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UNITED
NATIONS
A

        General Assembly
Distr.
GENERAL
A/46/13/Add.1
11 October 1991

Forty-sixth session
Official Records




REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF THE UNITED NATIONS
RELIEF AND WORKS AGENCY FOR PALESTINE REFUGEES IN THE NEAR EAST


Addendum


Financial situation of UNRWA in 1990 and 1991
and budget estimates for 1992-1993


1. The present addendum to the report of the Commissioner-General of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) to the General Assembly contains information on the financial results for 1990, an assessment of the current financial situation in 1991 and the Agency's budget estimates for the biennium 1992-1993. After approval by the General Assembly, the 1992-1993 biennial budget will be issued by the Commissioner-General as the operational budget of the Agency for the appropriation of funds in 1992-1993.

2. Direct assistance to the Palestine refugees is also provided by local Governments in the area of operations. Information on this assistance as provided by the Governments concerned is contained in annex I.

I. FINANCIAL RESULTS FOR 1990


3. The Agency's income to its General Fund amounted to $237.9 million in 1990. Out of this amount, the Agency re-allocated $4.6 million to fund a shortfall in income in Funded Ongoing Activities and $0.3 million to partially fund the emergency related programmes in Lebanon and the occupied territory, leaving the General Fund with a net income of $233.0 million. Total General Fund expenditure amounted to $229.9 million, thus the surplus of income over expenditure amounted to $3.1 million. After extraordinary adjustments, the Agency was able to increase the working capital reserve by an amount of $2.7 million in 1990. Currently this reserve amounts to $31.6 million, which is considered inadequate when measured against the size of the Agency's steadily growing operation and the manner in which it is funded. The Agency's financial position still needs strengthening.

4. Capital and special projects were budgeted at a level of $15.0 million for 1990; $3.9 million of this amount was funded by special contributions and $9.2 million from the General Fund.

II. FINANCIAL SITUATION IN 1991


5. The Agency's consolidated budget estimates for 1991 as presented to the General Assembly were $254.6 million. Of this amount, $226.5 million was for the General Fund, $14.1 million for funded ongoing activities and $14.0 million for capital and special projects.

6. At the time of preparing the present report, the Agency expects that total income will be sufficient to cover expenditure under the General Fund and funded ongoing activities, while the capital and special projects section of the budget has only been funded by external contributions up to an amount of $3.0 million. Because of the shortfall in external funding, it has been necessary to fund essential construction projects amounting to $5.7 million from internal resources leaving a shortfall in funding of $5.3 million (see annex II for the total of income actually pledged against the entire budget). The effect of the shortfall in income for capital and special projects is that much needed construction and renovation work on the Agency's education, health, relief and social service facilities will have to be delayed until additional funds are made available. This results in higher operating costs than would otherwise be necessary.

III. EMERGENCY OPERATIONS


7. Separate from the regular operations covered by the Agency's budget, UNRWA continued in 1990 to operate a supplementary budget to cover emergency operations in Lebanon, the West Bank and Gaza under the title, Extraordinary Measures in Lebanon and the Occupied Territory (EMLOT). Total expenditure in 1990 for these activities amounted to $33.5 million against total income of $19.4 million. The total 1991 EMLOT budget related to "core" emergency operations amounts to $41.6 million and includes activities for which the Agency is actively seeking special funding. In addition thereto, the Agency has received $4.3 million in contributions from external donors for activities and commodities which are not part of the "core" budget but for which allotments have also been made. EMLOT operations, which have been carried out for several years, are designed to address the needs created by the intifadah and the Israeli response to it as well as the deteriorating socio-economic conditions. With the intifadah continuing and socio-economic conditions more serious than ever, it seems certain that the services provided will still be required on an ongoing basis well beyond 1991. The total EMLOT budget for the 1992-1993 biennium is presently being fully reviewed by the Agency. It is expected that the cash portion of the budget, excluding in-kind food for displaced and needy refugees, will be less than its current level (adjusted to a biennial base), that is, less than $35 million for the next biennium.

8. Furthermore, the Agency is operating a second supplementary budget in 1991, the Expanded Programme of Assistance (ERA), comprising several projects aimed mainly at improving the infrastructure in the refugee camps in the West Bank and Gaza. The Agency is seeking total contributions of $65.0 million to cover this programme; to date $36.4 million has been contributed and pledged by various donors. Although the rate of receipt of new pledges has slowed considerably several projects are funded and implementation of these projects will continue in 1992-1993. Further funds that will be sought by the Agency will have an emphasis on income-generation and the programme may be extended to include the other three fields as well.

IV. GAZA HOSPITAL


9. Separate from the Agency's regular budget and emergency operations, UNRWA is currently engaged in fund raising and planning for the construction of a 200-bed general hospital in the Gaza Strip. The total cost of this project is estimated at $35.0 million of which $20.0 million represents construction and equipment and $15.0 million represents the running costs for three years. To date, contributions and confirmed pledges amounting to $3.6 million have been received towards the cost of this project. The Agency is reasonably optimistic that additional pledges for the balance of the construction and operating costs will also be forthcoming.

V. MEDIUM-TERM PLANNING PROCESS


10. The Agency's sixth annual review of the Medium-Term Plan has set out the Agency's programme plans and operational work plans for the biennium 1992-1993 with emphasis on the three substantive programmes - Education, Health and Relief and Social Services. The Medium-Term Plan has formed the basis for the policies that have been applied in the preparation of the 1992-1993 biennial budget. Previously the medium-term planning process operated on an independent cycle from the Agency's budgetary process. The Commissioner-General has recently decided that operational planning, based on longer-range strategic planning, will now be combined with the Agency's budgetary process. By combining both processes, a closer link will be forged between planning and the budgetary implementation of those plans as well as reducing the amount of work effort which results from having two separate processes. Long-term planning will be expanded to include a four-year time framework covering two biennia. The long-term plan will include a broad analysis of needs, priorities and Agency-wide goals and objectives for consideration by the General Cabinet and the Commissioner-General. The plan will also serve as a basis for biennial policy guidance.

VI. BUDGET ESTIMATES FOR THE BIENNIUM 1992-1993


11. Following the practice adopted in 1985, the Agency's proposed 1992-1993 biennial budget estimates are being submitted during the forty-sixth session of the General Assembly in the present addendum to the Commissioner-General's report. The budget estimates for the biennium 1992-1993 are subdivided into the following three sections: (1) General Fund; (2) funded ongoing activities; and (3) capital and special projects.

