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UNITED
NATIONS
A

        General Assembly
Distr.
GENERAL
A/49/172
7 June 1994

Original: English

Forty-ninth session
Item 80 of the preliminary list*


REPORT OF THE SPECIAL COMMITTEE TO INVESTIGATE ISRAELI
PRACTICES AFFECTING THE HUMAN RIGHTS OF THE PALESTINIAN
PEOPLE AND OTHER ARABS OF THE OCCUPIED TERRITORIES

Note by the Secretary-General


The Secretary-General has the honour to transmit to the members of the General Assembly the attached periodic report covering the period from 1 December 1993 to 31 March 1994, which was submitted to him, in accordance with paragraphs 5, 6 and 7 of Assembly resolution 48/41 A of 10 December 1993, by the Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices Affecting the Human Rights of the Palestinian People and Other Arabs of the Occupied Territories.




________________________

* A/49/50/Rev.1.


94-24279 (E) 060794
CONTENTS

Para.Page
LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL4
I.
II.
INTRODUCTION
INFORMATION RECEIVED BY THE SPECIAL COMMITTEE
1 - 4
5 - 472
5
6
A.General situation 5 - 1826
1.
2.
General developments and policy statements
Incidents resulting from the occupation
5 - 77
78 - 182
6
16
(a)
(b)
(c)
List of Palestinians killed by troops or Israeli civilians
List of other Palestinians killed as a result of the occupation
Other incidents
78
78
79-182
17
27
30
B.Administration of justice, including the right to a fair trial183 - 23551
1.
2.
Palestinian population
Israelis
183 - 204
205 - 235
51
53
C.Treatment of civilians236 - 39658
1.General developments236 - 32558
(a)
(b)
Harassment and physical ill-treatment
Collective punishment
236
237 - 290
58
58
(i) Houses or rooms that were demolished or sealed
(ii) Imposition of curfews, sealing off or closing of areas
(iii) Other forms of collective punishment
237 - 243
244 - 289
290
58
59
63
(c)
(d)
(e)
Expulsions
Economic and social situation
Other developments
291 - 295
296 - 320
321 - 325
63
64
67
2.Measures affecting certain fundamental freedoms326 - 34968
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
Freedom of movement
Freedom of education
Freedom of religion
Freedom of expression
326 - 332
333 - 341
342 - 348
349
68
69
70
71
3.Information on settlers' activities affecting the civilian population350 - 39671
D.Treatment of detainees397 - 40577
1.
2.
Measures concerning the release of detainees
Other information concerning detainees
397 - 400
401 - 405
77
78
E.
F.
Annexation and settlement
Information concerning the occpied Syrian Arab Golan
406 - 463
464 - 472
79
86
LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL


7 May 1994
Sir,

The Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices Affecting the Human Rights of the Palestinian People and Other Arabs of the Occupied Territories has the honour to transmit to you herewith, in accordance with paragraphs 5, 6 and 7 of General Assembly resolution 48/41 A, a periodic report updating information contained in the periodic report it adopted and presented to you on 14 January 1994 (A/49/67). The present periodic report has been prepared in order to bring to your attention, and to the attention of the General Assembly, updated information on the human rights situation in the occupied territories.

The present periodic report covers the period from 1 December 1993 to 31 March 1994. It is based on written information gathered from various sources among which the Special Committee has selected relevant excerpts and summaries, which are reflected in the report.

Accept, Sir, the assurances of my highest consideration.


Stanley KALPAGE
Chairman of the Special Committee to
Investigate Israeli Practices Affecting
the Human Rights of the Palestinian
People and Other Arabs of the
Occupied Territories

His Excellency
Mr. Boutros Boutros-Ghali
Secretary-General of the United Nations
New York




I. INTRODUCTION


1. In its resolution 48/41 of 10 December 1993, the General Assembly:

2. The Special Committee continued its work under the rules of procedure contained in its first report to the Secretary-General and held the second of its series of meetings from 25 April to 7 May 1994 at Geneva, Cairo, Amman and Damascus. Mr. Stanley Kalpagé (Sri Lanka) continued to be Chairman. The meetings were also attended by Mr. Ibra Déguène Ka (Senegal). Mr. Abdul Majid Mohamed, who represents Malaysia on the Special Committee, attended the meetings at Geneva and Cairo. Mr. Zainal Azman Zainal Abidin represented Malaysia during the Special Committee's meetings at Amman and Damascus.

3. Section II of the present report describes the situation in the Arab territories occupied by Israel as it affects the human rights of the civilian population. The information contained in the report reflects written information received by the Special Committee during the period from 1 December 1993 to 31 March 1994. The Special Committee has followed the situation in the occupied territories on a day-to-day basis through reports appearing in the Israeli press and in the Arab language newspapers published in the occupied territories. It has also examined a number of communications and reports from Governments, organizations and individuals pertaining to the period covered by the present report.

4. The geographical names as well as the terminology employed in the present report reflect the usage in the original sources and do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Special Committee or the Secretariat of the United Nations.

II. INFORMATION RECEIVED BY THE SPECIAL COMMITTEE

A. General situation

1. General developments and policy statements

5. On 1 December 1993, Israel and Jordan concluded an agreement allowing Amman to open additional banks in the territories. The agreement placed no limits on the number of banks that could be opened. (Jerusalem Post, 2 December 1993)

6. On 1 December 1993, Attorney-General Michael Ben Yair declared that the plan by settlers to set up a paramilitary organization, "Hashomer", to guard settlements was illegal and that security officials should prevent its establishment. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 2 December 1993)

7. On 1 December 1993, it was reported that the police had recently arrested a seven-member Hamas cell from the Abu Tor neighbourhood that had been responsible for throwing fire-bombs at a hotel in Jerusalem on 6 September. (Jerusalem Post, 1 December 1993)

8. On 3 December 1993, it was reported that according to the investigation conducted with regard to the killing of Ahmed Abu Rish on 28 November, Abu Rish had been unarmed and did not shoot at the time he was killed by undercover units, despite what the Israel Defence Forces (IDF) spokesman had at first affirmed. Two wanted fugitives belonging to the Fatah Hawks had been in his home. When they had moved inside the house, the soldiers had started to shoot. The two fugitives had managed to escape. (Ha'aretz, 3 December 1993)

9. On 7 December 1993, dozens of platoons, including several teams of elite combat units, were deployed in the West Bank following the killing of Mordechai and Shalom Lapid. Army sources stated that there were more soldiers in the West Bank then than at any other time over the past few years. (Jerusalem Post, 8 December 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 9 December 1993)

10. On 8 December 1993, it was reported that the General Security Service (GSS) and the IDF had recently carried out dozens of arrests of activists of organizations opposed to the peace process in the territories. (Ha'aretz, 8 December 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 9 December 1993)

11. On 9 December 1993, B'tselem, the human rights organization, reported that during the sixth year of the uprising (December 1992 to December 1993), troops had killed 165 Palestinians, as compared with 121 the previous year and 97 the year before. B'tselem estimated that 1,095 Palestinians had been killed by troops since the uprising had begun on 9 December 1987, while the Associated Press reported that 771 had been killed by other Palestinians. In the territories, 58 Israeli civilians had been killed by Palestinians since the beginning of the uprising, while 58 Palestinians had been killed by Israeli civilians up to 7 December. During the six years, 51 Israelis had been killed by Palestinians, while 18 Palestinians had been killed by Israelis inside the Green Line. For the first time, no houses had been destroyed for security reasons. The number of houses sealed had also decreased. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 10 December 1993)
12. On 9 December 1993, it was reported that 34 Palestinians had been killed since the signing of the Declaration of Principles with Israel on 13 September 1993. Seventeen Israelis had been killed in armed attacks during the same period. According to B'tselem, 12 Palestinians had been killed during the month of November 1993, including two boys under the age of 16. The report by B'tselem also showed that 182 Palestinians had been injured, 78 of whom were children, and that 26 houses had been either bombed or raided by the IDF during the same month. (Al-Tali'ah, 9 December 1993)

13. On 16 December 1993, it was reported that a course for Palestinian television reporters had begun at the Jewish-Arab Institute in Givat Haviva. Eighteen students from Gaza, Jenin, Tulkarm, Ramallah, Hebron and Jerusalem were participating in the course. (Jerusalem Post, 16 December 1993)

14. On 16 December 1993, security forces and the IDF arrested 10 Hamas activists in the Sheikh Radwan and Tufah neighbourhoods of Gaza City. During the previous weeks, some 40 Hamas and Popular Front activists had reportedly been arrested. (Ha'aretz, 17 December 1993)

15. On 16 December 1993, the Yediot Aharonot newspaper reportedly published an interview with the military commander of Hebron (no name was mentioned) questioning the existing judicial system. He confirmed that settlers who were taken to court by the IDF were usually released half an hour later, pending police investigation, which seldom yielded any results. The commander added that he had no authorization to chase or arrest Jewish children who attacked Arab property while Arab children were detained for similar offences and only released against the payment of very high fines by their parents. (Al-Tali'ah, 16 December 1993)

16. On 17 December 1993, it was reported that according to a recent poll support among Palestinians for the agreement with Israel had fallen from 64.9 per cent to 41.5 per cent since mid-September. The survey was conducted by the Centre for Palestine Research and Studies in Nablus on 12 December. The poll was conducted among 1,137 interviewees. (Jerusalem Post, 17 December 1993)

17. On 19 December 1993, it was reported that the IDF and security forces were to remove from the list of wanted fugitives 36 names of Fatah activists from the Gaza Strip. (Ha'aretz, 19 December 1993)

18. On 20 December 1993, it was reported that the GSS and IDF forces had apprehended three teenagers in Hebron who were suspected of killing yeshiva student Erez Shmuel on 28 May 1993. They had also recently arrested three Hamas activists who were suspected of involvement in the attack with an axe on an Israeli in Hebron on 15 November. (Jerusalem Post, 20 December 1993)

19. On 23 December 1993, Izz Al-din al-Qassam, the armed wing of Hamas, issued a statement that it would stop shooting at settlers if soldiers would stop shooting at Palestinians and if a series of other conditions were met. One of the conditions was that Israel agree that Gaza settlers would leave Gaza within three months and that the settlers from the West Bank would give up their weapons and leave within one year. The group also demanded that undercover units stop their activities and that all prisoners be released. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 24 December 1993)

20. On 23 December 1993, an internal memorandum by the Israeli Police Investigation Department explained the reasons why settlers who were accused of attacking Arab persons and their property were not arrested and brought to court. According to the Ha'aretz newspaper, the police stated that they were unable to take Jewish offenders to court for lack of evidence against them. It added that the IDF failed to gather the evidence when arresting settlers who had committed offences. The memorandum also indicated the following main areas of unrest in the occupied territories: the Ariel and Karni Shamron settlements in the area of Tulkarm; Alon Moreh, the Maaleh Ephraim and Karni Shamron settlements in the Nablus area; the Tsmut Dutan settlement in Jenin and Kiryat Arba and Matih Benyamin settlements in Hebron. (Al-Tali'ah, 23 December 1993)

21. On 23 December 1993, it was reported that the IDF had established some 150 fixed and mobile military checkpoints at the entrances to Palestinian cities and towns following the recent acts of violence in the occupied territories. Palestinian residents complained of traffic problems caused by the setting up of these checkpoints, which also adversely affected the economy. They estimated that 80 per cent of commercial activity was hindered by the establishment of the checkpoints. (Al-Tali'ah, 23 December 1993)

22. On 24 December 1993, security forces stopped their search for Fatah fugitives from the Gaza district who had killed Israelis and Palestinians, in accordance with an agreement that had been reached between senior Fatah leaders in the district and IDF commanders in the region. An IDF source confirmed the report. (Jerusalem Post, 24 December 1993)

23. On 26 December 1993, Hamas reiterated its pledge to halt attacks against Jews if Israel agreed to withdraw all of its forces from the territories. (Jerusalem Post, 27 December 1993)

24. On 5 January 1994, it was reported that the GSS was to receive a special budget allocation in order to establish a special administrative unit that would take care of the about 2,000 collaborators. (Ha'aretz, 5 January 1994)

25. On 9 January 1994, B'tselem published its long-awaited report on Palestinians who had been killed by other Palestinians, months after being accused of delaying the publication of the controversial study. The report, entitled "Collaborators in the Occupied Territories: Human Rights Abuses and Violations" indicated that Palestinians had killed between 750 and 950 persons. The report condemned the Palestinian organizations, which either ordered or did not put an end to the killings, but it was not indulgent either with the security authorities for recruiting Palestinians as spies, frequently under duress (also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 13 January 1994). At a press conference called to present the report, the Director of B'tselem, Yizhar Be'er, stated that there were at least 5,000 known collaborators. The report refuted claims frequently made during the first three years of the uprising by leading Palestinian activists that collaborators had all been proven guilty during fair trials. B'tselem estimated that more than half of those killed may not have been Israeli agents at all. However, at least 35 per cent to 40 per cent were agents, according to Israeli sources. The report also indicated that collaborators had killed 14 persons. For its part, the IDF indicated that 964 Palestinians had been killed by Palestinians up to 22 December 1993. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 10 January 1994)

26. On 13 January 1994, the commander of a special IDF unit is reported to have declared during a radio interview that military instructions prohibited the use of any violent means, including tear-gas, against Jewish settlers who caused trouble in the occupied territories. Jewish persons who caused disturbances could only be arrested. (Al-Tali'ah, 13 January 1994)

27. On 17 January 1994, it was reported that Lt.-Col. R, the commander of the IDF Duvdevan undercover unit, had stated in a report published in the latest issue of the army magazine Bamahaneh that the unit had not decreased its activities since the signing of the agreement with the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO). (Jerusalem Post, 17 January 1994)

28. On 20 January 1994, it was reported that, according to IDF data, 64 Palestinians had been killed by IDF shooting in 1993, among them children under the age of 10. (Ha'aretz, 20 January 1994)

29. On 20 January 1994, a spokesman for the Israeli Ministry of Finance was reported to have declared that an additional $30 million had been earmarked for the reinforcement of the security of the settlements in the occupied territories. (Al-Tali'ah, 20 January 1994)

30. On 21 January 1994, it was reported that in 1993 security forces had killed 11 wanted fugitives and arrested 129 in the West Bank. Some 4,410 Palestinians had been arrested in the West Bank or in the entire territories during the year. (Ha'aretz, 20 and 21 January 1994)

31. On 27 January 1994, it was reported that a total of 49 Fatah supporters had been arrested in the Gaza Strip since 23 January, 22 of whom had later been released after interrogation. (Jerusalem Post, 27 January 1994)

32. On 27 January 1994, according to a well-informed Israeli source, the municipality of West Jerusalem is reported to have issued 54 demolition orders during the previous two years that affected Arab neighbourhoods in East Jerusalem. Thirty-eight houses had already been demolished. The rest of the orders remained to be carried out. (Al-Tali'ah, 27 January 1994)

33. On 28 January 1994, the Chief of the General Staff, Lt.-Gen. Ehud Barak, stated that the sum of approximately $100 million (or 250) that had been allocated to the IDF for redeployment (including roads, infrastructure construction and security measures) in the Gaza Strip and Jericho was well below the army's real needs (also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 13 January 1994). Barak stated that the cost of a security fence the IDF planned to build around the Israeli settlements in the Gaza Strip would absorb the greater part of the allocated budget. (Jerusalem Post, 31 January 1994)

34. On 30 January 1994, security sources informed the Cabinet that support for the peace process amongst the Palestinians in the territories was on the decline. As compared with September 1993, when 65 per cent of Palestinians were in favour of making peace, support had dropped to between 48 and 51 per cent in recent weeks. Also in September, only 26 per cent (or 28 per cent) had indicated that they were opposed to peace, as compared with 40 per cent who opposed it in January. (Jerusalem Post, 31 January 1994; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 20 January 1994)

35. On 1 February 1994, it was reported that two "terrorist" cells responsible for setting cars on fire, stoning and throwing fire-bombs in eastern Jerusalem had been discovered by the police. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 1 February 1994)

36. On 2 February 1994, it was reported that, according to figures released by the police, the number of Israelis killed in the context of the uprising in 1993 had risen by more than 50 per cent over 1992, despite an overall drop in terrorist attacks. In 1993, 43 civilians and 22 security personnel had been killed in uprising-related attacks as compared with 24 civilians and 15 security personnel the previous year. The number of Palestinians killed by other Palestinians went down from 238 in 1992 to 150 in 1993. The figures also showed a decline of about 16 per cent in the number of attacks, including incidents of stone-throwing and fire-bombs, within the Green Line, and 9 per cent in the territories. The number of shootings, widely thought to have risen, actually dropped by more than 30 per cent. Sharp rises, however, were registered in the number of grenade attacks and bombings. The police also reported an increase in the number of files opened against Jewish residents of the territories, but did not have the exact figures since such statistics had not been recorded in the past. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 3 February 1994)

37. On 2 February 1994, it was reported that the United States Department of State had indicated in its annual world-wide report on human rights, which encompasses 42 countries, that there had been some positive human rights developments in Israel in 1993, especially following the signing in September of the Declaration of Principles. However, the report criticized what it termed continued torture and extrajudicial killings by undercover units in the Israeli-occupied territories, albeit on a somewhat reduced scale from the previous year. The Israeli army was also accused of standing by while Jewish settlers carried out revenge attacks against Arab civilians. The report stated that fewer houses of security offence suspects had been demolished, but that 27 houses had been sealed. (Jerusalem Post, 2 February 1994)

38. On 2 February 1994, the leader of Fatah in Gaza, Zakaria Agha, called for the establishment of a committee on which various Palestinian factions would be represented to decide whether a suspected collaborator deserved to be killed. A proposal was reportedly raised with Hamas leaders in Gaza, but no agreement had been reached. (Jerusalem Post, 4 February 1994)

39. On 3 February 1994, the monthly report of the Mandela Institute for Political Prisoners showed that 3,860 Palestinians were imprisoned in 15 prisons and that 7,486 other persons were held in detention in 6 military camps. (Al-Tali'ah, 3 February 1994)

40. On 3 February 1994, it was reported that the Israeli Police Minister, Moshe Shahal, had inaugurated the first civil guard unit in the West Bank settlements. Shahal declared during the inauguration ceremony in the Maaleh Adumim settlement that his Ministry planned to open four more such units in the following settlements: Ephrat, Ariel, Givat Zeev and Maaleh Ephraim. (Al-Tali'ah, 3 February 1994)

41. On 10 February 1994, it was indicated that the Chief Police Inspector, Rafi Peled, had disclosed earlier in the week that the Israeli police and border guards would be raising trained dogs brought from the Netherlands to capture troublemakers and persons who threw stones and incendiary bottles. (Al-Tali'ah, 10 February 1994)

42. On 10 February 1994, Foreign Minister Shimon Peres is reported to have declared at a conference held at Brandeis University near Boston, that the settlements would remain and would be defended by the IDF, whatever the agreement provided for. (Al-Tali'ah, 10 February 1994)

43. On 14 February 1994, it was reported that the IDF had started evacuating more bases in the Gaza Strip. The building currently being evacuated was located in Gaza City and served as Gaza's Central Prison and a military base. (The Jerusalem Times, 18 February 1994)

44. On 14 February 1994, the police spokesman announced that the police were to set up additional roadblocks, increase the number of patrols and prosecute illegal Palestinian workers as part of an intensified effort to combat terrorism. The enhanced security measures would be complemented by efforts to push through the legislature more severe fines to be imposed against Israelis who employed Palestinians illegally. The police reportedly also stated that they wanted legislation to be enacted forbidding Palestinian day labourers to remain overnight in Israel. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 15 February 1994; also referred to in The Jerusalem Times, 18 February 1994)

45. On 15 February 1994, a new civil guard unit was officially inaugurated in Maaleh Ephraim during a ceremony attended by Police Minister Moshe Shahal and Inspector-General Rafi Peled. It was the second such unit established in the territories in one month. (Ha'aretz, 16 February 1994)

46. On 17 February 1994, it was reported that a Jerusalem-based Fatah cell, which had been involved in several fire-bomb attacks in recent months, had been uncovered by the police. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 17 February 1994)

47. On 17 February 1994, Hamas announced that it would grant amnesty to Palestinians collaborating with Israel if they killed their Israeli agents or helped the movement to kill members of the Israeli security forces. (Ha'aretz, 18 February 1994)

48. On 18 February 1994, B'tselem stated in a report entitled "Firing at Vehicles by Security Forces in the Occupied Territories" that 30 Palestinians had been shot dead at army roadblocks during the uprising even though the vast majority of them posed no threat to the security forces. B'tselem stated that the army was not properly abiding by its own regulations for setting up roadblocks and that soldiers manning the roadblocks often violated the rules for opening fire. The group called for a change in open-fire regulations to include only life-threatening situations. At present, soldiers could open fire if they believed that vehicles contained wanted terrorists. (Jerusalem Post, 20 February 1994; Ha'aretz, 21 February 1994)

49. On 18 February 1994, the head of the Palestinian Police Committee, Farouk Amin, stated that the Palestinian police force would be composed of PLO members based in several Arab countries. Eight hundred Palestinians who had served on the Israeli police force and had resigned in 1988 when the intifadah leaders asked them to do so would also join the forces. (The Jerusalem Times, 18 February 1994)

50. On 18 February 1994, a report by the International Solidarity Organization in Washington, D.C., revealed that the killings carried out by Israel's special units in the occupied territories had been in compliance with direct orders by the Shin Beth, the Israeli secret service or the military authorities. The human rights organization was referring in particular to the death of Abdul Rahman Aruri in December 1993 and Salim Muwafi in February 1994. (The Jerusalem Times, 18 February 1994)

51. On 21 February 1994, Hamas warned Israeli Arabs (Druze and Bedouins) not to enlist in IDF units in the territories. (Jerusalem Post, 22 February 1994)

52. On 24 February 1994, the Government of Israel is reported to have announced that 19 Palestinians had been killed in the Gaza Strip during the first two weeks of that month on suspicion of collaboration. Security sources indicated that the majority were killed by Hamas, four by the Fatah Hawks and three in unclear circumstances. (Al-Tali'ah, 24 February 1994)

53. On 25 February 1994, senior Palestinian sources reported that the majority of the Palestinians who would serve on the Palestinian police force under the interim self-government arrangements would come from outside the territories. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 25 February 1994; also referred to in The Jerusalem Times, 18 February 1994)

54. On 28 February 1994, Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin opened the Knesset debate on a resolution condemning the Hebron massacre by speaking of the personal shame that the killing had caused him. All Zionist factions united in support of the resolution condemning the attack by an Israeli settler, but made a distinction between the settler, his sympathizers and the majority of Jewish settlers in the territories. The vote was 93 to 1, with 7 abstentions. The resolution expressed the Knesset's "deep shock" and condemned the "criminal and revolting murder". (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 1 March 1994)

55. On 28 February 1994, following the agreement by the Cabinet to establish an independent commission of inquiry to investigate the Hebron massacre, including the role of the IDF, Supreme Court President Justice Meir Shamgar appointed five members to serve on the state commission. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 28 February 1994; Jerusalem Post, 1 March 1994; also referred to in The Jerusalem Times, 4 March 1994)

56. On 1 March 1994, three members of a Hamas terrorist cell operating in Jerusalem were uncovered by the police after a vehicle the cell members had stolen broke down while they were on their way to carry out a major attack in the capital. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 9 March 1994)

57. On 1 March 1994, the Officer Commanding (OC) Central Command, Maj.-Gen. Danny Yatom, informed the Knesset Foreign Affairs and Defence Committee that 30 Palestinians had been killed by Baruch Goldstein inside the Machpelah Cave and that five more had been killed in clashes with the army in Hebron following the massacre. Yatom explained that the original inflated list of victims (between 53 and 59 people) included names that were listed twice and the names of people who had turned out to be alive. The army placed the number of wounded in the massacre at several dozen. However, the director of Hebron's largest hospital, Dr. Daoud Obeidi, dismissed the army report, saying that the correct figure of casualties was around 40. According to the Palestine Human Rights Information Centre, 58 people were killed during the massacre and its aftermath. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 2 March 1994)

58. On 3 March 1994, following the massacre in Hebron, B'tselem criticized the army's handling of the unrest. It called on the army to stop sending reinforcements to the troops in the territories when emotions were running high and to lift the curfews and closures, which only heightened the anger. B'tselem urged the Government to stop introducing troops into the occupied territories who were not trained, equipped and experienced in crowd dispersal and the use of non-lethal measures. According to the organization, some 21 Palestinians had been killed by the army during disturbances following the massacre (16 persons in the West Bank, 7 of them in Hebron, and 5 persons in the Gaza Strip). B'tselem reportedly investigated closely 12 of these deaths. In none of the 12 cases were the soldiers' lives in danger, which is a condition for opening fire on protesters, 11 of whom were shot in the upper body or head with live ammunition. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 4 March 1994; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 10 March 1994)

59. On 3 March 1994, the Jerusalem police arrested a gang of 11 Palestinian residents of Beit Hanina, northern Jerusalem, for allegedly throwing stones, bottles and fire-bombs at Israeli targets. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 9 March 1994)

60. On 4 March 1994, it was reported that there were only 3 soldiers on regular duty at the Ibrahimi Mosque on 25 February 1994, instead of the usual 20, when Baruch Goldstein opened fire at the worshippers. The unit, which only intervened five minutes after Goldstein had started shooting, reportedly closed the doors of the mosque, opened fire and prevented people from leaving or entering the premises. According to an eyewitness, Husni Rajabi, 42, another person helped Goldstein to load the ammunition. Soldiers are also reported to have delayed the arrival of ambulances at the mosque for 50 minutes. (The Jerusalem Times, 4 March 1994)

61. On 4 March 1994, it was reported that, as a measure aimed at preventing incidents and in accordance to new regulations being finalized by the army, Israeli civilians would no longer be able to bring weapons into the Machpelah Cave in Hebron. Separate entrances to the site would be made for Jewish and Muslim worshippers. (Jerusalem Post, 4 March 1994)

62. On 4 March 1994, for the first time since Jerusalem was reunified in 1967, the Western Wall Plaza was closed for about an hour to Jewish worshippers and tourists for fear that Muslim worshippers on the Temple Mount would begin rioting. The decision was taken to clear the area as a pre-emptive measure, based on intelligence reports that stone-throwing incidents could be expected. Most of the 30,000 Muslim worshippers, far fewer than expected because of the closure of the territories, left the Temple Mount following noon-time Ramadan prayers without causing any incidents. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 6 March 1994; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 10 March 1994; The Jerusalem Times, 11 March 1994)

63. On 7 March 1994, Izz Al-din al-Qassam, the military wing of Hamas, threatened suicide attacks on several settlements (Kiryat Arba, Gush Katif, Kedumim, Tekoa and Ariel) if they were not evacuated by 15 March. The leaflet, entitled "The Settlers Will Pay with Their Blood for the Massacre", described a five-stage plan for attack. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 8 March 1994)

64. On 8 March 1994, it was reported that bus service to Gush Etzion, Kiryat Arba and the Hebron Hill settlements had been severely curtailed since the Hebron massacre. The Egged bus company spokesman Dedi Golan stated that was being done because of an IDF order that all buses had to have an army escort. He strongly denied that the restrictions were deliberately meant to inconvenience the settlers. (Jerusalem Post, 8 March 1994)

65. On 8 March 1994, Acting OC Central Command Maj.-Gen. Danny Yatom told the commission of inquiry into the killings that according to testimony collected from Palestinian mourners, 29 people had been killed by Goldstein on 25 February in Hebron, and another 5 in the ensuing disturbances. There were 90 wounded inside the Cave and another 130 later. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 9 March 1994)

