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UNITED
NATIONS
A

        General Assembly
A/37/13 (SUPP)
30 June 1982

REPORT
OF THE COMMISSIONER-GENERAL
OF THE UNITED NATIONS
RELIEF AND WORKS AGENCY
FOR PALESTINE REFUGEES
IN THE NEAR EAST

______________


1 July 1981 - 30 June 1982




GENERAL ASSEMBLY


OFFICIAL RECORDS: THIRTY-SEVENTH SESSION

SUPPLEMENT No. 13 (A/37/13)



UNITED NATIONS

New York, 1982




NOTE


Symbols of United Nations documents are composed of capital letters combined with figures. Mention of such a symbol indicates a reference to a United Nations document.

In the present report, the term "West Bank" refers to the occupied West Bank of the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan and the term "Jordan refers to the Hashemite Kingdom of Jordan excluding the occupied West Bank, wherever it is necessary to differentiate between these two Fields of the Agency's area of operations.





[Original: Arabic/English/French]

[16 September 1982]


CONTENTS
ParagraphsPage
Letter of transmittal ......................................................

Letter from the Chairman of the Advisory Commission of the
United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees
in the Near East to the Commissioner-General ...............................
v



vi
FOREWORD BY THE COMMISSIONER-GENERAL .............................

REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER-GENERAL ...............................
.........

1 - 217
xi

1
I.

II.
SUMMARY OF THE REPORT ......................................

SUMMARY OF DEVELOPMENTS IN UNRWA's AREA OF OPERATIONS,
1 JULY 1981-30 JUNE 1982 ...................................
1 - 27


28 - 80
1


5
A.Lebanon ................................................ 28 - 36 5
1.

2.

3.

4.
Impact of financial crisis .........................

Continuing hostilities in Lebanon ..................

Comprehensive survey of remuneration ...............

Assistance from the Palestine Liberation Organization .......................................
28

29 - 34

35


36
5

5

6


6
B.Syrian Arab Republic .................................... 37 - 45 6
1.

2.

3.

4.

5.
Comprehensive survey of remuneration ..............

Impact of financial crisis .........................

Health care ........................................

Impact on UNRWA of local political tensions ........

Assistance to refugees in poverty .................
37

38 - 39

40 - 41

42 - 44

45
6

7

7

7

8
C.Jordan .................................................. 46 - 52 8
1.

2.

3.

4.
Impact of threat to school programme ...............

Assistance to refugees in poverty...................

Medical care .......................................

Response to Israeli invasion of south Lebanon ......
46 - 48

49

50 - 51

52
8

8

9

9
D.West Bank ............................................... 53 - 56 9
1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.
Staff matters ......................................

Legal matter .......................................

Security ...........................................

Improvements in camps ..............................

Health .............................................

Effects of financial crisis ........................

Construction projects ..............................

Help for disabled ..................................
53

54 - 55

56 - 60

61

62

63

64 - 65

66
9

9

10

10

11

11

11

11
E.Gaza Strip ............................................. 67 - 8011
1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.
The security situation .............................

Relations with the Israeli occupation authorities ..

Withdrawal from the Sinai ..........................

Improvements .......................................

Health .............................................

Housing ............................................

Supply and transport ...............................
67 - 69

70 - 74

75

76

77 - 78

79

80
11

12

13

13

13

14

14
III.REPORT ON THE OPERATIONS OF THE AGENCY, 1 JULY 1981-
30 JUNE 1982 ...............................................
81 - 19615
A.Education and training services ........................ 81 - 10015
1.

2.

3.

4.
General education ..................................

Vocational and technical education .................

Teacher training ...................................

University scholarships ............................
84 - 90

91 - 93

94 - 98

99 - 100
15

17

17

18
B.Health services ........................................101 - 13419
1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.
Medical care .......................................

Control of communicable diseases ...................

Maternal and child health ..........................

Nursing services ...................................

Environmental health ...............................

Nutrition, including supplementary feeding .........

Medical and para-medical education and training ....
103 - 108

109 - 113

114 - 120

121

122 - 128

129 - 131

132 - 134
19

20

20

21

22

22

23
C.Relief services .........................................135 - 16124
1.

2.

3.

4.
Eligibility and registration .......................

Rations ............................................

Camps and shelters .................................

Welfare ............................................
142

143 - 147

148 - 156

157 - 161
25

25

27

28
D.Personnel and administrative matters ...................162 - 17629
1.

2.

3.

4.


5.

6.

7.

8.
Location of UNRWA Headquarters .....................

Joint Inspection Unit study of UNRWA ...............

Changes in the staffing table ......................

Implementation of ICSC common system job
classification master standards ....................

Pay administration .................................

Threatened termination of teachers .................

Staff-management consultations .....................

Sex discrimination .................................
162

163 - 164

165 - 168


169

170 - 171

172 - 173

174 - 175

176
29

30

30


32

32

32

32

33
E.Legal matters ...........................................177 - 19033
1.

2.

3.

4.

5.
Agency staff .......................................

Agency services and premises .......................

Refugee shelters ...................................

Lebanon ............................................

Claims against Governments .........................
177 - 181

182 - 185

186

187 - 188

189 - 190
33

34

34

35

35
F.Financial operations ....................................191 - 19635
IV.BUDGET FOR 1983 AND REVISED BUDGET FOR 1982 ................197 - 21740
A.

B.

C.
Budget provisions ......................................

Budget estimates .......................................

Financing the budget - 1982 and 1983 ...................
197 - 214

215

216 - 217
40

43

43
Annexes
I.

II.


III.
Statistical information ................................................

Pertinent records of the General Assembly and other United Nations
bodies .................................................................

Financing of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine
Refugees in the Near East ..............................................
46


72


74


LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

27 August 1982

Sir,

I have the honor to submit my annual report to the General Assembly on the work of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) for the period 1 July 1981 to 30 June 1982, in compliance with the request in paragraph 21 of resolution 302 (IV) of 8 December 1949 and paragraph 8 of resolution 1315 (XIII) of 12 December 1958.

In the foreword to the report, I have made some preliminary observations on the emergency situation in Lebanon, which has become the foremost of our preoccupations. The period of the report covers only the initial weeks of the crisis, following the Israeli invasion of Lebanon on 6 June. I shall treat the impact on UNRWA's operations of that invasion and its aftermath in a separate report to the Secretary-General.

UNRWA's financial difficulties have been exacerbated by the cost of the emergency operations, and I have found it necessary yet again to focus on them in the foreword. General Assembly decision 36/462 of 16 March 1982 was helpful in pointing to measures which might alleviate the difficulties. But the Agency must still look to Governments for generous additional assistance.

The main body of the report begins with a summary of the three sections which follow. The first of these presents the principal developments in the Agency's area of operations, field by field; the second describes the education, health and relief programmes and the support services; and the third presents the revised budget for 1982 and proposed budget for 1983, for consideration by the General Assembly at its thirty-seventh session.

The three annexes provide statistical data on UNRWA's programmes and financing, pertinent records of the General Assembly and other United Nations bodies, and the text of General Assembly decision 36/462.

In preparing the final text of the report, I have consulted the UNRWA Advisory Commission, which considered the draft at its meeting on 26 August 1982. I have taken into account members' opinions, although it should not be assumed that all of the Governments represented on the Commission necessarily subscribe to all of the views I have expressed. The Committee's advice is embodied in the Chairman's letter to me of 26 August, of which I enclose a copy.

I have deemed It appropriate also to maintain the practice of showing the draft to representatives of the Government of Israel and to give consideration their comments, given that a major part of the Agency's operations continues to conducted in areas occupied by Israel since 1967.

Accept, Sir, the assurances of my highest consideration.

(Signed) 0lof RYDBECK
Commissioner-General



The President of the General Assembly
United Nations
New York





LETTER FROM THE CHAIRMAN OF THE ADVISORY COMMISSION OF THE UNITED
NATIONS RELIEF AND WORKS AGENCY FOR PALESTINE REFUGEES IN THE NEAR
EAST TO THE COMMISSIONER-GENERAL


26 August 1982

Dear Mr. Rydbeck,

At its meeting held in Vienna on 26 August 1982, the Advisory Commission of UNRWA considered the draft report on the Agency's services and activities during the period 1 July 1981-30 June 1982, which you intend to submit to the United Nations General Assembly at it's thirty-seventh session.

The Commission notes with profound sadness that the hostilities arising from the Israeli invasion of Lebanon have caused loss of life and destruction and hindered the smooth operation of the Agency and its efforts to carry out its humanitarian task. In these circumstances, the Commission wishes to pay tribute to the courage dedication which UNRWA staff, and more particularly the staff in the field, have demonstrated under your guidance and congratulates you on the efforts you are exerting in the fulfillment of your task.

Aware of the increased difficulties which the Agency must face and of the added costs resulting therefrom, the Commission strongly encourages you in your efforts to find the necessary resources which will enable the Agency to assure the emergency relief programme. The Agency estimates the first installment of the credits necessary to implement the initial phase of the emergency programme in Lebanon at $US 39 million. The second phase, which involves the reconstruction of the damaged installations, will cost several times this amount. It would be particularly helpful if you would provide as soon as possible, to all potential contributors, preliminary estimates of the over-all cost of such reconstruction, so that they can plan their contributions without delay.