A. Background


12. The Agency's total regular budget for the biennium 1992-1993 as presented in the present addendum, amounts to $572.0 million compared to the 1991 approved budget of $254.6 million. The Agency's biennial budget for 1992-1993 was prepared on the basis of a 5 per cent compound growth rate on the 1991 approved budget base. It has for many years been the practice of the Agency to request from its donors an annual increase in their contributions in the order of 5 per cent. This rate of growth is explained as needed and regarded as sufficient under normal circumstances to meet an increasing demand on the Agency's services due to the natural growth of the refugee population and at the same time cover necessary salary and price increases. Based on a compound growth rate of 5 per cent, the 1992-1993 biennial budget should have amounted to $548.0 million; the actual budget as presented at $572.0 million is $24.0 million higher than this figure. The explanation for this increase is as follows:

(a) A provision for salary increases amounting to $15.0 million was originally included in the biennial budget within the 5 per cent compound growth rate. Because of a change in outlook relating to cost-of-living increases in the Near East, however, it was considered that this amount was no longer adequate for the 1992-1993 biennium; therefore the Commissioner-General authorised an additional increase of $15.0 million in this reserve;

(b) The in-kind portion of the 1992-1993 budget, which is mostly for the provision of basic commodities, is $9.0 million higher than planned because of an increase in the number of beneficiaries in the milk distribution programme and because of increases in commodity prices. In addition, the projected phasing out of the dry ration programme (which replaced the mid-day meal programme in 1991 as a transitional measure) is not proceeding at the pace originally envisaged. Thus the increase of $24.0 million over the 1992-1993 ceiling is due to the inclusion of additional salary reserves $15.0 million and additional in-kind commodities $9.0 million.

B. General Fund


13. The General Fund budget represents the minimum resources needed by the Agency to operate its major programmes and maintain its facilities. These recurrent costs for the education, health and relief and social services programmes of the Agency include costs for staff, consumable materials, transportation, contractual services, grants and subsidies. Each of these main programmes is described in greater detail in the sections that follow.

14. For 1992-1993 the General Fund budget estimates amount to $513.0 million of which $470.6 million represents cash expenditure and $42.4 million expenditure on donated food commodities and services. This is an increase of $60.1 million or 13.3 per cent over the approved General Fund budget for 1991 as adjusted to a biennial base. (See table 1, sect. A.) This increase is mainly accounted for by the cumulative growth factor and the inclusion of the additional items listed in paragraph 12 above.

15. Included in the General Fund budget for the 1992-1993 biennium is an amount of $3.8 million for the introduction of a new computerised finance and supply system. Implementation of this system commenced in 1991 and will be completed in 1994. The Agency is currently reviewing the project with a view to reducing the cost of implementation.

C. Funded ongoing activities


16. The Agency's ongoing activities as shown in annex III are expected to be fully funded in 1992-1993 by special contributions pledged by various donors. It is estimated that $30.3 million will be required for these activities in 1992-1993, an increase of $2.1 million or 7.5 per cent from 1991 (adjusted to a biennial base). This increase arising in the in-kind portion of the budget is entirely due to an expansion in the number of programme beneficiaries and increases in commodity prices (see table 1, sect. B).


D. Capital and special projects

17. Owing to financial constraints lasting for many years, UNRWA was not able to implement several needed construction projects. Therefore very many of its facilities are severely dilapidated and need to be replaced. Resources are required in 1992-1993 to construct schools, health clinics and other facilities to provide an acceptable standard of service to the Palestine refugees. If fully implemented, this construction programme would enable the Agency to run its programmes more efficiently and at lower cost in the future. At present only part of the $14.0 million requirement for 1991 has been funded. Therefore, if sufficient funds are not forthcoming before the end of this year, a number of these projects will be carried over into 1992-1993. (See table 1, sect. C.) If funds are not found to enable the Agency to build these much needed facilities, additional buildings will have to be rented which will increase the overall operating costs of the Agency.

Table 1. 1991 approved budget and 1992-1993 proposed biennial budget estimates

(Thousands of United States dollars)

            1991
        Approved budget
          1992-1993
        Proposed estimates
CashIn kindTotalCashIn kindTotal
A.General Fund
I. Education services
Elementary education 61 753 16 61 769135 375 32135 407
Preparatory education 38 576 26 38 602 90 567 54 90 621
Vocational and professional training 7 665 896 8 561 15 947 2 128 18 075
Other activities 5 474 796 6 270 10 921 1 834 12 755
    Total I
113 468 1 734115 202252 810 4 048256 858
II. Health services
Nutrition and supplementary feeding 2 615 2 615 1 813 1 813
Medical services 22 248 584 22 832 58 631 1 358 59 989
Environmental sanitation 7 338 275 7 613 16 286 610 16 896
    Total II
32 201 859 33 060 76 730 1 968 78 698
III. Relief and Social Services
Relief Services 7 84616 557 24 403 16 96238 200 55 162
Social Services 1 857 1 1 858 3 741 1 3 742
    Total III
9 70316 558 26 261 20 70338 201 58 904
IV. Operational services
Supply and transport services 13 812 994 14 806 31 228(2 014) 29 214
Architectural and engineering services 5 470 5 470 11 904 11 904
Production and self-supporting units 17 17
    Total IV
19 282 994 20 276 43 149(2 014) 41 135
V. Common Services
General management 12 994 12 994 30 450 166 30 616
Administrative services 18 660 - 18 660 46 778 0 46 778
    Total V
31 654 0 31 654 77 228 166 77 394
    Total, General Fund
206 30820 145226 453470 62042 369512 989
B.Funded ongoing activities
Education services 4 452 123 4 575 9 087 243 9 330
Health services 1 033 8 221 9 254 40819 587 19 995
Relief and social services 244 1 245 924 6 930
Common services 4 4 0
    Total, Funded ongoing activities
5 733 8 345 14 07810 42519 836 30 261
C.Capital and special projects
Education services 8 114 8 11417 321 17 321
Health services 1 506 1 506 4 105 4 105
Relief and social services 1 501 1 501 2 691 2 691
Operational services 405 405 1 901 1 901
Common services 2 501 2 501 2 737 2 737
    Total, Capital and special projects
14 027 14 02728 755 0 28 755
    Grand total
226 06828 490254 558509 80062 205572 005

Table 2. Summary of Programme and service of the 1991 approved
budget and 1992-1993 proposed biennial budget estimates

1991
Approved budget
1992-1993
Proposed estimates
CashIn kindTotalCashIn kindTotal
Education services126 034 1 857127 891(50.2%)279 218 4 291283 509(49.6%)
Health services 34 740 9 080 43 820(17.2%) 81 24321 555102 798(18.0%)
Relief and social services 11 44816 559 28 007(11.0%) 24 31838 207 62 525(10.9%)
Operation services 19 687 994 20 681 (8.2%) 45 050(2 014) 43 036 (7.5%)
Common services 34 159 - 34 159(13.4%) 79 971 166 80 137(14.0%)*
Total226 06828 490254 558509 80062 205572 005
* Unadjusted. Please refer to annex IV for an analysis of common services costs against total costs.