66. On 11 March 1994, for the first time, police disarmed all civilians entering the Western Wall Plaza in order to prevent outbreaks of violence between Jewish and Muslim worshippers in the area. The ban on weapons was lifted in the late afternoon after the Jewish prayer services at the Wall and Muslim prayers at the Al-Aqsa Mosque had passed without incidents. Some 30 to 40 thousand Muslim worshippers attended the final Friday Ramadan services at the Temple Mount, which is far fewer than in previous years because of the closure of the territories. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 13 March 1994)

67. On 15 March 1994, the B'tselem human rights organization published a report showing that 62 Palestinians had been killed by Israeli civilians during the uprising, not counting the Hebron massacre (according to Al-Tali'ah dated 24 March 1994, 21 Palestinians had been killed by Israeli civilians inside Israel). According to the report, entitled "Law Enforcement vis-à-vis Israeli Civilians in the Territories", in only four of those cases was the civilian in a life-threatening situation that justified opening fire. The group accused settlers of perpetrating acts against Palestinians and their property, while the authorities for the most part reportedly looked the other way. B'tselem singled out the army, police, judicial system and the State Attorney's Office for failing to enforce the law. The government crackdown on the Kach movement was termed too little, too late, and the group maintained that Kach activists were not the only ones who attacked Arabs. B'tselem charged that throughout the six years of the uprising the Government had ignored and often chosen not to take the necessary measures to protect Palestinians from Israeli civilians, in particular from settlers. In response to the report, both the police and the IDF stated that they treated Jews and Arabs in exactly the same way with regard to law enforcement. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 16 March 1994)

68. On 15 March 1994, it was reported that some 24 residents of the Gaza Strip who possessed guns had been arrested since 11 March. Four of them were wanted by the security forces. (Ha'aretz, 15 March 1994)

69. On 16 March 1994, Palestinian witnesses of the Hebron massacre refused to appear before the Israeli Commission of Inquiry. Palestinian officials explained the boycott by saying that the five witnesses would only testify before the Palestinian Commission established by President Yasser Arafat to study the circumstances of the Hebron massacre. (Al-Tali'ah, 17 March 1994; The Jerusalem Times, 18 March 1994)

70. On 18 March 1994, it was reported that the Temple Mount in Jerusalem had been closed to all but Muslims since the Hebron massacre. This was only the second time since 1967 that the site had been closed. A similar closure of the Temple Mount had been imposed immediately after the Temple Mount riots in 1990. Officials of the Muslim Waqf explained that they had closed the area to visitors because of fears that a Jewish extremist might launch an attack there (or in protest against the closure of the Machpelah Cave in Hebron and the preventing of Muslims from the West Bank from praying in the Al-Aqsa Mosque on the Temple Mount following the massacre). However, the Jerusalem police spokesman announced that the decision had been made jointly by Muslim officials and the police for security reasons and that the site would be reopened soon. (Jerusalem Post, 18 March 1994; Ha'aretz, 20 March 1994)

71. On 18 March 1994, it was reported that Palestinian leader Faisal Husseini had rejected a proposal by Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin to station Palestinian police officers in Hebron in order to protect Arab residents from Israeli extremists. The police force would have been under Israeli control. (The Jerusalem Times, 18 March 1994)

72. On 21 March 1994, it was reported that Police Minister Moshe Shahal had sent a letter to the Mayor of Jerusalem, Ehud Olmert, in order to examine the possibility of erecting a fence above the Western Wall to prevent the throwing of stones by Arab worshippers. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 21 March 1994)

73. On 24 March 1994, OC Judea and Samaria Maj.-Gen. Shaul Mofaz told a press conference in Jerusalem that with the deaths of the Hamas activists killed in the Hebron shoot-out on 23 March, the list of wanted Hamas (and Islamic Jihad) members in the West Bank (or in the Hebron area) had been reduced to under 10. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 25 March 1994)

74. On 24 March 1994, Palestinian residents of Tel Al Ramida in Hebron affirmed that the number of Jewish settlers living inside the town was about 70 and that the official Israeli figures were highly exaggerated in order to convince public opinion of the difficulty of evacuating settlers from the city. (Al-Tali'ah, 24 March 1994)
75. On 29 March 1994, it was reported that two officers of the Palestinian Police had met over the weekend with senior IDF officers in the Gaza Strip for discussions on the establishment of the police force there. (Jerusalem Post, 29 March 1994)

76. On 29 March 1994, representatives of B'tselem and of Palestinian Lawyers for Human Rights demanded an independent investigation into the shoot-out in Jabalia on 28 March, during which six Fatah Hawk members had been killed by an undercover unit. According to a report published by the organizations, undercover soldiers had shot to kill when they opened fire on the six Fatah men. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 30 March 1994)

77. On 29 March 1994, the Peace Watch organization issued a report claiming that since the Oslo Accord had been signed in December, Fatah had carried out 28 attacks on Israelis resulting in death or injuries within the Green Line and in the territories. Peace Watch, an independent, apolitical body, was established following the signing of the Declaration of Principles to monitor possible violations of the accord by both sides. (Jerusalem Post, 30 March 1994)

2. Incidents resulting from the occupation

78. The following abbreviations of the names of newspapers are used in the tables:
(a) List of Palestinians killed by troops or Israeli civilians

Date
Name and age
Place of residence
Remarks and sources
5 December 1993Khaled Awad Shehada, 20 or 27Jabalia refugee camp (Gaza Strip)Shot dead by soldiers after he had opened fire on bus passengers, killing one reserve soldier. (H, JP, 6 December 1993)
5 December 1993Talal (Rushie al) Bakri, 54East JerusalemDied of wounds sustained on 3 or 4 December 1993 after being shot by a settler from Kiryat Arba. The settler allegedly opened fire at the taxi taking Bakri to work, reportedly believing that the vehicle was about to run him down. (H, 6 December 1993, JP, 5, 6 and 17 December 1993; also referred to in AT, 9 December 1993)
6 December 1993Abdel Rahman Ibrahim (Ziad al Arourri), 32Ramallah, Kfar Arour (West Bank)Wanted Hamas activist. Shot and killed by an undercover unit. Unarmed. (H, JP, 7 December 1993; also referred to in AT, 9 December 1993)
6 December 1993Basema al Tamimi, 44Al Nabi Saleh (West Bank)She succumbed to wounds after being hit by a woman IDF soldier. (AT, 9 December 1993)
9 December 1993Mohammed Abu Awad, 52Turmus Ayya (West Bank)Tractor driver, was ploughing a field. Shot dead by an Israeli gunman. (JP, 10 December 1993; also referred to in AT, 9 December 1993)
10 or 11 December 1993Sa'ada (Abdel Mahdi) Fataftah, 29

His brothers, Mohammed (Abdel Mahdi) Fataftah, 27

Ishaq (Mahmoud) Fataftah, 25 or 27
Tarkumiyeh (West Bank)
"


"
Shot dead by unknown Jewish activists when they were driving back from work in the Hebron area. (H, JP, 12 and 13 December 1993; also referred to in AT, 16 December 1993)
13 December 1993Anwar (Abu or Abdel or Karim), Aziz, 22Jabalia refugee camp (Gaza Strip)Islamic Jihad activist. Suicide bomber, was driving a stolen ambulance. He crashed into a military jeep and the ambulance exploded. Soldiers shot at the ambulance after they signalled to the driver to stop, but he ignored the orders and drove towards them at high speed. (H, JP, 14 December 1993)
13 December 1993

"
Ashraf (Jamil Hussein al-) Sindi, 26

Mohammed (Ahmed/Abu) Muammar, 25
Shaburah refugee camp (Gaza Strip)
"
Wanted fugitive belonging to the Islamic Jihad.

Red Eagle activist. Soldiers were checking a car near Rafah. A physical struggle ensued after one of the passengers tried to grab a soldier (or when he threw a grenade at the soldiers). Soldiers opened fire, killing both. (H, JP, 14 December 1993)
14 December 1993Osama Hameid (or Mahmadi Mahmoud Hamid), 26Tufah neighbourhood of Gaza City (Gaza Strip)A Border Police patrol spotted a stolen car with three Palestinians in it, two of whom were armed. They refused to obey orders to halt and fired back at soldiers when soldiers started shooting. (The car may have been laden with explosives.) (H, JP, 15 December 1993)
14 December 1993Hassan Baka (or Bassem Bagiri), 20Sheikh Radwan neighbourhood of Gaza City (Gaza Strip)During Hameid's funeral, youths threw stones at an IDF lookout post while soldiers opened fire (or was shot while standing on a rooftop with another youth, reportedly holding a petrol bomb.) (JP, 15 December 1993)
15 December 1993Ashraf Khalil (or Mahmoud Ahmed), 18Jabalia refugee camp (Gaza Strip)Shot dead by a soldier after he had attacked another soldier with an axe. Hamas activist. (H, JP, 16 December 1993)
24 or 25 December 1993Abed El Maid Halil, 17Hebron area (West Bank)Shot dead by soldiers who were dispersing stone-throwers after they had refused to obey orders to halt. Masked. (H, JP, 26 December 1993)
3 January 1994Fadel Ibrahim Hafen (or Rassem, or Rihan), 19Jabalia (Gaza Strip)Died in unclear circumstances. Shot dead by soldiers after he had threatened them with a large building block (or during dispersal of rioters). (H, JP, 4 January 1994)
3 January 1994Farid Sharawi, 17, 18 or 21Shati' refugee camp (Gaza Strip)Shot dead by troops dispersing rioters. According to the army, was part of a group of three men, one of whom was holding a Kalashnikov rifle. Arab sources stated that soldiers shot at stone-throwers. Circumstances unclear. May have been shot by mistake. (H, 4 and 5 January 1994; JP, 4 January 1994)
"
Abbas (Haled) Saidi, 17 or 18Shati' refugee camp (Gaza Strip)Died in the same circumstances as Sharawi.
5 January 1994Iyyad (Abd el-Karim) Hinnawi, 20Jabalia refugee camp (Gaza Strip)Shot dead by the army, apparently during the dispersal of stone-throwers. (JP, 6 January 1994)
6 January 1994Imad Abd el-Wahab Kilab (or Kitab)Shu'fat refugee camp (Gaza Strip)Shot dead by the Border Police after he had stabbed an IDF soldier. (H, JP, 7 January 1994)
14 January 1994Amjad Salim Shibana, 20Kabatiya/Hebron (West Bank)Members of the military wing of Hamas. Died during a shoot-out with the army during the night. Troops used explosive charges to break into the house where they were hiding near Hebron, then charged inside, killing the remaining gunmen. (H, 17 January 1994, JP, 16 and 17 January 1994; also referred to in AT, 20 January 1994)
"
Mohammed Salleh Kamil, 22Tubas/Hebron Kabatiya (West Bank)
"
"
Amjad (Fuad Abdel Sami) Abu Khalaf, 20Hebron (West Bank)
"
"
Hamidan Al'Ja'ba, 22Hebron (West Bank)
"
14 January 1994Yusef Islim, 21Gaza City (Gaza Strip)Shot dead after he had stabbed an Israeli to death. (JP, 16 January 1994)
19 January 1994Name not reportedRamallah (West Bank)Shot dead by soldiers while throwing fire-bombs. Was reportedly badly burned when the fire-bomb he was holding fell on him. (H, JP, 20 January 1994)
19 January 1994Abdel Razek (Mohammed Husam) Fanoun, 20Hebron (West Bank)Wounded by IDF shooting on 18 January 1994 when soldiers opened fire on stone-throwers in Hebron. Died in hospital; unclear circumstances. (H, JP, 20 January 1994; also referred to in AT, 20 January 1994)
3 February 1994Salim (Musbah Hassan) Muwafi, 24Rafah refugee camp (Gaza Strip)Wanted Fatah Hawk. Killed by undercover troops during a shoot-out battle in the refugee camp. According to Palestinian sources, he did not open fire at the soldiers who shot him and his killing was deliberate and planned. (H, 4 and 6 February 1994; JP, 6 February 1994)
4 or 5 February 1994Ayman Zagout (possibly the same person as the one indicated below)Rafah refugee camp (Gaza Strip)Died of wounds he sustained during a shoot-out with undercover troops on 3 February in the Rafah refugee camp. Belonged to the Fatah Hawks. (JP, 6 February 1994)
Iyad Abu Rokba, 23Jabalia (Gaza Strip)Died in hospital of gunshot wounds sustained earlier in the week. (H, 6 February 1994)
4 or 5 February 1994Iman (Adnan Abd el-Fatah as) Souri, 10 or 13Jabalia refugee camp (Gaza Strip)Killed when soldiers opened fire on stone-throwers. Was apparently not involved in the stone-throwing incident. Was reportedly killed by mistake, while on his way to the library. Investigation under way. (H, JP, 6 February 1994)
4 or 5 February 1994Khiri (Abd el-Jabar) Yussuf Abdallah, 33Balah (West Bank)Shot dead after he ran through an army checkpoint and refused to obey orders to stop, despite repeated calls (the village was under curfew at the time). Suspected of belonging to a gang that stole cars. (H, 6 February 1994; JP, 6 and 7 February 1994)
15 February 1994Ihad Barakat, 17Rafah (Gaza Strip)Shot dead by the army after he and other people threw stones (or bombs) at soldiers. (H, 16 February 1994)
15 February 1994Farez Abu ZakarRafah (Gaza Strip)Died of wounds sustained several days earlier as a result of IDF shooting. Circumstances unclear. (H, 16 February 1994)
16 February 1994Marwan (Mahmoud) Sa'adi (or Saadeh), 19Halhoul (West Bank)Shot dead after he threw stones at an army patrol, and fled, ignoring orders to halt. (H, 17 February 1994; JP, 17 and 18 February 1994)
17 February 1994Anwar Rashid Katat, 24Siris (West Bank)Reportedly made a threatening gesture directed at troops manning an army checkpoint. (H, JP, 18 February 1994)
24 February 1994Abd al-Rahman Hamdan, 23Khan Younis refugee camp (Gaza Strip)One of the most wanted members of Hamas. Shot dead by security forces in a day-long battle in Abu Dis.
(H, JP, 25 February 1994)
25 February 1994Selim Falah Idriss Nour Al Mohtasib, 24;
Tarek Adnan Mohamed Ashour;
Jamil Ayed Tamin Al Natsha, 45;
Selman Awad al-Ja'bari, 38;
Marawan Motlik Abu Najma, 37;
Abdel Rahim Abu Esnina, 45;
Ahmed Abdallah Abu Esina, 23;
Alaa Badr Taha Abu Esina, 17;
Sefian Barakat Zaheda, 23;
Raed Abdel Al Motlib Al Natsha, 19;
Nimr Mohamed Nimr Mejahed, 32;
Hatem Khedr Al Fakhouri;
Wael Salah Al Mohtasib, 32;
Kamal Jamal Kafisha, 11;
Arafat Robhi Al Bayed;
Saber Mussa Kateba;
Mohamed Ateya Al Saleyma;
Isamel Fayez Kafisha;
Abdel Hamid Al Jabari, 48;
Mohamed Raji Gheith;
Walid Zohair Gheith, 40;
Arafat Mussa Burkan;
Diab Abdel Latif Al Kerki, 24;
Rami Arafat Al Rajbi, 13;
Khaled Hamza Al Kerki, 20;
Talal Hamad Dandis, 17;
Jaber Aref Abu Hadid, 12;
Khaled Khalwi Abu Esima, 12;
Mohamed Sadek Abu Zananu, 45;
Ayman Ayoubal Kawasmi;
Zeidan Jaber, 25;
Nader Salem Zaheda;
Yussef Khalil Al Horub;
Kefah Abdel Moez Marka;
Abdel Rehim Al Aljouni
HebronShot dead by settler Baruch Goldstein while they were praying inside the Ibrahimi Mosque at the Cave of the Patriarchs in Hebron. (H, JP, 27 and 28 February 1994; also referred to in AT, 3 March 1994)
25, 26 and 27 February 1994Ateya Mohammed Ateya

Al Selyma

Mohamed Yussef Ali Ghayada

Amjed Shahin

Rami Nashaat Jamous


Ismail Adnan Azmi


Amjed Ismail Al Badawi


Najeh Awad Abdel Fatah Ziyada

Abdel Rahman Abdel Rahim Al Ajlouni

Mohamed Suleiman Abu Jama

Walid Abu Dweikat
Hebron (West Bank)
"

Nahalin (Bethlehem) (West Bank)

Jerusalem

Rafidiya/Nablus (West Bank)

Tulkarm refugee camp (West Bank)

Jalazone refugee camp
(West Bank)

Madama/Nablus (West
Bank)

Askar refugee camp/
Nablus (West Bank)

Rahat (West Bank)
Killed during clashes following the Ibrahimi Mosque massacre.
According to the army, six Palestinians were killed in Hebron on 25 February, the day of the massacre. (AT, 3 March 1994; also referred to in H, JP, 27 and 28 February 1994; JP, 1 March 1994)
25 and 26 February 1994Name not reportedRafadiya refugee camp (West Bank)Shot by soldiers when he threw stones at them. (H, 27 February 1994)
25 or 26 February 1994Name not reported, 16Beit Jalla (West Bank)Allegedly shot by an Israeli civilian after he had stoned an Israeli bus. (H, 27 February 1994)
Mariam al-Omar, 38Sengiy (West Bank)Hit by a bullet while standing on the balcony of her house as residents were stoning Israeli cars. (H, 28 February 1994; also referred to in AT, 3 March 1994)
25 or 26 February 1994Name not reportedRamallah area (West Bank)Killed by the army during clashes. (H, 27 February 1994)
25 or 26 February 1994Name not reportedWest BankKilled by the army during clashes. (H, JP, 28 February 1994)
25 or 26 February 1994
"


"
Hamed Abu Aboud, 24


Mahmud Abu Abda, 24


Fadel Karanawi, 16
Sheikh Radwan (Gaza Strip)

Bureij refugee camp
(Gaza Strip)
"
All three were killed in disturbances after the massacre in Hebron.
(H, 27 February 1994; also referred to in AT, 3 March 1994)
25 or 26 February 1994 Avni Subhi Abu AjawaGaza City (Gaza Strip)Reportedly shot by soldiers while standing at the door of his house while the city was under curfew. (H, 27 February 1994; also referred to in AT, 3 March 1994)
25 or 26 February 1994Fadi Tarek Mustafa, 17Issawiya (East Jerusalem)According to his family, he had not committed any offence. He was not holding a tear-gas canister or any other object and had not thrown stones at a Border Policeman, contrary to what the army had said. According to the family, he had just walked out of his home when he was fatally shot, without any warning. Investigation under way. (H, 27 February 1994; JP, 28 February 1994; also referred to in AT, 3 March 1994)
27 February 1994

"
Ayman Haniya, 17 or 18


Najah (Awad) Ziyada, 21
Gaza City (Gaza Strip)

Madmah (West Bank)
Both were fatally shot during riots. (H, JP, 28 February 1994; also referred to in AT, 3 March 1994)
27 February 1994Name not reportedTulkarm refugee camp (West Bank)Palestinian sources reported this casualty, which was not confirmed by the army. (H, 28 February 1994)
28 February 1994Abdel Rahim, Al AjlouniHebronKilled during clashes with the IDF. (JT, 3 March 1994)
2 March 1994Iman Karashi, 11Gaza City (Gaza Strip)Shot accidentally by soldiers when they chased a suspicious car three weeks earlier. Died of her wounds. (H, JP, 3 March 1994)
2 March 1994Osama Mustafa Abu Ghazala, 17Hebron (West Bank)Fatally wounded during clashes that erupted in Hebron after the curfew was lifted in the city. (H, JP, 3 March 1994; also referred to in AT, 3 March 1994)
2 March 1994Osman Ali Burham, 20Jericho (West Bank)Shot dead when the army dispersed a demonstration. (H, JP, 3 March 1994; also referred to in AT, 3 March 1994)
March 1994Talal Dweikat, 25Askar (Nablus)Killed when soldiers opened fire to disperse demonstrators. (JT, 3 March 1994)
4 or 5 March 1994Iyad Salah, 17Khan Younis (Gaza Strip)Shot dead after he and an accomplice stabbed and wounded two persons from Moshav Katif, in a greenhouse located in the moshav. (H, 6 March 1994; JP, 6 and 7 March 1994)
4 or 5 March 1994
"
Nasser a-Tirawi, 24


Hatam Kabi, 26
Balata refugee camp (West Bank)
"
Both were killed as a result of IDF shooting at an armed resident who had fired at the soldiers. The gunman apparently fled. The two bodies were later brought to the Nablus hospital. (H, JP, 6 March 1994)
4 or 5 March 1994Intisar Murtaja, 17Gaza City (Gaza Strip)Shot and killed after he had tried to stab a soldier on foot patrol. (H, JP, 6 March 1994)
7 March 1994

"
Samir (Aid) Dweik or Zweid, 25

Wail Natshe, 16, or Wail Zaim Azrat, 23
Hebron (West Bank)

"
The army claimed that the two were involved in a stone-throwing incident that placed an army patrol in danger. The soldiers opened fire. However, Palestinian sources stated that Dweik was fatally shot when he left his home, while Natshe was shot dead when he was watching the arrest from the roof of his home. (H, JP, 8 March 1994)
8 March 1994Ibrahim (Halil Salah) Sala(i)meh Khan Younis (Gaza Strip)Wanted Hamas fugitive. Was killed by IDF soldiers at the Erez checkpoint when he pulled out an UZI sub-machine-gun and tried to shoot the soldiers. Was shot inside the car. (H, JP, 9 March 1994)
13 March 1994Anwar (Zaki Mahmoud) Farhana, 25Tulkarm (West Bank)Was killed, apparently by army gunfire, during a stone-throwing incident (or when a demonstration was broken up by soldiers in a nearby refugee camp). Died in hospital.
(H, JP, 14 March 1994)
15 March 1994Abdullah Mahsein, 22Jabalia refugee camp (Gaza Strip)With an accomplice, opened fire at a military jeep. While escaping, they encountered an undercover Border Police unit. Was shot dead in the ensuing shoot-out. (H, JP, 16 March 1994; also referred to in JT, 18 March 1994)
16 March 1994Amjad Zein El Din (or al-Ouwai), 21 or 22Hebron (West Bank)Shot by soldiers who were dispersing rioters. Died in hospital. (H, 17 March 1994; JP, 17, 18 March 1994; also referred to in AT, 17 March 1994; JT, 18 March 1994)
17 March 1994

"
Mustafa (or Mohammed) Shahwan, 22 or 23

Taha(r) Abu Samah (or Masahah), 32 or 35
Khan Younis (Gaza Strip)

Bani Suheila (Gaza Strip)
Wanted Hamas fugitive.


Hamas activist.

Both were killed during a shoot-out with (undercover) troops. Soldiers stopped a car. One of the two passengers pulled out a pistol and opened fire, wounding one soldier. The troops returned fire, killing them both. (H, JP, 18 March 1994)
18 or 19 March 1994Abdul Rahim Hamash, 45Beit Jalla (West Bank)A soldier shot him dead after he attempted to attack the soldier's father, who had surprised him and an accomplice when they tried to steal a car in the Gilo neighbourhood of Jerusalem. (H, 20 March 1994)
21 March 1994Ahmed Aliwa, 35, blindGaza City (Gaza Strip)Shot accidentally by Border Policemen who returned fire at assailants shooting at them from a passing car on 20 March. The IDF stated that he was killed by terrorist fire. Died in hospital. (H, 21 and 22 March 1994)
22 March 1994Magda Muhammed Younes Zahade, 35Hebron (West Bank)Pregnant. Died in hospital. Palestinian sources stated that she was shot in her home, as she watched clashes (actually the besieging of four Hamas gunmen) through her window. According to the preliminary investigation, she was apparently killed by gunfire coming from the house where the terrorists were hiding, as she watched the exchange of fire. (H, JP, 23 and 24 March 1994; also referred to in AT, 24 March 1994; JT, 25 March 1994)
23 March 1994
"

"
Marwan Abu Rumeilla, 24

Iyad Abu Sneineh, 21

Mohammed Abu Sneineh, 21
Unknown

"

"
Wanted fugitive.

Wanted fugitive.

