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UNITED
NATIONS

Distr.
GENERAL
CERD/C/SR.1533
16 August 2002

Original: ENGLISH

COMMITTEE ON THE ELIMINATION OF RACIAL DISCRIMINATION

Sixty-first session

SUMMARY RECORD OF THE 1533rd MEETING

Held at the Palais des Nations, Geneva,

on Monday, 12 August 2002, at 10.00 a.m.

Chairman: Mr. DIACONU

CONTENTS


ORGANIZATIONAL AND OTHER MATTERS (continued)

STATEMENT BY THE SPECIAL RAPPORTEUR OF THE COMMISSION ON HUMAN RIGHTS ON THE RIGHT TO ADEQUATE HOUSING



The meeting was called to order at 10.20 a.m.

/...

STATEMENT BY THE SPECIAL RAPPORTEUR OF THE COMMISSION ON HUMAN RIGHTS ON THE RIGHT TO ADEQUATE HOUSING

33. Mr. KOTHARI (Special Rapporteur of the Commission on Human Rights on the right to adequate housing) ...

/...

37. He had recently visited Romania to investigate the problem of the Roma populations who were facing intense discrimination in all sectors, but particularly with regard to housing and access to services. Other recent visits had included a visit to the Chiapas area of Mexico, where indigenous populations lived in poverty, and a visit to the occupied Palestinian territories where the targeting of the home was one of the principal means of dispossessing the Palestinians. The non-discrimination framework had been very useful in the analysis of those issues.

/...

45. Mr. AMIR said he would like to know how the Special Rapporteur was grappling with the matter of the right to housing in Palestine. Putting aside the political aspects of that question, it was unheard of, from the point of view of the right to housing, that a house could be built on land from which its rightful owners had been driven.

/...

54. Mr. KOTHARI (Special Rapporteur of the Commission on Human Rights on the right to adequate housing) said that it would be difficult to make general recommendations about housing on the global level. The principle of non-discrimination in housing could, however, be useful for States, especially in their efforts to analyse data on housing and to resolve some of the related issues. He was attempting to construct a global legal understanding and framework, and would welcome the Committee’s assistance.

55. An important element of descent-based discrimination was the targeting and destruction of homes in ethnic conflicts, which was a clear violation of the right to housing. There was no question that the occupation of Palestine was illegal, and that the occupied lands must be given back to the Palestinian people. He welcomed questions regarding land ownership, and was especially interested in the right to land in rural areas.

/...

60. He had been studying urbanization, and was developing specific recommendations on ethical housing and land policies. In Palestine and in many other countries, government planning practices were a chief means of displacing populations. In certain democratic countries, city and regional master plans created segregated housing patterns. He had been conversing with the World Bank, with regional development banks, and with inter-governmental agencies on the question of the privatization of services, which had clearly led to greater discrimination and segregation throughout the world.

61. The CHAIRMAN thanked the Special Rapporteur for his visit.


The meeting rose at 1 p.m.



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