E. Staffing

18. Staff costs make up a large part of the Agency's operational budget as shown in table 3, parts I, II and IV. These costs are carefully controlled and monitored throughout the operational year. The planning assumptions for the 1992-1993 budget were: (a) to allow an increase in the education, health and relief and social services programmes to meet additional requirements due to the growth in population; (b) to increase staffing in the health and relief and social services programmes aimed at slightly improving the level of services provided by these programmes to the refugee population and (c) to allow a limited increase in staffing levels in operational and common services to cope with the increasing demands for programme support. Table 4 contains the staffing table of the Agency. It indicates the source of funding (United Nations-funded, UNRWA-funded and loaned staff) and shows the total number of staff employed. Efforts to improve the productivity of staff are continuing through the Agency-wide training programmes and the introduction of improved equipment and facilities.

Table 3. Summary of the regular and extrabudgetary
estimates classified by expenditure groups
(Thousands of United States dollars)
I.United Nations-funded staff costs
International 8 075 20 605
II.UNRWA-funded staff costs
International 1 406 6 108
Locally recruited157 616350 002
      Subtotal
159 022356 110
III.Other costs
General stores 10 458 18 668
Medical supplies 3 241 10 581
Automotive supplies 1 556 3 531
Basic commodities (fresh food) 934 1 909
Rent 1 080 2 324
Utilities 1 614 4 250
Construction 1 477 2 028
Maintenance of premises and equipment 3 616 7 477
Equipment 4 884 10 107
Subsidies 4 093 8 152
Hospitalization 3 019 13 398
Reserves (mainly operational reserves) 1 914 3 003
Travel 2 530 4 594
Communications 689 1 877
Training 706 1 348
Hire of transport 954 2 609
Port and customs fees 1 457 2 983
Insurance 215 525
Miscellaneous services 4 934 11 172
Contras and miscellaneous income (4 427) 6 205)
      Subtotal
44 944104 331
IV.Supplies and services in kind
International staff costs 2 200 5 393
Basic commodities 26 042 56 138
Rent 74 310
Utilities 152 306
Miscellaneous services 22 57
      Subtotal
28 490 62 204
      Total I to IV
240 531543 250
V.Capital and special projects 14 027 28 755
      Grand total
254 558
=======
572 005
=======
Table 4. Staff posts by grade

Established posts
United Nations
    Established posts
    UNRWA's budget
    Posts provided by
    UNESCO and WHO
    Grand total
    1991
1992-1993
    1991
1992-1993
    1991
1992-1993
    1991
1992-1993
Professional and above
USG
    1
    1
    -
    -
    -
    -
      1
    1
ASG
    1
    1
    -
    -
    -
    -
      1
    1
D-2
    1
    1
    1
    1
    2
    2
      4
    4
D-1
    10
    10
    -
    -
    -
    -
    10
    10
P-5
    16
    16
    5
    5
    8
    8
    29
    29
P-4
    36
    38
    9
    16
    10
    10
    55
    564
P-3
    15
    16
    3
    4
    -
    -
    18
    20
P-2/1
    2
    2
    5
    4
    -
    -
      7
    6
Subtotal
    82
    85
    23
    30
    20
    20
    125
    135
General Service
Other services
    10
    10
    -
    1
    -
    -
    10
    11
Subtotal
    10
    10
    -
    1
    -
    -
    10
    11
Area staff
G-18
    20
    16
    20
    16
    17
    15
    16
    15
    16
    16
    92
    106
    92
    106
    15
    125
    130
    125
    130
    14
    251
    284
    251
    284
    13
    79
    75
    79
    75
    12
    392
    414
    392
    414
    11
    234
    235
    234
    235
    10
2 6072 658
    2 607
2 658
    9
2 1192 162
    2 119
2 162
    8
5 1275 929
    5 127
5 929
    7
1 4621 502
    1 462
1 502
    6
1 4561 713
    1 456
1 713
    5
    724
    789
    724
    789
    4
    308
    310
    308
    310
    3
    169
    171
    169
    171
    2
    408
    402
    408
    402
    1
    ___
    ___
2 7512 820
    ___
    ___
    2 751
2 820
Subtotal
    -
    -
18 33919 732
    20
    20
18 33919 732
Grand total
    92
    95
18 36219 763
    20
    20
18 47419 878

19. The total number of international posts show a net increase by 11 from 135 in 1991 to 146 in 1992-1993. This increase is detailed as follows: 3 P-3 posts of Engineer (to plan and supervise the Agency's construction programme); 2 P-4 posts of Development and Planning Officer in the occupied territory (to supervise our expanded programmes); 3 P-4 posts of Deputy Division Chief at Headquarters (to be effected through the conversion of 3 senior area staff posts, grade 18); 1 P-3 post of Communications Officer (to supervise the Agency's radio network) and 1 P-4 post of Legal Officer and 1 GS post of Secretary in the United Nations Administrative Tribunal, funded by UNRWA (established at the request of the Tribunal because of the expected increase in casework arising from the admission for the first time of potential appeals from the Agency's 19,732 area staff to the Tribunal). Table 5 shows an analysis of the increase in international staff by programme by field.

20. The total number of regular budget area staff posts in the Agency in 1991 is 18,339. It is planned that this number will increase by 1,393 posts to a total of 19,732 posts in 1992-1993. This represents an increase of 7.6 per cent over two years or 3.7 per cent per year. A vast majority, that is, 1,035 of the new posts are teacher posts; 565 of those directly relate to the implementation of the tenth year of the education cycle in Jordan and the West Bank and 166 posts directly relate to the enhanced curriculum introduced in schools in Jordan and the West Bank. Remaining additional teacher posts are required to meet the natural growth in the school population. The significant increases for Jordan and West Bank are reflected in table 6 which shows the increase in posts by programme by field. Table 7 shows an analysis of the area staff posts by major occupational category.


Table 5. Analysis of the increase in international staff posts by programme by field*

ProgrammeGazaLebanonSyrian Arab RepublicJordanWest
Bank
Head-
quarters
Total
1. Education programme
    Total 1991 posts
1414
    Additional posts
0
Total 1992-1993 posts0000066
Percentage increase0.0%0.0%0.0%0.0%0.0%0.0%0.0%
2. Health programme
    Total 1991 posts
66
    Additional
    posts
0
Total 1992-1993 posts0000066
Percentage increase0.0%0.0%0.0%0.0%0.0%0.0%0.0%
3. Relief and social services programme
    Total 1991 posts
111249
    Additional
    posts
11
Total 1992-1993 posts10112510
Percentage increase0.0%0.0%0.0%0.0%0.0%25.0%11.1%
4. Operational services
    Total 1991 posts
13213818
    Additional
    posts
1113
Total 1992-1993 posts23224821
Percentage
increase
100.0%0.0%0.0%100.0%33.3%0.0%16.7%
5. Common services
    Total 1991 posts
644566388
    Additional
    posts
1157
Total 1992-1993 posts744576895
Percentage increase16.7%0.0%0.0%0.0%16.7%7.9%8.0%
6. All programmes and services
    Total 1991 posts
87771195135
    Additional
    posts
212611
Total 1992-1993 posts1077813101146
Percentage increase25.0%0.0%0.0%14.3%18.2%6.3%8.1%
*See para. 19.