The three were reportedly leaders of Hamas in the West Bank. Killed in a 30-hour-long shoot-out with the army in Hebron. The confrontation ended when their hide-out was demolished by explosives. Four bodies were retrieved from the rubble. (H, JP, 23 and 24 March 1994; also referred to in JT, 1 April 1994)
25, 26 or 27 March 1994Riad Aslimiya Abdallah, 34 or 35Idna (West Bank)Died in hospital. Shot several times by a man in a car after he had stopped his truck at the side of the road near Beit Guvrin to pray. An Israeli man was arrested. (H, 28, 30 March 1994; JP, 28 and 29 March 1994; also referred to in AT, 31 March 1994)
28 March 1994

"

"

"

"

"
Ahmed Abu Abtihan


Majdi Obeid, 25

Abdel Hakim Shamali, 25

Nahad Abu Uda, 20

Anwar (al) Makusi, 25

Jamal Abdel Nabi, 30
Jabalia refugee camp (Gaza Strip)

Sajaya (Gaza Strip)
"

Jabalia (Gaza Strip)
"

Sheikh Radwan (Gaza City)
The six members of the Fatah Hawks were killed by an undercover IDF patrol in the Jabalia refugee camp although they were not on the wanted list. According to Palestinian eyewitnesses quoted in the Jerusalem Times, the men were wearing uniforms and distributing leaflets and did not shoot. According to B'tselem, undercover soldiers shot to kill and did not act in self-defence. (No warning shots were reportedly fired into the air.) One of the men was initially only wounded and reportedly tried to escape, but was subsequently shot in the head at point-blank range. According to the version of the IDF, an IDF unit identified suspected terrorists dressed in fatigues, some of whom were masked and armed with two Kalashnikov assault rifles and two pistols. The soldiers fired at these persons, who were inside two parked cars, and killed them after they had opened fire on the patrol. (H, 29 and 30 March 1994; JP, 29, 30 and 31 March 1994; also referred to in JT, 1 April 1994)
29 March 1994(Nahad) Omar (al) Kabani, 16 or 17Bureij refugee camp (Gaza Strip)Shot dead by soldiers after Palestinians stoned a military jeep. Soldiers responded with gunfire. (H, JP, 30 March 1994)
30 March 1994Wael Nofel, 18Deir Sharaf (West Bank)Died on the way to hospital. Shot from an Israeli car travelling on the Nablus-Tulkarm road, apparently by the driver of the car. (H, 31 March 1994; also referred to in AT, 31 March 1994; JT, 1 April 1994)
(b) List of other Palestinians killed as a result of the occupation

Date
Name and age
Place of residence
Remarks and sources
3 or 4 December 1993Ahmed Akkiel Khan Younis (Gaza Strip)Died during surgery. May have been poisoned by drugs. Fatah Hawks took responsibility for the killing. (JP, 5 December 1993)
3 or 4 December 1993Mohammed Abu Asi, 39Gaza City (Gaza Strip)Found dead after being kidnapped by Hamas supporters. (JP, 5 December 1993)
3 or 4 December 1993Akram Ghabiyeh, 30Gaza City (Gaza Strip)Shot by masked men. (JP, 5 December 1993)
7 December 1993Haled Sakallah, 43Gaza City (Gaza Strip)Fatah activist. Shot in the street by three masked men.
(H, 8 December 1993)
17 or 18 December 1993Khalil Ekki, 24Gaza City (Gaza Strip)(JP, 19 December 1993)
19 December 1993Sami KabasDeir el-Balah (Gaza Strip)Killed by masked men.
(H, JP, 20 December 1993)
19 December 1993Name not reported, 24Gaza City (Gaza Strip)(H, JP, 20 December 1993)
2 January 1994Azam (al) Haimani, 35Hebron (West Bank)Shot dead. (H, JP, 3 January 1994)
5 January 1994Abdul Agabria, 53Taibe (West Bank)Shot dead by two masked men at a gas station in Kalkiliya. (H, JP, 6 January 1994)
17 January 1994Rashad Morad, 21Tufah neighbourhood (Gaza Strip)Kidnapped from his home. Shot dead. (JP, 18 January 1994)
"
Osman Alal (or Abd al-Raz), 29Sejaya neighbourhood (Gaza Strip)
"
23 January 1994Yunis Bari, about 57Saniriya (West Bank)Head of the village.
Shot. Died in hospital.
(JP, 24 January 1994)
26 January 1994Name not reported, 55Jabalia refugee camp (Gaza Strip)Shot dead in his home.
(H, 27 January 1994;
JP, 28 January 1994)
27 January 1994Kamal Mahmoud Jamil ShahadaNazlah neighbourhood (Gaza Strip)Shot dead. (H, 28 January 1994)
27 January 1994Mohammed Jamal al-Dagam, 55Jabalia (Gaza Strip)Shot dead in his home.
(H, 28 January 1994)
30 January 1994Mohammed Saka, 22Nablus (West Bank)Killed when a gas canister he was handling blew up. Investigation under way to determine whether the blast occurred during the preparation of a bomb or whether it was an accident. (JP, 31 January 1994)
1 February 1994

"


"


"


"
Jamal al-Jamal(i), 23 or 31

Ihab Hussein, 44


Bassam al-Masri, 26


Nabil Mohram, 22


Name not reported
Beit Lahiya (Gaza Strip)

Rafah refugee camp (Gaza Strip)

Nuseirat refugee camp (Gaza Strip)

Sheikh Radwan (Gaza Strip)
"
Shot dead. (H, JP, 2 February 1994)

"


"


"


(H, JP, 2 February 1994)
2 February 1994Salah Ashur (Assur), 40Deir el-Balah (Gaza Strip)Found dead near his home. Kidnapped. (H, 3 February 1994;
JP, 3 February 1994)
2 February 1994Samir Kheil (Kahil), 35 or 36Sabra (Gaza Strip)(JP, 3, 4 February 1994)
2 February 1994Yussuf Salaibi (or Ayman el-Khouli), 21 or 35Shati' refugee camp (Gaza Strip)(H, 3 February 1994; JP, 3 and 4 February 1994)
4 or 5 February 1994Abdel Fatah Daoud, 41Kalkiliya (West Bank)Shot dead. (H, JP, 6 February 1994)
10 February 1994Adel Aziz Hassan Najar, 81 or 83Khan Younis (Rafah) (Gaza Strip)Shot dead. (H, JP, 11 February 1994)
13 February 1994Abdul Rahman Zeno, 37Gaza City (Gaza Strip)Abducted. (JP, 14 February 1994)
13 February 1994Fatima Abu Odeh, 56Khan Younis (Gaza Strip)Shot dead. (JP, 14 February 1994)
13 February 1994Kader Dalamli, 35Gaza City (Gaza Strip)Kidnapped. Dismembered body found inside a garbage bag.
(JP, 14 February 1994)
15 February 1994Yussuf Lafi, 23Khan Younis (Gaza Strip)Kidnapped. (H, 16 February 1994)
17 February 1994Abdallah AbedMaghazi refugee camp (West Bank)(H, 18 February 1994)
18 February 1994Name not reportedRafah (Gaza Strip)(H, 20 February 1994)
4 or 5 March 1994Salmi Dabari, 40Rafah (Gaza Strip)According to Palestinian sources, he was targeted as an informer for Israel after refusing to resign from the local police force in 1988.
(H, 6 March 1994; JP, 7 March 1994)
13 March 1994Mohammed Bakr, 60Shati' refugee camp (Gaza Strip)Shot to death by at least two gunmen. Was murdered in an apparent revenge attack by the family of a man who had been killed. (H, JP, 14 March 1994)
18 or 19 March 1994Ala Abu Dawas, 15Tubas (West Bank)Was killed when an explosive device he was handling together with his cousin blew up prematurely. However, Palestinian reporters stated the blast occurred near an area used by the IDF and the boys had apparently found a discarded explosive device and played with it. (H, JP, 20 March 1994)
18 or 19 March 1994Mohammed Naji, 40Gaza City (Gaza Strip)Worked in the past for the Israeli police; abducted several days earlier. (JP, 20, 21 March 1994)
18 or 19 March 1994Zarifa Za'atar, 43 or 44Gaza City (Gaza Strip)Shot in the head by masked men. Abducted several days earlier.
(JP, 20, 21 March 1994)
21 March 1994Abdallah Fatah Ali WanGaza StripKilled by Hamas activists.
(H, 22 March 1994)
22 March 1994Name not reportedRafah refugee camp (Gaza Strip)Killed by Hamas activists. (H, 23 March 1994)
25, 26 or 27 March 1994Jamal Abu HassanGaza City (Gaza Strip)Shot dead. Kidnapped a week earlier by Hamas. (JP, 28 March 1994)
"
Mohammed Abu Abdo, 28Gaza City (Gaza Strip)Shot dead by Hamas. Was severely tortured. (JP, 28 March 1994)
Khadar Adal, 30Gaza StripFound near the Shati' refugee camp garbage dump. A handwritten message by Hamas was found on his body.
(JP, 28 March 1994)


(c) Other incidents

79. On 1 December 1993, an Israeli kindergarten teacher, Shalva Ozana, 24, was killed, while a yeshiva student was in critical condition after the car in which they had hitched a ride was shot at from a passing car near Al Bireh. The two Israelis who had picked them up at the French Hill intersection in Jerusalem were slightly wounded. A resident of Moshav Katif was reportedly shot at in an adjoining Palestinian neighbourhood. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 2 December 1993)

80. On 2 December 1993, Yitzhak Weinstock, the 19-year-old yeshiva student who had been wounded on 1 December in a shooting attack, succumbed to his wounds. Six residents of the Gaza Strip were injured during clashes with the security forces in the Zeitoun neighbourhood of Gaza and in the Jabalia refugee camp. A bomb exploded near an Israeli vehicle near Alkana, while several shots were fired at another vehicle near Shiloh. There were no injuries or damage in either case. (Ha'aretz, 3 December 1993)

81. On 3 and 4 December 1993, three Palestinians were killed by Gaza gunmen over the weekend (see list). Six Palestinians were shot and wounded, one of them critically and another rather seriously, by residents of Kiryat Arba during two separate incidents in Hebron (also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 9 December 1993). In Ramallah, an Arab was wounded when a bomb he had apparently intended to throw at a police station blew up in his hand. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 5 December 1993)

82. On 5 December 1993, a bus driver prevented a potential bloodbath near Holon when he pushed a Palestinian gunman out of his vehicle and drove off after the gunman had opened fire on passengers, killing reserve soldier David Masrati, 32, of Holon. The assailant was subsequently killed by soldiers (see list). The Palestinian who had been shot by a resident of Kiryat Arba during the weekend died of his wounds (see list). A commercial strike was observed in his memory. Four residents of the Gaza Strip (refugee camp of Jabalia, Khan Younis) and two residents of the West Bank were injured during clashes with the army. An Israeli was slightly injured by a stone thrown at his vehicle in the Ramallah area. A Border Policeman was also slightly injured by a stone. Four tourists were injured by stones hurled at their bus in East Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 6 December 1993)

83. On 6 December 1993, gunmen opened fire at a minibus near Hebron, killing a father and son from Kiryat Arba, Mordechai Lapid, 56, and Shalom Lapid, 19, and wounding three more children from the same family. Security forces shot and killed a wanted Hamas activist near Ramallah (see list) (also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 9 December 1993). Two Israelis were wounded when a fire-bomb was thrown at their car near the village of Al-Jib, north of Jerusalem. The car was destroyed completely. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 7 December 1993)

84. On 7 December 1993, a Fatah activist was killed by three masked men (see list). A Palestinian journalist was reportedly slightly injured by IDF shooting during the dispersal of disturbances in the Nuseirat refugee camp. Several shots were fired at an IDF post in the Ikbat Jaber refugee camp near Jericho. There were no injuries or damage. IDF troops and civilian mourners fired shots in Hebron during the funeral procession for the two members of the Lapid family. A barrage of stones and cinder blocks was set up as the procession passed through the centre of the city. No injuries were reported. An Israeli bus was stoned in Bethlehem. Soldiers reportedly shot back and injured three or four Palestinians. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 8 December 1993)

85. On 8 December 1993, a settler from Kedar, near Maaleh Adumim, and his pregnant wife were shot by masked men while shopping in Bethlehem. The man was seriously injured (also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 9 December 1993). Palestinian sources reported that settlers had seriously wounded a Palestinian near Ramallah. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 9 December 1993)

86. On 9 December 1993, an Israeli gunman shot dead a Palestinian tractor driver near the village of Turmus Ayya (see list) (also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 16 December 1993). A woman from Gush Katif was stabbed and slightly injured by two men in the Moshav Katif greenhouses in the Gaza Strip. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 10 December 1993)

87. On 10 and 11 December 1993, three Arabs were shot dead by unknown Jewish activists as they were driving back from work near Hebron (see list). Immediately after the attack, protests broke out in Tarkumiyeh and nearby Beit Aula but were quickly suppressed by the army (also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 16 December 1993). Three Fatah activists stabbed an Israeli in the Gan Or settlement in the Gaza Strip. The Israeli was slightly injured and a Palestinian who had tried to defend him was also injured. A soldier (or a Border Policeman) was slightly wounded in Gaza City when a gunman fired at his patrol car. Two soldiers were injured by stones in Khan Younis and in Nablus. A Palestinian was seriously wounded in the Nablus incident, after he had stoned a military patrol. Shots were fired at soldiers manning a roadblock near Kiryat Arba and at a police station in the Gaza district where a policeman was slightly wounded. Palestinian sources reported clashes in the refugee camps of Jabalia and Khan Younis, which resulted in three injuries. A bomb exploded near an IDF position in the Gaza district, without causing damage. A car was burned in East Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 12 December 1993)

88. On 12 December 1993, an Egged company bus driver was seriously wounded when gunmen shot at the bus he was driving south of Hebron. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 13 December 1993)

89. On 13 December 1993, three reserve soldiers were slightly injured when their jeep was attacked by a suicide bomber driving a stolen ambulance near the Sajaya junction in the Gaza Strip (see list). A wanted fugitive from the Islamic Jihad and a member of the Red Eagles were killed in a clash with troops near Rafah (see list). Palestinian sources reported nine injuries by IDF shooting in the Jabalia refugee camp and two injuries in the Shati' refugee camp. Two soldiers were reportedly slightly injured in Rafah and one policeman was injured in Nablus when they were stoned. Two grenades (or bombs) were thrown at IDF troops in Rafah without causing any casualties or damage. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 14 December 1993)

90. On 14 December 1993, security forces shot and killed two Palestinians in two separate incidents in Gaza City (see list) (also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 16 December 1993). One policeman was slightly wounded in one of the incidents. Ten Palestinian youths and one soldier were reportedly injured during clashes in the Jabalia refugee camp. Three residents were also reportedly injured in the Sheikh Radwan neighbourhood. In Ramallah, a soldier was slightly wounded when a bottle of acid exploded near him as he was helping to break up a march. Two petrol bombs were thrown at a police building without causing any injuries or damage. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 15 December 1993)

91. On 15 December 1993, a soldier shot dead near the Jabalia refugee camp a Palestinian who had attacked another soldier with an axe (see list). Palestinian sources reported that troops had shot and wounded 10 (or 15) Palestinians in Gaza. Four or five of them had reportedly been shot in a car that was rushing one of the wounded to a hospital. Five petrol bombs were thrown at military targets in the Gaza Strip: four in Sajaya and one in Gaza City. In Rafah, an Egged company bus returning workers from their jobs in Israel was hijacked and set on fire by Fatah Hawk activists. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 16 December 1993)

92. On 16 December 1993, some nine residents were injured in numerous clashes that reportedly took place in the Gaza Strip (Sheikh Radwan, five; Jabalia, four). A petrol bomb was thrown at an IDF post in the Jabalia refugee camp, while a grenade was thrown at a military building in Gaza City. There were no injuries or damage in either case. A bomb exploded in Rafah without causing any harm. A general strike was observed in the Gaza Strip. (Ha'aretz, 17 December 1993)

93. On 17 and 18 December 1993, Palestinian gunmen shot dead a man in Gaza City (see list). In the same city, soldiers shot at three men who they suspected were about to attack their military post. The three turned out to be carrying toy guns. Military sources stated that two of the men were wounded, one of them seriously. A Palestinian photographer was slightly injured by a rubber bullet when soldiers dispersed a group of stone-throwers in Ramallah. Local residents indicated that three other Palestinians were slightly wounded when troops fired rubber bullets and percussion grenades at 30 to 40 youths who were throwing stones. Six residents of the Gaza Strip were reportedly injured during clashes with the army (Jabalia refugee camp, three; Gaza City, two; Shati', one). Several rallies and processions were held by Islamic Jihad groups in the Jabalia refugee camp, in Khan Younis and in the Sheikh Radwan neighbourhood to commemorate a member who had been killed earlier in the week. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 19 December 1993)

94. On 19 December 1993, three persons were killed in the Gaza district (see list). A resident of Beit Lid, near Tulkarm, was beaten by two Israelis who then left him in an orange grove. Police were investigating the incident. Palestinian sources reported clashes in Jabalia, Khan Younis and Nablus during which seven residents were injured. Stone-throwing incidents were also reported in Ramallah. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 20 December 1993)

95. On 20 December 1993, an IDF soldier was slightly wounded by a stone thrown at him in Khan Younis while his unit was unsealing several streets that the army had blocked in the town. A Border Policeman was injured in the Bureij refugee camp. Shots were reportedly also fired at a settler's vehicle in the same refugee camp. They did not cause any injuries or damage. Palestinians reported additional clashes in the Jabalia and Rafah refugee camps, where three residents were wounded. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 21 December 1993)

96. On 21 December 1993, a soldier was slightly wounded by a stone thrown at him in Shati'. (Jerusalem Post, 22 December 1993)

97. On 22 December 1993, a 60-year-old security guard, Anatov Kalsanikov, was found dead in Ashdod, apparently the victim of a nationalistically motivated attack. Meir Mendelovich, 33, and Eliahu Levin, 25, both from Bnei Brak, were killed by gunmen who riddled their car with automatic weapon fire between Ramallah and Beitunya (also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 23 December 1993). Palestinian sources reported that stone-throwing incidents had occurred in the refugee camps of the Gaza Strip (Jabalia, Khan Younis and Shati') and in the West Bank (Ramallah and Nablus) and that two residents were injured by IDF shooting in the Shati' refugee camp. An IDF soldier was slightly wounded by a stone in Gaza City. Several shots were fired at an army jeep in Hebron without causing any harm. In Gaza City, a petrol bomb was thrown at a patrol, while an explosive device was deactivated in a police station in the same city without causing any injuries or damage. Another petrol bomb was thrown at an Israeli vehicle near Shiloh. The vehicle was damaged. (Ha'aretz, 23 and 28 December 1993; Jerusalem Post, 23 and 26 December 1993)

98. On 24 and 25 December 1993, a 17-year-old Palestinian from the West Bank was shot dead by soldiers (see list). Lt.-Col. Meir Mintz, 35, the coordinator of special units operating against wanted Palestinian militants in Gaza, was shot to death. Three other soldiers were wounded after Palestinian gunmen ambushed their jeep on the outskirts of Gaza City. The assailants managed to escape. According to Palestinian sources, five residents were injured during clashes in Jabalia, Shati', Khan Younis and Gaza City. Five soldiers were slightly wounded during different incidents in Hebron, Gaza City and the Shati' refugee camp. A bomb was thrown at an IDF observation post in Gaza City, but did not cause any injuries or damage. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 26 December 1993)

99. On 26 December 1993, a fire-bomb was thrown at a military patrol in Bethlehem (or near Jerusalem), but exploded without causing injuries or damage. An Israeli-Arab man suffered slight injuries when his car was stoned as he drove past the Halhul municipality. Isolated incidents were reported in the Gaza Strip. Demonstrations during which two people were injured by IDF shooting were reported in Rafah and in Khan Younis. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 27 December 1993)

100. On 28 December 1993, Palestinian sources reported several clashes in the territories during which five residents were wounded by IDF shooting (Gaza Strip, three; West Bank, two). (Ha'aretz, 29 December 1993)

101. On 29 December 1993, an Israeli garbage disposal subcontractor working for the Defence Ministry was stabbed and injured near Hebron. A petrol bomb was thrown at a vehicle from East Jerusalem, west of Hebron, damaging the car. An explosive device was discovered near an IDF base in the Gaza Strip and was deactivated without causing harm. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 30 December 1993)
102. On 30 December 1993, two IDF soldiers were wounded in Gaza City when gunmen ambushed their vehicle. Five residents were reportedly injured in the territories during clashes with the army (Khan Younis, Jabalia and Shati', three; Hebron, two). (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 31 December 1993)

103. On 31 December 1993 and 1 January 1994, 9 (or 11) Palestinians were reportedly injured over the weekend. Most of them were wounded by IDF shooting during the dispersal of stone-throwers. In Gaza City, for instance, troops wounded four (or six) Palestinians after a petrol bomb was thrown at an IDF patrol jeep. Two Palestinians were wounded during disturbances in Ramallah, while two were wounded in Rafah. Two petrol bombs were thrown at army vehicles near Hebron in two separate incidents; a local resident was injured. Six IDF soldiers were injured by stones (Gaza Strip, two; Hebron, two; Jenin, two). Large crowds gathered to celebrate the anniversary of the creation of the Fatah movement and to show support for Yasser Arafat throughout the territories. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 2 January 1994)

104. On 1 January 1994, two Israeli drug addicts, Haim Weizmann, 30, and David Bublil, 44, were killed in Ramle, apparently for nationalistic motives. (Jerusalem Post, 3 January 1994; Ha'aretz, 4 January 1994)

105. On 2 January 1994, a man was shot dead in Hebron (see list). Six residents were reportedly injured in Gaza City. A youth who threw an explosive device at soldiers was shot and wounded. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 3 January 1994)

106. On 3 January 1994, soldiers shot and killed three Palestinians in the Gaza Strip in separate incidents (see list). Three additional residents were injured by IDF shooting (in the Shati' refugee camp). Stones were thrown at Israeli vehicles in the West Bank. A pipe bomb exploded and injured two soldiers in an IDF shooting range located near Petah Tikva, less than a kilometre from the Green Line. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 5 January 1994)

107. On 4 January 1994, four residents of the Shati' refugee camp were wounded during clashes with the IDF. (Ha'aretz, 5 January 1994)

108. On 5 January 1994, soldiers shot and killed a Palestinian in the Gaza Strip, apparently while dispersing stone-throwers (see list). A resident of Taibe was shot dead by two masked men in Kalkiliya (see list). A Palestinian was slightly injured when a grenade was thrown at an IDF patrol near the Erez junction. No soldiers were injured in the incident. An Israeli bus carrying workers was set on fire near the same junction. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 6 January 1994)

109. On 6 January 1994, an IDF soldier was stabbed and seriously injured near a bus stop north of Jerusalem while the person who attacked him was shot dead (see list). (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 7 January 1994; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 7 January 1994)

110. On 7 and 8 January 1994, six residents and four members of the security forces were wounded over the weekend during incidents in the territories. Six Palestinians received gunshot wounds: four in Gaza; one in Nablus and one in the Shati' refugee camp. Four soldiers were injured by stones: three in Gaza and one in the West Bank). Palestinian sources also reported disturbances in the Rafah and Khan Younis refugee camps. (Ha'aretz, 9 January 1994)

111. On 9 January 1994, a man from the village of Yatta (West Bank) who was armed with a knife was arrested after spending the night in the school building in Sussya, a settlement in the Hebron hills, which was surrounded by settlers and soldiers. (Jerusalem Post, 10 January 1994)

112. On 10 January 1994, Palestinians threw a hand-grenade at an IDF jeep in the Khan Younis refugee camp, slightly wounding a soldier and a Border Policeman. Four residents were reportedly injured when soldiers subsequently opened fire. After the attack, Palestinians threw five fire-bombs at a patrol in Khan Younis, without causing casualties or damage. Also in Khan Younis, a man was reportedly shot and wounded by wanted gunmen. According to local sources, a masked man writing graffiti in Gaza City was surprised by undercover units after the beginning of the curfew and was shot and wounded. The same sources reported that youths threw stones at troops who fired back with tear-gas in the same city. In Ramallah, seven persons were reportedly injured by IDF shots (or by an IDF grenade) fired during clashes. A stolen car carrying gas canisters, apparently intended to be used as a car bomb, was discovered on a busy street in Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 11 January 1994)

113. On 11 January 1994, Palestinian sources reported that four residents had been injured in the Gaza Strip during clashes with the army (Shati' refugee camp, two; Jabalia refugee camp, two). Stones were thrown on the main roads of Gaza City. In the West Bank, one Israeli was slightly wounded by a stone. Incidents also occurred in Ramallah and in Hebron, with one injury reported in the latter. (Ha'aretz, 12 January 1994)

114. On 12 January 1994, reserve Sgt. Ehud Sevitzki, 29, was killed by an officer during a violent altercation with a Palestinian prisoner in Ketziot prison in the Negev desert. Two soldiers were slightly wounded in Jabalia when gunmen opened fire at them. Other soldiers fired back, reportedly wounding a youth who was later taken to the hospital. Several fire-bombs were thrown at Israeli targets in Hebron and in Ramallah. No injuries or damage were caused during the incident. In Gaza City, explosives experts deactivated four pipe bombs after three others had exploded, thus alerting soldiers to where the remaining ones were located. There were no injuries or damage. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 13 January 1994)

115. On 13 January 1994, an Arab woman tried to stab a Border Policeman in Jerusalem's Old City but was overpowered before anyone was injured. Three soldiers were wounded when they were ambushed by gunmen while on patrol near Yatta, south of Hebron. Stone-throwing incidents and clashes with the IDF were reported in Gaza City, where two injuries were reported, and in the Shati' refugee camp, where one injury was reported. Three youths were reportedly injured after throwing stones at soldiers who had come to close down two schools in Gaza City. A general strike called by Hamas to protest the Oslo agreement was observed in the Gaza Strip, with the exception of Khan Younis and Rafah. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 14 January 1994)

116. On 14 and 15 January 1994, four members of the military arm of Hamas were shot dead in Hebron (see list). A soldier was slightly wounded in the exchange of fire, while the four were barricaded in a house. A Palestinian stabbed Grigory Fayzi, 37, to death and wounded another man near the Erez checkpoint before being shot dead (see list). After the shooting, protests erupted in the Sheikh Radwan neighbourhood of Gaza City. According to different sources, between 3 and 12 persons were injured. (Jerusalem Post, 16 January 1994)

117. On 16 January 1994, two policemen were slightly injured by stones thrown at them in Bethlehem. A grenade was thrown at a Civil Administration vehicle in Khan Younis. There were no injuries or damage. (Jerusalem Post, 17 January 1994)

118. On 17 January 1994, two Palestinians from the Gaza Strip were killed (see list). Four soldiers were wounded in a grenade attack in the Rafah refugee camp. Palestinian sources reported that three residents had been wounded by IDF shooting (Rafah, two; Khan Younis, one). Two Palestinians were injured near the A-Ram junction when their car was shot at by soldiers, after they reportedly did not stop at an army checkpoint. In Ramallah, an Arab woman tried to stab a soldier outside the Civil Administration building. Stone-throwing incidents were reported in Hebron. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 18 January 1994)

119. On 18 January 1994, an Israeli man was stabbed and slightly injured by an Arab in the Erez industrial zone near Gaza. The teenage attacker was then pursued by a security guard who shot and slightly wounded him after he had tried to stab the guard as well. A fugitive was shot and injured by security forces when he tried to escape. Nine Palestinians were shot and wounded, one of them critically, in two separate stone-throwing incidents in Hebron (seven) and Nablus (two). (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 19 January 1994)

120. On 19 January 1994, soldiers shot dead a Palestinian who had thrown a fire-bomb in Ramallah (see list), sparking off clashes between the security forces and local residents. The youth had thrown three fire-bombs before being shot. Another Palestinian was also injured by IDF shooting during the same incident. The killing sparked off several hours of rioting by residents, with soldiers responding by firing tear-gas into the crowd. A Border Policeman was slightly wounded in the head when his jeep was stoned. A Palestinian who had been shot and injured when soldiers opened fire on stone-throwers in Hebron on 18 January 1994 died in hospital (see list). In Nablus, a bus driver and a security guard were slightly injured by broken glass in a stoning incident. In Rafah, a soldier was slightly wounded when a grenade was thrown at an army patrol. Two petrol bombs were thrown at a bus in Nablus and at a police car in Bethlehem, causing slight damage. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 20 January 1994)

121. On 20 January 1994, two soldiers on patrol were slightly wounded in Khan Younis when a bomb thrown at their jeep exploded. Four children (or three children with a woman) were hurt by shrapnel and were taken to hospital. According to Palestinian sources, stones, iron bars and bottles of acid were thrown at IDF patrols in the territories (Gaza City, Khan Younis, Rafah, Jabalia and Hebron). One resident was reportedly injured by IDF shooting in Jabalia in January 1994 and three were injured by rubber bullets in Gaza City. Another resident was injured by rubber bullets in Hebron. An Israeli bus driver and an IDF soldier were slightly wounded in separate stone-throwing incidents in Rafah and Nablus. An Israeli-Arab woman was seriously injured when she was hit by a stone in Nablus. A locally manufactured grenade and a fire-bomb were thrown at Israeli forces in Khan Younis. A fire-bomb was also thrown at an IDF patrol in Betunia. There were no injuries or damage in either incident. Shots were fired from a passing car at an army position in the Khan Younis area. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 21 January 1994)

122. On 21 and 22 January 1994, Moshe Baker, an Israeli, aged 61, was stabbed to death in Rishon Letzion by three workers from the Gaza Strip. A home-made bomb, which had been planted on the road near Kibbutz Kisufim, located 5 kilometres inside the Green Line, exploded upon the passage of an IDF patrol. No injuries were reported. Four petrol bombs were thrown at a gas truck near the Ein el-Hilweh refugee camp, in the West Bank. Fifteen residents were reportedly injured, two of them seriously, during clashes that occurred in Hebron, Kalkiliya, Ramallah, Jabalia and Khan Younis. Several were wounded by IDF shooting. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 23 January 1994)

123. On 23 January 1994, the head of the Saniriya village in the West Bank was shot dead (see list). In Jabalia, an 18-year-old youth was shot and slightly wounded by troops when he stoned their patrol. Two masked men attempted to set fire to an Israeli bus carrying workers to the Jabalia refugee camp; however, the driver managed to put out the fire. (Jerusalem Post, 24 January 1994)

124. On 24 January 1994, a Palestinian from the Shu'fat refugee camp stabbed a Jewish co-worker and a yeshiva student in Jerusalem. Police believed that the incident was triggered off by a work dispute and not nationalistically motivated. The assailant was arrested. Four Palestinians were injured when they threw stones at IDF forces in Rafah. Four other residents were wounded in the Gaza Strip. The stoning of Israeli vehicles was reported in Jenin. There were no injuries. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 28 January 1994)

125. On 25 January 1994, Palestinian sources reported that four residents were injured by IDF shooting in the Gaza Strip (Rafah, two; Khan Younis, two). The same sources reported stone-throwing incidents in Gaza City, Khan Younis and Rafah, and in the Shati' and Jabalia refugee camps. Several Israeli vehicles were stoned in the West Bank. (Ha'aretz, 26 January 1994)

126. On 26 January 1994, a man was shot dead in Jabalia (see list). Gunmen opened fire at an army jeep in Gaza City, slightly injuring a soldier before one of the assailants was seriously wounded by return fire. After the shooting, some 300 Hamas supporters marched to the site of the incident. Soldiers opened fire to disperse the crowd, wounding an 18-year-old Palestinian. Palestinian sources reported clashes in the refugee camps of Jabalia, Khan Younis and Shati', where four residents were injured. Disturbances also occurred in Hebron, Ramallah and Nablus during which one resident was wounded. A soldier was injured by stones in Ramallah. A fire-bomb was thrown at an IDF patrol in Khan Younis and shots were fired in its vicinity. An explosive device was thrown at the IDF in Gaza City. There were no injuries or damage (also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 27 January 1994). Two incidents of shooting from passing vehicles at settlers were reported in Gush Katif, one near the Morag settlement and the other near the Gadid settlement. No injuries were reported in either attack. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 27 January 1994)

127. On 27 January 1994, two men were murdered in the Gaza Strip (see list). A soldier was hit and slightly injured by a stone while patrolling in Gaza City. Palestinian sources reported that four residents were injured in Gaza City and Khan Younis while stones were thrown at settlers' vehicles in the West Bank. Shots were fired near an army post in the Jabalia refugee camp. They did not cause any injury or damage. (Ha'aretz, 28 January 1994)

128. On 28 and 29 January 1994, three soldiers were slightly wounded by a grenade thrown at their patrol in Rafah. Arab sources reported in the territories clashes during which six residents were injured (Rafah, two; Jabalia, two; Hebron and Ramallah, two). A young stone-thrower was shot and injured by the army in Nablus, after he had refused to obey orders to stop. An explosive device and a petrol bomb were thrown at the security forces in Bani Suheila and in Abu Dis. Settlers' vehicles were stoned in the Al Bireh area. No damage was reported. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 28 January 1994)

129. On 30 January 1994, a local resident was killed in Nablus when a gas canister he was handling blew up (see list). Two (or three) other persons were also injured in the explosion. A resident of the Atzmona settlement in the Gush Katif area was shot and wounded near Rafah. An Arab shepherd was wounded near the Yitzhar settlement when settlers shot at him. Four residents were reportedly injured in the Gaza Strip during clashes with the army in Rafah, Khan Younis, Jabalia and Shati'. One resident was wounded in Ramallah. In the West Bank, seven incidents were reported in Hebron, Al Bireh and Ramallah during which stones were thrown at settlers' vehicles. There were no injuries. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 31 January 1994)

130. On 31 January 1994, an IDF soldier reported being attacked and stabbed by a carload of Arabs outside the Ben-Shemen forest, east of Lod.

