Question of Palestine home || Permalink || About UNISPAL || Search

Le Conseil des droits de l'homme adopte des résolutions sur le Liban, le territoire palestinien occupé et le Darfour - débat du Conseil des droits de l'homme - communiqué de presse Français
Follow UNISPAL RSS Twitter

Source: Human Rights Council
20 June 2007



UNITED NATIONS

Press Release




xxxxxxxxxx
HUMAN RIGHTS COUNCIL ADOPTS THREE
RESOLUTIONS ON LEBANON, OCCUPIED
PALESTINIAN TERRITORY AND DARFUR
xxxxxxxxxx


Human Rights Council
MORNING
20 June 2007



Concludes Discussion on President's Text on Institution Building in the Council



The Human Rights Council this morning adopted by consensus three resolutions on follow-up to the report of the Commission of Inquiry on Lebanon, follow-up to Human Rights Council resolutions S-1/1 and S-3/1 on the occupied Palestinian territory, and follow-up to the resolution on the situation of human rights in Darfur.


/...


In the resolution on the human rights situation in the occupied Palestinian territory and follow-up to Human Rights Council resolutions S-1/1 and S-3/1, the Council called for the implementation of its resolutions S-1/1 and S-3/1, including the dispatching of the urgent fact-finding missions; and requested the President of the Human Rights Council and the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights to report to the Council at its next session on their efforts for the implementation of Council resolutions S-1/1 and S-3/1 and on the compliance of Israel, the occupying power, with these two resolutions.

Pakistan on behalf of the Organization of the Islamic Conference introduced the resolution. Israel and Palestine spoke as concerned countries, and Canada and Germany on behalf of the European Union spoke in explanations of the vote after the vote.

/...

Also this morning, delegates continued with statements on the institution–building package adopted by the Council at the end of its fifth regular session at midnight on 18 June. Most delegations paid tribute to Ambassador Luis Alfonso de Alba of Mexico, the first President of the Human Rights Council, and the facilitators who had guided the development of institutional mechanisms. Delegations expressed their satisfaction with the adoption of the institution-building proposals, and with the broad consensus, spirit of dialogue and atmosphere of flexibility and cooperation that had been needed to achieve the outcome. Achievements in building this spirit should be preserved and built upon. There were reservations, comments and concerns on a range of issues, such as ways to improve the Universal Periodic Review, system of country mandates and other aspects of the institution building document. Some countries regretted that certain country mandates, notably for Belarus and Cuba, had not been continued. The adoption of a Code of Conduct for mandate-holders was broadly welcomed as a tool that would enhance the service of human rights. The rights to self determination and development were among those stressed in the light of the proposals and institutional agenda. Essential principles of universality and non-selectivity should be strengthened in order to enhance the Council's credibility, and the Council now needed to translate commitment into positive acts, speakers said.

/...

Action on Resolution L.5

In a resolution (
A/HRC/5/L.5) on the human rights situation in the occupied Palestinian territory: follow-up to Human Rights Council resolutions S-1/1 and S-3/1, adopted without a vote, the Human Rights Council calls for the implementation of its resolutions S-1/1 and S-3/1, including the dispatching of the urgent fact-finding missions; and requests the President of the Human Rights Council and the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights to report to the Council at its next session on their efforts for the implementation of Council resolutions S-1/1 and S-3/1 and on the compliance of Israel, the occupying power, with these two resolutions.

TEHMINA JANJUA (
Pakistan), speaking on behalf of the Organization of the Islamic Conference, introducing the resolution, said Resolution S-1/1 had expressed deep concern over the human rights breaches by the occupying force in the Palestinian territory. The third special session of the Human Rights Council had adopted a resolution on Israeli military incursions. The High-Level Fact-Finding Mission of Archbishop Desmond Tutu and Christine Chinkin had been unable to visit Beit Hanoun but had made specific recommendations. Special Rapporteur John Dugard who was to head the Fact-Finding Mission under S1/1 was also unable to undertake his mission. The resolution presented asked for a report on the implementation of the two resolutions.

