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About the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People

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Source: Division for Palestinian Rights (DPR)
Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People (CEIRPP)
30 September 1994




September 1994


Volume XVII, Bulletin No. 8



Contents

Page
I.
    Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People reviews developments in the peace process
1
II.
    Excerpt from the report of the Secretary-General on the work of the Organization
2
III.
    Excerpt from the statement issued by the Foreign Ministers of the five permanent members of the Security Council
4
IV.
    Excerpt from the final communiqué issued by the Ministerial Council of the Gulf Cooperation Council at its fifty-second ordinary session on 17 September 1994
4
V.
    Excerpt from the documents of the Eleventh Ministerial Conference of the Movement of Non-Aligned Countries
5
VI.
    Excerpt from the Ministerial Declaration of the Group of 77
7
VII.
    Resolution adopted by the seventh extraordinary session of the Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers, held at Islamabad from 7 to 9 September 1994
8
VIII.
    The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization sponsors Oslo concert to celebrate first anniversary of Israeli-Palestinian peace accord
12
IX.
    Other documentation issued by the United Nations
13
X.
    Non-governmental organization: activities and information
13







I. COMMITTEE ON THE EXERCISE OF THE INALIENABLE RIGHTS
OF THE PALESTINIAN PEOPLE REVIEWS DEVELOPMENTS
IN THE PEACE PROCESS


The Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People held its 208th meeting on 23 September 1994. The Chairman reported on the combined International Non-Governmental Organizations (NGO) Meeting and European NGO Symposium on the Question of Palestine held at Geneva from 29 August to 1 September 1994. The Chairman welcomed the agreement reached between Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) regarding the West Bank, transferring power and responsibilities to the Palestinian Authority from the Israeli Government and its civil administration in such areas as education and culture, health, social welfare, tourism and taxation. He stressed the need to support the Palestinian Authority in developing the Palestinian economy, which was an essential underpinning for peace. He welcomed the Oslo Declaration and expressed the hope that the ongoing efforts to generate the needed assistance would be productive.

The Committee heard a statement by the Permanent Observer for Palestine to the United Nations, Mr. M. Nasser Al-Kidwa, concerning the latest developments.

As summarized in a press release (see GA/PAL/672), he said:

"... there had been important developments in the situation of the Palestinian people, the most important of which has been the signing on 13 September 1994 of the Oslo Declaration. That document had basically dealt with economic issues, one of its aims being to guarantee the expenses incurred during the first few months of the transfer of responsibilities to the Palestinian side were covered. The Declaration had also referred to the Palestinian-Israeli agreement on early empowerment in specific areas of responsibilities. The agreement had come late, well beyond the date scheduled in the Declaration of Principles, and indeed was only now operative. Nevertheless, reaching agreement had been a positive step and he looked forward to its earliest possible implementation.

"He went on to say that he had returned to his country last month. He used the word "return" intentionally, he said, since his presence there had come within the meaning of the understanding reached by the two parties in the Declaration of Principles. He had become acquainted with the situation on the ground. It was a promising situation, and one packed with positive potential, but it was full too of disappointment--stemming from "overwhelming" Israeli violations, which he had personally witnessed, of agreements on Jericho and Gaza and of almost every article of the Declaration of Principles.

"Nonetheless, he said, he believed that there was a political will on both sides to go ahead with further implementation. It was also essential for the international community to continue playing a role in the process and to continue shouldering its responsibilities.

"Documents emerging from the Arab Ministerial meeting held in Cairo last week would be available in the course of next month, he said. He noted that a letter to the Arab Group from the Permanent Representative of the United States had dealt at some length with the situation in Palestine. It had been found necessary to respond to that letter, in order to express disagreement with the statements it made. Moreover, the Chairman of the Arab Group had announced his intention to sending a second letter restating the Group's belief, including its insistence of the need for the General Assembly to reaffirm its position on issues reflecting the final status of the agreements. That letter had been delivered today.

"The last General Assembly, he went on, had used a balanced and reasonable approach to produce positive results. It was important now for the Assembly to build on that outcome, ensuring that each new step correspond to the reality on the ground. Urging the Assembly to continue its support for positive developments, he said that its resolutions must reflect the improved situation in the occupied territories and pave the way for the future. Decisions on the final status of the occupied territories must be postponed until the final stage of the process was actually reached. Israel remained the occupying Power, and the Palestinian people were still being denied their inalienable rights.

"So far, he said, positive steps had come from one side only: what was needed now was equally positive steps from the other side, which was 'basically the United States and Israel'. He reiterated the need for Israel to recognize the Fourth Geneva Convention and said that failure to do so had largely been the result of pressure from one influential Member State.

"He urged full involvement in the peace process by the United Nations and all its associated bodies. The international community and the General Assembly should untiringly uphold the Charter as well as the validity of past Assembly resolutions, particularly those on the question of Palestinian self-determination. He reminded the Committee that 'illegal actions remained illegal', and that illegal actions in the occupied territories had not become less illegal with the start of negotiations on the territories. He looked forward to working together both with the Committee and the Assembly. He expressed the hope that this year would see a better package of resolutions reflecting broader international consensus while scrupulously observing the principles involved."