Events in the West Bank and Gaza Strip have also disrupted the Agency's operations.

The Commission notes again with regret that, despite your efforts, the financial situation of the Agency has not only remained uncertain but has considerably worsened: at 30 June, the Agency estimated the deficit for 1982 at $US 42 million and projected for 1983 a deficit of $US 86 million.

In this respect, the Commission welcomes the initiative of the General Assembly which requested the Joint Inspection Unit to carry out a comprehensive study of the Agency's operations and appreciates in particular the co-operation which you and your staff have shown.

Reaffirming, further, that the financing of UNRWA is the responsibility of the entire international community, the Commission is of the opinion that a lasting solution must be found to the Agency’s financial difficulties, to enable it to meet the basic needs of the Palestine refugees, particularly in the education field which must again become a priority among the activities of the Agency.

The Commission reaffirms that the continuation of UNRWA’s work is an element for stability and peace in the Middle East and that the Agency should continue to provide its services to the Palestine refugees, until the question of Palestine is solved in accordance with the United Nations resolutions.

To this end, the Commission would like the General Assembly of the United Nations to launch an appeal inviting new contributors to join the all too limited number of those who bear at present the totality of the Agency’s financial burden.

The Commission notes with satisfaction the fruitful co-operation between you and the Governments of the Arab States hosting the Palestine refugees in the interest of the Agency and the refugees and thanks those Governments for the direct and indirect services which they provide to the refugees; and thanks all Governments, organizations and individuals who have participated in maintaining the services.

The Commission recalls that the major part of UNRWA headquarters is still outside its area of operations and requests you to consider the relocation of he headquarters as soon as possible in Beirut, as of priority, or, if this is impossible, elsewhere in the area, in accordance with United Nations General
Assembly resolutions.

The Commission also thanks the United Nations Secretary- General for his support and for the efforts he exerts to enable the Agency to fulfil its mission.

Yours sincerely,


(Signed) Albert THABAULT
Chairman
of the Advisory Commission


Mr. Olof Rydbeck
Commissioner-General of the
United Nations Relief and Works Agency
for Palestine Refugees in the Near East

FOREWORD

BY THE COMMISSIONER-GENERAL


1. Only three and a half weeks of the reporting period remained when the Israeli Defense Forces invaded south Lebanon and quickly overran that part of the country lying between the northern Israeli border and the southern outskirts of Beirut. By 30 June 1982, the surviving armed forces of the Palestine Liberation Organization in south Lebanon had been driven back to west Beirut, where they were under siege. In Beirut and south Lebanon, main in the areas of Sidon and Tyre, there were about 197,000 Palestine refugees registered with UNRWA. About half of these lived in towns or villages which were originally founded by UNRWA as tented camps over 30 years ago and are still commonly called "camps". The other half lived among the rest of the civilian population in other towns and villages. The wave of destruction which has now overtaken the Palestinian people in south Lebanon is far greater than was the case during the Israeli invasion of Lebanon in 1978.

2. At the end of the reporting period, a full assessment had not yet been possible of the displacement of the Palestine refugees resident in Beirut and south Lebanon, nor of the precise extent of the damage to Agency installations or to housing belonging to the Palestine refugees. However, there was already no doubt that the scale of destruction of the refugee camps, of which there are six in south Lebanon, was very severe. Tens of thousands of Palestine refugees were made homeless once more and were reduced to a state of misery. The condition of the families in many cases was made even worse by the absence of the men-folk who had been killed, wounded, taken prisoner or had retreated with units of the Palestine Liberation Army. By the end of the reporting period, the Lebanon Field Office of UNRWA had succeeded, despite the military situation around Beirut, in sending convoys of relief supplies to Sidon, and the Agency’s West Bank Field Office had obtained permission from the Israeli Government to send in UNRWA staff and relief supplies to the Tyre and Sidon areas across the Israeli frontier. The immediate need for emergency relief remained acute and UNRWA's international staff from the Lebanon, West Bank and Jordan Field Offices and from UNRWA Headquarters, together with much depleted locally-engaged staff, were struggling to reorganize UNRWA's services. In west Beirut, also, emergency relief was necessary to thousands of Palestine refugees who came into the city from places further south, in particular Damour, or who had to leave their homes in the southern part of the city for places they believed to be safer. Thousands of Palestine refugees also fled from their homes, in south Lebanon into the Beqa'a valley in east Lebanon, where relief was provided by UNRWA's Syrian Field Office because of the severing of communication between west Beirut and the Beqa’a Valley. Similarly, the Syrian Field Office provided relief to Palestine refugees in the Tripoli area of north Lebanon.

3. In Lebanon as a whole there are many Palestine refugees who are not registered with UNRWA. This distinction has arisen from several historical causes. In the present situation of desperate need, I have not thought it justifiable to confine UNRWA's relief services to those Palestine refugees who are on UNRWA's registers. While UNRWA staff will continue to seek out displaced registered Palestine refugees in Lebanon, they will not turn away other Palestine refugees who may appeal to UNRWA for emergency relief. After the Arab-Israeli war in 1967, the then Commissioner-General of UNRWA also dropped the distinction and the General Assembly, in its resolution, 2252 (ES-V) of 4 July 1967, approved his decision. The General Assembly endorsed the efforts of the Commissioner-General at that time “to provide humanitarian assistance, as far as practical, on an emergency basis and a temporary measure to other persons in the area who are at present displaced and are in serious need of immediate assistance as a result of the recent hostilities”.

4. In order to enable the Agency to meet the cost of emergency relief measures for a period of six months after the beginning of the invasion, I issued an appeal to Governments and to non-governmental organizations, for $39 million. However, the cost of reconstruction and rehabilitation will be many times this figure and I shall issue a further appeal when the needs and possibilities for reconstruction have been assessed. It is already evident that accommodation will have to be provided for tens of thousands of displaced refugees and that UNRWA will need to replace many of its installations, including schools, clinics, supplementary feeding and sanitation facilities, distribution centres and offices. In the beginning, accommodation will have to be provided in the form of tents until more permanent structures can be erected. One of the most urgent tasks is likely to be the erection of tents to house the Agency’s schools until new buildings can be put up. From the humanitarian point of view, speed in providing shelter to the displaced Palestine refugees, is of the greatest importance, since the autumn rains will set in by October.

5. Since the war was not yet over at the end of the reporting period and since the outcome of the fighting, in terms of its effects on Palestinian families in Beirut and on their housing, was not known, I shall submit a special report to the Secretary-General on the emergency situation in Lebanon, in time for its distribution to Member Governments of the United Nations during the forthcoming session of the General Assembly.

6. The financial situation of the Agency remains serious and I was obliged to report to the General Assembly in October 1981 that the forecast budgetary deficit for 1982 would be $80 million. Because of the serious financial outlook of the Agency, the General Assembly at its thirty-sixth session requested the Working Group on the Financing of UNRWA to make proposals for overcoming UNRWA's financial crisis, and I am indebted to the Working Group for the care with which they approached their task. On 16 March 1982, the General Assembly in its decision 36/462 endorsed the recommendations of the Working Group. These recommendations included a request to the Joint Inspection Unit to carry out a comprehensive review of the Agency's organization, budget and operations. The Joint Inspection Unit has commenced its review and my staff and I have had several meetings with the inspectors. I welcome the Unit's involvement and have promised the fullest co-operation of UNRWA's administration in carrying out the review. The General Assembly also called on Governments to be more generous in their contributions to UNRWA’s finances and I have, with the support of the Secretary-General, made appeals to Governments to increase their voluntary contributions.

7. In the same decision, the General Assembly also called upon Governments or organizations making contributions in kind either to give cash instead or to all UNRWA to sell their contributions for cash. For a number of years, my predecessors and I have appealed to donors of commodities to substitute for them gifts in cash. When contributions are made in cash the Agency has greater flexibility in deciding on the use of the resources made available to it. When contributions are made in kind, the Agency is bound to use these contributions in certain ways determined the donors. Most of the gifts in kind made to the Agency are of foodstuffs which can be used only in one of the Agency's feeding programmes. Over the years the Agency's regular priorities have shifted from the provision of emergency relief its education and health programmes. The shortfall of income below budgeted expenditure has threatened the continuation of the Agency's school programme, since only contributions in cash can pay the wages of its school teachers. I have been much encouraged by the response of several Governments, which have in the past given an important part of their contributions in the form of foodstuffs, and in particular I have been heartened by the initial response of the Commission of the European Community, which is the largest contributor to UNRWA of foodstuffs. The Agency still attaches value to its programme of supplementary feeding for vulnerable groups, mainly mothers and small children, to the special rations for families identified as living in poverty and to catering in UNRWA's residential vocational and teacher training centres. UNRWA has informed the European Community and other major donors of commodities of the quantities of foodstuffs it could use for those three purposes. A much lower priority attaches to the distribution of basic rations to the 830,000 person's who now receive them. I recognize that some Governments which in the past have given foodstuffs to the Agency may face difficulties in making the conversion to gifts of cash. If those Governments are unable to make their contributions for 1983 wholly in the form of cash, then UNRWA, must ask to be given the freedom to sell donated commodities for dash in so far as the quantities received are in excess of those needed for higher priority feeding programmes. In 1981, the Agency's income in the form of foodstuffs or in cash tied to the distribution of food was $42 million.