Table 6. Analysis of the increase in area staff posts by programme by field

ProgrammeGazaLebanonSyrian Arab RepublicJordanWest
Bank
Head-
quarters
Total
1. Education programme
    Total 1991 posts
3 1391 4811 9844 5071 8386813 017
    Additional
    posts
82494664727411 099 a/
Total 1992-1993 posts3 2211 5302 0305 1542 1126914 116
Percentage increase2.6%3.3%2.3%14.4%14.9%1.5%8.4%
2. Health programme
    Total 1991 posts
744513377755567162 972
    Additional
    posts
55352863482231
Total 1992-1993 posts799548405818615183 203
Percentage increase7.4%6.8%7.4%8.3%8.5%12.5%7.8%
3. Relief and social services programme
    Total 1991 posts
188908212911710616
    Additional
    posts
97467(1)32
Total 1992-1993 posts197978641351249648
Percentage increase4.8%7.8%4.9%4.7%6.0%-10.0%5.2%
4. Operational services
    Total 1991 posts
20118012911514347815
    Additional
    posts
94257027
Total 1992-1993 posts21018413112015047842
Percentage increase4.5%2.2%1.6%4.3%4.9%0.0%3.3%
5. Common services
    Total 1991 posts
131168113151198158919
    Additional
    posts
14100(2)4
Total 1992-1993 posts132172114151198156923
Percentage increase0.8%2.4%0.9%0.0%0.0%-1.3%0.4%
6. All programmes and services
    Total 1991 posts
4 4032 4322 6855 6572 86329918 339
    Additional
    posts
156998172133601 393
Total 1992-1993 posts4 5592 5312 7666 3783 19929919 732
Percentage increase3.5%4.1%3.0%12.7%11.7%0.0%7.6%
Table 7. Analysis of area staff posts by major occupational category

Occupational categories19911992-1993Increase
Teachers10 90211 9371 035
Instructors53955314
School attendants7998089
Doctors/dentists20725043
Nurses/hygienists53758245
Assistant pharmacists1141206
Midwives12213614
Laboratory technicians/helpers12617448
Sanitation labourers1 1001 15151
Engineers57614
Drivers31432915
Welfare workers14416824
Manual labourers
    Cleaners
41042010
    General labourers
1801811
    Kitchen workers
1411432
    Messengers
6363-
    Food distributors
3535-
    Cooks
4545-
    Laundry workers
2727-
    Guards
3091 2103091 223 -13
Office clerks48549611
Typists/secretaries2422464
Education administration posts28632337
Health administration posts314314-
Relief administration posts104103(1)
Operational services administration posts4545-
Common services administration posts236233(3)
Other miscellaneous posts a/456480 24
18 33919 7321 393
F. Non-staff costs

21. As shown in table 3, parts III and IV, expenditure on non-staff costs in 1992-1993 under the General Fund and funded ongoing activities is $161.1 million, compared to $71.2 million in 1991. Expenditure on medical supplies and hospitalization has increased because of an expansion of the Agency's programmes.

VII. PROGRAMMES AND SERVICES

22. UNRWA is currently operating three regular substantive programmes providing direct services to the Palestine refugees. These programmes are (a) education, (b) health and (c) relief and social services. In addition, UNRWA provides operational and common services in support of the substantive programmes, which are at times also referred to as services.

23. In 1992-1993 the education programme accounts for 49.6 per cent of the total budget, while the health programme represents 18.0 per cent, the relief and social services programme 10.9 per cent, operational services 7.5 per cent and common services 14.0 per cent. Each of the programmes and services is described below.

24. The Agency's largest programme consists of the basic cycle of elementary and preparatory education for refugee children which accounts for 85 per cent of total education expenditure. The refugee population growth rate, about 3 per cent per year, requires substantial increases in the teaching staff and new classrooms to keep pace with the school population which will grow from 366,000 pupils in 1990-1991 to 400,000 at the end of the 1992-1993 biennium. The proposed budget provides for 1,035 new teaching positions over the two year period, including teachers for an expansion of the basic education cycle in Jordan and the West Bank from nine to ten years and an expansion of the required curriculum to meet new government standards of Jordan. In addition to refugee children enrolled in UNRWA-operated schools, there are almost 8,600 students in Lebanon who will receive small subsidies from the Agency while attending government or private schools.

25. UNRWA schools continue to operate on a very economical basis with an average student-teacher ratio of 38:1 at the elementary level and 28:1 at the preparatory level. The annual cost per student enrolled is also very low by regional as well as international standards averaging about $250 per student for elementary and $350 per student for the preparatory level. The cost per pupil varies between each field because of differences in salary scales, class occupancy rates, the extent of double shifting and the amount of funds included in each field's budget for school construction. Of the 11,583 staff members serving in Agency's elementary and preparatory schools (1990-1991), about 92 per cent are involved directly in classroom teaching duties.

26. An area of major concern is the heavy reliance on double shifts in many of the elementary and preparatory schools and the seriously overcrowded conditions in most schools. Almost three quarters of UNRWA schools operate two shifts. The accelerating growth of the school-age refugee population, particularly in Gaza, the West Bank and Jordan is outpacing the Agency's ability to obtain funding for new classroom construction. In the 1992-1993 biennium, $1.6 million is allocated for the construction of 58 additional classrooms which provide only for the increased school population with no reduction in the number of double shift schools.

Table 8. Education programme

(Thousands of United States dollars)

GazaLebanonSyrian Arab RepublicJordanWest BankHeadquartersTotal
1990 expenditure33 96411 93821 65334 55519 4092 979124 498
1991 approved budget33 76110 46920 79636 55318 3068 006127 891
1992-1993 proposed budget70 34324 17441 33576 91542 20828 534283 509
Number of students:
    1991-1992
98 79235 29859 422140 25643 005-376 773
    1992-1993
99 93336 01560 658153 90343 666-394 175
    1993-1994
101 35736 86567 850 157 50547 639-405 216
Number of area staff:
    1991
3 1391 4811 9844 5071 8386813 017
    1992-1993
3 2211 5302 0305 1542 1126914 116

27. The quality of education provided in Agency schools is monitored closely through regular examinations. Over the last decade success rates for UNRWA students in host country-referenced examinations have been very high. Standardized tests in selected subjects such as mathematics and reading ability will be introduced in all fields during the 1992-1993 biennium to ensure that a consistent level of achievement is met within Agency-operated schools. Of special concern, however, is the impact on students in Gaza, the West Bank and Lebanon of school closures and disruptions, particularly in the crucial elementary grades. Special measures have been taken to provide self-learning materials although these activities can compensate only partially for lost classroom time. More attention is being given to the need for additional compensatory programmes.

28. Vocational and technical training is being provided to refugee students in eight training centres located in Gaza, the West Bank (3), Jordan (2), the Syrian Arab Republic, and Lebanon. Enrolment for the 1992-1993 biennium will increase to approximately 4,700 students, about 20 per cent of which are women. Traditionally, many graduates of UNRWA vocational training courses found employment in the Gulf region but opportunities have been reduced sharply following the Gulf war. The selection of courses offered is being re-examined to give more emphasis to the employment market in the five fields of operation and to make greater use of UNRWA vocational training capabilities to support local income generation projects sponsored by the Agency.