II. EXCERPT FROM THE REPORT OF THE SECRETARY-GENERAL
ON THE WORK OF THE ORGANIZATION


The report of the Secretary-General on the work of the Organization, submitted to the General Assembly at its forty-ninth session, contained the following paragraphs relating to the question of Palestine (see A/49/1, paras. 576-583):

"Despite the differences of positions, the parties to the Middle East peace negotiations have accomplished a great deal in the course of the 12 months since my last report. The bilateral negotiating process initiated at Madrid culminated in an exchange of letters of mutual recognition by Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) and the signing by them on 13 September 1993 of the Declaration of Principles on Interim Self-Government Arrangements (A/48/486-S/26560, annex). In my report of 19 November 1993 (A/48/607-S/26769). I expressed the hope that the agreement would lead to a comprehensive peace in the region, acceptable to all the parties concerned. I stated that the United Nations stands ready to lend its full support to the peace process.

"This important development was followed by the signing of the Common Agenda and the Washington Declaration (A/49/300-S/1994/939, annex) by Israel and Jordan in September 1993 and July 1994, respectively. I also welcomed the signing by Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization of the Agreement on the Gaza Strip and the Jericho Area in May 1994 (see A/49/180-S/1994/727, annex).

"In the course of the year, a measure of progress has also been achieved in the multilateral negotiations on Middle East regional issues, which have entered a new phase. In their meetings at Tunis, Beijing, Moscow, Copenhagen, Cairo, The Hague, Muscat, Doha and Rabat the five working groups in the negotiations began to focus on a number of specific projects dealing with arms control and regional security, water resources, environment, economic development and refugees. The United Nations has continued to play an active role as a full extra-regional participant in the deliberations of the multilateral working groups.

"In February 1994, the peace process suffered a setback caused by a particularly serious act of violence perpetrated by an armed Israeli settler against Palestinian worshippers at the al-Ibrahimi Mosque in the West Bank town of Hebron. Dozens of Palestinians were killed and scores wounded. I condemned this act of violence in the strongest terms. The Security Council considered the situation, and with its adoption of resolution 904 (1994), called for the implementation of measures to guarantee the safety and protection of the Palestinian civilians throughout the occupied territory, including the establishment of a temporary international or foreign presence. The Security Council also reaffirmed its support for the peace process and called for the immediate implementation of the Declaration of Principles.

"In early April 1994, the peace talks were frustrated once again when Palestinian attacks were launched against passenger buses in the Israeli towns of Afula and Hadera, resulting in casualties among Israeli civilians. I condemned these violent incidents and urged the parties to continue their negotiations towards the implementation of the Declaration of Principles. In accordance with the provisions of Security Council resolution 904 (1994), a contingent of observers, known as the Temporary International Presence in Hebron, was deployed in Hebron from May to August 1994.

"In order to sustain support for the Declaration of Principles and the Cairo implementation agreement, it will be essential to promote economic and social development in the occupied territories and to bring about, as quickly as possible, tangible improvements in Palestinian living conditions, particularly in the Gaza Strip, where needs are greatest. In September 1993, I established a high-level task force to identify new projects and activities that could be rapidly implemented by UNRWA, UNDP and UNICEF, the three United Nations agencies with long-established operations in the occupied territories. The report of the task force, which identified immediate additional needs of the Palestinian people assessed at $138 million, was conveyed on my behalf by the Administrator of UNDP to the Conference to Support Middle East Peace, convened in Washington, D.C., on 1 October 1993. The Conference pledged some $2.4 billion in economic assistance to the occupied territories for the five-year transition period. Conference participants acknowledged that, in view of its massive presence on the ground, the United Nations would be an effective channel for such assistance, especially in the short term. (For more detailed information on UNRWA operations, see paras. 361-368 of the report.)

"On 14 September 1993, the day after the signing of the Declaration of Principles, the Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Palestine Liberation Organization, Mr. Yasser Arafat, in a meeting with me in New York, requested United Nations technical assistance in a variety of sectors, in particular for building the Palestinian administration to be entrusted with the tasks of self-government. In response to his request, I dispatched, in October 1993, a technical mission to Tunis and the occupied territories, for consultations with the PLO leadership. The mission also met with senior officials in Egypt, Israel and Jordan. The parties welcomed my intention to ensure a unified and coherent approach in the provision of economic, social and other assistance in the occupied territories.

"Following the mission and pursuant to General Assembly resolution 48/213 of 21 December 1993, I decided to appoint Mr. Terje Roed Larsen of Norway as the Special Coordinator in the Occupied Territories. Mr. Larsen will provide overall guidance to and facilitate coordination among the programmes and agencies of the United Nations system so as to assist in the implementation of the Declaration of Principles. Mr. Larsen is also responsible for activities that fall outside the traditional sectoral responsibilities of the agencies, such as coordination of the training of the Palestinian police force, which was requested by Mr. Arafat in a letter to me dated 10 December 1993."