8. UNRWA's school programme was again placed in jeopardy in 1982 by the Agency's budgetary deficit, which had been reduced by 30 June to $42 million. Any curtailment of the school system, involving the closure of schools, the denial of schooling to some or all of the 340,000 pupils and the dismissal of up to 10,000 teachers, would represent a major upheaval, with explosive consequences for the region. I therefore decided in late April that I would accept the financial risk of keeping the schools open to the end of the financial year in December 1982, rather than incur the inevitable political risks of closing the schools. A favorable response to the decision of the General Assembly, to which I have referred above, by Governments who have in the past given foodstuffs to the Agency will increase the cash income available to the Agency for the maintenance of the school programme.

9. Much of the 12 month period under review has been marked by political tension throughout the region and by unrest in the occupied territories of the West Bank and Gaza Strip. This unrest was intensified from November 1981 and continued intermittently to the end of the period. It was countered by security measures on the part of the Israeli occupation authorities which in turn intensified the resentment of the population, including the registered refugees. There were numerous instances of the disregard of the United Nations status of UNRWA installations and staff. This caused interruption to the teaching in UNRWA schools and training centres in the West Bank and Gaza Strip. In the other three Fields there were some demonstrations of political feeling which also interrupted studies. In Syria, the fighting in Hama in February and March 1982 caused disruption to the Agency's services there. In Lebanon, the cease-fire which was arranged in July 1981 brought cross-border hostilities largely to a halt, but anxieties concerning an Israeli invasion and sporadic clashes between various armed factions kept tension high and caused some disturbances to the Agency's programmes. The situation of the Palestine refugees in Lebanon became immeasurably worse after the invasion on 6 June 1982.

10. In the occupied territories of the West Bank and Gaza Strip there were some differences between the Agency and the Israeli authorities, not all of which had been resolved by the end of the reporting period. There was interference by the Israeli authorities in the Gaza Strip with the construction activities of the Agency, and in two cases, despite prior co-ordination with the authorities, building works were stopped after the Agency had entered into commitments with building contractors, thus causing the Agency to incur financial losses. One serious problem in the Gaza Strip and the Sinai, which remained unresolved at 30 June 1982, was the fate of over 4,500 Palestine refugees living in the southern part of Rafah town who, after the return of the Sinai to Egypt in April 1982, found themselves cut off by the newly re-established frontier from their means of livelihood and from UNRWA's services.

11. In view of the extensive devastation in south Lebanon as a consequence of the war, UNRWA has entered once again a period when many of the Palestinian people to whom it has rendered its services for 32 years need those services desperately. The conversion of contributions in kind to contributions in cash may increase UNRWA's cash income in 1983, and possibly in 1984, sufficiently for the Agency to meet essential expenditure on its education, health and priority feeding programmes. However, the potentially enormous cost of restoration and replacement required in consequence of the war, in addition to the cost of emergency relief to the displaced and dispossessed, will be totally beyond the Agency's means, unless Governments come forward generously with additional help for those of the Palestinian people who are the victims of the war.


REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER-GENERAL

I. SUMMARY OF THE REPORT


Survey of developments in UNRWA's area of operations

1. The security situation in four of the five fields of UNRWA's operations was tense for much of the period under review, with demonstrations and disorders causing interruptions to the Agency's services, while Jordan remained relatively calm. The situation in Lebanon deteriorated drastically with the invasion by the Israeli Defense Forces early in June. The Israeli army quickly overran the southern part of Lebanon and by the end of June west Beirut was under siege (see paras. 29-34, 42-44, 51, 55-59 and, 66-68).

2. UNRWA’s financial crisis cast its shadow over the fields of operation once more. The threat to the continuation of the schools programme caused particular concern among the teaching staff, and there was in consequence an increased rate of resignations. The Commissioner-General's announcement on 26 April that he hoped to be able to maintain the schools programme until the end of 1982 relieved the anxiety (see paras. 28, 38-39, 45-48 and 63).

3. The remuneration of locally engaged staff is now determined on the basis of salary survey's conducted by the International Civil Service Commission (ICSC) in all fields except Jordan, where discussions have been held with the staff on the introduction of the system in that field also. The resulting pay levels have generally been satisfactory to the staff. Discussions have continued on certain outstanding matters, including interim adjustments to pay between surveys (see paras. 35, 37 and 53).

4. A number of staff members were detained by the authorities. Some restrictions on duty travel of certain Agency staff members were eased in the occupied territories (see paras. 54, 55 and 177).

5. In the Gaza Strip, certain difficulties have been experienced with the Israeli authorities over the Agency's construction programme. Some families, whose houses were demolished as a punitive measure, were re-housed, by the Agency. A new water scheme was installed by the authorities in the middle camps (see paras. 70-74).

6. Assistance has been received from the civil authorities in all fields in conducting the Agency's programmes. In Lebanon, the PLO provided material assistance (see para. 36).

7. Discussions with the Syrian Government over the extension to Syria of the Agency's programme for additional assistance to the poorest families has led to no agreement. In Jordan the programme was implemented in respect of about 12,000 persons. The programme is also being carried out in the occupied territories of the West Bank and Gaza Strip (see paras. 45 and 49).

8. The Agency had to meet a sharp rise in the cost of surgical operations in Syria. In Jordan, the Agency reimbursed hospital costs to poor families. Cholera broke out in some fields (see paras. 40, 50-51 and 77-78).

9. The improvement of the infrastructure in camps was continued (see paras. 61 and 76).

10. The withdrawal of Israel from the Sinai in April 1982 left some thousands of Palestine refugees deprived of UNRWA services, formerly given from Rafah in the Gaza Strip (see para. 75).

Education and training services

11. The United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) is responsible for the professional aspects of the education programme. The school enrolment in October 1981 was almost 340,000 pupils, nearly 3,000 more than in the previous year. Double-shifting in schools was widespread. Unrest and demonstrations were frequent, particularly in Lebanon, the West Bank and Gaza Strip, where schooling suffered interruptions (see paras. 81-90).

12. The number of training places in UNRWA vocational and teacher training centres was increased. Operations at four of the eight training centres proceeded normally, but the centres in the West Bank and Gaza were affected by disturbances. During the academic year 1981/1982, UNRWA awarded 351 scholarships to Palestine refugees studying at Arab universities (see paras. 91-100).

Health services

13. Under the professional guidance of the, World Health Organization. (WHO), medical care was provided at 100 UNRWA health units and at 22 government and private clinics. Other services were subsidized by UNRWA. The Agency operated 24 dental clinics, three central laboratories and 23 clinical laboratories. It continued to run a small hospital at Qalqiliya in the West Bank and, jointly with the Public Health Department, a tuberculosis hospital in Gaza. A shortage of hospital beds in Beirut persisted (see paras. 101-108).

14. Prevention and control of communicable diseases remained among the main concerns of the Agency's Department of Health. An outbreak of cholera occurred during 1981. A tuberculosis control programme was maintained (see paras. 109-113).

15. Maternal and child health care was provided in most UNRWA health centres. School health services were continued, as well as health education (see paras. 114-121).

16. The Agency provided basic community sanitation services in camps, but lack of funds again reduced subsidies to self-help schemes (see paras. 122-128).

17. The growth of children attending child health centres was monitored. The Agency's supplementary feeding programme provided meals, milk and extra rations for vulnerable groups (see paras. 129-131).

18. The Agency further developed its programme of education and training of health staff (see paras. 132-134).

Relief services

19. These consist of rations, help with housing in needy cases and welfare assistance. The Israeli invasion of Lebanon on 6 June 1982 enormously increased the need for relief services in that field. In Jordan, the Agency continued to distribute rations on behalf of the Jordanian Government to persons displaced in 1967 who were not registered with UNRWA as refugees. The number of registered refugees on 30 June 1982 was 1,925,726 (see paras. 135-142).

20. The average number of basic rations issued by the Agency in 1981 was 226,1769. By June 1982, the Agency had identified 42,687 refugees as "special hardship cases” and eligible for additional assistance. The General Assembly, in decision 36/462 of 16 March 1982, requested Governments making contributions in kind to UNRWA to convert these to cash. This would release funds for the higher priority education programme after the needs of the most vulnerable groups had been assured (see paras. 143-147).

21. The number of registered refugees living in camps represented 35.11 per cent of the registered refugee population. After the re-establishment of the border between the Sinai and the Gaza Strip in April 1982, the housing of 173 families living in the border zone had so far been demolished. A shortage of housing remained in the Gaza Strip (see paras. 148-156).

22. The Agency gave relief to welfare cases, ran pre-school activities for young children, youth activities or adolescents and programmes to develop the skills of women, youngsters not receiving formal training and the disabled (see paras. 157-161).

Personnel and administrative matters

23. The main headquarters of UNRWA remained at Vienna. The Joint Inspection Unit began a study of the Agency's organization and programmes in April 1982. There was an increase of 110 posts in the staffing table, mainly due to the recruitment of additional teachers. The preparatory work for the implementation of the ICSC job classification standards for international posts was almost finalized by the end of the period. Comprehensive pay surveys were completed by ICSC in Lebanon and the Syrian Arab Republic and the results were implemented. The Agency's serious financial position threatened the employment of many Agency staff, particularly teachers. Discussions continued between administration and staff on a new memorandum of agreement to govern conditions of employment. The Agency intended to eliminate inequalities in treatment of female staff compared with their male colleagues, but this had to be postponed for reasons of cost. (See paras. 162-176).

