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UNITED
NATIONS
E

Distr.
GENERAL
E/CN.4/2002/SR.2
19 March 2002

Original: ENGLISH

COMMISSION ON HUMAN RIGHTS

Fifty-eighth session

SUMMARY RECORD OF THE 2nd MEETING

Held at the Palais des Nations, Geneva,

on Tuesday, 19 March 2002, at 10 a.m.

Chairperson : Mr. JAKUBOWSKI (Poland)

CONTENTS


STATEMENT BY THE MINISTER FOR FOREIGN AFFAIRS OF SPAIN

STATEMENT BY THE MINISTER OF STATE IN CHARGE OF HUMAN RIGHTS

OF TURKEY

STATEMENT BY THE MINISTER FOR FOREIGN AFFAIRS OF SLOVENIA

STATEMENT BY THE MINISTER FOR FOREIGN AFFAIRS OF SWEDEN

STATEMENT BY THE DEPUTY PRIME MINISTER OF CROATIA

ORGANIZATION OF THE WORK OF THE SESSION



The meeting was called to order at 10.05 a.m.

STATEMENT BY THE MINISTER FOR FOREIGN AFFAIRS OF SLOVENIA

20. Mr. RUPEL (Slovenia), ...

[...]

23. His Government welcomed the recent initiatives to halt the vicious cycle of violence in the Middle East, particularly Security Council resolution 1397 (2002), with its affirmation of “a vision of a region where two States, Israel and Palestine, live side by side within secure and recognized borders”. It was also vital that both sides should conform to basic human rights standards and humanitarian law.

[...]

STATEMENT BY THE MINISTER FOR FOREIGN AFFAIRS OF SWEDEN

27. Ms. LINDH (Sweden) paid tribute to Mrs. Robinson, the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights, for the integrity and independence she had shown in carrying out her difficult task, and said it was most regrettable that she would not be seeking a renewed mandate.

[...]

29. The international community had to act when international law and human rights were violated in conflicts, such as the one in the Middle East, where the situation had become intolerable. Her Government was concerned at Israel’ s extrajudicial killings, summary executions and the use of excessive and indiscriminate force against civilians together with the attacks by the Israel Defence Force on ambulances and hospitals, in violation of the Geneva Convention. It was equally concerned at the Palestinian suicide bombings and terrorist acts against Israeli civilians. A political solution based on international law, including the relevant Security Council resolutions, and on the principle of land for peace must be found. She called on both parties to comply with their obligations under international and humanitarian law and human rights conventions: agreement on the establishment of an international monitoring mechanism would be a constructive step towards ensuring respect for those laws and instruments.

[...]

ORGANIZATION OF THE WORK OF THE SESSION (agenda item 3)

[...]

51. Mr. AKRAM (Pakistan), speaking on behalf of the Organization of the Islamic Conference (OIC), said that respect for and the promotion of human rights was one of the main pillars of Islam and an important item of the OIC agenda. OIC had adopted resolutions condemning the violations of human rights of Islamic peoples in Palestine and the other occupied Arab territories, Jammu and Kashmir, and Bosnia and Herzegovina, the Armenian aggression against Azerbaijan and the inhuman isolation imposed on the Turkish Cypriot people. In its approach to its work within the Commission, OIC was imbued with the Islamic prescription of dialogue.

52. The Islamic world considered terrorism to be a grave violation of human rights and condemned it in all its forms and manifestations, including State terrorism. There must be a clear definition distinguishing terrorism from the legitimate struggles of peoples for the right to self-determination and against foreign occupation or alien and colonial domination. Attempts to exploit the aftermath of the terrorist attacks of 11 September 2001 in order to justify intensification of repression in Palestine and Kashmir, for example, should be condemned by the international community. OIC would seek action during the current session of the Commission to counter those who promoted Islamophobia and propaganda against Islamic values.

53. OIC was opposed to the use or threat of force against any Islamic country. The campaign to eradicate terrorism was unlikely to succeed if root causes such as foreign occupation, poverty, underdevelopment and the inequities in the international economic and social order were not addressed.

54. The Commission must assume its responsibility to halt the massive killings of innocent people in Palestine. The Islamic countries deeply resented Israel’s failure to comply with the resolutions of the Commission and other United Nations bodies. The principles of international law and humanity must be observed. The best hope for a just peace in the Middle East lay with recent initiatives from the Arab and Islamic world.

[...]

71. Mr. WISNUMURTI (Indonesia), speaking on behalf of the Like-Minded Group (LMG) of countries comprising, Algeria, Bangladesh, Bhutan, China, Cuba, Egypt, India, Indonesia, Iran, Malaysia, Myanmar, Nepal, Pakistan, the Philippines, Sri Lanka, Sudan and Viet Nam, stressed the need for the Commission to deal seriously with current situations which affected the entire international community, including the violations of the human rights of Palestinians in the occupied territories, and the issue of terrorism in the aftermath of the events of 11 September 2001. The spirit of cooperation arising out of the latter events should encourage Member States to promote dialogue and cooperation within the Commission. Regrettably, however, despite some improvement, discussions in the Commission remained prone to polarization and double standards seldom found elsewhere.

[...]


The meeting rose at 1.05 p.m.

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