III. EXCERPT FROM THE STATEMENT ISSUED BY THE FOREIGN MINISTERS
OF THE FIVE PERMANENT MEMBERS OF THE SECURITY COUNCIL


The following is an excerpt from a statement issued on 29 September 1994 by the Ministers for Foreign Affairs of the five permanent members of the Security Council following a meeting with the Secretary-General (see S/1994/1122, annex):

"....

"The Ministers also noted with satisfaction that the peace process in the Middle East has witnessed breakthroughs. They expressed appreciations for the efforts of the Russian Federation and the United States as co-sponsors and for the support of the United Nations and the EU. They welcomed the Agreements of the Gaza Strip and the Jericho area and on the preparatory transfer of powers and responsibilities reached between Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization as well as the Washington Declaration recently signed by Israel and Jordan and hoped that all parties continue to adopt a practical and flexible attitude in finding early solutions to the remaining issues consistent with relevant Security Council resolutions. Negotiations on final status issues should be based on Security Council resolutions 242 (1967) and 338 (1973) and seek to produce permanent and lasting peace and security throughout the region. The Ministers also reaffirmed the need for the international community to provide tangible support for the implementation of the agreements reached by the parties.

"...."




IV. EXCERPT FROM THE FINAL COMMUNIQUÉ ISSUED BY THE
MINISTERIAL COUNCIL OF THE GULF COOPERATION
COUNCIL AT ITS FIFTY-SECOND ORDINARY SESSION
ON 17 SEPTEMBER 1994


The following are excerpts from the final communiqué issued by the Ministerial Council of the Gulf Cooperation Council at its fifty-second ordinary session, held at Riyadh on 17 September 1994 (see A/49/412-S/1994/1078):

"The Ministerial Council held its fifty-second ordinary session on Saturday, 17 September 1994, at the headquarters of its secretariat at Riyadh, under the chairmanship of His Royal Highness Prince Saud Al-Faisal, Minister for Foreign Affairs of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia and Chairman of the current session of the Ministerial Council,...."

"...

"The Ministerial Council studies new developments in the peace process in the Middle East. It noted with satisfaction the tangible process achieved on the Palestinian-Israeli track and the major steps being taken by the two sides within the framework of the early transfer of responsibilities to the Palestinian civilian Authority and the expansion of the Palestinian self-government. It invites the international community and the co-sponsors of the Conference, the United States of America and the Russian Federation, to put pressure on Israel to desist from placing obstacles in the way of the Authority's exercise of its functions. The Council welcomes the progress made on the Jordanian-Israeli track. It expresses its deep concern with no tangible progress has been made in the talks on the Syrian-Israeli track and the Lebanese-Israeli track owing to Israel's obduracy and refusal to apply the principles agreed upon at the Madrid Peace Conference and the principle of land for peace. The Council affirms that the essence of the peace process is the achievement of a just and comprehensive peace on all tracks.

"The Ministerial Council reaffirms its full support for the peace process on all tracks with a view to arrival at a just, comprehensive and lasting solution to the Palestinian question and the Arab-Israeli conflict on the basis of Security Council resolutions 242 (1967) and 338 (1973) and the principle of land for peace, the achievement of full Israeli withdrawal from all the occupied Arab territories, the restoration to the Palestinian people of its legitimate rights and the establishment of its independent State, with Jerusalem as its capital.

"The Ministerial Council calls on the international community, in particular the Security Council and the co-sponsors of the peace process, to persuade Israel not to change the status of Jerusalem with its 1967 boundaries, to comply with the resolutions of international legitimacy concerning Jerusalem and with the imperative requirement not to make any changes in its demographic characteristics during the transitional stage that might prejudice the outcome of talks on its permanent status.

"...."



V. EXCERPT FROM THE DOCUMENTS OF THE ELEVENTH MINISTERIAL
CONFERENCE OF THE MOVEMENT OF NON-ALIGNED COUNTRIES


At the Eleventh Ministerial Conference of the Movement of Non-Aligned Countries, held at Cairo from 31 May to 3 June 1994, a number of documents relating to a review of the international situation were adopted and submitted to the General Assembly, including the Cairo Declaration (see A/49/287-S/1994/894, annex) an excerpt from which follows:

"Palestine and the Middle East question

"131. The Ministers reaffirmed their support for the peace process initiated at the Madrid Peace Conference of October 1991 which aims at achieving a comprehensive, just and lasting peace in the Middle East based on Security Council resolutions 242 (1967) and 338 (1973) and the principle of land for peace. They acknowledged as important steps the Palestinian-Israeli Declaration of Principles signed between Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization on 13 September 1993 and the Agreement signed in Cairo by the two parties on 4 May, 1994 relating to the Gaza Strip and Jericho area which gave tangible first stage implementation of that Declaration through the withdrawal of Israeli forces and the entry of a Palestinian police force. The Ministers also acknowledged as an important step the Jordanian-Israeli Common Agenda, and expressed the hope that urgent progress would be achieved on the other tracks through Israeli fulfillment of the basic requirements of a comprehensive peace in the Middle East.