131. On 1 February 1994, the bodies of five Palestinians who had been murdered were found in the Gaza Strip, while a sixth person was shot and seriously wounded in Kalkiliya (see list). (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 2 February 1994)

132. On 2 February 1994, three residents of the Gaza Strip were killed (see list). Two other residents of the Gaza Strip were kidnapped, one of whom was found shot in the leg. The IDF confirmed that policemen shot a 10- or 11-year-old girl by mistake during a car chase in Gaza. The girl was reported to be in critical condition. Three settlers from Kiryat Arba were shot and wounded in Halhul from a passing car as they were driving by (also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 3 February 1994). In Hebron, an improvised explosive device was thrown at an IDF patrol. In Gaza, several rounds of gunfire were fired at a police station. Four residents of the Gaza Strip were reportedly injured during clashes (Rafah, two; Jabalia, two). (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 3 February 1994)

133. On 3 February 1994, undercover troops shot and killed a wanted member of the Fatah Hawks during a shoot-out in the Rafah refugee camp (see list). Two other members of the gang were seriously wounded in the exchange of fire while two soldiers were slightly injured. Palestinian sources reported five more injuries during the IDF-initiated operation. The army shot and wounded two young stone-throwers (one of them seriously) in Gaza City, after soldiers were stoned by a group of youths. A resident of Hebron was seriously wounded by IDF gunfire when he made a U-turn in front of an IDF roadblock and, according to the army, failed to heed orders to halt. Several clashes between the army and the residents were reported throughout the territories, causing five injuries (Gaza Strip, four; Nablus, one). Two petrol bombs were thrown at civilian and military vehicles in Gaza City, without causing harm. One explosive device was thrown at an IDF patrol in the West Bank. It did not cause any injuries or damage. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 4 February 1994)

134. On 4 and 5 February 1994, a member of the Fatah Hawks died of wounds sustained on 3 February during a shoot-out with the army in the Rafah refugee camp (see list). Two other Arab residents were killed by the army while another one was killed by Palestinians (see list). Numerous incidents were reported over the weekend and more than 10 Palestinians were reportedly injured by IDF shooting (West Bank, four; Gaza Strip, six). A soldier was slightly injured by stones in the Jabalia refugee camp. A settler from Karnei Shomron was stoned in Kalkiliya. Several petrol bombs were thrown at IDF positions and patrols, especially in refugee camps. No injuries were reported in any of the cases. Shots were fired at army outposts in Maghazi and Bureij. Gazans observed the second day of a three-day general strike called to mourn the killing of the Fatah Hawk activist on 3 February. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 6 February 1994)

135. On 6 February 1994, Palestinian sources reported that four residents had been injured by IDF shooting in the Jabalia refugee camp. An explosive device was discovered in the same camp. Stone-throwing incidents were reported in the West Bank; one resident of Hebron was wounded. (Ha'aretz, 7 February 1994)

136. On 8 February 1994, an Arab youth who threw stones at an undercover IDF patrol was shot and moderately wounded in Jenin. In Hebron, a 28-year-old man was treated by an army medic for burns he had suffered when a fire-bomb thrown at an IDF patrol landed near him. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 9 February 1994)

137. On 9 February 1994, an Israeli man was stabbed and injured in Jaffa by a resident of the Gaza Strip. A young Palestinian who had thrown stones at an IDF unit in Gaza City was shot and slightly injured. Several shots were fired at soldiers in Khan Younis, without causing any harm. In Khan Younis also, a soldier was slightly injured by a stone. A petrol bomb was thrown at an IDF unit in Hebron. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 10 February 1994)

138. On 9 February 1994, a general strike was observed in the occupied territories in celebration of the monthly anniversary of the beginning of the intifadah. Twelve Palestinians, including six children, were reportedly shot and injured during clashes with the IDF in the Gaza Strip. A hand-grenade was thrown at an Israeli military patrol in Rafah but caused no injuries. Two incendiary bottles were thrown at patrols in Gaza City. Three youths were reportedly injured in clashes with Jewish settlers in East Jerusalem. (Al-Tali'ah, 10 February 1994)

139. On 10 February 1994, Naftali Sahar, 75, from Rehovot, was found dead in his orange grove near Kibbutz Na'an. He was allegedly killed by an Arab labourer who had hit him on the head with an iron bar. A man was shot dead in Khan Younis (see list). Five Palestinians were reportedly wounded by IDF shooting during clashes with the army in the Gaza Strip (Rafah, Shati', Jabalia,
Khan Younis), while two soldiers were slightly injured by stones thrown at them in Gaza City and Hebron. An Israeli bus driver was slightly injured by glass fragments when a stone hit his vehicle in Beit Jalla. A grenade was thrown at an army outpost in the centre of Hebron and exploded without causing injuries. An IDF patrol was stoned in Ramallah while a bottle of acid was thrown at soldiers in Jenin. No injuries or damage were reported in either case. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 11 February 1994)

140. On 11 and 12 February 1994, the body of Ilan Sudri, 23, from Moshav Yoshivya, was found near Moshav Heletz, near the site where his blood-stained vehicle had been discovered after he was kidnapped on 9 February. A Palestinian was shot and injured during a stone-throwing incident near Hebron. A wanted gunman was show and seriously injured during a joint operation by the police and the Border Police in Rafah. Several clashes and stone-throwing incidents were reported in the territories; seven residents were reportedly injured by IDF shooting. Most of the incidents occurred in the refugee camps of the Gaza Strip (Rafah, Khan Younis, Shati', Jabalia). Several shots were fired at an IDF outpost in the Hebron area. Three petrol bombs were thrown at a military vehicle in the Nablus area. A bottle of acid was thrown at an IDF outpost in Nablus. There were no injuries or damage in any of the cases. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 13 February 1994)

141. On 13 February 1994, an agent of the GSS, Noam Cohen, 28, from Jerusalem, was killed while two other agents were moderately wounded when they were ambushed by Hamas in Bitunya (Ramallah) village (West Bank) (also referred to in The Jerusalem Times, 18 February 1994). The gunmen managed to escape. The bodies of three persons were found in the Gaza Strip (see list). Four residents of the Gaza Strip (Rafah, two; Jabalia, two) were injured by IDF shooting. Stone-throwing incidents were reported in the refugee camps of the Gaza Strip and in the Hebron and Jenin areas. Two soldiers were injured by stones in the Jabalia refugee camp and in Gaza City. Two grenades were thrown at a police and at an army vehicle in two separate attacks in the Gaza Strip but did not cause any injuries. A petrol bomb was thrown at the building of the Civil Administration in Tulkarm. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 14 and 15 February 1994)

142. On 14 February 1994, Palestinian sources reported clashes between the residents and the army in the Gaza Strip. Two residents of the Rafah refugee camp were injured by IDF shooting during a stone-throwing incident, while three other people were wounded in the Jabalia refugee camp. One soldier was slightly wounded by stones in Gaza City. Vehicles were stoned on the main highways of the Gaza Strip. Stones were also thrown in the West Bank but no injuries were reported. A bottle containing an unidentified liquid was thrown at an IDF patrol in Nablus. The bottle exploded without causing any injuries. (Ha'aretz, 15 February 1994)

143. On 15 February 1994, a young resident of the Gaza Strip was shot and killed by the army (see list). Another resident may also have been injured in the same incident, when soldiers fired back at stone- (or bomb-) throwers in Rafah. A Palestinian reportedly died of wounds sustained several days earlier when he had been shot by the army (see list). A man was found dead in the Gaza Strip (see list). A 17-year-old Palestinian from Gaza attacked a man from Ashdod with an axe, apparently in an attempt to gain acceptance by a terrorist group. The attacker was caught by the police. Four residents of the Gaza Strip were reportedly injured during clashes with the army (Khan Younis, two; Jabalia, two). (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 16 February 1994)

144. On 16 February 1994, soldiers shot and killed a Palestinian during a clash with a group of stone-throwing youths in the Hebron area (see list). A man was shot in the head and seriously injured by gunmen in Kalkiliya. An Israeli man was stabbed and slightly injured in Ramallah. The assailant managed to escape. Palestinian sources reported that two residents were injured in the Gaza Strip while another one was wounded in Hebron. Clashes were also reported in the Shati', Khan Younis and Rafah refugee camps. Two vehicles belonging to settlers were stoned in the Al Bireh area. No injuries were reported. A terrorist attack was thwarted at the market in Hadera (within the Green Line), after a vegetable vendor spotted a suspicious man from Baka as-Sharkia (West Bank) concealing a knife under his clothing. The man was captured when he tried to flee the scene. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 17 February 1994)

145. On 17 February 1994, Yuval Golan, 35, from Moshav Zitan, a private contractor working for the IDF who was stabbed on 29 December 1993 near Hebron, died in Soroka Hospital. A soldier shot dead a Palestinian who had made a threatening gesture directed at troops manning an army checkpoint in the territories (see list). A man was killed in the Maghazi refugee camp (see list). His wife was seriously injured when the man was kidnapped by Hamas activists. Troops shot and wounded at least two to four Palestinians, one of them critically, during clashes with stone-throwing demonstrators in Halhul. Numerous incidents were also reported in Hebron and Ramallah. The clashes in those cities reportedly erupted when news spread that the army had killed Marwan Saadeh a day earlier. Four Palestinians were reportedly injured by IDF shooting during clashes with the army in the Gaza Strip (Rafah, two; Jabalia refugee camp, two). Two soldiers were slightly injured by stones in Rafah. Three fire-bombs were thrown at army patrols in the West Bank. No injuries or damage were reported in any of the incidents. A man from Bethlehem was found in a cave in Jerusalem, after being abducted by masked men. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 18 February 1994; Jerusalem Post, 20 February 1994)

146. On 18 February 1994, Zipora Sasson, 33, a pregnant woman from the Ariel settlement, was shot dead on the trans-Samaria highway as she was returning home with her family. Her vehicle was attacked by automatic rifle fire a few kilometres from the settlement. (Jerusalem Post, 20 February 1994)

147. Also on 18 and 19 February 1994, a man was killed in Rafah (see list). In the Gaza Strip, three residents were reportedly injured during clashes with the army (Khan Younis, two; Jabalia, one). In the West Bank, stones were thrown in Ramallah, Al Bireh and Hebron. Palestinian sources reported one injury by IDF shooting during the incidents. Four vehicles parked in Jerusalem's East Talpiot neighbourhood were vandalized. (Ha'aretz, 20 February 1994)

148. On 20 February 1994, a resident of Moshav Pedia was stabbed by an Arab from Hebron in a carpentry shop in the moshav. Two soldiers were slightly wounded in a shooting incident in the Rafah refugee camp. Gunmen opened fire at an IDF patrol. Soldiers returned fire, wounding one (or two) assailant(s). A few hours earlier, in the same city, soldiers shot at a group of Arab stone-throwers, wounding two slightly. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 21 February 1994)

149. On 21 February 1994, shots were fired at an IDF patrol in the Tulkarm area. The soldiers fired back. According to Palestinian sources, four residents were injured in the Gaza Strip during clashes with the army (Gaza City and Rafah, three; Jabalia, one). The IDF spokesman did not report any injuries in the Gaza Strip. An Israeli vehicle was shot at near Beit Sahur. There were no injuries or damage. A soldier was slightly injured near Beit El when stones were thrown at his vehicle. Stones were also thrown in Ramallah, Hebron and Al Bireh. A patrol was stoned in the Jericho area. A bomb reportedly exploded in the centre of Hebron without causing any harm. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 22 February 1994)

150. On 22 February 1994, a soldier was slightly wounded by shrapnel when a grenade was thrown at an IDF position in Gaza City. Three other incidents in which weapons were used against IDF troops in the Gaza Strip, two shootings in Gaza City and one (or two) pipe bomb attack(s) in the Jabalia refugee camp were also reported. There were no injuries or damage. A petrol bomb was thrown at an Israeli vehicle near the Jelazoun refugee camp. Three residents were reportedly injured by the army in Rafah and in Khan Younis. Stone-throwing incidents were also reported in the Jabalia refugee camp. In Jenin, a 19-year-old Palestinian was slightly wounded when he threw stones at a Border Police patrol. Clashes with the security forces were reported in Hebron, Al Bireh and Ramallah. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 23 February 1994)

151. On 23 February 1994, a resident of Rafah who was following soldiers in an allegedly suspicious manner was shot and moderately wounded. A wanted Islamic Jihad fugitive was slightly injured and captured in Gaza City after he had tried to run down several soldiers. Palestinian sources reported isolated incidents in the Gaza Strip (Rafah; Jabalia refugee camp) and two injuries by army gunfire. An Israeli man was slightly injured when his car was stoned in Halhul. In Dimona, a police officer was slightly wounded by gunfire during what he described as a kidnapping attempt. An explosive device was discovered in Bethlehem and was deactivated by Border Police explosives experts without causing harm. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 24 February 1994)

152. On 24 February 1994, security forces shot dead one of the most wanted members of Hamas, and wounded and captured another wanted activist in a day-long shoot-out just outside Jerusalem (see list). An Israeli woman suffered moderate injuries when she was struck by stones thrown by Palestinians in the village of Bidu, near Ramallah. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 25 February 1994)

153. On 25 February 1994, Baruch Goldstein, 40, from the Kiryat Arba settlement, opened fire at Muslim worshippers in the Ibrahimi Mosque, which is located in the Cave of the Patriarchs in Hebron, killing dozens of Palestinian men. The first reports placed the death toll between 51 and 59, while the latest IDF reports stated that 39 persons had been killed (see list). Goldstein, who apparently had no accomplices, was reportedly killed by Arabs on the spot. Many other Palestinian worshippers were wounded during the attack; 120 to 125 according to the IDF; and 200 according to Palestinian sources. In the immediate aftermath of the massacre, severe clashes erupted throughout the occupied territories (and in Israel) as the news of the massacre spread. Six other Palestinians were reportedly killed by the IDF in Hebron (information provided by the army) (see list). Also according to the army, 10 additional residents of the territories were killed (West Bank, five; Gaza Strip, four; East Jerusalem, one) over the weekend during extremely violent disturbances that broke out despite the curfew imposed on most of the areas in order to prevent unrest (see list). Between 150 and 200 residents were wounded during the clashes but no final report was made. Several members of the Israeli armed forces were wounded during confrontations with the angry crowd. A number of Israeli civilians were also wounded, mostly by stones thrown at their vehicles (also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 3 March 1994; The Jerusalem Times, 4 March 1994). An Israeli man, Morris Eisenstadt, 79 or 80, was axed to death while sitting near the main bus station in Kfar Sava. The attack was reportedly carried out by an Arab in retaliation for the massacre in Hebron. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 27 and 28 February 1994; Jerusalem Post, 1 March 1994)

154. On 27 February 1994, two (or three) Palestinians were killed (see list) while dozens were wounded during clashes with the army, including an eight-year-old boy who was seriously injured by gunfire, when hundreds of people broke a curfew imposed throughout the territories to continue expressing their anger at the Hebron massacre. Sporadic unrest continued in East Jerusalem, while the police fired rubber bullets and tear-gas to disperse stone-throwers in several Arab neighbourhoods (Ras el-Amud, A-Tur, Shu'fat and the Muslim and Christian Quarters of the Old City). Two Israelis were wounded after failing to stop at an army roadblock on the Netanya-Nablus highway. A Palestinian shot a Thai worker in a hothouse in Moshav Gitit in the Jordan Valley. The assailant managed to escape. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 28 February 1994)

155. On 28 February 1994, unrest continued in East Jerusalem when a fire-bomb was thrown at a vehicle in East Talpiot and a car was set on fire in Wadi Joz. No injuries were reported in either incident. Clashes were reported in the neighbourhoods of A-Tur and Ras el-Amud and in the Shu'fat refugee camp. (Jerusalem Post, 1 March 1994)

156. On 28 February 1994, a Palestinian youth was killed by the IDF during clashes in Hebron (see list). Four other youths were injured. IDF soldiers injured four women who staged a demonstration in Jericho. (Al-Tali'ah, 3 March 1994)

157. On 1 March 1994, soldiers manning a roadblock near the village of Bidiya on the trans-Samaria highway shot and killed by mistake David Baruch, 30, an Israeli man from the Ariel settlement, and wounded his wife. In Gaza City, nine residents were injured when soldiers dispersed stone-throwers. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 2 March 1994)

158. On 1 March 1994, the IDF fired two missiles at the houses of Anouar Metaya Banoura and Walid Bishara Banoura, both in Beit Sahour. The ceilings of the two houses collapsed. According to the IDF, soldiers had been shot at from the houses. The house owners denied the allegations. A Palestinian passer-by was hit and killed by the IDF when it opened fire at demonstrators in the town of Askar (see list). In a separate development, Radio Israel reported that four Palestinians had been arrested in Khan Younis for carrying weapons. (Al-Tali'ah, 3 March 1994)

159. On 2 March 1994, an 11-year-old girl who was accidentally shot by soldiers in Gaza City three weeks earlier died of her wounds (see list). Two Arab teenagers were shot dead by soldiers in Hebron and Jericho (see list), while dozens of Palestinians (between 50 and 60) were wounded during violent clashes in the territories (Hebron, Jericho, Jabalia and Bureij, and the refugee camps of Shati', Nuseirat, Khan Younis and Rafah). The disturbances erupted following the lifting of the curfews for several hours to enable the residents to purchase necessary items. In Gaza City a soldier was injured by a stone. In Jabalia, a bomb was de-activated without causing harm near an IDF outpost. Several shots were fired at an Israeli vehicle in the southern Gaza Strip (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 3 March 1994; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 3 March 1994)

160. On 3 March 1994, four Palestinian stone-throwers were injured by IDF shooting in the Jabalia refugee camp. One Border Policeman was hit by an empty bottle in Bethlehem. Large units of the police and Border Police used tear-gas to prevent several Arabs from forcibly entering the Temple Mount in Jerusalem. There were no injuries. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 4 March 1994)

161. On 4 and 5 March 1994, four Palestinians were killed in separate incidents in the territories over the weekend, three of them by soldiers and one by an Israeli civilian. In Gush Katif, a member of Moshav Katif and a volunteer worker were attacked when they entered a greenhouse in order to work there. Although they were both injured, the moshavnik shot and killed one of the assailants (see list). Another assailant was injured while two others fled. In the Balata refugee camp, two Palestinian youths were killed as a result of IDF shooting at an armed resident (see list). Four (or six) other residents were reportedly wounded during the incident. In Gaza City, a soldier shot and killed an Arab who had tried to stab him while he was on a foot patrol (see list). According to Palestinian sources in Rafah, a man was murdered (see list). Palestinian sources reported numerous clashes in the Gaza Strip, which resulted in 29 injuries (Gaza City, Khan Younis, and the refugee camps of Khan Younis, Rafah, Shati' and Jabalia). Some eight injuries were reported in the West Bank, two of them in Ramallah. A bomb was found on the road between Eyal and Kochav Yair and was neutralized safely. In East Jerusalem, youths threw stones and bottles at the police, who responded with the firing of canisters with tear-gas and rubber bullets. According to Palestinian sources, 20 youths were wounded, 2 seriously. Two policemen were also slightly wounded. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 6 March 1994; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 10 March 1994)

162. On 7 March 1994, two Palestinians were shot dead by soldiers in Hebron (see list) as widespread unrest broke out when the army temporarily lifted the curfew imposed on the city. Three (or 6 or up to 14) residents and two soldiers were injured during the riots. Unrest also broke out around Bethlehem University, where students were holding a memorial service for the victims of the massacre in Hebron. One student was reportedly slightly injured (by army fire or by a stone thrown by a fellow student). In the Jabalia refugee camp, an Associated Press photographer was hit in the leg by a rubber bullet while nine residents were reportedly injured during violent disturbances. In the Gaza Strip, a soldier and a Border Policeman were injured in an incident at a roadblock involving a Palestinian car whose occupants had fled and shot at the police. A wanted fugitive from Jabalia was wounded in a gun battle with IDF troops and was later captured at a local hospital. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 8 March 1994)

163. On 8 March 1994, a wanted Hamas fugitive from Khan Younis and a resident of East Jerusalem (Israeli citizen) believed to have been his driver were killed by the army at the Erez checkpoint after the Hamas fugitive had tried to shoot at the soldiers (see list). Police and Border Police clashed with Arab rioters just outside the Old City in East Jerusalem. Youths threw bottles and stones at the police, who responded by firing tear-gas canisters and rubber bullets. Two Border Policemen and a journalist were slightly wounded during the riots. Palestinian sources reported several clashes in Ramallah, Khan Younis and Bureij, which resulted in several injuries. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 9 March 1994)

164. On 9 March 1994, Palestinian sources reported that 31 residents and one soldier were injured during clashes with the IDF in the Gaza Strip (Khan Younis, Jabalia, Shati'). In Ramallah, two Palestinians were injured during a stone-throwing incident with the army. Two Israelis were stoned and injured during separate incidents near Ramallah and in Jenin. (Ha'aretz, 10 March 1994)

165. On 11 and 12 March 1994, numerous clashes were reported in the occupied territories over the weekend. In the West Bank, in Tulkarm, four people were wounded when a Hamas demonstration was broken up. Two or three local residents were slightly wounded in Ramallah by rubber bullets and tear-gas during the dispersal of a demonstration there. Disturbances also erupted in Hebron. Severe clashes were reported in the Gaza Strip during which five residents were injured by IDF shooting in Jabalia, five in Deir el-Balah and two in Rafah. A soldier was injured by shots fired near the Ganei Tal settlement in the southern Gaza Strip. A gunman fired at an IDF patrol from a passing car in Gaza City. A volley was fired from a moving car at an IDF outpost in the Jabalia refugee camp. No one was injured. The car managed to escape. A soldier was slightly wounded by a stone in the Ramallah police station. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 13 March 1994)

166. On 13 March 1994, for the first time since the uprising began over six years ago, a Palestinian from the Shati' refugee camp was murdered in an apparent revenge attack by the family of a man who had been killed (see list) (also referred to in The Jerusalem Times, 18 March 1994). Another Palestinian was killed in Tulkarm, apparently by army gunfire during a stone-throwing incident (see list). Three additional residents were wounded during the same incident. Sporadic disturbances marred what was otherwise a relatively quiet day in the territories, with residents marking the first day of Id al-Fitr, the holiday marking the end of the holy month of Ramadan. Minor incidents were reported in Dahariya, south of Hebron, in Hebron and in Ramallah. There were no injuries. In the Gaza Strip, disturbances were reported in the Jabalia refugee camp, in Rafah, Khan Younis and in Gaza City, resulting in five injuries. In Rafah, gunmen shot several times at an army lookout post. No soldiers were hurt and the attackers fled. In the same city, a soldier was slightly injured by a stone. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 14 March 1994)

167. On 14 March 1994, an Israeli was slightly injured by a stone thrown at his car near the village of Sinjil, north of Ramallah. A Border Policeman was slightly injured when stones and bottles were thrown at his army jeep in Tulkarm. Two petrol bombs were thrown earlier at a military vehicle in the same city. There were no injuries or damage. A youth from Abu Dis (East Jerusalem) was caught after he had set an Israeli car on fire. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 15 March 1994; Ha'aretz, 16 March 1994)

168. On 15 March 1994, one gunman was killed (see list) and another seriously wounded by a unit of undercover Border Policemen after an attack in Beit Lahiya in the northern Gaza Strip. Palestinian sources reported disturbances in the Jabalia refugee camp, Khan Younis, Rafah and in Shati'. According to the sources, nine residents were wounded during the disturbances. One resident of Ramallah was reportedly slightly injured by shooting while several stone-throwing incidents occurred in the West Bank. Dozens of Arab youths rioted outside Jerusalem's Old City. They threw bottles and stones at Border Police patrols. The police responded by firing rubber bullets and tear-gas canisters, and at least one youth was hit by a rubber bullet and slightly injured. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 16 March 1994)

169. On 16 March 1994, soldiers dispersing rioters in Hebron shot and killed a Palestinian (see list) and wounded another 10 to 16 residents (also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 17 March 1994). Two Border Policemen were slightly wounded by stones thrown during the disturbances. In the same city, a patrol was attacked with stones, while a bottle of acid was thrown at another IDF unit. No one was injured. The clashes took place after the curfew was lifted briefly to allow the population to buy some food. In the Gaza Strip, some 10 to 20 residents and one Border Policeman were slightly wounded in the Jabalia refugee camp after stones were thrown at IDF soldiers. Other incidents were reported in the Gaza Strip, especially in the refugee camps of Shati', Khan Younis and in Gaza City (60 persons are estimated to have been injured in Gaza and Hebron, The Jerusalem Times, 18 March 1994). An Israeli woman was stoned and slightly wounded as she drove through Beit Jalla, near Bethlehem. An Arab woman who had attempted to stab a soldier near the Ramallah police station was apprehended. A petrol bomb was thrown at a patrol in Jenin. There were no injuries. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 17 March 1994)

