWA camps.

134. Provision is being made for sanitation services for an increased camp population (from approximately 465,000 at the end of 1962 to approximately 478,000 at the end of 1963), a sewage system at Homs (Syrian Arab Republic), essential improvements in water supply (in Lebanon, Jordan and Gaza) and normal staff cost increases. On balance, the 1963 budget is $8,000 less than estimated expenditure in 1962, principally because of a reduction in capital construction.
SHELTER
1st half-year
2nd half-year
Total
1963 Budget
$ 348,000
$ 348,000
$ 696,000
1962 Estimated expenditure
$ 734,000

135. The shelter programme includes construction, repair and maintenance of shelter provided for refugees by the Agency (including grants in cash or in kind for
roofing to refugees who construct their own shelter), the costs of allocating and controlling the use of shelter and otherwise administering the programme, and the expenditures for construction, repair and maintenance of roads and paths, and associated drainage facilities.

136. The budget item for shelter construction in 1963 amounts to $400,000 out of the total of $696,000. This represents a reduction of $50,000 as compared with the similar provision for 1962 and provides only for the more urgent cases of social changes within existing camps, assistance for destitute cases and the limited replacement of the worst of the present sub-standard shelters and "squatters" huts in the precincts of organized camps (especially in Jordan). Some provision also has been made for necessary additional roads in existing and expanded camps, the maintenance of old roads, and normal staff cost increases. On balance the budget for 1963 is $38000 below that of 1962.
SOCIAL WELFARE
1st half-year
2nd half-year
Total
1963 Budget
$ 357,500
$ 357,.000
$ 715,000
1962 Estimated expenditure
$ 708,000

137. These estimates include the costs of all welfare activities. The largest single item is transport and distribution of used clothing donated for refugees by voluntary organizations. Welfare activities also include case work among individuals, burial grants, aid to religious institutions and community projects in refugee camps and villages. Community projects have received increasing emphasis in recent years, especially crafts training for adults and youth activities designed to combat idle ness and stimulate self reliance. The net increase of $7,000 for 1963 is required to meet the increase in normal staff costs.
PLACEMENT SERVICES
1st half-year
2nd half-year
Total
1963 Budget
$ 77,500
$ 77,500
$ 155,000
1962 Estimated expenditure
$ 202,000

138. This service assists those qualified refugees who apply for help to find suitable employment. It also provides grants for subsistence and travel to refugees who request it after having obtained for themselves valid travel documents and proof of employment in other localities.

139. The net reduction of $47,000 is due to two factors: a decrease in the number of cases of assisted emigration and the fact that it will not be necessary in 1963 to repeat the provision this year for a special survey of employment prospects for graduates from the Agency's training centres.
ELIGIBILITY AND REGISTRATION
1st half-year
2nd half-year
Total
1963 Budget
$ 165,500
$ 165,500
$ 331,000
1962 Estimated expenditure
$ 295,000

140. Eligibility and registration activities include investigations to determine eligibility and maintenance of records with respect to changes in family status by reason of births, marriages, or deaths; changes of location; transfers to other categories of entitlement with respect to rations or service benefits; and systematic checks on eligibility rolls as a means of keeping them as accurate as possible.

141. For 1963 provision has been made not only for normal staff cost increases but also for added staff, equipment and operations which are essential for rectifying the ration rolls.

TRANSPORT WITHIN THE UNRWA AREA

1st half-year
2nd half-year
Total
1963 Budget
$1,480,0.00
$1,480,000
$2,960,000
1962 Estimated expenditure
$2,971,000

142. The Agency's transport system covers both passenger and freight movements by road, rail, sea or air within the UNRWA area (whether by Agency-owned vehicles or hired transport) including related costs of loading, unloading and insurance, as well as port operations and the essential replacement of vehicles.

143. Despite normal staff cost increases, a small decrease in the total is anticipated in 1963, principally because of savings on vehicle maintenance, on transport services between Beirut and Jordan, and on port storage costs on goods destined for Syria as a result of construction of a new UNRWA warehouse in the Syrian Arab Republic in 1962.
SUPPLY CONTROL AND WAREHOUSING
1st half-year
2nd half-year
Total
1963 Budget
$ 349,500
$ 349,500
$ 699,000
1962 Estimated expenditure
$ 752,000

144. This heading covers receiving, warehousing, issuing of all Agency supplies. and the administrative procedures necessary to the control of inventories.

145. Two factors account for a net reduction of $53,000 in the 1963 estimates, even taking into account normal staff increases, viz., the provision in 1962 of a new UNRWA warehouse that will reduce rentals in the Syrian Arab Republic and a reduction in 1963 in other new warehousing construction.
INTERNAL SERVICES
1st half-year
2nd half-year
Total
1963 Budget
$1.255,000
$1,255,000
$2,510,000
1962 Estimated expenditure
$2,522,000

146. Internal services include those Agency-wide functions and services essential to proper operation, i.e., administration, personnel, translation, procurement, legal, finance and mechanized records, protection and security, public information, technical and statistical services. Principally, staff costs are involved. (In 1962, these estimates were combined with those for general administration and liaison. For 1963 the latter are shown separately in order to provide more detailed and precise information on Agency operations and administration.)