Legal matters

24. Twenty-nine staff were arrested and detained without charge, and the Agency, again had difficulty in obtaining information concerning the reasons. In the West Bank and Gaza Strip, the interrogation of staff continued, with interruptions to the Agency's work. The Agency's services were placed under strain at various times, particularly in the occupied territories. In the Gaza Strip, the occupation authorities sought to impose new restrictions on construction by the Agency. An Agency installation was damaged by the fighting in Hama in February 1982. The Agency re-housed some families whose homes in the Gaza Strip had been demolished on punitive grounds. Much damage was caused to Agency property in Lebanon during the fighting in June 1982. Claims against the Governments of Israel and Jordan were, pursued (see paras. 177-190).

Financial operations

25. Income for 1981 was $190.9 million and expenditure $181.5 million. The projection at 30 June 1982 of the Agency's financial operations for 1982 showed a prospective deficit of $42 million. The Agency entered the 1982 financial year with a cash balance of $39.7 million. The level of cash balances is an important factor in calculating the ability of UNRWA to meet its liabilities until the end of the year. The separation benefit entitlements of locally-recruited staff stood at $57.3 million at 30 June 1982 (see paras. 191-194)

26. The Working Group on the Financing of UNRWA recognized the importance of maximizing the freely disposable cash income available to the Agency. This was endorsed in March 1982 by the General Assembly, which called upon Governments to make contributions to the Agency in cash rather than in kind. Of the income of $191.5 million expected as at 30 June 1982, only $121 million was freely disposable cash (see paras. 195 and 196)

Budget for 1983 and revised budget for 1982

27. The budget proposed for 1983 amounts to $271.4 million, compared with a revised budget of $233.5 million for 1982. At 30 June 1982, a deficit of $86 million was projected for 1983 compared with a revised deficit of $42 million for 1982 (see paras. 197-217).

II. SURVEY OF DEVELOPMENTS IN UNRWA's AREA OF OPERATIONS,
1 July 1981-30 JUNE 1982


A. Lebanon

1. Impact of financial crisis

28. The Government, PLO, Agency staff and the refugees were again this year -seriously concerned about the likelihood of the closure of UNRWA/UNESCO schools by the end of the school year 1981/1982 and the adverse repercussions to be expected from such a decision. There was no doubt in the minds of the refugee community that closing the schools would precipitate the termination of all the Agency’s activities, an eventuality which was alleged to be the aim of a Western plot to liquidate the Palestinian problem. The Agency’s financial crisis was the more worrying because it was taking place in Lebanon at a critical time, when the security situation was rapidly deteriorating and it was difficult to see what authority might take over UNRWA's services in the event of the Agency's collapse. The announcement made by the Commissioner-General on 26 April, expressing the hope that he would be able to maintain the Agency's education programme throughout 1982 despite continuing difficulties in raising income, met with great relief.

2. Continuing hostilities in Lebanon

29. The security situation in Lebanon remained a matter for serious concern throughout the year. Israeli military action, clashes between various para-military organizations, clashes between the Lebanese Army and the Arab Deterrent Force, bomb and booby-trapped car explosions, political assassinations, and attacks against diplomatic missions continued in Beirut and elsewhere in the country, terrorizing the population and causing numbers of casualties. The Government was prompted to establish an internal security force special unit, which started its activities on 26 April 1982, to be responsible for the protection of diplomatic missions.

30. The voluntary evacuation of families of United Nations staff, which was authorized by the United Nations in mid-May 1981 on the advice of the United Nations Designated Official in Lebanon, ended in mid-September, when there was a relative improvement in the security situation.

31. Israeli military action (air raids and artillery shelling) during the month of July 1981 (until the cease-fire of 24 July) caused several casualties among registered refugees and severe damage to refugee shelters in the camps of Rashidieh, Burj esh-Shemali, el Buss and Ein el Hilweh, all in south Lebanon. A limited emergency programme was immediately implemented to provide food, kitchen kits and blankets to those refugee families who were badly in need of assistance. An amount of $92,404 was later allotted, with the help of Caritas and OXFAM, to a programme to assist the refugees in rebuilding or repairing their shelters, and to repair damage to Agency installations and to roads and sewers in camps.

32. Prior to the Israeli invasion on 6 June 1982, internal disturbances, terrorist explosions and Israeli military action caused 44 registered refugees to be killed and 102 injured during the period under review. The injured included two UNRWA teachers and one school attendant.

33. Agency health, education and relief services have been affected in varying degrees. The school programme suffered several interruptions, and the training programme at the Siblin Training Centre was disrupted more than once during the period from mid-February to mid-April, when rumors spread of an imminent Israeli action in south Lebanon. Health services were interrupted in the Tyre area between 18 and 24 July 1981. In Beirut, the polyclinic, which had had to close from 2 April 1981 because of internal clashes, reopened on 2 September 1981. There were only minor delays in the distribution of ration. 0n the whole, the Agency’s operations were maintained without serious disruptions until, the Israeli invasion of June 1982.

34. On 6 June 1982, the Israeli Defense Forces entered south Lebanon and advanced quickly to the southern outskirts of Beirut. Of the six refugee camps in south Lebanon, four were destroyed or severely damaged, including the housing of the refugees and Agency installations. Thousands of Palestinians lost their homes. In west Beirut, further thousands were displaced and found temporary shelter. Some Palestine refugees also fled into the Beqa’a valley in east Lebanon and to the Tripoli area in the north, and a few thousand into Syria. By the end of the period under review emergency relief and medical care were being organized for there people. Because of the difficulties -of communication and supply, these services were being temporarily supplied in south Lebanon by the West Bank Field Office, and in east and north Lebanon by the Syrian Field Office under the direction of the Lebanon Field Office. The Commissioner-General will submit to the Secretary-General a special report on the situation in Lebanon from 6 June to 31 August 1982.

3. Comprehensive survey of remuneration

35. The locally-recruited staff were in general well satisfied with the implementation by the Agency of the recommendations of the International Civil Service Commission, which took effect from 1 April 1981 and which helped them to cope with the greatly increased cost of living.
4. Assistance from the Palestine Liberation Organization

36. The PLO has continued to provide direct aid to refugees to improve school premises, electricity and water supplies and road communications, particularly in camps. This has eased pressure on the Agency from the refugees. In one instance, in November 1981, PLO contributed about 18 per cent (LL 160,000) of the cost of the construction of an Agency school in the Beqa’a area.
B. Syrian Arab Republic

1. Comprehensive survey of remuneration

37. The findings of the comprehensive survey of remuneration carried out by the International Civil Service Commission (reported on in paras. 84 and 85 of last year's report) were analyzed and the recommendations of ICSC implemented. The outcome was a pay increase and enhanced benefits for locally-recruited staff, retroactive to 1 April 1981, which have led to improved staff relations. However, they do not appear to have alleviated the difficulty, in recruiting, qualified local staff, particularly in the more remote areas of the, field, which derives at least as much from the uncertainty of the Agency's future and the scarcity of the requisite skills as from the Agency's rate of pay. Even for posts in Damascus, it has proved almost impossible to find candidates who have both the required professional qualifications and adequate English language proficiency.
2. Impact of financial crisis

38. The uncertainty over their future, occasioned by the Agency's financial crisis, continued to have a serious effect on the morale of the staff, particularly the teaching staff, and was undoubtedly. A major factor in the resignations of staff and the difficulty experienced in filling their posts with qualified replacements. As a result, the Agency has again had to fill many teaching posts with inexperienced teachers even, in some cases with teachers lacking the requisite academic qualifications.

39. The financial crisis necessitated reducing construction and maintenance to an absolute, minimum, with the result that the Agency’s infrastructure has become even more dilapidated. However, a new wing at the Damascus Vocational Training Centre, was completed, funded by the Organization of Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC). For its part, the, Syrian Government continued to improve the infrastructure an the refugee camps, most notably paving and asphalting roads in many of them and improving the water supply system in Khan Damascus.
3. Health care

40. An increase in the cost of surgical operations, together with reduced access to Government, hospitals, resulted in a very large increase in hospitalization costs, paid on behalf, of refugee patients.

41. The pilot family planning project, carried out in co-ordination with the, Department of Mother and Child Care and Family Planning in the Ministry of Health, and reported on in paragraph 87 of last year's report, was completed successfully.
It will be extended to other Agency health centres in the Field.
4. Impact on UNRWA of local political tensions

42. The state of relations between Syria and her neighbours has had little impact on the Agency's operations other than to increase the time required to obtain visas for staff travelling on duty to Jordan. Events within Syria had little or no direct effect on operations- either, except that fighting in the town of Hama resulted in restricted movement and caused severe damage to the premises rented by the Agency as a sub-area office, distribution centre and supplementary feeding centre. The supplementary feeding programme had to be suspended.

43. Limitations on the use of the port of Beirut and the consequent diversion of shipments to the ports of Latakia and Tartous continued to affect supply operations in the Field.