29. In addition to its regular elementary, preparatory and vocational programmes, UNRWA also offers pro-service training for 850 teacher trainees and a small higher education scholarship programme for students of outstanding academic potential.

30. Estimated costs for the education programme amount to $283.5 million in 1992-1993, an increase of $27.7 million or 10.8 per cent over the 1991 base (doubled to adjust to a biennial base). The increase in the budget at Headquarters is due to the inclusion of a provision for increased staff costs Agency wide.

31. The aim of the Health programme is to provide essential health services to eligible Palestine refugees on a level consistent with the public health programmes of host Governments for their own population. These services comprise medical care (both preventive and curative), environmental health in refugee camps and a nutrition and supplementary feeding subprogramme.

32. The UNRWA Health Department employs 2,972 professional and auxiliary health staff in 1991, including 207 doctors and dentists, 659 nurses, hygienists and midwives, and 240 paramedical staff to deliver primary health care services to some 2 million Palestine refugees eligible for health services.


Table 9. Health programme

(Thousands of United States dollars)

GazaLebanonSyrian Arab RepublicJordanWest BankHeadquartersTotal
1990 expenditure11 4127 7357 8238 49310 8921 51947 874
1991 approved budget11 8625 5766 2748 9208 5962 59243 820
1992-1993 proposed budget24 80914 92512 89518 69723 6687 804102 798
Number of beneficiaries:
    1991
528 684310 585289 923960 212430 083-2 519 487
    1992-1993
560 882329 499307 5791 018 688456 275-2 672 923
Number of area staff:
    1991
744513377755567162 972
    1992-1993
799548405818615183 203

33. Medical care services, by far the largest subprogramme, provides curative and preventive medical care services including maternal and child health care. These services are operated through the Agency's own facilities comprising 113 health centres, 45 dental clinics, 44 laboratories and 103 specialised clinics for control of non-communicable diseases such as cardiovascular and ophthalmic diseases, diabetes and hypertension. Hospital services are provided through 619 subsidised beds in private hospitals and in one hospital with 36 beds run by the Agency.

34. Most of the 1992-1993 budget will continue support for current services. Additional priorities for the 1992-1993 biennium are: reducing reliance on costly contractual agreements by upgrading and expanding the Agency's own diagnostic and treatment facilities; improving professional training for Health Department staff and implementing strategies to address specific health problems such as growth-retarded children, iron-deficiency anaemia and diabetes. The management of health centres is also receiving more emphasis. Patient flow analysis studies are being completed in all fields to reduce waiting time, provide more time for consultations and to make better use of staff. All health centres are being monitored regularly to ensure that standards of cleanliness, patient scheduling and other management requirements are being met.

35. The rising cost of hospitalisation is a major concern. In 1990 about 25 per cent of the Health Department's cash budget was spent on hospitalisation. The strategy for 1992-1993 will be to maintain hospital expenditure in each year at a maximum not to exceed $7.0 million per annum. In addition to reducing costs for contractual laboratory and diagnostic services, a review of practices among doctors in making hospital referrals is also being undertaken. The shortage of hospital beds is particularly acute in Gaza which has a very low ratio of only 1.2 beds per 1,000 population (including government hospitals which are inaccessible to the uninsured because of the unaffordable cost). The Health Department is proceeding with plans to begin construction of a 200-bed general hospital in Gaza financed by special donations.

36. Environmental health services are provided by UNRWA to about 882,000 refugees residing in 58 camps, in cooperation with the host Governments and local municipalities. The programme includes potable water to meet domestic needs and collection and disposal of refuse and liquid wastes.

37. Overcrowding is a problem of growing concern. The refugee camp population increased by about 75 per cent over the past 20 years from 492,000 in December 1970 to 856,000 in December 1990. The problems associated with inadequate refuse collection systems, treatment and disposal of effluent and the quality, quantity and distribution of potable water are becoming further aggravated with the growth in population, especially in the occupied territory and Lebanon. UNRWA has been able to make some modest improvements but the long-term needs far exceed the financial resources available.

38. For 1992-1993, about $0.4 million will be allocated from the regular budget for environmental health improvements in Lebanon, Gaza and the West Bank. In addition, the expanded programme of assistance (EPA) has received donations of about $1.9 million for specific projects to improve the environmental health infrastructure in Gaza and the West Bank.

39. The nutrition and supplementary feeding subprogramme protects and promotes the nutritional status of the most vulnerable groups of Palestine refugees consisting of children (6-36 months), pregnant women, nursing mothers and tuberculosis out-patients.

40. The 1990 UNRWA nutrition survey confirmed that, by comparison with 15 years ago, most refugee children no longer suffer from protein energy malnutrition, except in the Syrian Arab Republic where there is a residual problem of moderate not grave severity. There remains however, a serious problem of iron deficiency anaemia affecting children under three years and women of reproductive age. As a result of the 1990 survey, a new strategy was adopted which included: termination of the old midday meal programme as at 1 January 1991 and replacing it with food supplements in the form of dry rations for a transitional period of three years; converting old feeding centres into special care clinics for growth-retarded children and maintaining other components of the programme relating to the management of anaemia.

41. The programme for 1992-1993, although reduced, will continue to protect and promote the nutritional status of vulnerable groups of Palestine refugees by distributing milk rations to some 113,000 children (6-36 months) and dry rations to about 57,000 pregnant women, nursing mothers and tuberculosis out-patients.

42. Estimated costs for the health programme amount to $102.8 million in 1992-1993, which is an increase of $15.2 million or 17.3 per cent over the 1991 base (doubled to adjust to a biennial base). The increase in the budget at Headquarters is due to the inclusion of a provision for increased staff costs Agency wide.

43. The objectives of the relief and social services programme include providing needy refugees with assistance to maintain a minimum standard of living and promoting self-reliance. Out of the total budget, for this programme, 90 per cent is allocated for the relief services subprogramme, including commodities for distribution to the needy valued at $38.1 million in 1992-1993. In addition, a number of Governments provide special contributions to support projects serving especially vulnerable groups such as widows, the aged and the physically disabled.

44. A major concern for UNRWA is the deteriorating economic conditions in four of the five fields of operation. Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza have suffered 20 years of economic stagnation and further decline as a result of the Israeli response to the intifadah. During the intifadah the per capita income has reduced by about 50 per cent in the occupied territory, bringing it down to about $800 per annum. Jordan has suffered a two-year economic crisis resulting in a 30 per cent decline in its standard of living; the Gulf war caused further damage to the economy. Finally in Lebanon, 17 years of civil war has brought severe economic and social hardship to the refugee community.