147. Although the normal staff increases and the necessity of additional office space for education and training personnel have added slightly to the 1963 budget, these have been more than offset by projected reduction of staff in internal services.

GENERAL ADMINISTRATION AND LIAISON
1st half-year
2nd half-year
Total
1963 Budget
$ 591,500
$ 591,500
$1,183,000
1962 Estimated expenditure
$1,175,000

148. Under this heading provision is made for the general administration of both headquarters and field offices and the direction of operations through field office areas and camps, as well as for liaison offices in New York and Geneva and the office of the Agency's representative in Cairo.

149. Normal staff cost Increases have been largely offset by expected staff reductions, so that the net increase is only $8,000.
ELEMENTARY AND SECONDARY EDUCATION
1st half-year
2nd half-year
Total
1963 Budget
$4,565,000
$4,565,000
$9,130,000
1962 Estimated expenditure
$7,989,000

150. These estimates cover the costs of elementary schooling (6 years) and preparatory schooling (3 years, except in Lebanon where it is 4 years) for virtually all eligible refugee children requesting assistance, and 3 further years of secondary schooling for a limited number of children selected on merit

151. The school population in 1963, which forms the basis for budget estimates in general education, is shown in the following tables, together with comparative data for other years:

Elementary
Schools
1961-1962
1962-1963
1963-1964
UNRWA
110,439
123,087
133,125
Government
21,428
23,373
23,547
Private
13,302
13,546
14,498
TOTAL
145,169
160,006
171,770
Preparatory
Schools
1061-1962
1962-1063
1963-1964
UNRWA
25,823
37'468
38,0457
Government
6,215
7,468
9,007
Private
4,174
2 820
2,680
TOTAL
36,212
41,506
49,732
Secondary
Schools
1961-1962
1962-1963
1963-1964
UNRWA
875
886
886
Government
11,189
11,400
12,500
Private
2,855
2,360
2,360
TOTAL
14,919
14,646
15,746
Total number of pupils in elementary, preparatory and secondary schools
Schools
1961-1962
1962-1963
1963-1964
UNRWA
137,137
155,191
172,656
Government
38,832
42,241
45,054
Private
20,331
18,726
19,538
TOTAL
196,300
216,158
237,248
a This table shows the total in (1) UNRWA, (2) Government and (3) private schools for all three cycles combined.

152. Of the total estimated increase of $1,141,000 in 1963 over 1962, a sum of $716,000 is required to provide for the growth in school population (larger numbers of classrooms and teachers, provision of books and supplies), normal increases in staff costs and the balance for improvements in education and adjustments in subsidies paid to host Governments and private schools for the services they render.

153. The budget does not provide for a number of basic improvements which were included in the original three-year plan (particularly reduction in rate of classroom occupancy, many of which are extremely overcrowded), because the Agency feels that it must give priority to accommodating the increased population at exlstmg standards.
VOCATIONAL AND UNIVERSITY EDUCATION
1st half-year
2nd half-year
Total
1963 Budget
$1,701,500
$1,701,500
$3,403,000
1962 Estimated expenditure
$2,968,000

154. The Agency provides vocational training in inustrial, commercial and agricultural subjects as well as teacher training, for an increasing number of young refugee men and women, end university scholarships for a limited number who are qualified for study in medicine, dentistry, and kinds of engineering needed in the Middle East. Vocational training is largely conducted in the Agency's own centres and teacher training in both the UNRWA centres and in government institutions. University scholarships are awarded only in institutions within the Middle East, in the interest of helping as many individuals as possible with the limited funds available.

155. The whole programme of vocational and teacher-training expansion envisaged in the three-year plan has been made possible by special funds from the World Refugee Year and related sources. By the end of 1962, the Agency expects to have in operation or under construction eleven trades and teacher training centres, two more than originally scheduled. Expected utilization of these centres in 1963 is shown in the following table:

Capacity utilized 1963
Training in UNRWA centres
1st half
2nd half
(i)
Kalandia Vocational Training Centre
344
392
(ii)
Wadi Seer Vocational Training Centre
404
396
(iii)
Ramallah Men's Teacher-Training Centre
300
400
(iv)
Ramallah Girls' Vocational Training Centre/Teacher-Training Centre
294
538a
(v)
Damascus Vocational Training Centre
376
392
(vi)
Homs Vocational Training Centre
144
276a
(vii)
Gaza Vocational Training Centre
276
368
(viii)
Beit Hanoun Training Centre
108
75
(ix)
Khan Younis Vocational Training Centre
80
(x)
Siblin Vocational Training Centre
288
396a
(xi)
Siblin Technical & Teacher-Training Insti tute
157a
TOTAL
2,534
3,470
a These centres will not be at full capacity until 1964/65 school year