"132. The Ministers affirmed that comprehensive peace in the Middle East should entail: full withdrawal of Israel from all Palestinian territory including Jerusalem as well as from the Syrian Golan and Jordanian territories occupied since 1967, and from the occupied Lebanese territories, the realization of the legitimate national rights of the Palestinian people, primarily its right to self-determination on its national soil, guaranteeing arrangements for peace and security of all States in the region, including those named in resolution 181 (II) of 29 November 1947, within secure and internationally recognized boundaries; resolving the problem of the Palestinian refugees in conformity with General Assembly resolution 194 (III) of 11 December 1948, and subsequent relevant resolutions, resolving the problems of the Israeli settlements.

"133. The Ministers recalled Security Council resolution 252 (1968) of 21 May 1968, which calls upon Israel to rescind all measures which change the legal status of Jerusalem. They reaffirmed their view that all legislative and administrative measures and actions taken by Israel, the occupying power, which had altered or purported to alter the character and status of the Holy City of Jerusalem, in particular the so-called `Basic Law' on Jerusalem as the capital of Israel, were null and void. In this respect, they recalled Security Council resolution 478 (1980) of 20 August 1980, which called upon those States that had established diplomatic missions at Jerusalem to withdraw such missions from the Holy City. They reiterated, in this regard, that the issue of Jerusalem could not be resolved by unilateral measures and noted that the Declaration of Principles signed between Israel and the PLO of 13 September 1993 stipulated that Jerusalem would be one of the issues to be dealt with in the final stages of negotiations.

"134. The Ministers reaffirmed that Israeli settlements in the Palestinian territory and other Arab territories occupied since 1967 were illegal, an obstacle to peace and should be dismantled. They emphasized that there were grave security, economic and social repercussions of the Israeli policy and practice of building settlements in the occupied territories. They considered that full peace required, inter alia, the dismantling of these settlements.

"135. The Ministers recalled Security Council resolution 465 (1980) of 1 March 1980 and other resolutions affirming the applicability of the Geneva Convention relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War, of 12 August 1949, to the occupied Palestinian territory, including the Holy City of Jerusalem, and all other territories occupied by Israel since 1967.

"136. The Ministers reiterated their support for Security Council resolution 904 (1994) which condemned the massacre inflicted upon unarmed innocent Palestinians while at prayer in the Ibrahimi Mosque at Hebron in the occupied West Bank in February 1994 and called for the most decisive action to be taken by the international community to ensure that such acts are not repeated. They also reiterated that sufficient measures had to be taken to ensure the security and protection of the Palestinians in the occupied territories and that Israel must put an end to its policy of establishing or consolidating settlements in the Arab occupied territories. They reaffirmed that it was imperative to address the issue of illegal Israeli settlements in the occupied territories as a matter of urgency and priority since their presence continues to be a violation of the relevant Security Council resolutions, the Fourth Geneva Convention and proved to be a serious threat to the peace process.

"137. The Ministers reaffirmed that Israel, the occupying power, should facilitate the return of Palestinians deported from the occupied Palestinian territory since 1967, accelerate the release of Palestinians arbitrarily detained or imprisoned and respect scrupulously all fundamental freedoms of the Palestinian people, such as the freedom of education, including the free operation of schools, universities and other educational institutions.

"138. The Ministers noted, with appreciation, the remarkable efforts exerted by the Syrian, Lebanese and Jordanian Governments in order to open up possibilities for achieving progress, in their full commitment to peace in the Middle East, and demanded that Israel totally withdraw from the occupied Syrian Golan, Lebanese and Jordanian territories, in implementation of the relevant Security Council resolutions and in accordance with International law, and the principle of the inadmissibility of the acquisition of territory by force.

"139. The Ministers considered that all legislative and administrative measures and actions taken or to be taken by Israel, the occupying power, such as its illegal decision of 14 December 1981, that purport to alter the character and legal status of the occupied Syrian Golan are null and void, constitute a flagrant violation of International law and of the Geneva Convention relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War, of 12 August 1949, and have no legal effect. They called upon Israel to comply with Security Council resolution 497 (1981) of 17 December 1981 and to withdraw fully from the occupied Syrian Golan to the lines of 4 June 1967, in implementation of Security Council and General Assembly resolutions."