45. Some 616 professional and auxiliary staff are assigned to the relief and social services programme in 1991, including welfare workers, instructors and distribution team members. Services are delivered through the Agency's own facilities comprising 93 food distribution centres, 62 women's programme centres, 17 youth activities centres and 8 community-based rehabilitation centres for the disabled.

Table 10. Relief and social services programme

(Thousands of United States dollars)

GazaLebanonSyrian Arab RepublicJordanWest BankHeadquartersTotal
1990 expenditure8 0265 9452 7565 1534 35178027 011
1991 approved budget7 8255 9382 9965 2834 7521 21328 007
1992-1993 proposed budget17 44613 0206 55011 52510 3493 63562 525
Number of beneficiaries:
    Regular category refugees
    1991
370 050267 923260 014881 147337 564-2 116 698
    1992-1993
399 938282 586275 421937 715360 350-2 256 010
    Special hardship cases:
    1991
50 99338 85115 15829 71826 855-161 575
    1992-1993
56 22042 83316 71132 76429 608-178 136
Number of area staff:
    1991
188908212911710616
    1992-1993
19797861351249648

46. The relief services subprogramme provides the basic requirements for food, shelter, clothing and other necessities for survival for more than 37,000 needy Palestinian refugee families (162,000 persons) classified as special hardship cases (SHCs). The percentage of such persons to the total number of registered refugees has risen steadily in most fields over the past five years and in 1990 was about 7 per cent of the total eligible refugee population. In Lebanon and Gaza, the percentage of total population was 13 per cent and 12 per cent respectively. Based on current trends and conditions, the biennium budget anticipates a 5 per cent increase in the number of SHCs in 1992-1993. A programme for the rehabilitation of shelters of SHCs will continue in 1992-1993 based on the findings of the 1991 survey of living conditions of SHC families. In the West Bank and Gaza, the improvements are being financed through the expanded programme of assistance.

47. The social services subprogramme is operated with particular emphasis on women in developments rehabilitation of the disabled and developmental social services for SHCs, including self-help income-generation projects. Welfare workers represent the front line of this effort and the number of welfare workers employed in 1991 was 144 or about one worker for every 257 SHC families. During the 1992-1993 biennium, the number of social workers will increase by 24 additional posts Agency wide to reduce this very high ratio.

46. According to UNRWA registration records, 17 per cent of the heads of refugee families are women; in the SHC category the percentage of women may be higher. The UNRWA women's programme has three objectives: developing income-earning capacity, providing support in coping with family problems and facilitating participation in decisions on services and community projects. The multipurpose Women's Programme Centres serve as a focal point for the Agency's work. Thanks to continued financial support, several projects will be carried out during the biennium to further develop the self-reliance of women refugees.

49. Income-generation schemes will be expanded significantly in 1992-1993. UNRWA aims at raising funds over the next five years to an amount of $20 million in order to expand both the range and volume of income-generation activities. This expansion will be funded outside the regular budget under EPA. The programme will target Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza where economic conditions are particularly poor but Jordan, the Syrian Arab Republic, and Lebanon will also be included. A grant-based scheme will target SHCs with the object of reducing their dependence on welfare assistance and a loan-based scheme using a revolving loan fund will make small and medium-size loans at very favourable interest rates to refugees in need of capital to start or expand a business. During the 1992-1993 biennium, the income generation scheme will assist an estimated 2,700 families at a level of $6.0 million. Subject to the receipt of donations, the activity in subsequent years will increase as the programme expands further in the 1994-1995 biennium.

50. Estimated costs for the relief and social services programme amount to $62.5 million for 1992-1993, an increase of $6.5 million or 11.6 per cent over the 1991 base (doubled to adjust to a biennial base). The increase in the budget at Headquarters is due to the inclusion of a provision for increased staff costs Agency wide.

51. The three substantive programmes of the Agency are supported by a supply and transport operation and an architectural and civil engineering services group. The supply and transport operation provides procurement, warehousing, freight and passenger transport services in all the areas of operation. In 1991, 110,000 tons of basic commodities and 6,800 tons of general cargo are being handled through a network of central and satellite warehouses for final distribution to the beneficiaries of the Agency's programmes. The Agency's fleet of vehicles is used to transport commodities and general stores, for garbage collection, water distribution, sewage clearance services and for the transport services required by the education, health, relief and social services. In total, the Agency has a fleet of 682 vehicles. All of these vehicles are maintained by the Agency's vehicle maintenance staff. The proposed budget for the supply and transport operation in 1992-1993 is $29.5 million, an increase of $0.1 million or 0.3 per cent over 1991 (doubled to adjust to a biennial base).

52. The architectural and civil engineering group is responsible for the design of all new Agency facilities and for the maintenance of existing Agency premises. In 1991 the staff are working on the design of buildings to the value of $10.0 million, supervising construction worth $25.1 million and implementing a maintenance programme of $7.7 million. The budget estimate for architectural and civil engineering services in 1992-1993 is $13.5 million, an increase of $1.7 million or 14.4 per cent over 1991 (doubled to adjust to a biennial base). The increase is due to planned additional expenditure on the maintenance of Agency premises ($1.2 million) and increased staff costs. The increase in the support costs associated with the construction of new facilities is, in most cases, recovered as a direct charge to the construction funds.

53. Common services support all programmes run by the Agency and cover two distinct areas: general management and administrative services. General management consists of the office of the Commissioner-General and Deputy Commissioner-General, the office of the Coordinator of Operations, External Relations, Public Information, Internal Audit, Provident Fund Secretariat and Programme Planning and Evaluation Office, the Department of Legal Affairs and the Office of the Director in each field. Administrative Services include finance, personnel and information systems functions.

Table 11. Operational services

(Thousands of United States dollars)

GazaLebanonSyrian Arab RepublicJordanWest BankHeadquartersTotal
1990 expenditure2 3792 0382 8321 8363 04910 06822 202
1991 approved budget2 9431 7393 0872 6064 1166 19020 681
1992-1993 proposed budget5 9104 2396 5694 9519 08412 28343 036
Number of area staff:
    1991
20118012911514347815
    1992-1993
21018413112015047842
Table 12. Common services

(Thousands of United States dollars)

GazaLebanonSyrian Arab RepublicJordanWest BankHeadquartersTotal
1990 expenditure2 1721 9372 0572 1892 93117 92429 210
1991 approved budget2 8571 8812 0092 2293 31721 86634 159
1992-1993 proposed budget6 3825 1564 6575 8857 63450 42380 137
Number of area staff:
    1991
131168113151198158919
    1992-1993
132172114151198156923

54. The proposed budget for common services in 1992-1993 is $80.1 million, an increase of $11.8 million or 17.3 per cent over 1991 (doubled to adjust to a biennial base). The explanation for this increase is as follows:


Thousands of
United States dollar
A net increase in posts:
      - 4 area staff posts
100
      - 7 international posts (2 development and planning officers, 1 legal officer and 1 secretary, 1 communications officer plus 2 deputy division chiefs at Headquarters; the latter ones converted from area staff posts)
1 300
Area staff cost increases
5 300
Accelerated implementation of a new information system
1 300
Increase in communication costs
900
Increase in the cost of services provided by the Vienna International Centre (an earlier underbudgeted item)
900
Increases in various reserves which will be distributed to the substantive programmes in the course of 1992-1993
5 800
Reductions in other budget items under common services
(3 800)
      Total increase
11 800
Table 13. All programmes and services