170. On 17 March 1994, a wanted Hamas fugitive and another Hamas activist were killed in a shoot-out with IDF troops in Khan Younis (see list). One soldier was slightly wounded in the exchange of fire. Elsewhere in the territories, 15 Palestinians were wounded by army gunfire, one of them seriously, during disturbances in the Gaza Strip, especially in the Jabalia refugee camp. In Nablus, soldiers reportedly shot and wounded between 8 and 18 persons during clashes with stone-throwers. Violent disturbances erupted at the Bir Zeit University and Palestinian sources reported six injuries. In Hebron, two people were reportedly wounded, probably when hundreds of Hebronites defied the curfew, taking to the streets in a march organized by Fatah in order to protest the killing by soldiers of a resident of the city a day earlier. In Beit Sahur, two high-school students were very slightly wounded during disturbances and stone-throwing incidents in the high school. A bomb exploded near the police station in the Rimal neighbourhood of Gaza City, without causing harm. In Beit Jalla, a petrol bomb and stones were thrown at an IDF jeep. There was no damage. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 18 March 1994)

171. On 18 and 19 March 1994, a 15-year-old Palestinian was killed (see list) and his 16-year-old cousin seriously wounded near Nablus when an explosive device they were handling blew up. In the Gaza Strip, a man and a woman were murdered (see list). A Palestinian was shot dead in the Gilo neighbourhood of Jerusalem after he had tried to attack an Israeli man who surprised him and his accomplice as they were trying to steal a car (see list). Arab sources stated that IDF troops had shot and wounded between 15 and 32 Palestinians - 2 of them seriously - during unrest in the territories (Hebron, Nablus, Ramallah, Shati', Khan Younis, Gaza City and the Jabalia refugee camp). Two soldiers were injured in two separate incidents in Gaza City and in Ramallah. A grenade was thrown at an IDF patrol in Hebron. No injuries or damage were reported. Two improvised bombs were thrown at an IDF patrol in the Jabalia refugee camp. Arab youths tried to burn the car of a tourist couple in East Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz, 20 March 1994; Jerusalem Post, 20, 21 and 23 March 1994)

172. On 20 March 1994, Border Policemen shot and badly wounded a blind Palestinian passer-by after shots were fired at them from a passing car in Gaza City. Palestinian stone-throwers and several other persons were wounded during clashes in the Gaza Strip (Jabalia refugee camp, two or three; Gaza City, two; Khan Younis; Rafah) and in the West Bank (Hebron, two or four; Nablus, one; Anabta, one; Ramallah; Bethlehem). Two soldiers were slightly injured by stones in Rafah. An Israeli who had driven into Ramallah by mistake was saved by a Palestinian restaurant owner after an angry mob pelted his car with stones and then chased him through the town. The man was injured in the head and his car burned. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 21 March 1994)

173. On 21 March 1994, the blind man who was shot accidentally a day earlier in the Gaza Strip died of his wounds (see list). A man was killed by Hamas (see list). Two Israelis were wounded by gunfire while three were slightly injured by glass fragments when an Egged company bus came under fire from gunmen near the Ateret settlement in the northern West Bank. A soldier who was in the bus opened fire and apparently scared away the gunmen who had been waiting in ambush. Palestinian sources reported that seven to nine residents were wounded, including an 18-month-old girl, when troops broke up disturbances in the Jabalia refugee camp. According to the same sources, nine additional people were wounded during clashes in Khan Younis, Rafah, and in the Bureij refugee camp. Violent clashes erupted in Kalkiliya where two 15- or 16-year-old youths were seriously wounded and seven other residents were injured when soldiers dispersed stone-throwers near a school. In Nablus, one Palestinian was moderately wounded by IDF gunfire during a stone-throwing incident. In Hebron, two Palestinian journalists (ABC television and Reuters) were reportedly detained by the security forces when troops dispersed stone-throwers. Arab sources stated that one of them was beaten by soldiers while filming the disturbances. Clashes also erupted in Ramallah. Three soldiers were slightly wounded in two separate incidents in Jabalia and in Gaza City. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 22 March 1994)

174. On 22 March 1994, a pregnant woman was shot dead in Hebron (see list) and another woman was reportedly injured during an exchange of fire between Hamas fugitives and the army. Widespread clashes erupted in Hebron. Thousands of angry Palestinians took to the streets and some stoned troops. A settler source indicated that they threw fire-bombs at a convoy of settler vehicles passing through Halhul on their way to Kiryat Arba. Some of the bombs exploded but there were no reports of injuries. Palestinian sources stated that five, seven or possibly even several dozen Palestinians were injured during the clashes in Hebron. A doctor at the Mohammed Ali Red Crescent Children's Hospital in Hebron stated that the 30 children in the hospital had been frightened by the shots and rockets fired by the security forces at a house located some 10 metres away from the hospital. A man was killed by Hamas activists in Rafah (see list). In Nablus, two Palestinian children, two youths and an infant bystander were wounded by troops who fired at children when they stoned civilian and army vehicles in the town square. Disturbances were also reported in Bethlehem. Two members of Kibbutz Nahal Oz, in the Negev, suffered moderate to serious injuries when they tried to apprehend three Arabs who had infiltrated the kibbutz and were trying to steal a car. An Arab woman was arrested after she had tried to stab a Border Policeman with a kitchen knife at the entrance to the Shu'fat refugee camp. In the Gaza Strip, incidents, in particular stone-throwing during which seven residents were wounded, were reported in the refugee camps of Rafah, Khan Younis and Jabalia and in Gaza City. Two Hamas activists armed with knives were captured by troops near the Erez checkpoint at the entrance to the Gaza Strip. They admitted that they were on their way to carry out an attack. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 23 and 24 March 1994; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 24 March 1994; The Jerusalem Times, 25 March 1994)

175. On 23 March 1994, three wanted members of Hamas (see list for 23 March) and a pregnant woman (see list for 22 March) were killed, while another Palestinian woman (and five other Palestinians) and six (or seven) IDF soldiers were injured during a day-long shoot-out in Hebron (also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 24 March 1994; The Jerusalem Times, 25 March 1994). The operation began early in the morning on 22 March when five wanted fugitives from the Izz Al-din al-Qassam group were spotted in southern Hebron. The IDF surrounded the group of houses in which they were supposedly hiding. At first, the troops refrained from shooting but during the afternoon an IDF patrol was reportedly fired at from one of the surrounded houses. Reinforcements were called in and they fired (reportedly also from the roof of the Mohtasseb Children's Hospital) several LAW rockets at the house and detonated explosive charges. The shoot-out continued throughout the night and lasted well into the following day. The 30-hour-long siege ended when the hide-out was destroyed by explosives in the afternoon. Three bodies were retrieved from the rubble. Also on 23 March, Victor Lashtsover, 45, from Pisgat Zeev, a security guard at the Income Tax Authority offices, was shot by a gunman as he was walking to work near Jerusalem's Old City. He succumbed to his wounds in a hospital. A resident of Tulkarm who tried to avoid an army inspection was shot and wounded. In Gaza City, gunmen opened fire from a car at a Border Police patrol in the Rimal neighbourhood. The policemen returned fire at the car, damaging the vehicle, but the gunmen managed to escape. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 24 and 25 March 1994)

176. On 24 March 1994, between 45 and 50 Palestinians were wounded (reportedly by IDF gunfire) during serious unrest that broke out throughout the territories, sparked off by the killing of three Hamas suspects in Hebron on 23 March. Ten Israeli soldiers and civilians were also slightly wounded during clashes (the throwing of stones and petrol bombs) that took place in the territories. Angry Palestinians took to the streets in Hebron and pelted soldiers with stones despite the curfew. Nablus was reportedly the focus of the disturbances, with more than 20 residents hurt, 3 seriously, in violent clashes with the IDF during which stones and bottles were thrown at the troops and Israeli vehicles. According to Palestinian sources, soldiers shot and wounded 16 Palestinians in the Jabalia refugee camp in the Gaza Strip after they had stoned an army base. Besides Nablus, Hebron and Jabalia, disturbances were also reported in Ramallah, Tulkarm, Rafah, Khan Younis, Gaza City and in the Shati' refugee camp. There were several reports of stonings in Ramallah, Kalkiliya and Bethlehem. A three-day strike was declared in the territories and was observed in almost all of the major cities. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 25 March 1994)

177. On 25, 26 and 27 March 1994 (weekend and first day of Passover), a Palestinian who had stopped his truck at the side of the road near Beit Guvrin (West Bank) to pray was shot several times by a man in a car who subsequently drove off (see list) (also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 31 March 1994). An Israeli man was later arrested. Three residents of the Gaza Strip were murdered by Hamas activists (see list). An IDF soldier was moderately wounded by Hamas gunfire in the Sheikh Radwan neighbourhood of Gaza City. Between 13 and 30 local residents, including an eight-year-old boy, were injured over the weekend in disturbances in Gaza City, in the Jabalia, Shati' and Maghazi refugee camps, and in Hebron, Tulkarm and Ramallah. An Israeli-Arab woman was moderately injured by a stone thrown at her car near Tulkarm. Two Border Policemen were also injured by stones in the West Bank. Stone-throwing incidents were reported in Jerusalem, but there were no injuries. Two cars (one owned by an Israeli and one rented) were set on fire in Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 28 March 1994)

178. On 28 March 1993, six members of the Fatah Hawks were killed by an IDF undercover patrol in the Jabalia refugee camp in the Gaza Strip (see list). During disturbances two youths and a 55-year-old woman were also injured in the incident (also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 31 March 1994, The Jerusalem Times, 1 April 1994). During disturbances in the West Bank, a soldier was wounded near Jenin, a Border Policeman and an Israeli woman were wounded near the Nur Shams refugee camp, while four Palestinians were wounded in Nablus. In the Gaza Strip, clashes were reported in the Shati', Jabalia and Khan Younis refugee camps, where two residents were injured. Two Border Policemen were slightly wounded by stones in Khan Younis. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 29 March 1994)

179. On 29 March 1994, a 70-year-old Israeli construction site manager was attacked in Petah Tikva with hatchets by two Palestinians from Khan Younis. The victim was critically wounded. The assailants were later arrested. Palestinians, angered by the death by shooting of six armed Fatah Hawks in the Jabalia refugee camp a day earlier, took to the streets, leaving one youth dead in Bureij refugee camp (see list) and dozens (65 to 75) injured in extremely violent clashes with the army that broke out throughout the territories. Between 11 and 17 Palestinians were reportedly wounded in Bureij, while others (between 25 and 40) were wounded in other parts of the Gaza Strip (Khan Younis, Rafah, Gaza City). Protests also erupted in the West Bank; between 25 and 30 Palestinians were wounded by army gunfire in Nablus and its environs; two persons were wounded in Tulkarm. In Hebron, soldiers used tear-gas and rubber bullets to keep some 400 youths from attacking Beit Hadassah (a Jewish neighbourhood). Two Palestinians were wounded during the incident. A soldier, a Border Policeman and possibly some 31 Israeli civilians were slightly wounded during stone-throwing incidents in the West Bank. A religious man was beaten by Arabs from the Old City on his way to the Western Wall. Several assailants were arrested. Three people and one Border Policeman were reportedly slightly injured in the Old City of Jerusalem when stones were thrown at them. A general strike was called by the Fatah and was mostly observed in the Gaza Strip. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 30 and 31 March 1994)

180. On 29 and 30 March 1994, clashes were reported in Hebron, Halhul, Jenin and the Shu'fat refugee camp. Fifteen Palestinians were reportedly injured in Hebron. Incendiary bottles were thrown at military patrols in Dhahiriya, Yamoun, Halhul and Kabatiya. An Israeli driver was injured by stones in Halhul and a soldier was wounded in the Shu'fat refugee camp. A Palestinian youth died during violent clashes in the Bureij refugee camp (his name was not reported). Fourteen Palestinians, including an eight-year-old child, were reportedly injured in the Nuseirat refugee camp and in the Shajiya quarter in the Gaza Strip. (Al-Tali'ah, 31 March 1994)

181. On 30 March 1994, a Palestinian who had stoned an Israeli car travelling along the Nablus-Tulkarm road was shot and killed, apparently by the driver of the car (see list). Between 12 and 20 Arabs were reportedly injured by IDF throughout the territories (Jabalia, Beit Lahiya, Nuseirat, Gaza City, Tulkarm, Hebron, Ramallah and Nablus), while five or six soldiers and an Israeli civilian were slightly injured by stones thrown at them in the West Bank. A general strike was observed for the second consecutive day in the Gaza Strip (to commemorate the eighteenth anniversary of Land Day), in protest against the killing of the six members of the Fatah Hawks. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 31 March 1994; also referred to in The Jerusalem Times, 1 April 1994)

182. On 31 March 1994, Isaac Rotenberg, 70, from Bat Yam, the construction worker who was attacked with an axe by two Gazans on 29 March in Petah Tikva, died at the hospital. Yossi Zandani, 28, from Bnei Ayish, was strangled and stabbed to death in his house. A letter in Arabic found near the body confirmed that he was the victim of a terrorist attack. Soldiers shot and seriously wounded a Palestinian gunman during an exchange of fire in the Jabalia refugee camp in the Gaza Strip. Another gunman was slightly wounded but managed to escape. The shooting sparked off stone-throwing incidents and riots in the camp; between 7 and 12 Palestinians were wounded by army gunfire (also referred to in The Jerusalem Times, 1 April 1994). Palestinian sources reported clashes in the refugee camps of Khan Younis, Bureij, Shati' and in Gaza City. Two Border Policemen were injured when their vehicles were stoned during two separate incidents, north of Jerusalem and in Ramallah. A petrol bomb was thrown at a Civil Administration vehicle in Ramallah. There were no injuries or damage. Two German tourists were injured, one seriously, when their car was stoned in Kalkiliya, after they had inadvertently entered the town. Four residents of that city were also wounded during clashes with the IDF. Settlers' cars were stoned in Halhul. An Israeli bus was stoned on the road between Jerusalem and Kiryat Arba. The driver and a passenger were slightly wounded. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 1 April 1994)
B. Administration of justice, including the right to a
fair trial

1. Palestinian population

183. On 5 December 1993, Ashraf Mahmoud Ibrahim, 13 (or 18), from the Nur Shams (West Bank) refugee camp, who had been blinded by IDF gunfire in May 1986 (or March 1988), was awarded approximately $468,230 by the Haifa District Court. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 6 December 1993)

184. On 15 December 1993, Mahmoud Araf Samir, from Al Bireh, the commandant of a Hamas cell whose members were convicted of planting the bomb that killed a Canadian tourist on a Tel Aviv beach in July 1990, was sentenced in the Nablus Military Court to nine-and-a-half years' imprisonment following a plea bargain. (Ha'aretz, 16 December 1993)

185. On 15 December 1993, the Nablus Military Court sentenced Zahar Jabrin (or Zuher Jubrin), from Salfit, the Hamas commander in the northern West Bank, to life imprisonment plus 30 years for the killing of reserve soldier Evyashar Gitai (or Gitai Avishar) and the wounding of two other reservists on 20 March 1993. He was also convicted of participating in an attempt to place a car bomb in Ramat Efal about a year earlier and of the kidnapping, torture and killing of several suspected collaborators. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 16 December 1993)

186. On 4 January 1994, the parents of five children (Yousuf A'azi, 5; Sohair Afana, 13; Yousuf Kishui, 11; Atia Firani, 3; and Mahmoud Roul, 12) who claimed that their children had been killed by IDF gunfire in the Shati' refugee camp in Gaza filed a suit against the Government of Israel at the Tel Aviv District Court, claiming approximately $358,000 in damages. (Jerusalem Post 5 January 1994)

187. On 5 January 1994, Ali (Mahmoud Ahmed Mahmoud) Rabi, 25, from Azun, was sentenced by the Nablus Military Court to life imprisonment and an additional 10 years for the killing of a man in Azun in April 1992 on suspicion that he had sold land to Israelis. He was also convicted of setting on fire cars of Arabs who were suspected of cooperating with Israeli authorities. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 6 January 1994)

188. On 10 January 1994, the Nablus Military Court sentenced Ahmed Marshud, 21, from the Balata refugee camp and deputy commander of the Hamas military arm in the northern West Bank, to seven years in prison and a three-year suspended sentence. He had helped to prepare the suicide car bomb that exploded at a roadside restaurant in Mehola a year earlier, killing an Arab worker and wounding eight soldiers. He had also recruited the driver, who was also killed in the incident. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 11 January 1994)

189. On 10 January 1994, it was reported that the military courts in the territories had been imposing harder sentences for security violations since the Declaration of Principles was signed with the PLO in September. As an example, a youth aged 17 was sentenced to eight months' imprisonment for throwing a stone at a military vehicle. The military prosecutor asked for a severe sentence since the violation had occurred after the agreement was signed. Such violations used to be punished with a two-month sentence. (Jerusalem Post, 10 January 1994)

190. On 12 January 1994, Abdel Aziz Rantisi, the spokesman for the Hamas deportees in exile in Lebanon, was indicted by the Gaza Military Court on charges of being indirectly responsible for the Izz Al-din al-Qassam terrorist squads before his deportation. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 13 January 1994)

191. On 12 January 1994, the Nablus Military Court sentenced Faiz Jabber, 23 or 24, from Tulkarm, to 15 years in prison (or a life sentence plus 15 years) for participating in the killing of two alleged collaborators in 1992, for wounding a woman in a refugee camp, for attempted murder and for planning to kidnap a soldier. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 13 January 1994)

192. On 18 January 1994, Nihab Hashash, 34, from the Bureij refugee camp, was sentenced by the Gaza Military Court to 20 years of imprisonment for participating in the killing of reserve soldier Amnon Pomerantz three years earlier. The defendant and a number of other persons pelted Pomerantz's car with stones when he accidentally drove into the camp. They then set his car on fire, burning him alive. (Jerusalem Post, 19 January 1994)

193. On 24 January 1994, Riad Adwan, 41, from the Gaza Strip, who is currently serving a 20-year prison sentence for an attack on a soldier, was given an additional four years in prison for the September 1991 attempt to cut the throat of a Jewish guard, Reuven Aljam, at the Nitzan prison. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 25 January 1994)

194. On 25 January 1994, the Nablus Military Court sentenced Husan (Hassan Ibrahim) Mutzlah, 20, from Nablus, to eight years of imprisonment plus four suspended for attempted murder. In October 1991, Mutzlah threw a stone at an IDF patrol, which hit and seriously wounded a soldier. He was also charged with setting up roadblocks and causing disturbances. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 26 January 1994)

195. On 26 January 1994, Mohammed Hawmada, 30, from Nablus, was sentenced to life imprisonment by the Nablus Military Court. He was hired by Fatah to kill a suspected collaborator with another man. In June 1992, he went to the house of the suspected collaborator and shot him. (Jerusalem Post, 27 January 1994)

196. On 26 January 1994, it was reported that during the previous weeks dozens of youths aged 11 to 17 had been brought to court in the Nablus area, Ramallah and Hebron on charges of stone-throwing. (Ha'aretz, 26 January 1994)

197. On 1 February 1994, it was reported that the High Court of Justice had rejected a petition filed by eight residents of the Gaza Strip, who had been accused of killing suspected collaborators, that their trial be transferred from a Gaza military court to a civilian court, following the signing of the Declaration of Principles between Israel and the PLO. (Ha'aretz, 1 February 1994)

198. On 6 February 1994, the Jerusalem District Court sentenced three brothers (Abd al-) Jawad, 31; Mohammed, 28, and Ibrahim Shamansa (or Shamasna), 30, from Kafr Katana (West Bank) to three consecutive life terms for the killings of two Israeli youths (Lior Tubol and Ronen Karamani), a taxi driver (Rafi Doron) and a soldier (Yehoshua Friedberg) between 1990 and 1993. Jawad Shamansa was sentenced to a fourth life term for Friedberg's murder. Ibrahim (or Jawad) and Mohammed Shamansa received an additional 20 years each for attempting to murder another taxi driver. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 7 February 1994)

199. On 9 February 1994, Yussuf Masalaha, a Hamas activist from Khan Younis, was sentenced by the Tel Aviv District Court to two life sentences in prison for the murders of Yigal Vaknin in September 1993 and of David Reuben in May 1993. (Ha'aretz, 10 February 1994)

200. On 20 February 1994, Nassar Braham, 19, from Tulkarm, was sentenced by the Tel Aviv District Court to life imprisonment for stabbing Morris Edri to death in Netanya on 24 November 1993. (Jerusalem Post, 21 February 1994)

201. On 24 February 1994, it was reported that three residents of Khan Younis, Ala Abu Sata, 24, Farid Algisi, 20, and Aiman Abu Sata, 23, were sentenced to two consecutive life terms in prison each by the Tel Aviv District Court for the murders of Haim Weizman, 33, and David Dedi, 40, in Ramle on 31 December 1993. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 24 February 1994)

202. On 15 March 1994, the Tel Aviv District Court sentenced Salameh Mutzalah from Gaza City, who was convicted of the murder of David Reuven, 59, from Petah Tikva in May 1993, to life imprisonment. (Jerusalem Post, 16 March 1994)

203. On 15 March 1994, the Tel Aviv District Court sentenced Salameh Abdallah Muslah, 21, from Rafah, to life imprisonment for the murder of Yigal Vaknin in September 1993. (Ha'aretz, 16 March 1994)

204. On 29 March 1994, Attorney Andre Rosenthal, on behalf of the families of the detainees, lodged an appeal with the High Court of Justice against the commandant of the IDF forces in the West Bank requesting him to indicate where Mohammed Jit and Sudki Abu Sabah, both from Hebron, and Nidal al-Jabarin, from the area of Hebron, were detained since they had been arrested. (Ha'aretz, 30 March 1994)

2. Israelis

205. On 5 December 1993, the Supreme Court rejected a petition by the Temple Mount Faithful group, which had asked the court to stop illegal renovations being carried out on the Dome of the Rock. The three justices ruled that the work to repair and preserve the mosque was vital and necessary because the roof was in bad shape and water was leaking inside. (Jerusalem Post, 6 December 1993)

206. On 6 December 1993, a man suspected of wounding three Palestinian stone-throwers in Hebron on 3 and 4 December, Gilon Ben Said, 38, was remanded for three days by the Jerusalem Magistrates Court. Another suspect in the same case, Avner Gilboa, was placed under house arrest for eight days. (Jerusalem Post, 7 December 1993)

207. On 13 December 1993, Rabbi Avraham Toledano, who had been caught with arms accessories and manuals for preparing explosives at the Ben-Gurion Airport three weeks earlier, was remanded until trial by the Tel Aviv District Court. Toledano, a resident of Kiryat Arba and a senior member of the Kach movement, was formally indicted with smuggling weapons from the United States. During an earlier remand hearing, a judge had determined that the items were intended for use in attacks against Arabs. (Ha'aretz, 7 December 1993; Jerusalem Post, 7 and 14 December 1993)

208. On 17 December 1993, Kessar Mendes, 38, from Givat Harsina, was remanded until the ending of proceedings against him by the Jerusalem Magistrates Court. Mendes was charged with endangering human life by use of arms and aggravated assault against a policeman while resisting arrest. The charges arose from an incident that occurred on 4 December when settlers fired at an Arab vehicle near Hebron, killing one occupant, Talal Rushdie Bakri, 45. A homicide charge against Mendes was dropped after an autopsy revealed that the victim had not been killed by a bullet from his M-16 rifle. (Jerusalem Post, 16, 17 and 19 December 1993; Ha'aretz, 19 December 1993). According to an unidentified Israeli source, the charge against Mendes had been presented in a "political" manner. (Al-Tali'ah, 16 December 1993)

209. On 18 December 1993, six supporters of the Kach movement, four Americans and two Israelis, who were suspected of conspiring to carry out attacks against Arabs, of illegally possessing and trading weapons, organizing paramilitary drills and belonging to an illegal organization, were remanded for membership in an anti-Arab militia. All were arrested in Jerusalem on 17 December after prolonged surveillance and their arrest was the direct result of information received after the indictment of Rabbi Avraham Toledano. (Ha'aretz, 19 and 20 December 1993; Jerusalem Post, 19 and 21 December 1993)

210. On 20 December 1993, Supreme Court Justice Mishael Cheshin rejected the appeal made by David Bakush, from Beit El, who was charged with several offences during the rioting that followed the murder of Haim Mizrahi, that an order of the lower court that he should be remanded until trial be overturned. Cheshin stated that the charge of firing his pistol when his life was not being threatened, two weeks after the murder, could not be understood as being the result of Bakush's grief and rage. (Jerusalem Post, 21 December 1993)

211. On 25 December 1993, the Tel Aviv District Court sentenced Border Policeman Boaz Nahmani, 22, from Eilat, to six months in prison and a year's probation for the killing of Issam (Sliman Abdelnabi) Mughrabi, 13, in the Balata refugee camp in 1990. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 26 December 1993)

212. On 27 December 1993, American businessman Howard Friedman, who was suspected of plotting to attack Arabs and smuggle military equipment, was remanded for an additional 48 hours by the Petah Tikva Magistrates Court. Aharon Hacohen, from Maaleh Adumim, was also remanded for an additional seven days. The four other Kach movement supporters who were arrested on 17 December were released. (Ha'aretz, 21 and 22 December 1993; Jerusalem Post, 28 December 1993)

213. On 28 December 1993, a 16-year-old resident of Shiloh was indicted for the murder of Khamis (Mahmoud Rashid) Abu Awwad, 51, a Palestinian farmer who was shot dead while ploughing his field in Turmous Ayya on 9 December. (Ha'aretz, 10, 12 and 29 December 1993; Jerusalem Post, 12 and 29 December 1993)

214. On 2 January 1994, a resident of Shiloh aged 16 and a half was indicted for the murder of Hamis Mahmoud Abu Awwa, from Turmous Ayya, on 9 December 1993 and was remanded by the Jerusalem District Court until the end of the proceedings. (Ha'aretz, 3 January 1994)

215. On 21 January 1994, Yeroham Saguy, Mordechai Golosovsky and Yosef Stern, from the Yitzhar settlement, were indicted for building a roadblock made of stones on the road leading to the village of Burin, thereby intending to jeopardize the security of its residents. (Ha'aretz, 23 January 1994; Jerusalem Post, 25 January 1994)

216. On 24 January 1994, Hillel Lieberman, 30, from the Elon Moreh settlement, was indicted in the Tel Aviv District Court for throwing stones at Arab-owned cars on 7 November 1993, near the Eli settlement. He was charged with maliciously endangering human life on a public thoroughfare. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 25 January 1994)

217. On 1 February 1994, Yeroham Saguy, from the Yitzhar settlement (West Bank), was released on bail by the Hadera Magistrates Court after being arrested on 30 January on suspicion of shooting at an Arab shepherd. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 2 February 1994)

218. On 8 February 1994, Kach spokesman Noam Federman and Yehoyada Kahalani were acquitted by the Jerusalem District Court of setting fire to a car belonging to an Arab from Hebron in 1993 and of interfering with the activities of IDF soldiers. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 9 February 1994)

219. On 13 February 1994, the Association for Civil Rights in Israel, Israeli writers David Grossman and Shlomit Haraban, poet Galit Hazan-Rokam and Palestinian writer Izat Ghazawi appealed to the High Court of Justice to demand an inquiry into the killing by the IDF of Rami Ghazawi, 15, the son of Izat Ghazawi, who was shot in the courtyard of his high school in Al Bireh on 16 November 1993. (Ha'aretz, 14 February 1994)