VI. EXCERPT FROM MINISTERIAL DECLARATION OF THE GROUP OF 77


The following is an excerpt from the declaration adopted at the eighteenth annual Meeting of the Ministers for Foreign Affairs of the Group of 77, held in New York on 30 September 1994 (see A/49/462, annex, and Corr.1):

"The Ministers noted the initiation of Palestinian self-government arrangements in the Gaza Strip and Jericho area and called for the speedy extension of Palestinian self-government arrangements to encompass the entire occupied territories in implementation of the Declaration of Principles on Interim Self-Government Arrangements. In that regard, they reaffirmed their support of the Palestinian people as they strive to attain their inalienable rights, including the right to establish an independent State on their national soil, including Jerusalem. They also reaffirmed the permanent responsibility of the United Nations towards the question of Palestine. They emphasized the need for international assistance to support Palestinian development efforts in the economic and social fields. The Ministers also reaffirmed their support for the peace process initiated at the Peace Conference on the Middle East held at Madrid, which aimed at achieving a comprehensive, just and lasting peace in the Middle East based on Security Council resolutions 242 (1967), 338 (1973) and 425 (1978) and the principle of land for peace."




VII. RESOLUTION ADOPTED BY THE SEVENTH EXTRAORDINARY SESSION
OF THE ISLAMIC CONFERENCE OF FOREIGN MINISTERS,
HELD AT ISLAMABAD FROM 7 TO 9 SEPTEMBER 1994


"Resolution No. 1/7 EX on the
Question of Al-Quds Al-Sharif, Palestine and
the Arab-Israeli Conflict

"The seventh extraordinary session of the Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers held in Islamabad, Islamic Republic of Pakistan, from 2 to 4 Rabi'II, 1415H (7-9 September 1994),

"Having considered the report of the Secretary-General on the question of Al-Quds Al-Sharif, Palestine and the Arab-Israeli Conflict contained in document No. EX-ICFM/7-94/QP-D.1;

"Proceeding from the principles and objectives of the Charter of the Organization of the Islamic Conference;

"Pursuant to the resolutions of the Islamic Summit and Ministerial Conferences on the question of Al-Quds Al-Sharif, Palestine and the Arab-Israeli Conflict;

"Recalling the resolutions adopted by the United Nations General Assembly and Security Council, the Non-Aligned Movement, the Organization of African Unity and the League of Arab States on the situation in the occupied Palestinian territories, including the city of Al-Quds Al-Sharif and in the other occupied Arab territories;

"Recalling resolutions 465 (1980), 476 (1980) and 478 (1980) of the Security Council on the city of Al-Quds Al-Sharif and the Islamic resolutions emphasizing that the question of Al-Quds constitutes the heart of the Palestinian question which is the prime cause of all Muslims and the core of the Arab-Israeli Conflict, and that a just and comprehensive peace will only be achieved with the return of the city of Al-Quds Al-Sharif to Palestinian sovereignty as the capital of the State of Palestine;

"Reaffirming United Nations Security Council resolution 681 (1990), which states that all the provisions of the Fourth Geneva Convention relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War, concluded on 12 August 1949, apply to the Palestinian people in the occupied Palestinian territories, including the city of Al-Quds Al-Sharif;

"Recalling resolution 904 (1994) of the Security Council on the massacre of the Ibrahimi Mosque in the city of Al-Khalil, which calls for the provision of international protection to the Palestinians in the city of Al-Khalil;

"Expressing deep concern at Israel's continuing repressive measures and practices against Palestinian citizens, its siege of the city of Al-Quds Al-Sharif, and the continuing Israeli attacks on southern Lebanon and western Al-Bekaa;

"Proceeding from Islamic and international resolutions which reaffirm the legitimacy of the struggle waged by the Palestinian people under the leadership of the Palestine Liberation Organization, their sole legitimate representative, for the re-establishment of their sovereignty over their land, and the exercise of their inalienable national rights;

"Noting with interest the continuation of peace efforts aiming at the realization of a just and comprehensive solution of the Palestinian question and the Arab-Israeli conflict on the basis of Security Council resolutions 242 (1967) and 338 (1973), the principle of "land for peace" and the national and legitimate political rights of the Palestinian people;

"Emphasizing the role of the United Nations in the efforts to secure a just and comprehensive settlement of the question of Palestine and the Arab-Israeli conflict;

"1. Reaffirms all the resolutions of the Islamic Conferences relating to the question of Palestine and the Arab-Israeli conflict;

"2. Reaffirms that the Palestine question is the prime cause of all Muslims, and expresses its pride in, and solidarity with, the Palestine Liberation Organization in its just struggle for removing the effects of Israeli occupation and building the Palestinian national institutions on the land of Palestine with a view to fulfilling the inalienable Palestinian national rights, including the right of the Palestinian people to return to their homeland, to self-determination and to establish their own independent State on national soil with Al-Quds Al-Sharif as its capital;

"3. Calls on Member States to strengthen further their solidarity with the Palestinian people, and to support their just and legitimate struggle for ending Israeli occupation and achieving all their goals of freedom and independence;

"4. Affirms that a just and comprehensive peace in the Middle East region can only be achieved through complete and unconditional Israeli withdrawal from all the Palestinian territories occupied since 1967, including the city of Al-Quds Al-Sharif, and from the other occupied Arab territories;