ITZHAK LEVANON (
Israel), speaking as a concerned country, said with regards to L.5, it had been said that there was nothing new under the sun. Yesterday, apparently a new era for the protection of human rights had been ushered in, yet today for the tenth time in one year a resolution on Israel had been presented. There was absurdity in presenting this resolution, when even the Special Rapporteur had said that the issue had been dealt with. Still, the sponsors could not let go of their obsession with Israel. It was obvious that the main purpose of presenting such texts was to give the Council another tool to bash Israel. The difference between this resolution and the situation on the ground were striking. Only last year Hamas attacked Israel, and the Council had remained silence. Such cases would not be included, undoubtedly, in any future reports of the Special Rapporteur on the situation of human rights in the territories, as he was not mandated to do so. This propagated a one-sided historic picture, and would have negative consequences on the cause of peace.

MOHAMMED ABU-KOASH (
Palestine), speaking as a concerned country, said the draft resolution under consideration was identical to that of resolution 4/2 adopted without a vote at the last session of the Council. Its intention was also the same: that the resolutions of the Council had to be respected, even if the violator in question was Israel. In Israeli logic the whole world was wrong except for Israel. The two resolutions S-1/1 and S-3/1, which asked for the dispatching of the urgent fact-finding missions, were not merely tools to punish Israel: they called for the immediate protection of Palestinians in the occupied Palestinian territories and the Palestinian members of Parliament that had been kidnapped by the Israeli authorities. What had the Palestinian people done to Jews back in 1870 or furthermore in 1921, for it to establish its spearhead to confiscate Palestinian land? The draft resolution was a procedural resolution, and Palestine called for its adoption without a vote, as had been done at the last session.

TERRY CORMIER (
Canada), speaking in an explanation of the vote after the vote, said there should be substantive follow-up to the decisions of the Council. The Council had a responsibility to ensure it addressed situations in a fair and balanced manner, taking into account the positions of all sides. The Council's original decisions were flawed because they did not accurately and effectively represent the situation on all sides. Canada therefore disassociated itself from the issue.

BIRGITTA MARIA SIEFKER EBERLE (
Germany), speaking on behalf of the European Union, in an explanation of the vote after the vote, said there was deep concern for the human rights situation in the occupied Palestinian territory, in particular the recent escalation of violence in Gaza. All parties should exercise restraint and protect civilian lives and the work of the international organizations. The safety of civilians should remain a priority, and the European Union condemned all attacks. The European Union had not supported the resolution issuing from the special sessions, however, it agreed that it was vital for all States to cooperate with the mechanisms of the Council. For this reason, as already expressed, the European Union hoped that Archbishop Tutu would bring his mission to completion. For these reasons, the European Union was willing to accept the text without a vote.

/...

Statements on the President's Text on Institution Building in the Council

/...

ALIREZA MOYERI (Iran) ... Iran welcomed the adoption of a Code of Conduct for mandate-holders, understood that the mandate on the occupied Palestinian territories would be valid until the end of the occupation, and emphasized the need for confidentiality in the Complaints Procedure.

The compromise proposal on the agenda of the Council was noted with appreciation, especially the separate agenda items on racism and Palestine. But Iran was concerned that aspects of the agenda item "human rights situations requiring the attention of the Council" could lead to similar situations to those experienced by the Human Rights Commission, which had targeted developing countries in the pursuit of a political agenda dominated by a small group of countries. In this regard, the Chinese delegation's efforts under the rules of procedure to reflect the concern of developing countries were appreciated.


/...

SAMEH SHOUKRY (Egypt) said the document on institution building had not incorporated all the concerns of the African and Islamic groups, but great flexibility had been shown to achieve consensus, and it was hoped that the framework would enable the Council to take up its mandate to protect and promote human rights in a framework of justice, free of politicisation and double standards. It was surprising that in the Council's framework, certain comments on the Special Rapporteur's mandate on Palestine had been heard. Despite the suffering of the Palestinian people and the foreign occupation that was behind their hardship, narrow political concerns were making themselves heard. This was a special and exceptional situation and it was hoped the Council would intensify political efforts to help overcome the situation in Palestine.

/...

GEBRAN SOUFAN (Lebanon) ... The inclusion on the agenda of an item on Palestine and the other occupied Arab territories had raised some criticisms. The intention had certainly not been to exclude other situations requiring the attention of the Council – still less to monopolize or paralyse its activities – but merely to highlight the devastating effects of longstanding occupation on the ability of individuals to enjoy their human rights. In conclusion, Lebanon called for constructive cooperation, dialogue that would animate and enrich their debates, and for an end to the attacks and antagonism in favour of a wise and calm approach that would consolidate the respect for human rights.

/...



__________



For use of the information media; not an official record


Follow UNISPAL RSS Twitter