220. On 21 February 1994, Kach spokesman Noam Federman was convicted of assault and unseemly public behaviour for spitting on Faisal Husseini on 19 January 1990, when the Palestinian leader was brought to court for a remand hearing. The Jerusalem Magistrates Court gave Federman a six-month sentence, suspended for three years, and gave him the option of paying a fine of approximately $1,000 or spending 60 days in jail. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 22 February 1994)

221. On 23 February 1994, David Bakush, 30, from the Beit El settlement, was sentenced to nine months in prison by the Jerusalem District Court after he was convicted of rioting with other settlers on two occasions. He was photographed by a soldier on 29 October 1994, after the murder of settler Haim Mizrahi, as he prepared to set on fire a fire engine that had been called after the rioters had set fire to an Arab house near Beit El. Two weeks later, he was accused of firing his pistol at an Arab home during a second riot in which a resident was wounded. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 24 February 1994)

222. On 24 February 1994, it was reported that the Nazareth District Court had convicted Assaf Memrayeb or Memrioub, 44, from the Hinanit settlement (West Bank), of throwing a grenade from which the pin had not been taken out inside an Arab house in the village of Yabed and of threatening its occupants. He was to be remanded until the end of the proceedings. (Ha'aretz, 9 and 24 February 1994)

223. On 24 February 1994, the Jerusalem District Court sentenced settler Aliho Scotlis to one year of imprisonment for complicity in the killing of Khamis Abu Awad two months earlier. (Al-Tali'ah, 24 February 1994)

224. On 28 February 1994, following the Hebron massacre perpetrated by a settler from Kiryat Arba, OC Central Command Maj.-Gen. Danny Yatom stated that he had issued three-month detention orders concerning five settlers from Hebron and Kiryat Arba, some of whom were members of Kach while others had a record of violent and lawless behaviour. They were: Baruch Marzel, Noam Federman, Ben Tsion Gofstein, Eyal Noked and Shmuel Ben Ishai. Ben Ishai was subsequently arrested. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 28 February 1994)

225. On 2 March 1994, wanted Kach activist Eyal Noked was arrested in Ra'anana and placed under administrative detention. (Jerusalem Post, 3 March 1994; Ha'aretz, 9 March 1994)

226. On 3 March 1994, the High Court of Justice refused to issue an interim injunction against the administrative detention of Kach activist Shmuel Ben-Ishai, but ordered that a hearing on his petition against the detention be held as soon as possible. Ben-Ishai was arrested on 27 February. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 3 March 1994; Jerusalem Post, 4 March 1994)

227. On 7 March 1994, Noam Federman and Ben Tsion Gofstein, two wanted Kach members, were detained by the police. They were to be held under administrative detention orders until 25 May. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 9 March 1994)

228. On 13 March 1994, the Jerusalem District Attorney's Office issued indictments against two Kach leaders in the Jerusalem Magistrates Court. Baruch Marzel, who had not been apprehended, was indicted for throwing bottles at Arabs in Beit Hadassah and in Hebron in October 1993. He was also charged with blocking an Arab vehicle near the Machpelah Cave. Kach spokesman Noam Federman, who was under administrative detention, was indicted for throwing stones and bottles at a group of Arabs. He was also charged with assaulting an Arab after telling him to leave the territories. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 14 March 1994)

229. On 15 March 1994, Rabbi Moshe Levinger, one of the leaders of the Jewish settlement in Hebron, was charged in the Jerusalem Magistrates Court with ignoring orders to leave a closed military area in Hebron on 12 July 1993. The trial date was set for April. Levinger was being investigated in Hebron on 14 March for allegedly insulting a Waqf official and forcibly entering the Yitzhak Hall in the Machpelah Cave while it was being used for Muslim prayers. (Ha'aretz, 15 and 16 March 1994; Jerusalem Post, 16 March 1994)

230. On 16 March 1994, the President of the Jerusalem District Court approved the administrative detention of Kach activist Baruch Ben-Yosef, who is also the Executive Director of the Temple Mount Yeshiva. Ben-Yosef had been arrested several days earlier. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 17 March 1994)

231. On 20 March 1994, Michael Ben-Horin, 46, from Moshav Nov in the Golan, was sentenced to two months' administrative detention by a judge of the Nazareth District Court, who had reportedly based his decision mainly on classified evidence. Ben-Horin was sentenced to three months of administrative detention by Defence Minister Yitzhak Rabin, in keeping with the government crackdown on extremists after the Hebron massacre. However, the President of the Court, Judge Yehuda Abramovich, ruled that two months was a sufficient sentence. Ben-Horin had been arrested a week earlier. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 14 and 21 March 1994)

232. On 21 March 1994, two Kach activists petitioned the High Court of Justice seeking release from administrative detention. The Court gave Defence Minister Yitzhak Rabin and Acting OC Central Command Maj.-Gen. Danny Yatom five days to respond to the petition submitted by Shmuel Ben-Ishai. Ben-Ishai had petitioned the High Court before, but his petition had been rejected because the Court stated that he had not yet appealed to a military court, as outlined by procedures governing administrative detention. A military court rejected Ben-Ishai's appeal on 18 March, clearing the way for him to petition the High Court. Baruch Ben-Yosef also petitioned the Court the same day concerning the legality of his detention. Jerusalem District Court Judge Vardi Zeiler had rejected his claims on 16 March, stating that the evidence presented by the GSS and the security forces proved that Ben-Yosef posed a security threat. (Jerusalem Post, 16, 18, 20 and 21 March 1994; Ha'aretz, 20 and 21 March 1994)

233. On 25 March 1994, the Military Court of Appeal in the territories rejected the appeal of Noam Federman, the Kach spokesman, concerning the three-month administrative detention to which he had been sentenced following the Hebron massacre. (Ha'aretz, 25 March 1994)

234. On 28 March 1994, Daniel Morali, 42, from the settlement of Adora (West Bank) and from Ashkelon (or Kiryat Gat), was remanded by the Kiryat Gat Magistrates Court for 15 days on suspicion of the killing of truck driver Riadh Salimi (or Riad Hassan Nimr Abdallah), 35, from Kafr Idna, near Hebron, on 25 March. (Jerusalem Post, 29 March 1994; Ha'aretz, 30 March 1994)

235. On 31 March 1994, the Supreme Court of Justice rejected the appeal lodged by Baruch Ben-Yosef, the Director of the Temple Mount Yeshiva, concerning his administrative detention and accepted the argument of the GSS that Ben-Yosef presented a danger to state security. Following the decision of the Supreme Court Ben-Yosef would be detained until 13 June 1994. (Ha'aretz, 1 April 1994)

C. Treatment of civilians

1. General developments

(a) Harassment and physical ill-treatment

236. On 13 December 1993, a young woman, 16, from Jenin who was married to a man from Galilee, was remanded for three days by Judge Reuven Ben-Horin of the Haifa Magistrates Court for living in Israel without a residence permit. She was arrested when she applied to the Ministry of the Interior to obtain an identity card since her three-month permit had expired two weeks before. The Judge emphasized, however, that the police should treat her well before turning her over to the Civil Administration. (Jerusalem Post, 14 December 1993)

(b) Collective punishment

(i) Houses or rooms that were demolished or sealed

237. On 28 January 1994, it was reported that, according to the Central Command, the IDF had demolished 205 homes belonging to Palestinians involved in terrorist activities and sealed 228 houses and 146 back streets from 1988 until the end of 1993. (Ha'aretz, 28 January 1994)

238. On 3 February 1994, Palestinian sources reported that three houses were badly damaged by the army during a search for the leader of the Fatah Hawks in the Shabura refugee camp. Several other houses were reportedly slightly damaged and the furniture inside destroyed. The IDF reported that one house was slightly damaged. (Ha'aretz, 4 February 1994)

239. On 17 February 1994, security forces carried out an operation to capture wanted gunmen in the Raziel neighbourhood in Rafah. The forces surrounded a number of homes in which gunmen were believed to be hiding. Several residents were arrested and several homes damaged when soldiers fired at them. No gunmen were captured during the operation, however. (Jerusalem Post, 20 February 1994)

240. On 24 February 1994, anti-tank missiles were fired and grenades thrown at a house in Abu Dis, in an attempt to force terrorists to evacuate the building. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 25 February 1994)

241. On 1 March 1994, two missiles were fired in Beit Sahour at the houses that belonged to Anouar Metaya Banoura and Walid Bishara Banoura. According to the IDF, soldiers were shot at from the houses, an allegation denied by the owners. (Al-Tali'ah, 3 March 1994)

242. On 23 March 1994, several anti-tank missiles (reportedly more than 100) were fired and explosive charges were detonated in two terrorist hide-outs in Hebron. (Jerusalem Post, 24 March 1994; Ha'aretz, 25 March 1994)

243. On 25 March 1994, it was reported that the residents of Hebron had said that seven houses were damaged during the shoot-out of 23 March, in addition to the one where the fugitives were hiding and which was destroyed. According to IDF data, two houses were completely destroyed by anti-tank missiles during the IDF operation. (Ha'aretz, 25 and 28 March 1994)

(ii) Imposition of curfews, sealing off or closing of areas

244. On 1 December 1993, the IDF imposed a curfew on Al Bireh and neighbouring Ramallah after an Israeli woman was killed and three other persons were injured in a shooting attack. The IDF imposed curfews on several areas of the Gaza Strip, including the Shati' refugee camp and the Sheikh Radwan neighbourhood. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 2 December 1993)

245. On 2 December 1993, the curfew placed on Al Bireh and Ramallah was lifted. (Ha'aretz, 3 December 1993)

246. On 6 December 1993, a curfew was imposed on Hebron following the killing of two Israelis near Kiryat Arba. (Jerusalem Post, 7 December 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 9 December 1993)

247. On 8 December 1993, troops closed off the Bethlehem area after two Israelis were shot at there. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 9 December 1993)

248. On 10 December 1993, following the killing of three Palestinians by Jewish assailants near Hebron, the IDF imposed a curfew on the villages of Tarkumiyeh and Beit Aula where protests had broken out. In Hebron and the surrounding villages, a curfew had been imposed since a settler shot and killed an Arab vegetable trader on 3 December. (Jerusalem Post, 12 December 1993)

249. On 15 December 1993, the curfew placed on Hebron following the killing of two Israelis on 6 December was lifted. (Ha'aretz, 16 December 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 16 December 1993)

250. On 16 December 1993, a number of Jewish settlements near Nablus were placed under curfew for a few hours during the night, when the IDF prevented an attempt to bring a Torah scroll to the tomb of Joseph in Nablus. (Jerusalem Post, 22 December 1993)

251. On 16 and 17 December 1993, the army sealed off Ramallah during clashes between stone-throwers and the army. (Jerusalem Post, 19 December 1993)

252. On 20 December 1993, the IDF unblocked several streets in Khan Younis. A week earlier, the IDF had already unblocked more than 20 streets in the Gaza Strip. (Ha'aretz, 19 and 21 December 1993; Jerusalem Post, 21 December 1993)

253. On 22 December 1993, the army imposed a curfew on Ramallah and Beitunya after two Israelis had been shot dead. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 23 December 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 23 December 1993)

254. On 4 January 1994, the IDF imposed a five-hour curfew on a large part of the Sabrah neighbourhood in Gaza City. The curfew was lifted after the arrest of five men. (Ha'aretz, 5 January 1994)

255. On 19 January 1994, a curfew was imposed on the village of Abud in order to facilitate the search for a local youth. (Ha'aretz, 20 January 1994)

256. On 24 January 1994, a curfew was imposed on an area of Rafah during searches for wanted men. (Jerusalem Post, 25 January 1994)

257. On 30 January 1994, a curfew was imposed on the Askar refugee camp following the explosion of a gas canister, which had killed one Palestinian. (Ha'aretz, 31 January 1994)

258. On 2 February 1994, Hebron and Halhul were placed under curfew following an attack on three settlers. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 3 February 1994)

259. On 3 February 1994, the army imposed a curfew on the Shabura refugee camp and on Rafah after the killing of a wanted Fatah Hawks activist. Hebron remained under curfew. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 4 February 1994)

260. On 4 February 1994, a curfew was imposed on the Tulkarm area (or on the village of Balah) while soldiers were searching for a wanted gunman. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 6 February 1994)

261. On 5 February 1994, the village of Bara (West Bank) was placed under curfew during an operation by security forces against a gang of car thieves. (Jerusalem Post, 7 February 1994)

262. On 10 February 1994, a curfew was imposed on the Shaje'ya neighbourhood of Gaza City after shooting at IDF soldiers (Al-Tali'ah, 10 February 1994)

263. On 13 February 1994, an indefinite curfew was placed on the Ramallah area (from Ramallah to Bitunya) following the killing of a GSS agent in Beitunya. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 14 February 1994)

264. On 14 February 1994, the Ramallah area remained under curfew for the second consecutive day. (Jerusalem Post, 15 February 1994)

265. On 18 and 19 February 1994, following the killing of a woman from the Ariel settlement on the trans-Samaria highway, a number of Arab villages in the vicinity of the settlement were placed under curfew. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 20 February 1994)

266. On 21 February 1994, a curfew was placed on Beit Sahur and searches launched after shots were fired at an Israeli car. (Ha'aretz, 22 February 1994)

267. On 23 February 1994, the army closed off the area of Bethlehem following the discovery of an explosive device. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 24 February 1994)

268. On 24 February 1994, a curfew was imposed on Abu Dis during an IDF operation to capture wanted activists. (Jerusalem Post, 25 February 1994; also referred to in The Jerusalem Times, 25 February 1994)

269. On 25 and 26 February 1994, following the massacre of Palestinians by a settler in Hebron, a curfew was placed on large areas of the territories and the Kiryat Arba settlement was closed off. (Ha'aretz, 27 February 1994)

270. On 27 February 1994, Hebron remained under curfew for the third consecutive day, as did much of the territories, including Bethlehem, Ramallah, Tulkarm, Kalkiliya, Nablus and the refugee camps located near those cities. The central and northern Gaza Strip remained under curfew. The Strip had been under closure since 25 February. The army decided to extend the closure to the remainder of the territories, preventing most Palestinians from entering Israel. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 28 February 1994)

271. On 1 March 1994, Hebron remained under a tense curfew for the fifth consecutive day. (Jerusalem Post, 2 March 1994)

272. On 2 March 1994, for the first time since the massacre, the curfew imposed on Hebron and Jericho was lifted for two hours in order to allow residents to buy essential goods. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 3 March 1994)

273. On 3 March 1994, it was reported that since 25 February most of the refugee camps and main cities in the territories had been placed under curfew. A general closure of the territories was also enforced. (Ha'aretz, 3 March 1994; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 3 March 1994)

274. On 4 March 1994, the IDF lifted the curfew that had been imposed on the refugee camps of the Gaza Strip and on several cities of the West Bank. However, Nablus, Ramallah, Tulkarm, Bethlehem and the adjoining refugee camps remained under curfew. Hebron and Jericho were declared closed military areas. The territories remained under closure. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 8 March 1994)

275. On 7 March 1994, the army temporarily lifted the curfew imposed on Hebron in order to allow the residents to purchase food and other necessities. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 8 March 1994)

276. On 8 March 1994, clashes in eastern Jerusalem forced the closure of Sultan Suleiman and Salah A-Din Streets for over an hour. (Jerusalem Post, 9 March 1994)

277. On 11 and 12 March 1994, the territories remained closed for the third consecutive week. Curfews were lifted from time to time to enable residents to purchase necessary items. (Ha'aretz, 13 March 1994; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 17 March 1994)

278. On 13 March 1994, the curfew was lifted for several hours in Hebron to allow the population to purchase necessities and to permit family visits, which are customary on the holidays (the first day of Id al-Fitr, the holiday marking the end of the holy month of Ramadan). (Jerusalem Post, 14 March 1994)

279. On 16 March 1994, the curfew was briefly lifted in Hebron in order to allow people to buy food. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 17 March 1994; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 17 March 1994)
280. On 20 March 1994, following the attack on a Israeli man in Ramallah, the army closed the area in order to launch searches for the attackers. It was reported that the curfew placed on Hebron and its environs was to be lifted. The closure of the territories remained in force. (Ha'aretz, 20 March 1994; Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 21 March 1994)

281. On 21 March 1994, IDF forces closed off all the roads between Jerusalem and Nablus, following a shooting attack on an Israeli bus near the Ateret settlement. Hebron remained under curfew and the territories under closure. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 22 March 1994)

282. On 23 March 1994, it was reported that the closure of the territories remained in force. (Ha'aretz, 23 March 1994)

283. On 23 March 1994, electricity was cut off in Hebron during a day-long shoot-out in the city that resulted in the killing of four Hamas members. The entire Hebron area was declared a closed military zone and remained under curfew for the twenty-fourth consecutive day. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 24 March 1994)

284. On 24 March 1994, Hebron remained under curfew. Parts of the city were declared closed military areas. The army imposed a curfew on Halhul, Nablus, Tulkarm, Nur Shams and the refugee camps surrounding them. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 25 March 1994)

285. On 25, 26 and 27 March 1994, the curfew placed on Hebron was lifted, however with some restrictions for a number of areas. The IDF placed Ramallah and the Dheisheh refugee camp under curfew. Tulkarm and its environs, Nablus and the adjoining refugee camps remained under curfew. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 28 March 1994)

286. On 28 March 1994, Nablus remained under curfew following disturbances and stone-throwing incidents. Following the killing of six members of the Fatah Hawks in the refugee camp of Jabalia by an undercover IDF patrol, the camp was placed under curfew. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 29 March 1994)

287. On 29 March 1994, Beit Lahiya and additional localities in the Gaza Strip were placed under curfew following serious rioting against the army. The IDF placed the Nablus and Tulkarm areas under curfew. (Ha'aretz, 30 March 1994)

288. On 30 March 1994, a Land Day curfew was imposed on 20 localities throughout the territories (the annual commemoration of the death of six Israeli Arabs who were killed in Israel in riots in 1976 protesting Israeli land expropriation). Mourners making their condolences to the families of the six members of the Fatah Hawks killed on 28 March were allowed to visit the families who were in Gaza City and in the Jabalia refugee camp despite the curfew. Several neighbourhoods of Hebron remained under curfew. The territories remained closed for the sixth consecutive week. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 31 March 1994)

289. On 31 March 1994, the Gaza Strip remained closed and most cities and areas of the territories (Nablus, Tulkarm, Ramallah and the adjacent refugee camps; the refugee camps of Dheisheh and El-Arrub, Halhul and the centre of Hebron) remained under curfew. (Ha'aretz, 1 April 1994; also referred to in The Jerusalem Times, 1 April 1994).

(iii) Other forms of collective punishment

290. No information is available on this subject.

(c) Expulsions

291. On 3 December 1993, it was reported that the PLO had presented the Government of Israel with a list of 51 recent deportees whom it stated should be allowed to return immediately. Marwan Barghouti, a former president of the Bir Zeit University student council and a founder of the Shabiba Fatah-affiliated youth movement (who was expelled in 1987), and Tayser Aruri, a senior member of the Communist Party (who was expelled in 1989), were reportedly on the list. (Jerusalem Post, 3 December 1993)

292. On 15 December 1993, the year-long expulsion of Hamas and Islamic Jihad activists came to an end when 197 of the remaining 215 deportees returned from southern Lebanon. The remainder of the 415 Palestinians who had been deported on 17 December 1992 was allowed to return at various times earlier this year. Eighteen of the activists decided to remain in Lebanon - with Israel's agreement - in order to avoid facing the possibility of being sentenced to long prison terms in Israel. The returnees were taken by bus to detention centres near Gaza and Nablus where they were to be held and questioned by the GSS for 96 hours before a decision would be made to return them to their homes or keep them in detention. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 16 December 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 16 December 1993)

293. On 19 December 1993, some 100 (or 132) out of the 197 deportees who turned to Israel after a year in Lebanon were released from detention. Security sources stated that several of the 65 who were still being held would be released during the next few days. The returnees were issued new identity cards and other documents before being released. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 20 December 1993)

294. On 21 December 1993, it was reported that the remaining 65 ex-deportees had remained in prison and that between 3 and 6 had been placed in administrative detention for a period of six months. At least 30 of the 197 deportees were reportedly to be placed under administrative detention or to serve prison sentences to which they had been sentenced before the expulsion. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 21 December 1993)

295. On 22 December 1993, it was reported that Israel would comply with a request made by PLO Chairman Yasser Arafat to allow two deportees and another man who was wanted by the Israeli authorities to occupy high-ranking positions in the Palestinian administration. Jibril Rajub, 40, from Hebron, had been deported in 1988. Arafat also asked for the return of Mohammed Dahlan, 32, from Khan Younis, to serve as his senior representative in Gaza. Mahmoud (al) Hindi, who left the territories before the Six-Day War, was to be the head of intelligence in the autonomous area. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 23 December 1993)
(d) Economic and social situation

296. On 20 December 1993, the Herzliya Medical Centre and Arab businessmen decided to jointly open a large, for-profit medical facility that would serve both the Arab and Jewish residents of Gaza. Located in the industrial area near the Erez checkpoint leading to the Gaza district, the centre had a computerized tomography (CT) body scanner. The facility had so far cost some $1 million. It would save Gaza residents from having to travel long distances in order to get a CT scan or other types of medical treatment. (Jerusalem Post, 21 December 1993)

297. On 22 December 1993, it was reported that, according to a report issued by the Association of Israeli-Palestinian Physicians for Human Rights, the infant mortality rate in the territories was four to five times higher than that in Israel. In the territories, 40 to 50 infants per thousand died annually, as compared with 9.9 per thousand in Israel. The findings also revealed that one ambulance served 5,000 people in Israel and 16,000 in the Gaza Strip. Women in the territories lived longer than men, with an average life expectancy of 62 and 60 years, respectively. The life expectancy in Israel was higher, with men reaching an average age of 74.6 years, as compared to 78.1 for women. (Jerusalem Post, 22 December 1993)

298. On 23 December 1993, the Civil Administration authorities were reported to have withdrawn hundreds of work permits from Arab residents of the occupied territories. The measure concerned mainly the residents of the Jenin and Ramallah areas. (Al-Tali'ah, 23 December 1993)

299. On 7 January 1994, Palestinian businessmen complained of having to pay taxes for their newly built industrial projects. According to the Israeli military order concerning the promotion of investment in the occupied territories, new projects should benefit from tax exemption during the first years of operation. (Al-Tali'ah, 7 January 1994)

300. On 12 January 1994, electricity was cut off during the night in several neighbourhoods of Gaza City, such as Sheikh Radwan, Rimal and Zeitoun. In the Gaza Strip, entire areas were reportedly subjected to electricity cuts because of the large number of unpaid bills from the consumers in that area. (Ha'aretz, 14 January 1994)

301. On 26 January 1994, Jordan's Central Bank announced that it had given tentative approval to five banks to reopen a number of branches in the West Bank. Five banks had received the authorization to do so after filing applications subsequent to the signing of an accord by Jordan and Israel in December that would allow Jordanian banks to reopen in the West Bank. (Jerusalem Post, 27 January 1994)

302. On 2 February 1994, several dozen Palestinians whose permits to work in Israel had recently been rescinded ended a 36-hour hunger strike in Gaza City after an agreement had been reached with the Civil Administration concerning the confiscation of the documents. Several hundred permits were cancelled since the beginning of the year for security reasons. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 2 February 1994; Ha'aretz, 3 February 1994)

303. On 4 February 1994, it was reported that Miri Segev, the legal adviser of the Defence Ministry, had told Neve Gordon, from the Association of Israeli-Palestinian Physicians for Human Rights, that the Ministry would pay the medical treatment of Nasser Muhammed Halil al-Sutri, from the Bureij refugee camp, who was accidentally injured by IDF shooting on 28 April 1993. (Ha'aretz, 4 February 1994)

304. On 10 February 1994, the head of the West Bank Doctors' Association, Dr. Issa Ja'anina, complained of the deteriorating situation in government-run hospitals. Dr. Ja'anina stressed the alarming shortage in medicine due to the fact that the Civil Administration had not yet paid the NIS 7 million that were allocated for medicines. Dr. Ja'anina added that since the beginning of the occupation the number of hospital beds had remained unchanged. Consequently, the ratio of beds per inhabitant dropped to 1.1:1,000 in 1993 in comparison with 2.2:1,000 in 1975. At the beginning of 1993, the ratio of beds in Israeli hospitals was 6.1:1,000. Government spending in the health sector also dropped by 55 per cent. Forty United States dollars were spent per inhabitant in 1987, against $18.1 in 1993. In comparison, Israel spent $370 for health per inhabitant in 1993. (Al-Tali'ah, 10 February 1994)

305. On 14 February 1994, Labour Minister Ora Namir signed an order allowing 1,000 unemployed Palestinians from the territories to receive work permits to help Israeli farmers with the harvest. (Jerusalem Post, 15 February 1994)

306. On 15 February 1994, it was reported that Mansour Niyahad, 23, from the Jabalia refugee camp, had asked in the Beersheba District Court that the Defence Ministry pay him about $367,000 in damages, because he had become 100 per cent invalid after being shot by the army in March 1989. (Ha'aretz, 15 January 1994)

307. On 18 February 1994, it was reported that the owners of the Palestinian pharmaceutical companies had rejected the Israeli request that they pay NIS 1,070 for each type of medicine being produced, which amounted to an increase or more than 1,500 per cent. The head of the GAMMA group of factories stated that the Israeli health officer had threatened the companies with closure unless they paid all the required amounts. He added that the Palestinian pharmaceutical companies had to implement Israeli law although they were not allowed to sell their products in Israel. (The Jerusalem Times, 18 February 1994)

308. On 24 February 1994, it was announced that the first bank with Palestinian capital, the Palestinian Commercial Bank, was to open in mid-March 1994 in Ramallah (Al-Tali'ah, 24 February 1994)

309. On 27 February 1994, the Government announced that 2,750 Thai workers would be allowed into the country to work in agriculture. So far, Ora Namir, the Minister for Labour and Social Affairs, had allowed 2,230 Thai workers into Israel, 500 of whom were assigned to the Gush Katif agricultural settlements. (Jerusalem Post, 28 February 1994)

310. On 1 March 1994, the Labour and Social Affairs Committee approved better maternity benefits for Palestinian women. The proposal was that it go before the Knesset for second and third readings. One change in the law would allow Palestinian women who gave birth in the territories to benefit from birth grants. Previously only women who gave birth in Israeli hospitals received such grants. The second proposal would change maternity leave pay from 75 per cent of a woman's salary to 100 per cent. If approved, the changes would take effect on 1 November. (Jerusalem Post, 1 March 1994)

311. On 1 March 1994, the Government decided that some $1,700 in a one-time compensation would be paid to every family in Hebron that lost a member in the Machpelah Cave massacre on 25 February. The Minister for Labour and Social Affairs, Ora Namir, stated that the compensation grant was an unprecedented step and humanitarian gesture taken in view of the seriousness of the events and their exceptional character. (Jerusalem Post, 2 March 1994)

312. On 6 March 1994, Radio Israel reported that the persons who were wounded in the Machpelah Cave shooting in Hebron would receive compensation payments from the Government ranging from about $8,300 for those who were slightly wounded to some $70,000 for persons who were wounded seriously or were fathers of six or more children. Despite the radio report, the Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs refused to release details of the compensation arrangement until Finance Minister Avraham Shohat had signed it. (Jerusalem Post, 7 March 1994)

313. On 17 March 1994, the head of the Civil Administration in the West Bank, Brig.-Gen. Gadi Zohar, together with the supervisor of the Bank of Israel, Ze'ev Abeles, issued a licence to the Bank of Jordan, represented by General Manager Faiz Abu al-Ainin, from Jordan, to operate its first area branch in Ramallah. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 17 March 1994; also referred to in The Jerusalem Times, 18 March 1994)