"5. Expresses its support and backing for the peace process in the Middle East, which is aimed at bringing about a just and comprehensive solution to the question of Palestine and the Arab-Israeli conflict and welcomes the agreements concluded within the framework of the peace process. It believes that the success of the peace process in the Middle East hinges on the fulfillment of the following principles and basic factors:

"First:

"It being based on the resolutions of international legality, including resolutions 242 (1967) and 338 (1973) of the Security Council, and the obligation to implement them in accordance with the Arab and international understanding of the two resolutions, which guarantees full Israeli withdrawal from all the occupied Palestinian territories, including Al-Quds Al-Sharif, as well as from the occupied Syrian Golan and Jordanian territories, and on the basis of the formula "land for peace"; of the legitimate national and political rights of the Palestinian people, and of the need to enable them to exercise their right of return in conformity with resolution 194 (1948);

"Second:

"Applicability of Security Council resolution 242 (1967) to all Arab occupied territories, including the Palestinian territories;

"Third:

"The fact that Al-Quds is the heart of the Palestine question which, in turn, is the heart of the Arab-Israeli conflict. Al-Quds is an integral part of the Palestinian territories occupied in 1967 and to it apply all the provisions applicable to the other occupied territories under the resolutions of the United Nations Security Council and General Assembly, and the necessity of its return to Palestinian sovereignty as capital of the State of Palestine, for the sake of peace and security in the region;

"Fourth:

"Dismantling the settlements already established since they are unlawful under the resolutions of international legality including resolution 465 (1980) of the Security Council, and cessation of the settling of Jews in the occupied Palestinian and Arab territories including Al-Quds Al-Sharif and the Syrian Golan, combined with the necessity of providing international guarantees to that effect;

"Fifth:

"The need to secure international protection for the Palestinian people in the occupied Palestinian territories, to implement the Fourth Geneva Convention of 1949 and the Hague Treaty of 1907, to halt all Israel's terrorist and repressive practices against the Palestinian people and Palestinian detainees in the occupied Palestinian territories, to halt the expropriation and attempted transformation of Islamic and Christian properties and waqfs, to halt the continuing violations of Islamic and Christian holy places and to halt the excavations which endanger these shrines;

"6. Calls for continued support for the Palestine Liberation Organization so that it can face up to the next phase, and for its stands in the forthcoming negotiations, aimed at consolidating the transfer of power in the occupied Palestinian territories to the Palestinian National Authority, and firmly establishing its control over all occupied Palestinian territories, including the city of Al-Quds Al-Sharif, and appeals to the various nations in the world to extend their support and assistance to the Palestinian National Authority;

"7. Calls for a more effective participation of the United Nations in promoting the success of the peace process in the Middle East, and reaffirms the continued and constant responsibility of the United Nations vis-à-vis the Palestine question until a just and comprehensive solution to all its aspects is achieved securing an end to occupation and the exercise, by the Palestinian people, of their inalienable national rights;

"8. Warns the international opinion and Security Council against the gravity of Israel's behaviour as though it were excepted from abiding by the principles of international law and exempted from compliance with the norms of international legality, and urges the international community to compel Israel to desist from violating the principles of international legality and to implement the resolutions of the United Nations General Assembly and Security Council without delay or procrastination;

"9. Deplores the aggressive Israeli scheme to partition the Ibrahimi Mosque Enclosure in the occupied city of Al-Khalil, which aims at seizing and Judaizing most of it and building a Jewish temple on its site. It calls on the member States to continue their coordination and intensive efforts in the various international forums to prevent the implementation of this scheme and to preserve the Ibrahimi Enclosure as a sacred mosque for Muslims as it has been through the ages. It warns that any slackness in these efforts would encourage Israel to undermine the Blessed Al-Aqsa Mosque and other Islamic and Christian shrines, which would affect the peace process;

"10. Calls on the international community to work for the return of the international observers to the city of Al-Khalil in accordance with the Security Council resolution 904 (1994), and to oblige Israel to allow them to carry out their tasks;

"11. Invites member States to work within the framework of the United Nations and at the international institutions and forums for compelling Israel to release the detainees, bring back the deportees, put an end to the method of collective punishment, and desist from any works that would endanger life and the environment in the occupied Palestinian and Arab territories;

"12. Strongly condemns Israel's continuing occupation of southern Lebanon and western Bekaa as well as its continuing aggressions and repressive and military practices against Lebanese citizens and against the Palestinian refugees in the camps in Lebanon. It calls on the United Nations Security Council to take the necessary measures to halt these aggressions immediately and demands the immediate, complete and unconditional withdrawal of Israel from the Lebanese territory. It reiterates its attachment to the independence, sovereignty and territorial integrity of Lebanon within its internationally recognized borders, as well as the need for implementing the Security Council resolutions on Lebanon, particularly resolution 425 (1978). It expresses its appreciation of the achievements of the High-Level Arab Committee of the Three, and calls on the international community to contribute to the International Fund for the Reconstruction of Lebanon;