44. In June 1982, the Syrian Field Office was heavily committed in bringing relief to thousands of Palestine refugees who had fled into eastern and north Lebanon and the Damascus area.
5. Assistance to refugees in poverty

45. The discussions with the Government referred to in paragraph 86 of last year's report have not produced an agreement on the provision of additional assistance to refugees in particular hardship.
C. Jordan

1. Impact of threat to school programme

46. The possibility that the financial deficit might force the Agency to relinquish responsibility for its general education programme for approximately 135,000 children in Jordan and to terminate the services of some 31,700 teachers was a matter of grave concern until the end of April 1982 and affected relations with the Jordan Government the refugee population And the Agency's staff.

47. The Government of Jordan, both as a host Government and as a member of the UNRWA Advisory Commission, was kept closely informed of the Agency's financial difficulties. The Commissioner-General was received by his Majesty King Hussein and had several meetings with the Minister for Foreign Affairs and the Minister for Occupied Territories Affairs to discuss the Agency's financial problems and ways to overcome them.

48. Pessimistic information on the Agency's financial situation had a profound effect on staff morale, which, among other things, resulted in significantly increased resignations by teachers. Another factor contributing to low staff morale was the lack of any cost-of-living salary adjustments. The purchasing power of salaries had declined substantially since January 1975, though there is no evidence that UNRWA wage levels are significantly out of line with the rest of the local labor market. Discussions are under way between the administration and the staff unions in Jordan concerning a comprehensive salary survey.
2. Assistance to refugees in poverty

49. It was not possible to remove the refugees' and the Government's opposition to the Agency's measures to give priority in its relief programmes to the most needy refugees. The cause of this opposition was the refugee community's fear that such a policy was likely to lead to a reduction in the general assistance given by the Agency to refugees as a whole. However, in the face of inadequate funds, the Agency considered that it had no alternative but to concentrate its resources on its education and health programmes and to ensure that relief went to those refugees certified as in need of it. The number of poor refugees receiving relief, mainly in the form of extra rations, health care, priority of admission to the Agency's training centres and some minor benefits, was approximately 121,000 persons out of 740,000 registered refugees in Jordan.
3. Medical care

50. On 1 July 1981, the Agency introduced a scheme whereby refugee patients suffering particular financial difficulties are reimbursed the costs, within certain limits, of treatment in Government hospitals. This scheme replaced a previous agreement with the Government, under which refugee patients, on certain conditions, were entitled to free services at government hospitals against payment by the Agency of a fixed annual amount. The present scheme, which concentrates mainly on the poor, has not been generally accepted by the refugee community or the Government of Jordan.

51. A cholera epidemic broke out in Jordan during the period July-September 1981. Although all possible precautionary and, preventive measures were taken both by the Government and by UNRWA, 64 cases occurred among camp residents.
4. Response to Israeli invasion of south Lebanon

52. In order to conserve stocks of food for emergency relief in Lebanon, the distribution of basic rations in Jordan (as in Syria) was suspended in June 1982. This measure met with the approval of refugee leaders in Jordan. UNRWA staff in Jordan, as well as in Syria, the West Bank and Gaza Strip, decided to forego a day's pay to assist Palestine refugees in Lebanon who were suffering the consequences of the Israeli invasion.
D. West Bank

1. Staff matters

53. Following the implementation of the recommendations contained in the International Civil Service Commission's report of 1980 on its comprehensive survey of conditions of employment in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, there remained a series of seven points which it was agreed the Agency administration would resolve to the extent possible, in consultation with the staff. These consultations were completed in November 1981 with a package settlement, effective 1 December 1981. The staff, it should be noted, are paid in Jordanian dinars.
2. Legal matters

54. In the West Bank, as in the Gaza strip, many staff members were summoned by the occupation authorities during (and after) Agency working hours, and in many instances returned without being interrogated. Discussions continued with the authorities to improve the passing of timely and complete information concerning detained staff and particularly staff brought to trial. This is a problem which the Agency faces in Jordan and the Syrian Arab Republic as well as the occupied territories.

55. There was progress in easing restrictions imposed by the Israeli authorities on the duty travel of certain Agency staff members to the West Bank and the Gaza Strip. Two staff members of headquarters (Amman) previously unable to travel to the occupied territories are now permitted to do so.
3. Security

56. There was serious unrest in the West Bank during the months of November and December 198i and from March 1982, provoked by the reaction of the population to various measures and decisions taken by the occupation authorities. Many of these led to strikes throughout the West Bank, curfews on some camps and villages for varying periods and restrictions on travel of residents in certain localities. Demonstrations took the form of stone throwing, tire-burning and construction of road barriers, all of which led to military intervention. Most of those events affected the Agency's operation to the extent that attendance at Agency schools and training centres varied from nil to 100 per cent during these periods. Some staff had difficulty at times in reaching their duty stations, but wherever it was possible they did so, thus encouraging pupils, trainees and patients to attend the Agency installations. In spite of this, much training time was lost at the three training centres and most of the schools. The 1980/1981 academic year had to be extended to make up for time lost in, that year and plans were made to compensate for further loss of time in 1981/1982.

57. During periods of curfew in camps, efforts to maintain essential services such as water supply, garbage clearance and, in some instances, preparation of food at supplementary feeding centres and operation of health centres were successful soon after the imposition of curfews.

58. On more than one occasion, troops entered two training centres to identify and detain those believed to be involved in incidents, but left soon after. In December, at one centre, 246 female trainees and 6 staff were detained, though all but one staff member were released the same night. Subsequently, 20 trainees were brought to trial and were fined or given suspended sentences.

59. Youth Activities Centre have been closed by order of the authorities at Kalandia camp since 13 December, at Dheisheh camp since 16 April, at Balaka camp since 21 May and at Arroub and Fawwar camps since 24 June.

60. Negotiations were in hand with the authorities to reconstruct the shelters of three families in Balata and Dheisheh camps, which were demolished as punitive measures in 1980. No punitive demolitions of shelters took place during the reporting year.
4. Improvements in camps

61. Refugees in camps continued to show considerable initiative by executing projects to enhance their environment, notably, in water supply, roads and pathways and sewage disposal. Seventy-seven self-help projects, were completed at a total approximate cost of $189,950, to which the Agency contributed $14,190 and the community the balance. 4,730 m2 of concrete pathways and 1,337 meters of surface drains were completed in the environmental sanitation self-help programme and 475 meters of main drains were constructed by the Agency at a total cost of $54,045
(including a $29,506 refugee contribution). The Community has a growing interest in welfare activities. There were considerable construction improvements to youth activities centres; a new centre was constructed at Shufat camp and an extension to the one at Far'a camp, as self-help projects. Two other centres at Arroub and Nur Shams were under construction.
5. Health

62. During the summer of 1981, two refugees (of a total of seven persons affected in the West Bank) were treated for cholera; one refugee died. An outbreak of measles was reported at the end of December 1981, peaking in January and then declining.
6. Effects of financial crisis

63. In common with the other four Fields, the freezing of non-recurrent expenditure except for the most urgent needs again caused many projects in the West Bank to be suspended. Less maintenance was carried out and the construction of new premises to replace unsatisfactory schools and health centres was deferred.
7. Construction projects

64. The Field Office completed several construction projects at a cost of $620,237. Some of these, namely the Aida Girls school, an extension to the Kalandia Vocational Training Centre, a central library for Kalandia and an extension to the Qalqilia hospital, had started before July 1981.

65. Twenty-seven shelters occupied by families in special hardship were repaired or reconstructed at a cost of $9,993. The occupants of the shelters could not afford to pay for the work themselves.
8. Help for disabled

66. The Field Office has paid special attention to handicapped refugees during this International Year of Disabled Persons. Committees were formed to identify the handicapped and to discuss ways and means of improving their condition. Many seminars were held and practical measures included the provision of wheel-chairs and crutches, suitably designed toys and games for disabled members of the family, and the organization of group picnics. Efforts were made to improve facilities for the convenience of the disabled in the camps.

E. Gaza Strip
1. The security situation

67. The year was much more difficult than the previous one, although at the beginning life in the camps was relatively quiet. During the first half of December 1981, operations were disrupted, particularly in the schools and the vocational training centre, as a consequence of the widespread disturbances throughout the Gaza Strip. UNRWA exerted great efforts to keep Agency schools working, but was frequently frustrated when gangs of youths roaming the streets threw stones at the tiled roofs and windows of schools to frighten the children into leaving. The situation was further aggravated after a pupil in Rafah was killed in a clash with the Israeli army, following which a curfew was imposed there for three days.

68. Tension has continued during 1982, mainly in Rafah in January when a curfew was imposed for four days following earlier demonstrations. In February, schools were disrupted by demonstrations over several days in Gabalia and in Rafah. March and April saw an escalation in the disturbances. During March there were many disruptions in schools, municipality strikes, throwing of hand grenades, curfews imposed in some areas and two school children shot dead. The situation worsened in April, particularly after the shooting incident at the Dome of the Rock on 11 April. Added to the already tense situation, this sparked off widespread demonstrations the like of which had not been seen before in the Gaza Strip, involving in some cases violent clashes between hundred's of demonstrators of all ages and the Israeli security forces. They were particularly bad in Jabalia, Nuseirat and Khan Younis, resulting in the deaths of three school children and many wounded. Also during April, more hand grenades were thrown in Gaza, and curfews were imposed for periods ranging from 2 to 10 days in various areas and camps. At one point, almost three quarters of the refugee camp population was under curfew.