(Thousands of United States dollars)

GazaLebanonSyrian Arab RepublicJordanWest BankHeadquartersTotal
1990 expenditure57 95329 59337 12152 22640 63233 270250 795
1991 approved budget59 24825 60335 16255 59139 08739 867254 558
1992-1993 proposed budget124 89061 51472 006117 97392 943102 679572 005
Number of area staff:
    1991
4 4032 4322 6855 6572 86329918 339
    1992-1993
4 5592 5312 7666 3783 19929919 732
VIII. FINANCING THE 1992-1993 BIENNIAL BUDGET

56. The cash and in-kind income required to finance the 1992-1993 biennial budget is shown in the following table.


Cash
In kind
Total
(Millions of United States dollars)
A. General Fund
470.6
42.4
513.0
B. Funded ongoing activities
10.4
19.8
30.2
C. Capital and special projects
28.8
-
28.8
        Total
509.8
62.2
572.0


57. Apart from its limited working capital, UNRWA has no other financial reserves on which to draw to finance the 1992-1993 biennial budget. Funding of the Agency's programmes in 1992-1993 will depend on the contributions received from donors. These contributions are normally made to the Agency in two forms: cash and in kind, the latter in most cases are donations of basic commodities and services.

A. Cash requirements

58. To continue its education, health, relief and social services, UNRWA will need $470.6 million in cash for its General Fund. Continuing support of about $10.4 million is anticipated for the specially funded ongoing activities, which is at the same level as in 1991. In addition to the above cash resources, a further $28.8 million will be needed for capital and special projects. Special donations will be sought for these projects.

B. In-kind requirements

59. The in-kind requirements for 1992-1993 are estimated to be $62.2 million. It has become customary for some donors to make in-kind contributions of basic commodities and services to UNRWA and it is anticipated that these contributions will continue to be adequate in 1992-1993.


ANNEX I


Direct government assistance to Palestine refugees a/

(1 July 1990-30 June 1991)


Note. All data in the table below is shown as reported by the Governments concerned and cannot be verified by UNRWA. Amounts are expressed in United States dollars computed by applying the United Nations operational rates of exchange applicable at the time the data is received.


EgyptIsraelJordanLebanon b/Syrian Arab Republic
Education services140 000 00011 830 00057 894 73728 561 682
Social welfare services)
)8 000 000
)
1 580 0003 007 5191 462 100
Medical services7 090 00016 124 8121 165 464
Housing and public services)
)
)
)295 000 000 c/
)
)
)
1 380 0005 413 5345 154 139
Security services-5 263 1583 098 140
Administrative and other services3 780 00016 842 10530 374 113
    Total
443 000 00025 660 000104 545 86569 815 638
a/ This assistance was rendered directly to the refugees, in addition to contributions to UNRWA (see annex II).

b/ Figures not received.

c/ Figure includes housing and public services, security, administrative and other services.


ANNEX II


Contributions pledged (or otherwise estimated based on
earlier contributions) for the 1991 regular budget
(General Fund, funded ongoing activities, capital
and special projects) as at 30 June 1991

(United States dollars)



    Contributors
Cash
In kind
Total
    I. Contributions from Governments
    Australia
1 954 250
-
1 954 250
    Austria
366 500
-
366 500
    Bahrain
15 000
-
15 000
    Barbados
1 000
-
1 000
    Belgium
540 541
2 544 597
3 085 138
    Brunei Darussalam
10 000
-
10 000
    Canada
9 626 383
-
9 626 383
    Chile
5 000
-
5 000
    China
60 000
-
60 000
    Colombia
1 828
-
1 828
    Cyprus
2 245
-
2 245
    Denmark
4 248 383
-
4 248 383
    Egypt
3 003
-
3 003
    Finland
4 979 253
-
4 979 253
    France
2 049 558
310
2 049 868
    Germany
5 981 297
-
5 981 297
    Greece
80 000
-
80 000
    Holy See
20 000
-
20 000
    Iceland
10 000
-
10 000
    India
10 714
-
10 714
    Indonesia
8 000
-
8 000
    Iran (Islamic Republic of)
30 000
-
30 000
    Ireland
142 896
-
142 896
    Israel
77 700
-
77 700
    Italy
12 382 828
-
12 382 828
    Japan
10 098 594
7 329 675
17 428 269
    Jordan
-
363 165
363 165
    Kuwait
1 100 000
-
1 100 000
    Lebanon
1 000
-
1 000
    Luxembourg
38 781
-
38 781
    Malaysia
10 000
-
10 000
    Maldives
1 000
-
1 000
    Malta
1 305
-
1 305
    Mauritius
1 110
-
1 110
    Mexico
2 999
-
2 999
    Monaco
5 556
-
5 556
    Morocco
29 000
-
29 000
    Myanmar
1 000
-
1 000
    Netherlands
4 455 456
-
4 455 456
    New Zealand
122 000
-
122 000
    Norway
10 239 605
-
10 239 605
    Oman
4 000
-
4 000
    Pakistan
14 591
-
14 591
    Philippines
2 000
-
2 000
    Portugal
25 000
-
25 000
    Qatar
35 000
-
35 000
    Republic of Korea
10 000
-
10 000
    Saudi Arabia
1 200 000
-
1 200 000
    Senegal
2 000
-
2 000
    Singapore
3 000
-
3 000
    Spain
1 991 150
-
1 991 150
    Sri Lanka
-
2 000
-
    Sweden
21 627 172
-
21 627 172
    Switzerland
2 413 794
4 228 188
2 413 794
    Syrian Arab Republic
-
45 000
-
    Thailand
14 000
-
14 000
    Tunisia
12 435
-
12 435
    Turkey
40 000
-
40 000
    United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland
10 672 888
-
10 672 888
    United States of America
62 000 000
-
62 000 000
    Venezuela
10 000
-
10 000
    Yugoslavia
20 000
-
20 000
    Subtotal
168 732 115
14 591 635
183 323 750
    II. Contributions from intergovernmental organizations
    European Community
30 514 285
21 536 000
52 050 285
    Subtotal
30 514 285
21 536 000
52 050 285
    III. Contributions from the United Nations and United Nations agencies
    United Nations (from regular budget)
8 075 000
-
8 075 000
    UNESCO
63 600
1 534 000
1 597 600
    UNDP
59 700
-
59 700
    UNICEF
-
34 211
34 211
    WHO
-
667 341
667 341
    UNDOF
-
4 022
4 022
    Subtotal
8 198 300
2 239 574
10 437 874
    IV. Other contributions
    United Nations Association of Japan
9 580
-
9 580
    Australian Care for Refugees (AUSTCARE)
48 704
-
48 704
    Cooperation for Development, United Kingdom
129 650
-
129 650
    Gaza Authorities
-
89 000
89 000
    Mennonite Central Committee Mission
5 000
-
5 000
    Near East Council of Churches
247 906
-
247 906
    Pontifical Mission for Palestine
40 000
-
40 000
    Rissho Kosei-Kai
80 000
-
80 000
    Swedish Save the Children Fund (Rädda Barnen)
211 000
-
211 000
    Sundry Contributors
14 295
117 616
131 911
    Subtotal
786 135
206 616
992 751
    GRAND TOTAL
208 230 835
38 573 825
246 804 660