156. Concurrently during 1963, teacher training and trades training outside UNRWA centres is proposed for the following numbers:

Number of trainees in 1963
Training outside UNRWA centers
1st half
2nd half
(i)
Teacher training—Gaza Training Centre
240
360
(ii)
Teacher training—Cairo Teacher-Training Centre
60
90
(iii)
Commercial /secretarial training
30
30
(iv)
"On-the-Job" and industrial training (United Arab Republic and Sweden). . .
389
277
(v)
Nursing and pharmacist training
33
51
TOTAL
752
808

Concurrently, also, in university education, it is proposed to bring the total number of scholarships up to the level of 500.

157. While in such a rapidly expanding programme, comparisons with the preceding year are not particularly meaningful, the summary figures covering expenditures for vocational and teacher training will illustrate how the budget has grown and how the distribution of expenditure between capital and operating costs has changed:


Type of cost
1961 expenditure and commitments
1962 estimated expenditure (In thousands of U.S. dollars)
1963 budget
Capital costs
3,613
534
32
Operating costs
1,433
2,434
3,371
TOTAL
5,046
2,968
3 403
PROJECTS AND INDIVIDUAL ASSISTANCE

1st half-year
2nd half-year
Total
1963 Budget
$ nil
$ nil
$ nil
1962 Estimated expenditure
$ 178,000

158. For the time being no budgetary provision is being made for this purpose in the 1963 budget, pending further examination of projects now under consideration, but a sum of $165,000 has been specifically earmarked for future expenditure on individual assistance in the Agency's working capital carried forward in 1963.
OPERATIONAL RESERVE
1st half-year2nd half-yearTotal
1963 Budget$ 400,000$ 400,000$ 800,000
1962 Original provision$ 800,000

159. For operational contingencies inherent in UNRWA activities and for those emergencies which the Agency has suffered in most years of its history, a provision has been made in 1963 of $800,000 (as in former years). This is almost precisely 2 per cent of the total budget and is considered the minimum margin in view of possible changes in prices of items the Agency must buy.
C. Financing the 1963 budget

160. Although the 1963 budget totals $39.6 million the Agency is requesting regular contributions totalling only $36.7 million on the assumption that it will find it possible to make up the balance from miscellaneous regular income, from special income associated with the Vocational Training Scholarships Fund, and from working capital.

161. A summary of the Agency's requirements and expected sources of funds follows:

1st half-year
2nd half-year
Total
(Expressed in millions of U.S. dollars)
Total budget (including the operational reserve of $0.8 million)
19.8
19.8
39.6
Deduct:
Miscellaneous regular income
0.45
0.45
0.9
Special income from vocational and teacher-training scholarships and related sources
0.6
0.6
1.2
To be taken from working capital if operational reserves required to be used
0.4
0.4
0.8
TOTAL DEDUCTIONS
1.45
1.45
2.9
Balance requested to be contributed by Governments
18.35
18.35
36.7

162. "Miscellaneous regular income" is composed about equally of miscellaneous contributions from non-governmental sources and income from the Agency's own operations (bank interest, sale of empty containers, etc.). In 1961 such income totalled about $1.6 million. However, some $0.7 million of this had only a paper value because the "gain on exchange" related to use in the Agency's accounts of the official exchange for the Egyptian pound; this was offset by an equal amount in the expenditure accounts. (For the years 1962 and 1963 the special market rate applicable to Egyptian pounds has been used for both expenditure and income accounts, so that both expenditure and income are more accurately presented in terms of actual dollar variations.)

163. The "special income from vocational and teacher-training scholarships and related sources" shown in the budget represents the final part of the approximate $7 million the Commissioner-General has undertaken to raise from sources other than regular government contributions curing the three-year plant Of this $7 million, some $5.5 million had actually been received or pledged by 30 June 1962, and the Commissioner-General has committed himself to raising the balance by mid-1963. However, he feels that this represents very nearly the limit of achievement in this area of fund raising. 164. Regular government contributions are requested in the amount of $36.7 million. This is $3.1 million more than has been pledged for 1962, an increase of about 9 per cent. The Agency feels that its budget for 1963 is essentially a minimum budget—Relief Services have been kept at the same low level of 1962, and increases in general education have been limited to those necessary to provide for population increases plus a few pressing improvements in standards which are essential if the Agency’s educational programme is to keep pace with the trends within the host Governments. The funds provided for vocational and teacher training and for university scholarships, while large compared to previous expenditures by the Agency, are sufficient to provide the opportunity of this kind of training to less than 10 per cent of the young persons who mature each year.


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