69. In such areas, the Agency's services were seriously affected, e.g., schools, normal health centre services supplementary feeding, ration distribution, and garbage collection. However, though not without some difficulty, in most of the camps under curfew the Agency managed to arrange to pump water to the refugees shelters, to provide essential health services (e.g., maternity wards) and ambulance transport for emergencies. In one or two instances, it was also possible to arrange some garbage collection.
2. Relations with the Israeli occupation authorities

70. Following the punitive demolition of shelters in May and June 1981, which left 76 refugees homeless, the Agency decided to re-house the refugees. Standard Agency shelters were built elsewhere in the camp and the families moved into them in early December.

71. The occupation authorities are installing a new water distribution network in Nuseirat, Maghazi and Bureij camps. An agreement was concluded in May 1982 between the authorities and UNRWA, under which UNRWA contributed $31,500 towards the costs of connecting its installations and the shelters of poor refugees to the network.

72. In December 1981, the agency was told by the authorities that, under IDF Order No. 654 of July 1980, amending the Education Ordinance of 2 January 1933 of the Mandatory Government of Palestine, it would henceforth have to obtain permits for all school construction, including additions and changes to existing schools. This followed a request by the Military Government early in 1981 to co-ordinate all UNRWA construction outside the camps. Accordingly, in April 1981 details had been provided concerning a school the Agency wished to build. In the absence of any reply to the contrary, the Agency proceeded to make the necessary plans, drawings and lease agreements, and had let a contract for over $160,000. Construction commenced on 9 February 1982. The authorities ordered the work to stop later that day and temporarily detained the contractor. The Agency objected both to the Civil Administration and to the Ministry of Foreign Affairs. Over two months later, the authorities responded that they had decided to complete the construction of an unfinished building in the same area, intended as a Government school but which
would also serve refugee children in the vicinity.

73. In April 1982, Law No. 4/1960 of the Egyptian Administration of the Gaza Strip was cited by the authorities in support of their requirement that the Agency must obtain permission before carrying out any kind of construction in the camps. However, the Explanatory Note attached to the Law made it clear that the law had been necessary because of contraventions committed by individual refugees, against whom, not UNRWA, it had been aimed. Furthermore, the law had never been applied to UNRWA in practice. The authorities were therefore notified that the Agency wished to continue its operations, such as the addition of classrooms to house extra pupils, without impediment.

74. On 23 May 1982, the authorities prevented the continuation of another project, this time for disabled refugees within the Khan Younis camp which had a contract value of some $50,000. The obstruction came despite detailed co-ordination of the project some time ago with the Military Government, which had finally informed UNRWA after almost a year of discussion that it could go ahead and build the centre without further referral.

3. Withdrawal from Sinai

75. Following implementation of the peace agreement between Egypt and Israel and the Israeli withdrawal from the Sinai in April 1982, several thousand registered refugees remained on the Egyptian side of the border, deprived of access to UNRWA’s services. The biggest problem was that of the Canada housing project (an Israeli Government scheme built on the site formerly occupied by a Canadian contingent with UNEF): over 4,500 refugees in the project were cut off from UNRWA's health centre, supplementary feeding centre, ration distribution centre, youth activities centre, pre-school, women’s activities centre and sewing centre. Perhaps most important, over 1,000 children were deprived access to their elementary and preparatory schools, although ad hoc arrangements were made for them to continue to receive instruction, using rooms in a former Government school, and for some students to cross the border to sit for their final examinations. As movement across the new border was restricted to a few exceptional cases, UNRWA's 56 employees in the Canada project were prevented from attending their places of work. Efforts were in hand at the end of the reporting period to try to provide some temporary alternative arrangements for essential services.
4. Improvements

76. UNRWA has again received special contributions to improve conditions for the refugees in the densely populated Gaza Strip. Three new youth activities centres have been built and six school libraries; a building formerly used by the tuberculosis hospital at Bureij has been converted into a school; roads have been improved; and pathways and drains have been constructed on a self-help basis with the participation of the refugees. In addition, more dilapidated old army barracks have been replaced by 214 shelters during the reporting period, two multi-purpose schoolrooms were almost completed, and construction of a new health centre had begun.

5. Health

77. Cholera broke out in the Gaza Strip between August and November 1981, when 161 confirmed cases were reported, of whom 88 were from the indigenous population and the remaining 73 were refugees. The incidence of the disease was 40.7 per 100,000 among the combined population of refugees and residents living in the towns and villages, but only 28.3 per 100,000 among the inhabitants of the refugee camps.

78. A three-year study, to evaluate the effect of the mass use of the oral rehydration salt (ORS) formula recommended by WHO for use in communities of developing countries, was completed at the end of 1981.

6. Housing

79. Three hundred and fifty-eight families comprising 2,183 individuals moved out of the camps into Government housing projects. Many of these were refugees whose shelters were demolished to make way for a security zone at the new Rafah border and who had moved to plots of land in a nearby housing project.

7. Supply and transport

80. Some 18 tons of prescribed textbooks, based on the Egyptian syllabus were received from Cairo via the Neot Sinai border crossing point for use in UNRWA schools in the Gaza Strip. A new workshop was opened in March 1982 to overhaul major vehicle assemblies for the Gaza and West Bank Fields.


III. REPORT ON THE OPERATIONS 0F THE AGENCY,
1 July 1981-30 June 1982


A. Education and training services


81. Under an agreement between UNRWA and UNESCO, the latter is responsible for the professional aspects of the education programme, which in 1981/1982 included general education at elementary and preparatory (lower secondary) levels in Agency schools vocational and teacher training at Agency centres, and a university scholarship programme. Many refugee children continued their education at the upper-secondary level in government schools of the host countries or in private schools. In 1981, expenditure on education and training amounted to $104.5 million and accounted for 57.8 per cent of the Agency is total expenditure.

82. In addition, the Agency provided some pre-school education (para. 159), youth activities and adult training in crafts (para. 161), and medical and para-medical education and training (paras. 132-134)

83. The crisis facing the education programme in 1981 and 1982, when forecast income was insufficient to cover the entire school system to the end of either 1981 or 1982, is referred to in the Foreword (para. 8) and in paragraphs 28, 38, 46-47 and 192.

1. General education

84. In 1981/1982 as in previous years, the largest single Agency activity was general education. In October 1981 a total of 338,386 pupils, 2,967 more than in 1980/1981, was, enrolled in the 645 Agency elementary and preparatory schools in Lebanon, the Syrian Arab Republic, Jordan, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip, served by a teaching force of 9,816. A further 88,662 refugee pupil were known to be enrolled in government and private elementary and secondary schools in the same areas, and approximately 45,750 non-eligible children were in Agency schools (see foot-note a/ to table 3 of annex I). The education staff in each field is headed by a locally recruited Field Education officer, working under the professional guidance of the Director of Education and of the specialist staff of the Department of Education at Headquarters.

85. Double-shifting of schools continued to be a problem and, because of the steady natural growth in the school population and the Agency's lack of funds for school construction on the scale required, was necessary in 479 schools (74.3 per cent of the total) during 1981/1982. In elementary schools in Jordan and the Syrian Arab Republic, double-shifting affected 95.3 and 93.5 per cent of the pupils respectively. It was possible to avoid turning children away from school only through double-shifting and the construction of some additional classrooms. Lack of funds for capital expenditure generally limited school construction to the minimum necessary to prevent triple- shifting and to replace the most unsatisfactory school premises. During 1981/1982, over all fields, 19 prefabricated classrooms, 75 standard class and administration rooms and 8 specialized rooms were completed, while 66 standard-class and administration rooms and 3 specialized rooms were under construction. In addition, under community-help schemes, 16 classrooms and 8 specialized rooms were constructed, and 2 specialized rooms were under construction.

86. In Lebanon, while schools in most areas opened for the new school year on the schedule date of 14 September, the schools in Beirut and Damour (south of Beirut) opened on 1 September in order to complete the work on the 1980/1981 curriculum, which had been disrupted as a result of armed clashes in the area between March and June 1981 (see para. 118 of last year’s report). While incidents of occasional violence occurred in various parts of Lebanon between the beginning of the school year and mid-April, disruption to the normal operation of schools was usually limited to those schools in the immediate vicinity of the violence, and then only for a few days on each occasion. There was, however, a significant interruption to the education programme the schools in the latter half of April and in May, due particularly to air-raids and their aftermath. June began with a heavy Israeli air attack on Beirut followed almost immediately by the Israeli invasion of Lebanon, when all schools throughout the country were closed down for this remaining month of the school year. Enrolment in Agency schools in Lebanon totaled 36,860 refugee pupils, 26,251 of whom were in the elementary and 10,609 in the preparatory cycle. Of the 87 schools, comprising 743 elementary and 310 preparatory class sections with a total of 1,261 teachers, 48 schools (with 518 class sections) operated a double shift. Prescribed textbooks for Agency schools in Lebanon totaled 195, all but one of which have been approved by UNESCO.