ANNEX III


Ongoing activities, expected to be fully funded
by donors in 1992-1993

(Thousands of United States dollars)


Title
1991
1992-1993
1. Supplementary Feeding Programme funded by the European Community
9 017
20 044
2. Mobile Health Team, Gaza a/
244
-
3. Gaza Centre for the Blind funded by the Pontifical Mission and other donors
245
520
4. University Scholarships funded by ARAMCO
69
138
5. Ramallah Men's and Women's Training Centres funded by the Government of Denmark
2 420
5 486
6. Mobile Dental Unit, Jordan, funded by the Near East Council of Churches
13
34
7. Dental Unit Amman Polyclinic, Jordan, funded by the Near East Council of Churches
15
31
8. Baqa'a Specialist Clinic, Jordan, funded by the Near East Council of Churches
-
44
9. Gaza Vocational Training Centre funded by the Government of Italy
1 951
3 712
10. Qalqilia Hospital, West Bank
104
252
14 078
30 261



ANNEX IV


A. Comparison of common services costs to total costs
for the period 1989 to 1992-1993


(Thousands of United States dollars)

Expenditure
Budget
1989
1990
1991
1992-1993
I. Total regular and extrabudgetary sources
265 009
292 545
328 985
638 692
II. Total common services - regular and extrabudgetary sources
29 410
34 625
40 098
85 473
A. Adjustments for items not belonging to common services
    Reserve held under common services which will be distributed later to the programmes
(2 809)
(8 519)
    Protective clothing on behalf of programmes
(97)
(166)
(99)
(187)
    Elements in common services included under the EMLOT programme general protection and emergency services in 1992-1993
(531)
(1 747)
(2 825)
    Stationery and printed forms for the programmes
(562)
(104)
    Guard posts for Agency installations
(1 502)
(1 697)
(2 458)
(3 853)
B. Adjustments for extraordinary posts
    Construction for common services facilities
(1 509)
(141)
(360)
(287)
    New Management information system
(1 326)
(3 832)
III. Revised common services total
25 209
30 770
30 221
68 795
IV. III. as a percentage of I.
9.5%
10.5%
9.2%
10.8%
B. Comparison of common services staff to local staff
for the period 1989 to 1992-1993


(Number of posts)



1989
1990
1991
1992-1993
I. Total Agency posts - regular and extrabudgetary (international and area staff)
18 128
18 596
18 520
20 462
II. Total common services posts - regular and extrabudgetary
1 007
1 054
1 199
1 151
A. Adjustments
    Posts in common services included under the programme general protection and emergency services in 1992-1993
(47)
(54)
(62)
    Guard posts for programme installations
(312)
(340)
(399)
(399)
III. Revised common services total
648
660
738
752
IV. III. as a percentage of I.
3.6%
3.5%
4.0%
3.8%
ANNEX V


Comparison of budgeted costs for rent under common costs

(United States dollars)


Area offices
Camp offices
Cairo offices
Field offices
Total
1991
1992-1993
1991
1992-1993
1991
1992-1993
1991
1992-1993
1991
1992-1993
Gaza
500
1 000
1 300
2 600
1 800
3 600
Lebanon
26 100
64 200
1 600
2 300
137 400
345 700
165 100
412 200 b/
Syrian Arab Rep
16 900
38 800
16 900
38 800
Jordan
22 900
211 800 a/
61 900
125 800
84 800
337 600
West Bank
35 000
70 300
800
1 500
35 800
71 800
    Total
100 900
385 100
1 600
2 300
500
1 000
201 400
475 600
304 400
864 000
a/ Indicates donated rent for Jordan camps not previously recognized in the budget. There is no increase in cash expenditure.

b/ It was necessary to renew rental contracts in the Lebanon field and rent additional facilities due to the evacuation of the Beirut Field Office. Increase in renewed rental agreements reflects increased $US value of Lebanese currency as well as (expected) improvement in local economy. The status of additional rented facilities is presently under review and there may well be an eventual reduction in these estimates.


ANNEX VI


Comparison of budgeted costs for travel under common costs

(Thousands of United States dollars)


Gaza
Lebanon
Syrian Arab Rep.
Jordan
West Bank
Headquarters
Total
1991
1992-3
1991
1992-3
1991
1992-3
1991
1992-3
1991
1992-3
1991
1992-3
1991
1992-3
Agency admin.
158
304
158
304
Field office admin.
21
36
13
33
17
23
15
20
20
34
86
146
Area office admin.
1
2
7
7
1
9
9
Administrative services
1
5
2
1
11
22
Public information
3
3
2
1
2
6
90
223
94
236
External relations
100
178
100
178
Planning & evaluation
40
68
40
68
Audit
158
264
158
264
Legal
2
33
116 a/
33
118
Protective services
1
1
1
1
Personnel services
4
2
2
4
2
119
202
125
210
Personnel policy
52
88
52
88
Management services
45
77
45
77
Training services
1
3
12
11
19
207
349
221
381
Finance
2
3
4
5
5
9
1
2
1
1
128
179
141
199
Information systems
3
4
2
3
2
3
173
326
180
336
Provident fund secretariat
49
93
49
93
New York office
19
35
19
35
Cairo office
2
3
2
3
Riyadh office
23
26
23
26
Total
35
53
23
60
45
66
19
29
33
43
1 394
2 550
1 549
2 801
ANNEX VII


Comparison of budgeted costs for communications under common costs


(Thousands of United States dollars)



Gaza
Lebanon
Syrian Arab Rep.
Jordan
West Bank
Headquarters
Total
1991
1992-3
1991
1992-3
1991
1992-3
1991
1992-3
1991
1992-3
1991
1992-3
1991
1992-3
Area office
2
2
6
11
7
14
12
27
27
54
Camp offices
1
1
2
7
20
8
23
New York office
5
13
5
13
Cairo office
6
0
6
Riyadh office
4
4
0
Public information
4
1
2
1
6
Adminis-
trative services a/
29
95
31
168
40
104
29
57
54
188
404
1 056
587
1 668
Total
29
105
33
170
46
116
37
73
73
235
414
1 071
632
1 770
a/ The intifadah and general heightened tension in the Middle East emphasizes the importance of maintaining reliable close communications with Headquarters and is reflected in the increased communication costs. The increase in communication costs is under review however, and efforts are under way to keep costs down while, at the same time, maintaining good communications.


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