314. On 18 March 1994, it was reported that markets in the West Bank were experiencing an unprecedented economic depression because of the closure of the occupied territories since 25 February. (The Jerusalem Times, 18 March 1994)

315. On 18 March 1994, Palestinian economists described as inaccurate an economic report published by the Israeli Office of Statistics on unemployment rates in the occupied territories. The report, issued on 18 March, stated that the rate of unemployment was 6.7 per cent during 1993 compared with 3.2 per cent during 1992. Palestinian statistics showed that the unemployment rates in the West Bank had reached 30 per cent and amounted to 45 per cent in the Gaza Strip. The number of unemployed workers was 339,000 until the Hebron massacre, when it increased dramatically as a result of the closure and the curfews. (The Jerusalem Times, 18 March 1994)

316. On 20 March 1994, 33 prisoners from the Hasharon and Massiyahu jails began to pick fruit in groves in the central region (of Israel) to replace temporarily workers from the territories, which were under closure. (Jerusalem Post, 21 March 1994)

317. On 20 March 1994, Police Minister Moshe Shahal announced that the territories would be closed until at least after the Passover holidays (2 April). However, a plan was being drawn up to compensate workers whose entry into Israel had been restricted since the massacre in Hebron on 25 February. He stated that the labourers from the territories would receive financial assistance. Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin had in principle approved the plan, estimated to cost between $5 and $6.6 million per month. However, Finance Minister Avraham Shohat and Maj.-Gen. Danny Rothschild, the Coordinator of government activities in the territories, still had to give their final approval. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 21 March 1994)

318. On 21 March 1994, Members of the Knesset (MK) Avraham Poraz indicated that, following reports that Hebron victims were refusing compensation, he would introduce a bill to triple the amount of compensation. The bill, to be proposed at the summer session of Parliament, would entitle the victims to the same benefits as those given to the families of fallen Israeli soldiers. (Jerusalem Post, 22 March 1994)

319. On 23 March 1994, the Red Cross announced that conditions for Palestinians living in the West Bank had deteriorated since the Hebron massacre and it asked Israel to rectify the situation. (Jerusalem Post, 24 March 1994)

320. On 30 March 1994, Alex Faran, the new head of the Employment Service, stated that during the last month 6,500 Palestinians had been issued permits to work in agriculture, 5,000 in construction and 3,300 in industry. (Jerusalem Post, 31 March 1994)

(e) Other developments

321. On 14 February 1994, after an eight-year legal battle, the Interior Ministry agreed to recognize the wife of Jibrin Abu-Hani, a Bedouin from Rahat, as a legal resident of the State under the family unification rules. The National Insurance Institute agreed to give the couple income maintenance, retroactive to their original application, plus linkage, before the case was heard by the Supreme Court. Jibrin Abu-Hani was married to a woman from the Gaza Strip. They were divorced at one point, but they remarried in 1985. This is when Abu-Hani applied to the National Insurance Institute for income maintenance. His application was refused, even though the couple met all the necessary criteria, because his wife, according to the Interior Ministry, was not a legal resident of the territories. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 15 February 1994)

322. On 22 March 1994, the Association of Israeli-Palestinian Physicians for Human Rights attacked the decision of the security forces to open fire during rioting in Hebron in proximity to a children's hospital, the Mohammed Ali Red Crescent Children's Hospital (or the Mohtasseb Children's Hospital). (Jerusalem Post, 23 March 1994)

323. On 24 March 1994, it was reported that the Mohtasseb Children's Hospital in Hebron had issued a statement saying that its 32 young patients had been terrified by the soldiers who stomped through the hospital with their guns and took chairs for use on the roof during the siege of a house where Hamas activists were hiding on 22 and 23 March. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 24 March 1994; also referred to in The Jerusalem Times, 25 March 1994)

324. On 24 March 1994, it was reported that the Israeli section of Defence for Children International was to receive an $80,000 grant from Canada for setting up a joint programme with the Palestinian Lawyers for Human Rights organization in Khan Younis. The project would focus on creating the basis for a juvenile justice system in the Gaza Strip. (Jerusalem Post, 24 March 1994)

325. On 31 March 1994, it was reported that Defence for Children International had asked Yitzhak Rabin, in his capacity as Defence Minister, to be mindful of the protection of Palestinian children in conjunction with the shoot-out in Hebron during which armed IDF soldiers had gone into the Mohtasseb Children's Hospital in order to conduct a security operation during which three wanted Hamas activists and a bystander were killed. (Jerusalem Post, 31 March 1994)

2. Measures affecting certain fundamental freedoms

(a) Freedom of movement

326. On 2 January 1994, it was reported that the IDF had recently closed most of the permanent checkpoints (about 20) located in the West Bank following the closure imposed on the territories a year earlier, in order to start setting up mobile surprise checkpoints. The checkpoints remained permanent in Jerusalem, however. (Ha'aretz, 2 January 1994)

327. On 23 January 1994, it was reported that, according to the number of work permits issued by the Civil Administration in the territories and the Ministry of Labour, some 30,000 Arabs from the territories were coming daily to work within the Green Line. However, thousands of others were estimated to be entering Israel and staying overnight illegally (work permit holders were allowed to stay in Israel only from 5 a.m. to 7 p.m.). (Ha'aretz, 23 January 1994)

328. On 26 January 1994, it was reported that the magnetic cards and licences to work in Israel of numerous workers from the Gaza Strip (reportedly several hundred) had recently been confiscated by the IDF during identity checks at the Erez checkpoint (also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 27 January 1994). Workers had been told that they would not be allowed to leave the Gaza Strip until July 1994 and they had been issued documents with the word "opponent" stamped on them. (Ha'aretz, 26 January 1994)

329. On 30 January 1994, Police Inspector-General Rafi Peled revealed that a high-technology computer system recently purchased by the police to identify fingerprints might be installed at the envisaged border checkpoints into the Palestinian autonomous areas. Magnetic cards were currently used at the Gaza border crossings. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 31 January 1994)

330. On 10 March 1994, after the lifting of the curfew imposed on several towns, including Nablus, Bethlehem, Tulkarm and Gaza, 4,500 agricultural workers aged over 40 were allowed to work inside the Green Line. (Al-Tali'ah, 10 March 1994)

331. On 13 March 1994, it was reported that male Arab agricultural workers from the territories above the age of 30 would be allowed to travel into Israel to work as at 13 March. For a number of days, the minimum age for men to be allowed to cross the Green Line was limited to 40; there were no age restrictions for women. (Jerusalem Post, 13 March 1994)

332. On 15 March 1994, the Hebron military commander ordered the closure of a thoroughfare linking east and west Hebron, extending over one square kilometre from Al Dabaweya to Al Sahla and the vegetable market, involving the safety of Arab citizens. Two weeks later, residents living within this area complained of enormous difficulties in reaching their houses since secondary streets around the area had also been closed. (Al-Tali'ah, 17 and 31 March 1994)

(b) Freedom of education

333. On 19 December 1993, it was reported that the Civil Administration had closed two schools in the Gaza Strip, in Gaza City and Khan Younis, from which stones had been thrown. (Ha'aretz, 19 December 1993)

334. On 13 January 1994, the IDF closed two government-run schools in the Rimal neighbourhood of Gaza City after soldiers were stoned there a few days earlier. (Ha'aretz, 14 January 1994)

335. On 3 March 1994, it was reported that the military authorities had ordered the closure of all schools in the occupied territories until further notice. (Al-Tali'ah, 3 March 1994)

336. On 7 March 1994, the University of Bethlehem, which had been allowed to open for the first time since the Hebron massacre, was closed after rioting had broken out there. (Jerusalem Post, 8 March 1994)

337. On 16 March 1994, classes resumed in all the high schools of the West Bank except in those in the areas placed under curfew such as Hebron and Halhul. The schools were closed immediately after the massacre in Hebron on 25 February, when large areas of the West Bank were placed under curfew. (Ha'aretz, 17 March 1994; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 17 March 1994, and The Jerusalem Times, 25 March 1994)

338. On 21 March 1994, students from the Gaza Strip, who were joined by Fatah leaders, one MK and students from the Movement of Arab and Israeli Students, demonstrated near the Erez checkpoint against the fact that they were being prevented by the Israeli authorities from going back to their studies in the West Bank. Some 1,130 students from the Gaza Strip who were registered at the universities or colleges in the West Bank were not allowed to return there, despite the beginning of the second semester a week earlier. (Ha'aretz, 22 March 1994)

339. On 25 March 1994, 300 Bir Zeit University students held a sit-in at a military checkpoint near Latrun in solidarity with the students of Gaza who were being prevented from attending classes because of the siege. (The Jerusalem Times, 1 April 1994)

340. On 30 March 1994, it was reported that the military authorities announced that Arab high schools in the West Bank would be closed for two days in order to try to prevent further rioting. The schools were reportedly the flash points for recent disturbances. This violated a two-year-old tacit agreement whereby Palestinians would act to prevent schools closures, which were common during the early days of the uprising. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 30 March 1994)

341. On 31 March 1994, it was reported that Arab schools throughout the territories were closed for two days. (Jerusalem Post, 31 March 1994; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 31 March 1994)

(c) Freedom of religion

342. On 23 December 1993, it was reported that many Christian Palestinians from the occupied territories would be prevented from celebrating Christmas in Jerusalem, to which they continued to be denied access. (Al-Tali'ah, 23 December 1993)

343. On 15 February 1994, the army closed the Al-Ayin mosque in Al Bireh (or Ramallah) for one year after it was discovered that the mosque was being used by activists of the Hamas military arm, Izz Al-din al-Qassam. The mosque was shut down by an order of the Acting OC Central Command Maj.-Gen. Danny Yatom. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 16 February 1994)

344. On 4 March 1994, police reportedly prevented Muslim worshippers under the age of 30 (or 40) from entering the Temple Mount in Jerusalem for the Ramadan prayers. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 6 March 1994)

345. On 4 March 1994, the Israeli authorities are reported to have tightened the closure of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip and prevented Palestinians from entering Jerusalem to pray at the Al-Aqsa Mosque. Al-Aqsa officials stated that the number of worshippers who were permitted into the compound was less than 20,000. Normally, the number of worshippers on Fridays during the Islamic holy month of Ramadan reached 200,000. It was also reported that Friday prayers had been prohibited in many other mosques in the occupied territories. (Al-Tali'ah, 10 March 1994, The Jerusalem Times, 11 March 1994)

346. On 18 March 1994, Palestinian sources in Hebron expressed concern regarding measures that the Israeli authorities had decided to implement under the pretext of protecting Muslim worshippers in the Ibrahimi Mosque. Hebron's Chief Magistrate, Sheikh Tayseer Tamimi, stated that the Israeli authorities had brought excavating equipment and building material to the mosque compound. Tamimi also maintained that the authorities were changing the features of the mosque. (The Jerusalem Times, 18 March 1994)

347. On 20 March 1994, it was reported that following the Hebron massacre only people over the age of 40 would be allowed to enter the Temple Mount for the Friday prayer. (Ha'aretz, 20 March 1994)

348. On 25 March 1994, the administrative director of the Jerusalem Islamic Waqf, Adnan Husseini, spoke about the tightening of Israeli security measures in the holy sites and described them as exaggerated. Husseini stated that the body searches of all men under the age of 40 outside the Dome of the Rock mosque before prayers were not necessary and were humiliating. Security was also increased around the Western Wall and synagogues. In addition to these measures, electronic devices were installed at the checkpoints on the roads leading into Jerusalem. (The Jerusalem Times, 25 March 1994)

(d) Freedom of expression

349. On 11 January 1994, a joint Palestinian-Israeli English-language magazine was launched during a Jerusalem press conference. The Palestinian-Israel Journal of Politics, Economics, and Culture was the result of a joint initiative undertaken by its editors, Ziad Abu Zayyad and Victor Cygielman. Each issue would focus on a different topic, the first being economics. The initial circulation was expected to be 4,000 copies, mainly among academics, students and intellectuals. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 12 January 1994)


3. Information on settlers' activities affecting
the civilian population

350. On 1 December 1993, hundreds of settlers blocked 12 key intersections in the West Bank in order to protest the killing of two Israelis in a terrorist attack. No confrontations were reported with Palestinians who were held up in long traffic jams on their way to work. (Jerusalem Post, 3 December 1993)

351. On 3 and 4 December 1993, six Palestinians were shot and wounded by settlers from Kiryat Arba in two separate incidents in Hebron, one of them critically and another seriously. The first incident occurred when rocks were thrown at Israelis in the centre of the city. They responded by firing at the stone-throwers and at all persons on the street at the time. Three people were injured. During the second incident, a settler (settlers) fired at an Arab-owned taxi, reportedly believing the car was about to run him (or them) down. A Palestinian passenger was critically wounded and a Palestinian couple who were sitting on the veranda of their home nearby were hit by shrapnel and slightly injured. (Ha'aretz, 5 December 1993; Jerusalem Post, 5 and 6 December 1993)

352. On 5 December 1993, the Palestinian who had been shot by a settler in Hebron died of his wounds. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 6 December 1993)

353. On 6 December 1993, some 800 infuriated Jewish residents from Kiryat Arba and Hebron congregated at the site where two Israelis had been shot dead. They screamed at IDF soldiers, attacked a number of camera crews and damaged Arab-owned cars and homes. They smashed windows of cars and houses in Hebron and in several villages near Hebron and frightened the local residents. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 7 December 1993)

354. On 7 December 1993, settlers set fire to a petrol station in the village of Sair (West Bank) and damaged dozens of houses and cars there and in the nearby neighbourhood of Givat Harsina. Arab-owned cars were stoned in the areas of Hebron and Ramallah. (Ha'aretz, 8 December 1993)

355. On 8 December 1993, Palestinian sources reported that settlers had seriously wounded a Palestinian near Ramallah when they reportedly threw a large stone from their car onto a passing Palestinian car. Settlers attacked cars and houses owned by Palestinians in Hebron, burning eight vehicles. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 9 December 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 9 December 1993)

356. On 9 December 1993, an Israeli gunman shot dead a Palestinian tractor driver near the village of Turmus Ayya in the West Bank. The killing was witnessed by a local woman. (Jerusalem Post, 10 December 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 16 December 1993)

357. On 9 December 1993, settlers are reported to have blocked the road leading to the Erez checkpoint and prevented Gazans from going to work inside the Green Line. Settlers are also reported to have severely beaten residents of Jamain village and to have destroyed several cars. (Al-Tali'ah, 9 December 1993)

358. On 10 and 11 December 1993, three Palestinians were shot dead by unknown Jewish activists as they were driving back from work to Tarkumiyeh near Hebron. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 12 December 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 16 December 1993)

359. On 12 December 1993, it was reported that some 60 complaints filed by Palestinians in the West Bank concerning property damaged by settlers were being investigated. (Ha'aretz, 12 December 1993)

360. On 15 December 1993, Dedi Zucker, the chairman of the Knesset Law Committee, charged that the authorities in the territories did not protect Palestinians, after finding out that in a sample of 40 complaints against Jewish settlers that involved eight killings, only five suspects had been brought to trial. Zucker stated that he had examined a sample of the complaints against settlers that had been filed between 1989 and 1993 and involved killings, the inflicting of gunshot wounds, assault on property, damage to livestock, stone-throwing and arson. He found that 16 files had been closed because the identity of the perpetrator was unknown; 10 files were closed because of a lack of evidence; 3 cases were still under investigation. In four cases, the police had failed to find evidence concerning the incident. Two cases had been under review by the State Attorney's Office since 1990. Suspects were put on trial in five cases. Out of the eight complaints regarding killings; five files had been closed because the suspect could not be found; one case had been under investigation since November 1990; and suspects had been brought to trial in two cases. (Jerusalem Post, 16 December 1993)

361. On 16 December 1993, settlement leaders voiced their disagreement against the directives issued to the military commanders in the territories concerning how to deal with Jews who broke the law. The new guidelines, which had been issued by the Attorney-General's Office earlier in the month, indicated that in certain circumstances soldiers could use "reasonable force" to arrest settlers and bring them to the police station. The document also gave local military commanders the authority to place both Jewish and Arab residents under curfew (also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 23 December 1993). The 14-page booklet explained the differences in responsibility between the IDF and the police, described the procedures soldiers were to follow during demonstrations by settlers and described the circumstances in which soldiers would be permitted to use force or to take other measures against rioters or to disperse violent demonstrations by settlers. The booklet was distributed to all officers in the territories. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 17 December 1993)

362. On 16 December 1993, for the first time in seven years since the beginning of the uprising, a number of Jewish settlements in the area of Nablus (Bracha, Elon Moreh, Tel Haim, Tapuach and Yitzhar) were placed under curfew for a few hours during the night, when the IDF prevented an attempt to bring a Torah scroll to the tomb of Joseph in Nablus. (Ha'aretz, 17 December 1993; Jerusalem Post, 22 December 1993)

363. On 23 December 1993, the IDF reportedly imposed a ban on car traffic at night in Hebron following the lifting of the curfew in that city a week earlier. Residents considered the measure an unofficial curfew since the ban did not apply to settlers' cars. The atmosphere of unrest and terror prevailing in Hebron prevented Palestinians from moving around the city on foot at night. During the previous three weeks, Arab residents had been subjected to repeated acts of violence by settlers, including the smashing of 18 cars, the setting on fire of a car and two shops, the destruction and burning of vegetable and fruit carts, and so on. Palestinians complained that the IDF focused its campaigns of arrest in neighbourhoods where Arab residents had to fight to protect their property and lives. Two hundred and fifteen residents had been arrested recently, 175 of whom had been released after paying a fine for curfew violation. (Al-Tali'ah, 23 December 1993)

364. On 31 December 1993, it was reported that the authorities were proposing to more than double the police force in the territories as part of a new, more stringent policy to combat expected unrest by Jewish settlers who opposed Palestinian self-rule. The guidelines included the setting up of new intelligence units that would operate in the areas concerned and a request for more detention facilities in the event of massive arrests. The proposal would grant police greater responsibility as regards quelling Jewish unrest in the territories. (Jerusalem Post, 31 December 1993)

365. On 3 January 1994, car windows were smashed and tires slashed on several vehicles parked outside the Orient House, the PLO headquarters in eastern Jerusalem. Some 3 to 10 vehicles were damaged in this manner. Kach claimed responsibility for the acts of vandalism. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 4 January 1994)

366. On 8 January 1994, police sources reported that the police division for the investigation of serious crimes had recommended to the Jerusalem District Attorney's Office that it charge four Kach members, including two senior activists (Kach leader Baruch Marzel and spokesman Noam Federman), for five attacks on Arabs and Arab targets over the past few months. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 9 January 1994)

367. On 13 January 1994, settlers from the Kiryat Arba settlement were reported to have assaulted and severely injured a 15-year-old boy from the village of Yata, Mahmud Mohammed Abu Safi. The police are reported to have disregarded Abu Safi's complaint. (Al-Tali'ah, 13 January 1994)

368. On 17 January 1994, members of the Committee for Security on the Roads established by the founder of Kach, the late Rabbi Meir Kahane, destroyed Arab-owned property in the Hebron area in three different incidents. (Ha'aretz, 18 January 1994)

369. On 30 January 1994, Yeroham Sagi, the deputy chief of security at the Yitzhar settlement near Nablus, was arrested after an Arab shepherd was wounded near the settlement. The shepherd came close to a temporary booth that settlement residents had set up near Yitzhar and was shot in the legs when spotted by the settlement's security officials who were riding in a jeep. The shepherd complained to the police and Sagi was arrested on suspicion that he was involved in the incident. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 31 January 1994)

370. On 31 January 1994, it was reported that several Palestinian vehicles had been stoned after a shooting attack at an Israeli car near the Morag settlement. (Ha'aretz, 31 January 1994)

371. On 31 January 1994, the National Federation of Israeli Journalists appealed to the IDF spokesman to stop what it termed the "continued harassment" of journalists covering the settlers' unrest in the territories. (Jerusalem Post, 1 February 1994)

372. On 1 February 1994, several dozen Kahana Hai activists apparently tried to invade the Arab village of Yasuf. Some 10 members were arrested and the area was declared a closed military zone. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 2 February 1994)

373. On 3 February 1994, it was reported that the Serious Crimes Squad was currently interrogating a 20-year-old man from Kiryat Arba who was suspected of involvement in an incident in which shots had been fired at an Arab car near Maaleh Ephraim two months earlier. Two Arabs from Jericho were wounded during the incident. (Jerusalem Post, 3 February 1994)

374. On 3 February 1994, the Kach-affiliated Committee for Security on the Roads took responsibility for setting fire to five Arab-owned stores in Hebron. No complaints were filed with the police. An activist belonging to the group stated that the IDF had prevented the group from vandalizing Arab property in nearby Halhul. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 4 February 1994)

375. On 3 February 1994, members of the Temple Mount Yeshiva were forced off the Temple Mount by police, when they reportedly enraged the official of the Waqf (the Muslim religious trust responsible for the Temple Mount) by acting as if they were starting to pray. According to a long-standing policy that had been upheld on several occasions by the High Court of Justice, Jews were forbidden to pray in the Temple Mount complex. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 4 February 1994)

376. On 3 February 1994, it was reported that Jewish settlers had decided to set up armed patrols on the Jordan Valley roads, including those linking Jericho with Awja, and on those linking the northern part of the Dead Sea with the Jordan River. (Al-Tali'ah, 3 February 1994)

377. On 4 February 1994, it was reported that the IDF and the police were investigating complaints filed by Arab residents of Hebron concerning damage caused by settlers to their houses, gardens and cars following the shooting attack of 2 February during which three settlers from Kiryat Arba had been injured in Halhul. (Ha'aretz, 4 February 1994)

378. On 17 February 1994, it was reported that the West Bank and Gaza Strip Settlement Council had announced a new campaign at discrediting the Israeli agreements with the PLO in the eyes of Israeli public opinion. Donations from Israel and from abroad would provide the necessary funds for the campaign. (Al-Tali'ah, 17 February 1994)

379. On 19 February 1994, about 100 settlers from Ariel marched carrying torches through Bidiya, an Arab village near the site where the woman settler had been killed a day earlier, as a large contingent of soldiers and Border Policemen maintained order. There were unconfirmed reports that the participants in the march had caused damage in the village. Other settlers marched through the village of Sartah, to which the murderers had allegedly fled. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 20 February 1994)

380. On 21 February 1994, it was reported that settlers had caused thousands of shekels worth of damage to Arab property in Hebron and in Halhul during the night of 19 February. Activists of the Committee for Security on the Roads, which is affiliated to the Kach movement, went to the cities immediately after the sabbath and went on a rampage, smashing windows and damaging other property. They prevented Arab cars from driving and in one case at least beat up drivers. The army reportedly arrested several Kach activists and Kiryat Arba residents. Arab property was reportedly also damaged in the villages of Bidiya and Sartah. (Ha'aretz, 21 February 1994)

381. On 21 February 1994, hundreds of settlers and their supporters set up roadblocks at different locations in the West Bank in order to keep Palestinians from using the roads to go to work, in protest against the murder of an Israeli woman on 18 February near the Ariel settlement. No confrontations with either Palestinians or the IDF were reported. However, Palestinian sources indicated that all Arab cars that tried to pass the roadblocks set up near Nablus were stoned. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 22 February 1994)

382. On 22 February 1994, the police indicated that Moledet MK Shaul Gutman had been forced by the police to leave the Temple Mount after it was discovered that he was carrying a weapon in violation of regulations. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 23 February 1994)

383. On 26 February 1994, armed settlers are reported to have attempted to open fire at a Palestinian family in the village of Burin, south of Nablus. They had to run away when other residents started chasing them. (Al-Tali'ah, 3 March 1994)

384. On 3 March 1994, it was reported that the IDF had begun issuing various orders against Kach activists and other suspected Jewish extremists in Kiryat Arba and Hebron. In most cases, the orders, which were signed by OC Central Command Maj.-Gen. Danny Yatom, banned entrance into Hebron and the Tomb of the Patriarchs. In a number of cases, entrance into Kiryat Arba was also prohibited. At the same time, most of the persons who had received the orders also received orders to turn in their automatic weapons to the security authorities. Similar orders banning entrance into Nablus and Hebron were given to a number of Kahana Hai activists in Kfar Tapuach. (Jerusalem Post, 3 March 1994)

385. On 3 March 1994, the leaders and public personalities of the Council of Jewish Settlements in the Occupied Territories called on the Jewish residents of the territories not to obey orders to turn in their automatic weapons to the police. (Ha'aretz, 4 March 1994)

386. On 5 March 1994, the IDF spokesman announced that the right-wing activists who had received orders concerning the restriction of their movement or orders to be placed under administrative detention would be removed from their army reserve units and would not be called up for reserve duty until further notice. (Jerusalem Post, 6 March 1994)

387. On 6 March 1994, seven ministers called upon the Government to remove the approximately 400 Jewish settlers from Hebron, saying that those who remained there could potentially find themselves in a life-threatening situation. The call was the clearest yet for the dismantling of a settlement. However, Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and Foreign Minister Shimon Peres pointedly refrained from joining in. (Jerusalem Post, 7 March 1994)

388. On 7 (or 8) March 1994, Kahana Hai spokesman and Kfar Tapuach council chairman David Axelrod was arrested after refusing to hand in his weapon to the police. He was subsequently released. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 14 March 1994)

389. On 13 March 1994, Leonard Goldenberg from the Tapuach settlement in the West Bank, who was also a member of Kahana Hai, was arrested after he refused to turn in his weapon. (Ha'aretz, 14 March 1994)

390. On 13 March 1994, the Cabinet unanimously decided to outlaw the extremist Kach and Kahana Hai movements, branding them "terrorist" organizations. Both groups were adherents to the anti-Arab doctrine of the late Rabbi Meir Kahane. In a rare press conference, Attorney-General Michael Ben Yair made it clear that more than just membership in the groups would be outlawed. He stated that those supporting the groups, both verbally or financially, could also face imprisonment. The Cabinet declared that the two groups would be banned under paragraph 8 of the 1948 Ordinance for the Prevention of Terror. The decision, which mentioned six leading members of the two groups by name, made it clear that, should new organizations with similar aims be set up, they too would be outlawed. While the measure adopted would not formally apply to settlers who were members of Kach - since the territories were outside the strict purview of the law - regional military commanders were reportedly told by Prime Minister Rabin to enforce the provisions of the measure as part of a military order. (Jerusalem Post, 14 March 1994)

391. On 14 March 1994, the police conducted searches in Kiryat Arba and Hebron for weapons that were supposed to have been turned in to the police. Two such weapons were confiscated. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 15 March 1994)

392. On 15 March 1994, the Kach headquarters and the Kahana Hai offices in Jerusalem were closed for at least six months, according to orders signed by Police Inspector-General Rafi Peled. The move marked the first public step taken by the police to carry out the government decision outlawing the two organizations. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 16 March 1994)

393. On 16 March 1994, the police confiscated the weapon of a resident of Beit Hagai who was suspected of shooting at stone-throwers in Hebron. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 17 March 1994)

394. On 23 March 1994, it was reported that the Palestinian residents of Hebron had stated that even after the massacre of 25 February they had been harassed by settlers who were in collusion with soldiers, especially near Beit Hadassah (a Jewish neighbourhood of Hebron). (Ha'aretz, 23 March 1994)

395. On 24 March 1994, armed Jewish settlers reportedly fired at and stoned Arab houses in Hebron. (Jerusalem Post, 25 March 1994)