87. In the Syrian Arab Republic, Agency schools started the year on 26 September and operated satisfactorily, except that the four schools in the Hama area could not operate between 6 February and 13 March because of fighting in the area. A total of 47,724 pupils attended the 65 elementary and 46 preparatory schools, comprising 1,199 class sections served by 1,422 teachers. Ninety-four of these schools, involving 1,065 class sections and 42,869 pupils, operated a double shift. Of the 115 textbooks currently prescribed, 71 have been approved by UNESCO.

88. In Jordan, the 208 Agency schools recommenced on 22 August and operated normally throughout the year. The total enrolment was 135,224 in the elementary and preparatory cycles comprising 3,326 class Sections served by 3,760 teachers. Double-shifting occurred in 194 schools, involving 3,129 class sections and 127,877 pupils. The total number of textbooks prescribed in Jordan was 111, of which 79 have been approved by UNESCO.

89. In the West Bank, Agency schools started the school year on 1 September and operated normally until November, when widespread unrest and demonstrations occurred and continued for the remainder of the school year, with serious adverse effects on the operation of the schools. Enrolment in the 99 Agency schools in the West Bank totaled 39,417 pupils in 785 elementary and 317 preparatory class sections, served by 1,265 teachers. Fifty-five schools, with 582 class sections and 22,104 pupils, operated a double shift. The 111 textbooks prescribed for Jordan are also the prescribed textbooks for the West Bank. Of the 79 approved by UNESCO, the Israeli occupying authorities have refused import permits for 11.

90. In the Gaza Strip, the Agency schools also commenced on 1 September and operated normally until December, when the work of most schools and pre-school centres was interrupted for up to 14 days by demonstrations in support of a strike by local doctors and pharmacists against certain measures introduced by the occupation authorities in the Gaza Strip. In 1982, as in the West Bank, demonstrations for various reasons by the Palestinian community escalated during March, April and May, with consequent serious disruptions to the operation of Agency schools. Enrolment totaled 79,161 pupils in 140 schools, comprising 1,254 elementary and 466 preparatory class sections with a teaching force of 2,108. Double-shifting occurred in 88 schools, involving 1,044 class sections with 48,703 pupils. The total number of text books prescribed by the Egyptian Ministry of education was 117; of these, UNESCO has approved 72, of which the occupying authorities have permitted the importation of 61, have disallowed the importation of 10 and have one under consideration.

2. Vocational and technical education

91. A further increase was registered in the number of training places available to Palestine refugees in the vocational and technical courses conducted in UNRWA training centres, bringing the training capacity to 3,868. The increase, a net total of 202 places, was due mainly to a generous contribution from the Fund of OPEC and was achieved by extending the double-shift system at the Damascus Vocational Training Centre, Wadi Seer Training Centre (Jordan) and Gaza Vocational Training Centre to include additional class sections in existing courses; and by the addition of a new course (Auto-body Repairer) at the Kalandia Vocational Training Centre (West Bank), two new courses (Auto-body Repairer, Air-conditioning and Refrigeration) at the Damascus Centre, a new Course (Auto Electrician) at the Gaza Centre, and a new class section in the Business and Office Practice course at the Siblin Training Centre (Lebanon). Details of the training places available in the Agency training centres in 1981/1982 by the trade group, centre and sex are given in table 5 of annex I. In addition, the Agency sponsored the vocational training of 45 refugees in private institutions.

92. Operations at four of the seven training centres proceeded normally during 1981/1982. But two of the Centres in the West Bank and the Gaza Centre were affected by disturbances such as protest demonstrations and strikes, the West Bank centres seriously.

93. Work opportunities for graduates of the Agency's vocational and technical education training centres continued to be excellent, as shown by the figures of 1,441 employed (88.2 per cent) out of the 1980/1981 graduates of Agency training centres. The demand for vocational training in Agency centres from Palestine refugees eligible for this form of assistance rises each year, but fewer than 20 per cent (approximately 1,900) of those applying can be accepted because of the limited capacity. Clearly there is ample justification for a large-scale expansion of the programme, but only limited expansion is possible given the Agency's present financial resources.

3. Teacher training

94. The teacher-training activities aim primarily at providing qualified teachers for Agency schools. The teacher-training sections of the Agency training centres accept Palestine refugee candidates who have successfully completed 12 years of general schooling, and provide them with a two-year professional training programme which qualifies them to teach at the elementary school level. Graduates of these centres are given priority for Agency appointments. If further teachers are needed, the Agency then resorts to employing university or high-school graduates, who usually lack professional qualifications. The Agency arranges basic in-service teacher- training courses for such under-qualified teachers through the Institute of Education, which forms part of the Department's Teacher and Higher Education Division.

95. During 1981/1982, pre-service teacher-training continued to be provided at four Agency centres – one in Amman, two in Ramallah, West Bank, and one in Siblin, Lebanon. Enrolment totaled 1,323, made up of 684 males and 639 females (see table 4 of annex I for details). Operations at the Amman centre during the year were satisfactory, but, as described in paragraphs 44, 67 and 69, teacher training at the West Bank centres and in Lebanon suffered serious interruptions as a result of the political situation in the region.

96. Towards the end of 1981, the Jordanian Ministry of Education issued a new set of revised syllabuses, which are now being followed by the Agency's teacher-training centres in Amman and Ramallah. At the end of the 1981/1982 school year, the second-year trainees of the Amman centre will sit for the General Comprehensive Examination to be conducted by the Jordan Government for the second time in Jordan. Of the 272 second-year teacher trainees of the Amman centre who sat for the first General Comprehensive Examination held by the Jordan Government in July 1981, 244 passed, recording an average percentage of 89.7 passes, the highest percentage obtained by any institution in Jordan.

97. At the end of the 1980/1981 training year, 635 teacher trainees (299 men and 336 women) graduated from the pre-service teacher-training centres. By 30 June 1982, 244 of them were employed in Agency schools and 179 were known to have found employment outside the Agency, making a total of 66.6 per cent of the 1981 graduates known to be employed.

98. In co-ordination with the Institute of Education, the two education development centres established in Jordan and the Gaza Strip in 1974 and the centre and units established in the West Bank, Lebanon and Syria in 1980/1981 continued their efforts to improve the quality of education provided by UNRWA schools in their respective fields. Fourteen senior Palestinian education staff members wore awarded fellowships for overseas study aimed at improving their professional competence; of these, eight were awarded by UNESCO, two by UNRWA, three by Governments and one by a voluntary organization.
4. University scholarships

99. During the academic year 1981/1982, UNRWA awarded 351 scholarships to Palestine refugees for study at Arab universities, of which 280 were continuing scholarships and 71 were new awards (see table 5 of annex I). The UNRWA scholarships, partly funded from special contributions, are awarded for one year, but are renewable from year to year for the duration of the course of study, provided the student passes the end-of-year university examinations and is promoted to the next stage of his course.

100. By its resolution 36/146 H of 12 February 1982, the General Assembly appealed, inter alia, to all Member States and United Nations agencies to make special allocations, scholarships and grants to Palestine refugees and requested UNRWA to receive, hold in trust and award them. The Secretary-General's report to the Assembly A/37/427 will describe the response in detail.

B. Health services

101. Preventive and curative medical care services were provided to eligible Palestine refugees at the 100 UNRWA health units and by special arrangement at 20 government and two voluntary agency clinics. Other health e vices were subsidized by UNRWA at government, university and private health, institutes.

102. The Israeli invasion of Lebanon which started early in June, resulting in the destruction of refugee camps and UNRWA facilities, caused total disruption of health and supplementary feeding services, particularly in the south and around, Beirut. Emergency, assistance to displaced, refugees was provided when the cessation of fighting permitted. Plans were prepared for the re-establishment of essential health services in places where displaced refugees had congregated, to be implemented as soon as the situation stabilized.

1. Medical care

103. Curative services, both in- and out-patient, were provided at about the same levels as in previous years. However, their delivery was interrupted from time to time by military action in south Lebanon, fighting in the Syrian Arab Republic and disturbances in the West Bank and Gaza Strip. (Statistical data in respect of the out-patient care directly provided by the Agency are shown in table 6 of annex I.)

104. The Agency operates 24 dental clinics and continues to strengthen its specialist clinics, where patients with degenerative and chronic diseases are seen by appointment and proper follow-up is ensured.

105. The laboratory facilities and equipment were further improved. The Agency administers three central laboratories in Gaza, Amman and Jerusalem, and 23 clinical laboratories where simple tests are carried out. In Lebanon and the Syrian Arab Republic, subsidized private laboratories provide the services normally performed by an UNRWA central laboratory.

106. The Agency continues to administer a small cottage hospital of 36 beds in Qalqiliya (West Bank) and nine camp maternity wards, the majority in the Gaza Strip. It also administers, jointly with the Public Health Department in Gaza, a tuberculosis hospital with a complement of 70 beds in Bureij camp. UNRWA continued to subsidize the necessary in-patient care facilities in government and private hospitals. The daily average number of hospital beds made available to refugee patients during the year was 1,460 (as shown in table 6 of annex I). The continually rising cost of medical care services entailed substantial increases in almost all the subsidies paid by UNRKA. In addition to their use of the subsidized facilities, an undetermined number of refugee patients independently sought admission to government hospitals at nominal cost. In Jordan, the Ministry of Health continued to collect fees from refugee patients referred to its hospitals by Agency medical officers. The Agency has therefore established a scheme to refund the cost of hospitalization at government hospitals to patients who are members of poor families. In the Gaza Strip, the Agency maintained its refund scheme for refugee patients hospitalized in government institutions in Gaza or Israel.