"13. Strongly condemns the policy of Israel in refusing to comply with Security Council resolution 497 (1981), and in imposing its jurisdiction, its laws and its administration on the occupied Syrian Golan, as well as Israel's policies of annexation, establishment of settlements, expropriation of lands, diversion of water resources and imposition of Israeli nationality on Syrian citizens. It considers that all those measures are null and void, and constitute a violation of the rules and principles of international law, relating to occupation and war and particularly the Fourth Geneva Convention of 1949. It demands the complete withdrawal of Israel from the entire Syrian Golan to the lines held on 4 June 1967;

"14. Calls on the international community and the Security Council to compel Israel to comply with United Nations resolutions, particularly Security Council resolution 487 (1981), to accede to the Treaty of the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons, to implement the resolutions of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) calling for the subjection of all Israeli Atomic facilities to the IAEA Comprehensive Safeguards System, to proclaim Israel's renunciation of nuclear armament, and to submit a full report on its stockpile of nuclear weapons and materials to the Security Council and the International Atomic Energy Agency as those steps are essential for the establishment of a free zone from weapons of mass destruction, and primarily nuclear weapons in the Middle East region, and fundamental factor for the establishment of a just and comprehensive peace in the region;

"15. Commends the efforts deployed by the Al-Quds Committee, under the Chairmanship of His Majesty King Hassan II of Morocco;

"16. Stresses the importance of continued joint Islamic efforts to preserve holy shrines in the occupied Palestinian territories and counter Israeli measures aiming at the Judaization of Al-Quds Al-Sharif and other holy places, within the framework of efforts to restore Al-Quds Al-Sharif to Arab Islamic sovereignty;

"17. Calls on Member States to honour their commitment to cover the approved budgets of the Al-Quds Fund and its Waqf set at one hundred million dollars each. It invites them to pay their contributions and appeals to them to continue the fund-rasing campaign at official and popular levels in favour of the Al-Quds Fund and its Waqf;

"18. Endorses the recommendations made by the thirteenth and fourteenth sessions of the Governing Board of the Al-Quds Fund;

"19. Expresses its appreciation to the United Nations, the Non-Aligned Movement, the Organization of African Unity, the United Nations Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People, and to all peoples and peace-loving forces for their support of the Palestinian question in the international forums, and their backing of the struggle and blessed intifadah of the Palestinian people. It calls on them to continue that support and assistance by all available means;

"20. Requests the Secretary-General to take necessary measures for continuing and strengthening contacts and coordination on the question of Palestine and the Arab-Israeli conflict between the Organization of Islamic Conference and the League of Arab States, the Organization of African Unity, the Non-Aligned Movement, the European Union, and the United Nations and its specialized agencies;

"21. Requests the Secretary-General to follow up the implementation of this resolution and to submit a report thereon to the next Islamic Conference of Foreign Ministers."




VIII. THE UNITED NATIONS EDUCATIONAL, SCIENTIFIC AND CULTURAL ORGANIZATION
SPONSORS OSLO CONCERT TO CELEBRATE FIRST ANNIVERSARY
OF ISRAELI-PALESTINIAN PEACE ACCORD

The following is based on a press release issued by the UNESCO Office of Public Information on 12 September 1994 (see OPI/NYO/94-9H):

"To celebrate the first anniversary of the signing of the historic Israeli-Palestinian peace agreement, UNESCO, the city of Oslo and the Norwegian Government organized a fund-raising concert which was held on 13 September 1994.

"The concert was dedicated to Johan Jorgen Holst, the late Minister for Foreign Affairs of Norway, who guided the secret talks between Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) that culminated in this historic accord. The concert's earnings would be used to support UNESCO's cultural activities in the new Palestinian autonomy.

"PLO Chairman Yasser Arafat, Israeli Foreign Minister Shimon Peres, Princess Martha Louise of Norway, UNESCO's Director-General Federico Mayor and other dignitaries attended the concert entitled `Salaam-Shalom', or peace in Arabic and Hebrew.

"UNESCO's cultural activities in Gaza and Jericho include plans to establish a Palestinian National Museum and projects to conserve monuments and historical sites. The Organization is also planning to help restore the old cities of Bethlehem, Hebron and Nablus. UNESCO in cooperation with the French Ministry of Culture will also provide its expertise to help set up a Palestinian Ministry of Culture."




IX. OTHER DOCUMENTATION ISSUED BY THE UNITED NATIONS


1. Report of the Special Committee to Investigate Israel Practices Affecting the Human Rights of the Palestinian People and other Arabs of the Occupied Territories (periodic report covering the period from 1 December 1993 to 31 March 1994 (A/49/172)

2. Report of the Commissioner-General of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA); 1 July 1993-30 June 1994 (A/49/13)

3. UNRWA: reports of the Secretary-General:

(a) Offers by Member States of grants and scholarships for higher education, including vocational training, for Palestine refugees (A/49/439);

(b) Palestine refugees in the Palestinian territory occupied by Israel since 1967 (A/49/440);

(c) Return of population and refugees displaced since 1967 (A/49/441);

(d) Protection of Palestine refugees (A/49/442);

(e) Protection of Palestinian students and educational institutions and safeguarding of the security of the facilities of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East in the occupied Palestinian territories (A/49/443);

(f) Revenues derived from Palestine refugees' properties (A/49/488);

(g) University of Jerusalem "Al-Quds" for Palestine refugees (A/49/505);

(h) Report of the United Nations Conciliation Commission for Palestine (A/49/509).




X. NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS: ACTIVITIES AND INFORMATION


1. Report on Israeli Settlement in the Occupied Territories, a bimonthly publication of the Foundation for Middle East Peace, is available from 555 13th Street, N.W., Suite 800, Washington, D.C. 20004-1109, United States of America (Fax 202 637 5910). The September 1994 issue includes articles on settlements remaining a key factor in negotiations, settlers and Rabin in rare agreement on negotiating strategy, PLO official saying no rationale exists for settlements, Gaza settlers adjusting to Palestinian autonomy and hidden security costs of settlements.

2. Washington Report on Middle East Affairs, vol. XIII, No. 3, September/October 1994, is available from the American Educational Trust, P.O. Box 53062, Washington, D.C. 20009, United States (Fax 202 232 6754). This issue includes articles on West Bank settlers riot, dispute over Jerusalem, Canada funding of Palestinian community's return to Gaza Strip, Israeli "ethnic cleansing" in Jerusalem, two views on the Washington Declaration, Yasser
Arafat's return, Palestinian territories in financial and legal limbo and UNRWA moving to Gaza.

3. The Other Front, a weekly bulletin on developments in Israeli society, is available from P.O. Box 19543, Jerusalem. Issue No. 288 of 5 September 1994 includes articles on Israel's demand for extradition, immigration and Palestinians inside Israel. Issue No. 289 of 12 September 1994 includes articles on Jerusalem, Rabin's proposal for withdrawal from the Golan Heights and demonstrations against destruction of homes in Jerusalem. Issue No. 290 of 25 September 1994 includes articles on the Declaration of Principles, Kiriat Arba and Palestinians inside Israel.

4. Human Rights Monitor, a quarterly publication of the "international service for human rights', is available from 1, Rue de Varembé, P.O. Box 16 CH-1211 Geneva 20 cic, Switzerland (Fax: 41 22 733 0826). Issue No. 24 of April 1994 includes comments on reports prepared by the United Nations Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices Affecting the Human Rights of the Palestinian People and Other Arabs of the Occupied Territories and that of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the Palestinian territories.

5. Kav La'Oved - Workers' Hotline for the Protection of Workers is available from 78 Allenby Street, Tel Aviv, Israel (Fax: 03 517 3081). The September 1994 issue contains an update on the employment of workers from the Occupied Territories in Israel, articles on proposed legislation for the implementation of the Gaza-Jericho Agreement, the rights of migrant workers, the operation of Kav La'Oved, Labour Court Journal, and the exploitation of Palestinian agricultural workers in Israeli Moshavim.

6. The Other Israel, a newsletter of the Council for Israeli-Palestinian Peace, available from: P.O. Box 2542, Holon, Israel 58125. The August/September issue (No. 62-63) is a collection of analytical commentaries on the peace process and the Declaration of Principles.

7. Middle East International, a biweekly publication, is available from P.O. Box 53365, Temple Heights Station, Washington, D.C. 20009, United States. Issue No. 483 of 9 September 1994 includes articles on the population issue and the Arab World, on Yitzhak Rabin and comments from Sir Anthony Parsons on the peace process and the role of the United Nations.

8. Focus on: The Transfer of Health Services to a Palestinian Authority, is available from The Association of Israeli-Palestinian Physicians for Human Rights (PHR), P.O. Box 10235, Tel Aviv, 61101, Israel. This report covers issues with regard to the transfer of health services to the Palestinian authority, the closure of the West Bank and Gaza Strip and its effects on health services for Palestinians, as well as a report on the 1993 activities of the PHR.

9. Une Terre Deux Peuples, a publication of the Association pour l'union entre les peuples juif et palestinien, is available from: C.P. 43, 1247 Anières, Geneva, Switzerland. The August/September 1994 issue includes articles on the annexation of the East Jerusalem, democracy and human rights in the new world order (lecture by Noam Chomsky), the Hebron massacre and the Shamgar Commission, the Palestinian refugees and the peace process, the closure of the Occupied Territories, meeting of Israeli, Palestinian and Swiss doctors in Geneva, protection of the rights of Palestinian workers and women's organizations for political prisoners.

10. SAMED - Palestinian Prison Voices, a bi-monthly newsletter of the Mandela Institute for Political Prisoners, is available from P.O. Box 19543, Jerusalem (Fax: 972 2 95 6468). Volume 13 of July/August 1994 includes articles on frustration over imprisonment, first Palestinian death in Palestinian custody, women in prison, prison visits, prisoners from 1948 and torture of a university student from Gaza.



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