396. On 25, 26 and 27 March 1994, 10 residents of Kiryat Arba who had defied IDF orders to stay out of Hebron during the holidays were arrested there. (Jerusalem Post, 28 March 1994)

D. Treatment of detainees

1. Measures concerning the release of detainees

397. On 30 December 1993, the Mandela Institute's report for the month of December 1993 indicated that a total of 11,273 Palestinians were currently incarcerated in Israeli detention camps and prisons (7,065) or had been arrested (4,088). These figures also included some 300 Palestinians who were under administrative detention. (Al-Tali'ah, 30 December 1993)

398. On 7 January 1994, Israel released 101 Palestinian prisoners (54 from the West Bank and 47 from the Gaza Strip), as part of what Israeli officials described as a "confidence-building measure". The persons who were released, most of whom belonged to the Fatah movement, had a short period of their sentences still remaining to be served and had not carried out attacks against Israeli civilians or soldiers. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 7 and 9 January 1994)

399. On 1 March 1994, 569 (570 or 588) Palestinian security prisoners were released. They all met three major criteria: they had already served most of their sentences, were affiliated with pro-peace process factions of the PLO, and had not committed serious offences (i.e. were not hard-core "terrorists" or activists involved in attacks on Israelis) after the signing of the Declaration of Principles. (Jerusalem Post, 2 March 1994; Ha'aretz, 4 March 1994; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 3 March 1994; The Jerusalem Times, 4 March 1994)

400. On 3 March 1994, 400 (or 415) Palestinian prisoners were released. They were all released according to the same criteria as the ones applied to those released two days earlier. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 4 March 1994; also referred to in The Jerusalem Times, 4 March 1994)

2. Other information concerning detainees

401. On 9 December 1993, detainee Nihad Suleiman Diab Kriman escaped from Ansar 2, the Beach detention centre in Gaza. (Ha'aretz, 12 December 1993)

402. On 12 December 1993, it was reported that Bassem Muhammad Abd ar-Rahman al-Tamimi, from Bani Salah in the Ramallah district, had been released several days earlier without bail and without a charge sheet having been filed against him. Al-Tamimi had been arrested on 9 November on suspicion of being a member of the cell that had killed Haim Mizrahi. During the investigation, al-Tamimi suffered from a serious haemorrhage in the head and lost consciousness. He was hospitalized and required an operation. The IDF and the GSS accused each other of responsibility for the wounds suffered by al-Timimi. An investigation was under way. (Ha'aretz, 12 December 1993; Mr. al-Tamimi's sister Basema al-Tamimi, 44, had been killed a few days' earlier by an IDF soldier; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 9 December 1993)

403. On 30 December 1993, it was reported that prisoners belonging to Fatah joined Israeli guards at the Ketziot detention camp in suppressing a violation of prison regulations by PLO prisoners who were opposed to the Israel-PLO peace accord. The incident allegedly occurred in block 4 of the tent camp in the Negev on 19 December, when prisoners affiliated with the Popular and Democratic Fronts for the Liberation of Palestine (PFLP and DFLP) refused to cooperate in the daily head-count. IDF guards fired tear-gas and rubber bullets while some Fatah-affiliated prisoners reportedly began hitting, kicking and tying up the PFLP and DFLP inmates. Reports placed the number of injuries from beatings and tear-gas inhalation at 121 and that from rubber bullets at 5. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 30 December 1993)

404. On 12 January 1994, reserve Sgt. Ehud Sevitzki, 29, was killed by an IDF officer during a violent altercation with a Palestinian prisoner at the Ketziot prison in the Negev desert. During a routine morning head-count, the Palestinian prisoner attacked the soldier and tried to take his gun. An officer apparently fired at the prisoner but hit Sevitzki and another reserve soldier instead. Sevitzki later succumbed to his wounds. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 13 January 1994)

405. On 22 March 1994, it was reported that since the closure of the territories the Palestinian detainees and prisoners in Israel had been denied the right of visit by their families. Representatives of the Red Cross met with representatives of the detainees in the Ketziot military detention centre, advising them to agree to see only their wives, but the proposal was rejected. (Ha'aretz, 22 March 1994)

E. Annexation and settlement

406. On 5 December 1993, residents of the village of Anata filed a petition to object against Ministry of the Interior order 1/226 providing for the confiscation of 375 dunums of land belonging to their village. (Al-Tali'ah, 9 December 1993)

407. On 7 December 1993, it was reported that Dedi Zucker had stated that the Government was continuing to spend millions of shekels on settlements despite its promise to slow down the pace of settlement construction after being informed by Housing Minister Binyamin Ben Eliezer that the Government had built 4,629 apartments in the settlements in 1993. (Jerusalem Post, 7 December 1993)

408. On 9 December 1993, it was reported that settlers had seized a total of 12 dunums of Arab land situated near the Elon Moreh settlement (northern West Bank) and Alon Shvut settlement (southern West Bank) with the aim of establishing new settlement sites. (Al-Tali'ah, 9 December 1993)

409. On 12 December 1993, Minister of the Economy Shimon Shetreet called for the alleviation of the country's housing shortage through the filling of several thousand vacant apartments in the territories (reportedly 4,400). Shetreet stated that Israel had nothing to lose by doing so since it had already been penalized by the United States for spending its aid money on settlements beyond the Green Line. (Jerusalem Post, 13 December 1993)

410. On 13 December 1993, the IDF removed a mobile home that had been set up by local residents near Neveh Dekalim in the Gush Katif area on 12 December. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 14 December 1993)

411. On 13 December 1993, the villagers of Al Labn Gharbeya filed a petition objecting to a military order whereby 20,000 dunums of cultivated land would be confiscated under the pretext that the area was military land. (Al-Tali'ah, 16 December 1993)

412. On 15 December 1993, the Democratic Arab Party charged that an IDF order dated 14 November to confiscate a strip of land 30 metres wide in Gaza, apparently for the building of a fence, contravened international law. (Jerusalem Post, 16 December 1993)

413. On 16 December 1993, it was reported that Arab residents of villages situated south-east of the Gaza Strip had organized a sit-in a week earlier in order to protest the confiscation of their land. According to military order 6/93, which was issued on 14 November 1993, a 30-metre-wide band of land 10 kilometres long was to be confiscated for military purposes for a period of 10 years. The land was under cultivation of fruit and vegetables. (Al-Tali'ah, 16 December 1993)

414. On 20 December 1993, a Government official confirmed that the Government was finalizing a plan to ensure Israeli control of land located between the Givat Zeev settlement and Jerusalem. The plan involved annexing several hundred dunums of land to Givat Zeev between the town's present southern border -including lands bordering the Arab village of Beit Iksa - and the north Jerusalem neighbourhood of Ramot. (Jerusalem Post, 21 December 1993)

415. On 20 December 1993, it was reported that, according to figures released by the Council of Jewish Communities in the Territories, the number of Jews there was 136,415. According to the Council, this represented an increase of 7.3 per cent over the last year and a 120 per cent increase since the beginning of the uprising in December 1987. According to the figures, there were some 144 settlements in the territories, the largest of which was Maaleh Adumim, with nearly 20,000 residents. The Council's numbers differed from those provided by the Peace Now movement, whose spokeswoman Vered Livne estimated that there were surely no more than 120,000 settlers, probably many fewer. (Jerusalem Post, 21 December 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 23 December 1993)

416. On 22 December 1993, nine families moved into empty Housing Ministry homes (which had not yet been put up for sale) in Talmon B, north of Ramallah. (Ha'aretz, 23 December 1993; Jerusalem Post, 23 and 27 December 1993)

417. On 23 December 1993, it was reported that three major development projects in the Jerusalem area, including large-scale housing construction in the territories just east of the capital, had been ordered to be expedited by Housing Minister Binyamin Ben Eliezer. (Jerusalem Post, 23 December 1993)

418. On 24 and 25 December 1993, eight families moved into the new Ofarim settlement near Amana, in the Gush Emunim settlement division, and connected the homes to an electricity generator. (Jerusalem Post, 27 December 1993)

419. On 24 and 25 December 1993, some 4,000 to 5,000 persons throughout the country climbed the barren hills in more than 80 locations in order to establish new settlements. The organizers of the "This Is Our Land" campaign, which proposed to double the number of settlement on state-owned land throughout the territories to 260, stated that the event was the first stage of the project. Foreign Minister Shimon Peres stated on Israeli Radio that the Government had no intention of allowing the building of new settlements. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 23 and 26 December 1993)

420. On 29 December 1993, the residents of Beit El moved eight caravans back into their settlement, thus ending a confrontation with the IDF that had been going on since the homes were placed on a hill just outside the settlement three weeks earlier. The mobile homes were to be the start of a new neighbourhood of Beit El, to be named "Givat Haim Mizrahi" in memory of the settlement resident killed on 29 October. (Ha'aretz, 29 December 1993; Jerusalem Post, 28, 29 and 30 December 1993)

421. On 30 December 1993, it was reported that the Government of Israel had approved a special budget for a settlement project that would link the Ja'afat Zaev settlement to the city of Jerusalem and would entail the confiscation of thousands of dunums of Arab land. (Al-Tali'ah, 30 December 1993)

422. On 3 January 1994, the Jerusalem Municipal Planning Committee approved the first stage of the construction of a Jewish housing project near the Beit Orot Yeshiva on the Mount of Olives. The Committee voted 7 to 3 to allow Beit Orot to place a dozen mobile homes on land adjoining the yeshiva in the Arab neighbourhood of A-Tur. Approval was given against the recommendations of the city's Planning Department, which had argued that the land had been earmarked for an Arab school. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 4 January 1994)

423. On 4 January 1994, the Mayor of Jerusalem, Ehud Olmert, sharply criticized the moving of seven mobile homes by settlers to the Beit Orot Yeshiva after midnight on 3 January 1994. While supporting the Yeshiva's building plans, Olmert ordered the mobile homes removed from the site in the A-Tur neighbourhood on the grounds that final approval for their placement had not yet been obtained. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 5 January 1994)

424. On 5 January 1994, it was reported that the Civil Administration had recently begun paving a road aimed at circumventing Jericho. (Jerusalem Post, 6 January 1994)

425. On 7 January 1994, the Mayor of Jerusalem, Ehud Olmert, declared that 15,000 dunums of land had been annexed to the city recently. Olmert added that development projects had been delayed in the areas concerned because of objections filed with the Israeli Supreme Court by Arab owners. In a separate development, several annexation projects were reported in the West Bank. A large number of dunums of land from the villages of Al Walja, Betir, Jaba', Husan and Surif were annexed to the Kfar Atsayun settlements; more than 2,000 dunums of land south of Nablus were confiscated for the benefit of the Gheytit settlement. (Al-Tali'ah, 7 January 1994)

426. On 7 January 1994, a spokesman for the Palestinian Land and Water Establishment for Studies and Legal Services reported that Israel had confiscated 5,000 dunums of land since the signing of the Israeli-Palestinian agreement. The spokesman also denounced the practice of setting up natural reserves and public parks in the occupied territories as a classic way of seizing land. (Al-Tali'ah, 7 January 1994)

427. On 10 January 1994, the Council of Jewish Communities in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip announced that it had cancelled plans to establish new settlements in the territories by doubling the existing ones. (Jerusalem Post, 11 January 1994)

428. On 13 January 1994, the Israeli news paper Yediot Aharonot is reported to have disclosed a secret plan by the Government of Israel concerning the establishing of an urban development project near East Jerusalem. The project, which was built on 5,000 dunums of Arab-owned land, would extend from the Maaleh Adumim settlement in the east to the Gush Atsayun settlement on the outskirts of Hebron in the south. (Al-Tali'ah, 13 January 1994)

429. On 13 January 1994, it was reported that 30 prefabricated houses had been added to the Tsuffim settlement near Kalkiliya. Building projects were reported also to have extended to Eyal settlement, north of Kalkiliya, and had reached the Arab city's limits. The building of a new road that would link the settlement of Bitar to the Upper Bitar settlement was reported to have started on land belonging to the Arab village of Nahalin. (Al-Tali'ah, 13 January 1994)

430. On 14 January 1994, it was reported that, according to the PLO office, some three plots of land had been requisitioned in the Gaza Strip for the needs of the IDF or Israeli settlements (near the Morag settlement, some 10 dunums of privately owned land had been taken from an Arab family for the building of a road leading from the settlement and to greenhouses. Near Kfar Darom, Bedouins were ordered by the army to leave their land. Near the Dugit settlement, 30 to 40 dunums of state land were declared a military area. (Ha'aretz, 14 January 1994)

431. On 17 January 1994, Deputy Defence Minister Mordechai Gur approved a plan in the amount of approximately $33.3 million aimed at increasing security in settlements throughout the West Bank (and the Gaza Strip). (Jerusalem Post, 18 January 1994)

432. On 17 January 1994, the Beit Orot Yeshiva located on the Mount of Olives in Jerusalem once again rejected the demands of the municipality to remove the seven mobile homes illegally placed there by the yeshiva two weeks earlier. (Ha'aretz, 7 January 1994; Jerusalem Post, 6, 10, 13 and 18 January 1994)

433. On 19 January 1994, Housing Minister Binyamin Ben Eliezer informed the Knesset that the Government was preparing preliminary blueprints for a series of security and bypass roads in the West Bank. He refused, however, to reveal additional details to the public. (Jerusalem Post, 20 January 1994)

434. On 20 January 1994, Palestinian land surveyors warned against the negative implications of the Israeli plan to build 650 kilometres of substitute roads in the occupied territories during the period of transition. The surveyors affirmed that the comprehensive plan, which Israel had already started implementing, would modify the borders of the West Bank and Gaza Strip, resulting in new de facto situations. (Al-Tali'ah, 20 January 1994)

435. On 20 January 1994, it was reported that settlers had started planting 3,000 dunums of land that had been confiscated by the Government of Israel from the village of Beit Lakiya in the Ramallah district. Arab landowners had filed an objection against the confiscation order. (Al-Tali'ah, 20 January 1994)

436. On 25 January 1994, a senior municipal official stated that the extent of illegal construction in eastern Jerusalem had been grossly exaggerated, with virtually no homes built there without permits in recent months. According to Jerusalem Mayor Ehud Olmert, some 438 homes had been built illegally in areas in eastern Jerusalem zoned as open spaces since 1967. One hundred and eighty-nine cases of building extensions or building starts had reportedly been recorded. Municipal sources added that an additional 800 homes had been built illegally in areas whose building plans were awaiting approval. (Jerusalem Post, 26 January 1994; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 20 and 27 January 1994)

437. On 25 January 1994, it was reported that Palestinian sources had accused Israel of confiscating 46,000 dunums of land in the West Bank, along the Green Line and around Jerusalem for military use and public needs since the September agreement with the PLO. They also accused Israel of having enlarged settlements such as Daniel and Beit El over an area of 1,025 dunums; of declaring the existence of eight natural reserves in the West Bank; of having paved eight roads linking settlements; of having initiated two projects of settlement development on an area of 5,520 dunums in the Hebron region; of having forcibly moved 46 extended families from confiscated land; and of having demolished 63 houses. (Ha'aretz, 25 January 1994)

438. On 26 January 1994, some 50 Jewish residents of the territories were arrested when the IDF evicted them from an abandoned home near Kiryat Arba (West Bank) where they had gathered, declaring the start of a new settlement. The operation marked the beginning of a campaign by the "This Is Our Land" movement to set up dozens of new settlements throughout the territories within a matter of weeks. The campaign was not approved by the entire movement and the Council of Jewish Communities in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip officially declared itself against it. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 26 January 1994)

439. On 27 January 1994, it was reported that the Israeli authorities had confiscated 30 dunums of land in the village of Beit Hanun for the purpose of building a new road that would link Israel with Israeli settlements in Rafah. (Al-Tali'ah, 27 January 1994)

440. On 29 January 1994, almost 100 residents of Gush Etzion tried once again to claim land near the Bat Ayin settlement (West Bank). Some 30 persons set up a guard booth and were waiting to be arrested as the "This Is Our Land" campaign continued. The area was declared a closed military zone on 27 January 1994 after a previous attempt to establish a settler presence on the site ended with the arrest of three persons. (Ha'aretz, 28 January 1994; Jerusalem Post, 30 January 1994)

441. On 30 January 1994, some 25 persons were arrested outside the Karnei Shomron settlement (West Bank) as part of the "This Is Our Land" campaign to establish a Jewish presence in the territories. The IDF intervened quickly after a few dozen persons set up a temporary booth near the settlement, about a kilometre north of Karnei Shomron. The IDF closed off the site and declared it a closed military area. Late at night, some 120 persons went to another site, one kilometre to the south of the settlement, and declared their intention to start a new settlement there. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 31 January 1994)

442. On 31 January 1994, some 100 residents of Maaleh Amos (West Bank) went to three different sites outside the settlement as part of the "This Is Our Land" campaign. The IDF declared the Maaleh Amos a closed military area. Meanwhile, some 20 persons went to the sites of the two previous attempts to establish new settlements in Bat Ayin and waited for the army to arrest them. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 1 February 1994)

443. On 31 January 1994, the first civil guard station in the territories was officially opened in Maaleh Adumim, after a decade of debate. Additional units would be established in Efrat, Ariel, Givat Zeev and Maaleh Ephraim. Civil guard units in the territories would operate under much stricter guidelines than those within the Green Line. The civil guards' jurisdiction in the territories would be limited to the settlements in order to avoid friction with Palestinians. (Jerusalem Post, 1 February 1994)

444. On 31 January 1994, a city spokeswomen stated that the Jerusalem municipality had paved the way for the construction of a Jewish housing project next to the Beit Orot Yeshiva on the Mount of Olives by finding another site for the Arab school it had originally planned to build there. The alternative site had reportedly been found at the request of Mayor Ehud Olmert in the village of A-Tur, in which the yeshiva was located. (Jerusalem Post, 1 February 1994)

445. On 2 February 1994, some 50 to 70 people involved in the "This Is Our Land" campaign left an area outside the settlement of Yakir after being asked to do so by the IDF. No arrests were made. The group returned to the same site late at night, however. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 3 February 1994)

446. On 3 February 1994, 15 people were arrested when the "This Is Our Land" movement took its campaign to an area about five kilometres east of Maaleh Adumim. The area was declared a closed military area. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 4 February 1994)

447. On 3 February 1994, the Director of the Islamic Waqfs in Jerusalem complained that the Israeli authorities had seized 50 additional dunums of land in the Muslim cemetery in the Mamila gardens, which are located in West Jerusalem. The confiscated land was to be used for a public park. The Director stated that other parts of the cemetery had already been seized in the past and had been turned into a parking lot and a public park. (Al-Tali'ah, 3 February 1994)

448. On 9 February 1994, the "This Is Our Land" movement established two encampments, one near the Hashmonaim settlement, north of Jerusalem, and the second one near the Nofim settlement, in the western West Bank. Both areas were declared closed military zones and arrests of settlers were carried out by the army. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 10 February 1994; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 17 February 1994)

449. On 10 February 1994, it was reported that Meir Davidson, who had helped to spearhead the purchase of Arab property in East Jerusalem for settlement groups, had been named municipal advisor on East Jerusalem affairs, which outraged the city's Arab community. (Jerusalem Post, 10 February 1994)

450. On 10 February 1994, the Israel Land Department recommended that the Finance Ministry confiscate 15,000 dunums of land located between the settlement of Pisgat Zeev and the French Hill, a plan that would bring the settlement closer to Jerusalem. In a separate development, it was reported that several hotels were to be built by a Jewish businessman in the area between the settlements of Maaleh Adumim and Pisgat Zeev. (Al-Tali'ah, 10 February 1994)

451. On 11 February 1994, it was reported that the Bedouins of Jahalin had been threatened with eviction and the destruction of their homes located at the foot of the Maaleh Adumim settlement. They had been told to move to another location in order to allow for the expansion of the settlement, which is located on the outskirts of Jerusalem. Residents believed that the intention behind the move was to cut the Jericho enclave off from the rest of the West Bank. The Bedouins from Jahalin had already been forced out of their homes in Tel Arad, in the northern Negev, in 1950 and were later "encouraged" to cross the border into the West Bank (then under Jordanian administration). They finally settled in their present location 40 years ago. (The Jerusalem Times, 11 February 1994)

452. On 14 February 1994, some 20 settlers from Bat Ayin, in the Gush Etzion region, set up a wooden structure outside the perimeter of the settlement in a fourth attempt to establish a presence outside their settlement as part of the "This Is Our Land" movement's campaign to double the number of settlements in the territories. Two previous attempts had led to arrests of the settlers. (Jerusalem Post, 15 February 1994)

453. On 15 February 1994, Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin reportedly told the Knesset Foreign Affairs and Defence Committee that hundreds of Jewish settlers in the Gaza Strip had asked to be relocated, but that the Government was not to offer compensation "at this time", so as not to encourage the abandonment of the area. (Jerusalem Post, 16 February 1994; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 24 February 1994)

454. On 16 February 1994, leaders of the "This Is Our Land" movement announced during a ceremony held in Jerusalem that a new settlement called "Neveh Yehudit" had been established next to an existing settlement, Karmeh Shamron, in the West Bank. The location of the settlement, in the Ramallah area, was being kept secret in order to prevent the army from evicting the 10 settlers who were already staying there. (Ha'aretz, 17 February 1994; also referred to in The Jerusalem Times, 18 February 1994)

455. On 18 February 1994, Housing Ministry spokesman Emit Dubkin stated that the Government considered greater Jerusalem to include the settlements of Maaleh Adumim, and Givat Zeev. In a separate development, it was reported that a tunnel was presently being built under the town of Beit Jala. The tunnel would allow the residents of the Gush Etzion settlement to reach Jerusalem without passing through any Arab towns. (The Jerusalem Times, 18 February 1994)

456. On 24 February 1994, it was reported that 800 dunums of land would be seized from the city of Hebron for the construction of road No. 35. The residents of Jinsafout, in the northern West Bank, had also reported the confiscation of several dunums of their land. (Al-Tali'ah, 24 February 1994)

457. On 25 February 1994, a poll conducted in the Ariel settlement by the Maghar Mahot Institute showed that 29 per cent of its residents were thinking of leaving the settlement. Numerous settlers from Ariel met with Knesset members to discuss the possibility of leaving Ariel and receiving compensation. (The Jerusalem Times, 25 February 1994)

458. On 9 March 1994, Housing Minister Binyamin Ben Eliezer told the Knesset that the Housing Ministry was ready to provide assistance to all families wishing to leave the territories for security reasons, even though there had been no change in official government policy. Ben Eliezer stressed that he was helping each family on an individual basis, for humanitarian reasons. Since the Hebron massacre on 25 February, several dozen families had reportedly applied to the Housing Ministry for aid that would enable them to find housing inside the Green Line. According to Ministry spokeswoman Ofra Preuss, each family had received a one-year subsidy for rent assistance of some $270 per month. (Ha'aretz, 4 March 1994; Jerusalem Post, 7 and 10 March 1994)

459. On 16 March 1994, the IDF began building a temporary outpost between Kiryat Arba and its Givat Harsina neighbourhood that would serve the soldiers stationed in Kiryat Arba and in Hebron. (Jerusalem Post, 17 March 1994)

460. On 17 March 1994, Ehud Olmert, the Mayor of Jerusalem, announced that work was to begin soon on a controversial new Jewish neighbourhood consisting of 7,500 units at Har Homa, in southern Jerusalem, on land annexed to the city after the Six-Day War. The Housing Ministry had reportedly already given permission for construction and had allocated funding for the infrastructure for the first 2,500 units. (Jerusalem Post, 18 March 1994)

461. On 20 March 1994, nine families moved into a new neighbourhood in the settlement of Anatot, just east of Jerusalem. (Jerusalem Post, 21 March 1994)

462. On 20 March 1994, settlers from the Magdolim settlement, 25 kilometres south of Nablus, started work on a large area of land belonging to the Palestinian residents of the village of Kissrah, claiming that it was government-owned land. The land area was estimated at 333 acres and was planted with wheat and olive trees. (The Jerusalem Times, 25 March 1994)

463. On 30 March 1994, the Centre for Land Research, which was affiliated with the Society for Arab Studies and Research in Jerusalem, had observed a noticeable increase in land seizure, the uprooting of trees and settlement activity since the Oslo Accord had been signed. The Centre's statement indicated that the average number of acres seized monthly since the beginning of the intifadah amounted to 1,378 acres a month. Following the Madrid Conference in 1991, the seizures had dropped to 625 acres per month. However, following the signing of the Oslo Accord, the average monthly rate of seizure had increased to 2,100 acres. The statement added that before the Madrid Conference settlements had been given only 58 acres per month. However, immediately before the Oslo Accord, the amount of land given to settlements had risen to 218 acres per month. The Centre estimated that land was currently being handed to settlers at a rate of 270 acres per month. The statement also indicated that over 10,700 fruit-bearing trees had been uprooted during the past six months. Over 250,000 trees had been uprooted in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip since the beginning of the intifadah. (The Jerusalem Times, 1 April 1994)

F. Information concerning the occupied Syrian Arab Golan

464. On 9 December 1993, police arrested three Druzes from the village of Majdal Shams on the Golan Heights on suspicion of writing pro-Syrian and anti-Israeli slogans on the walls of buildings in the region. (Jerusalem Post, 10 December 1993)

465. On 16 December 1993, it was reported that leaders of settlements in the Golan Heights had stated that they had learned that the Ministry of Tourism had almost entirely scrapped its tourism budget for the Golan. (Jerusalem Post, 16 December 1993)
466. On 18 December 1993, hundreds of Druze, Arab and Israeli peace activists demonstrated in Majdal Shams village on the Golan Heights, calling for the return of the region to the Syrian Arab Republic in return for a peace settlement. (Jerusalem Post, 19 December 1993)

467. On 4 January 1994, the first of two new neighbourhoods with 700 apartments was inaugurated north of Katzrin on the Golan Heights in the presence of Housing Minister Binyamin Ben Eliezer. (Ha'aretz, 5 January 1994)

468. On 17 January 1994, Deputy Minister for Defence Mordechai Gur announced, reportedly with the approval of Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and the Cabinet, that the Government would hold a plebiscite if it decided to make substantial territorial concessions to the Syrian Arab Republic as part of a comprehensive peace settlement. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 18 January 1994; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 20 January 1994)

469. On 3 February 1994, the Ministry of Agriculture authorized the extension of two settlements on the Golan Heights. The Ministry's Programme Committee allowed Moshav Ramot to add 20 families to the 77 currently living there, while Maaleh Gamla was allowed to add 26 families to the 60 already there. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 4 February 1994)
Nahallin
470. On 10 February 1994, three policemen were slightly injured by several masked residents of the village of Majdal Shams in the Golan Heights who had tried to prevent the arrest of a youth who was suspected of writing nationalistic slogans. The residents were arrested. (Ha'aretz, 11 February 1994)

471. On 12 February 1994, the Ha-Shomer ha-Tsa'ir movement passed a resolution at its annual convention stating that its two kibbutzim (Geshur and Natur) located in the Golan must not become obstacles to peace. Members would be expelled from the movement if they refused to evacuate as part of a peace treaty. (Jerusalem Post, 13 February 1994)

472. On 14 February 1994, a mounted policeman was slightly injured when Druze demonstrators threw stones at security forces in the centre of Majdal Shams on the Golan Heights, when they marked the twelfth anniversary of their general strike against the extension of Israeli law to the region. All businesses, shops and schools in Majdal Shams and the other Druze villages on the Heights (Masa'ada, Buka'ata and Ein Kiliya) were closed to mark the anniversary. (Jerusalem Post, 15 February 1994)

----- Naha




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