107. The prevailing circumstances in Beirut are responsible for a persistent shortage of hospital beds in Lebanon, since many of the hospitals are still inaccessible to Palestine refugees. Consequently, a large number of cases continue to be referred to the medical centre of the American University of Beirut at a relatively high cost. Many refugee patients, on their own initiative, seek admission to institutions run by the Palestine Red Crescent Society.

108. The Agency provides to a limited extent for the medical rehabilitation of crippled children in specialized institutions, as well as orthopedic devices. Contributions from voluntary agencies usually help to meet the cost of appliances.

2. Control of communicable diseases

109. Prevention and control of communicable diseases are among the main concerns of the Agency’s Department of Health. An expanded programme of immunization forms an integral part of the Agency's maternal and child health services. Infants and young children attending the clinics are thus protected against tuberculosis, diphtheria, tetanus, whooping cough, poliomyelitis and measles in all fields and also against enteric fevers in Syria. Reinforcing doses of vaccines are given to children on admission to school.

110. Among the control measures of public health importance are the improvement of environmental conditions; the emphasis on personal and food hygiene through health education activities, particularly in schools and health centres; and the administration of specific chemotherapy and chemoprophylaxis. Close co-operation is maintained with the government health authorities in disease surveillance and control.

111. An outbreak of cholera occurred in the area during 1981, involving 70 cases in Jordan, two in the West Bank and 74 in the Gaza Strip. Of these, two ended fatally, one in Jordan and one in the West Bank. Six cases of cutaneous leishmaniasis were reported by the West Bank, mostly in the Jericho area. Three imported cases of malaria were reported by Jordan.

112. The following diseases showed a decrease in incidence compared with the period of the previous report: brucellosis, conjunctivitis, diarrhoeal diseases, infectious hepatitis, poliomyelitis and trachoma; while an increase was observed in influenza, measles, mumps and whooping cough. There was no significant change in the incidence of other communicable diseases. (Further details are given in the; annual report of the Director of Health.)

113. The Agency operates a comprehensive tuberculosis control programme, including case detection, hospital and domiciliary treatment and follow-up of cases and their contacts. The incidence of respiratory tuberculosis has for several years been about one case in 10,000 of the population eligible for health services.

3. Maternal and child health

114. Maternal and child health care is provided in most UNRWA health centres, supported by specialist and hospital referral services. A number of government and voluntary agencies supplement Agency services, especially in Amman, Damascus and Jerusalem. Data on maternal and child health services are presented in table 6 of annex I.

115. Pre-natal care included regular health supervision and the issue of extra rations and iron-folate tablets. Approximately half the number of deliveries reported took place at home, attended by Agency-supervised dayahs (traditional birth attendants). A smaller number of deliveries were carried out in UNRWA maternity centres, six in the Gaza Strip, one in the Syrian Arab Republic and two in the West Bank. More babies were delivered in hospitals especially urban areas; but only complicated cases were referred by the Agency health staff.

116. The planned parenthood services continued in seven health centres in Gaza, two in Jordan and one in the Syrian Arab Republic.

117. Regular health supervision was provided in child health clinics for children up to three years of age and for special cases up to five years of age. Immunization was given against the six diseases included in the generalized expanded programme of immunization. The nutrition of children was promoted through educational activities in child health clinics and through the provision of nutritionally balanced meals at feeding centres. Dry milk was distributed to all children from six months to three years of age.

118. All health centres offered early and effective treatment, with oral rehydration salt, of children suffering from diarrhea. The study in Gaza of the efficacy of oral rehydration therapy was concluded by the end of 1981. Children at risk from malnutrition received special attention and care in the nutrition rehabilitation clinics, set-up as an integral part of the child health clinics. A WHO Consultant helped evaluate these clinics in the West Bank.

119. School health services were provided by health centre and special school health teams for children in UNRWA elementary and preparatory schools (see table 6 of annex I). Children entering school for the first time were medically examined, and the necessary health care was carried out in health centres and through referral to specialist care. Immunization against tuberculosis, diphtheria and, tetanus was given to school children in all Fields; in Syria, typhoid immunization was also given. Children in need received a mid-day meal at the supplementary feeding centres.

120. In each field, a team of health education workers promoted the health education programme with the participation of health, education and welfare staff. Their activities in health centres, schools, welfare centres and camp communities were supported by camp and school health committees and included camp sanitation and disease prevention campaigns. Classes in mother and child health care were included in the sewing courses for young women in all Fields. The health calendar for 1981, used primarily in Agency schools, covered topics related to the various aspects of the Agency's health programme. A series of assignments on health education was prepared for use in teacher-training programmes. World Health Day, on the theme Add Life to Years, was celebrated Agency-wide on 7 April with exhibitions, meetings and various other activities.

4. Nursing services

121. Registered nurses, auxiliaries and traditional birth attendants participate in the curative and preventive activities in health centres, schools and in the community. But there is difficulty in some Fields with recruitment of nursing staff, because of the scarcity of trained personnel and the increasing demand for them from employers in the region who are able to offer more competitive conditions of service.

5. Environmental health

122. In, co-operation with the host Governments, municipalities and local councils, the Agency provided basic community sanitation services in camps, comprising supplies of potable water, sanitary disposal of waste, drainage of storm water, latrine facilities, and control of insect and rodent vectors of disease. A total of 710,000 refugees and displaced persons living in 61 locations benefited from these services. There was some improvement in the sanitary conditions in a few camps, mainly through community self-help efforts.

123. Lack of funds again prevented the Agency from providing adequate subsidies (in the form of building materials) to self-help schemes, which resulted in a serious set-back to efforts to improve sanitation services further. However, a modest input by the Agency enabled pathways to be paved, drains constructed, sewer-lines laid and water-supplies improved in some camps. The refugee communities are more than willing to participate in projects of this kind, but further, financial support is needed to boost the programme.

124. At Amman New and Jabal el Hussein camps in Jordan, about 2,700 shelters have been connected to the municipal sewerage system and the rest will benefit soon from the Jordan Government scheme to provide sewerage facilities to all refugees living in the two camps. In Lebanon, three sewer-lines were laid at Ein el-Hilweh camp in continuation of a self-help scheme initiated in 1979, before the camp was destroyed in the Israeli invasion of June 1982.

125. The self-help and municipality-assisted programmes to provide indoor taps to refugee shelters made further progress. Five camps in the Gaza Strip benefited, three in Jordan, one in Lebanon, one in the Syrian Arab Republic, and 11 in the West Bank, including Jalazone camp where most of the shelters were provided with indoor taps.

126. In the Syrian Arab Republic, a scheme to provide an adequate, independent supply of water to schools, clinics, and supplementary feeding centres at four camps in the Damascus area has been completed. Improvised chlorinators were replaced with electrically-driven chlorine-solution feeders at most of the Agency's water pumping stations, improving the disinfection of the water supplies. In the West Bank, financial and technical assistance was provided to Nur Shams camp inhabitants to build an elevated water reservoir.

127. Refuse collection and removal facilities were maintained at an adequate level with the replacement of worn-out vehicles. Contractual arrangements with the nearby municipalities further improved the service in four camps in the West Bank and one camp in Jordan.

128. The condition of the sanitary facilities at the Agency's schools has caused concern. To improve them will require a substantial capital outlay, but a special effort is being made to find the resources in view of the priority which must be accorded to this task.

6. Nutrition, including supplementary feeding

129. Constant supervision, protection and promotion of the nutritional status of the refugees is an important feature of the Agency's health services, directed particularly at the most vulnerable groups of refugees: infants, pre-school and school children, pregnant women, nursing mothers, non-hospitalized tuberculosis patients and certain others. The growth of children attending the child health clinics is closely monitored through regular weight measurements. The data collected during the year show a generally satisfactory nutritional state in most refugee children, although a sizeable percentage of them continue to suffer from mild or moderate degrees of malnutrition. In both respects, the refugee children compare closely with the indigenous residents of the host countries.

130. The Agency’s supplementary feeding programme provides hot mid-day meals, milk and extra rations for vulnerable groups. At the 92 UNRWA supplementary feeding centres and four voluntary agency centres, nutritionally balanced mid-day meals are served six days a week to young refugee children and on medical grounds, to older children and adults. A special high-protein high-calorie diet is also available daily to infants and children suffering from diarrhea or malnutrition. Vitamin A and D capsules are issued with the meals. Whole and skim milk are distributed in dry form to non-breast- fed infants up to six months and to all children from six to 36 months attending the child health clinics. However 61,000 children benefit from this programme (see annex I, table 7).

131. In Jordan, as in previous years, the Agency continued to provide, on behalf of the Government and on a reimbursable basis, milk and mid-day meals for persons displaced in 1967 (other than UNRWA-registered refugees) and living in the camps.

7. Medical and_para-medical education and training

132. The Agency maintained and further developed its programme of education and training in the field of health. In 1981/1982, 144 refugee students held UNRWA medical university scholarships (see annex I, table 5) and 190 refugee trainees were enrolled in laboratory technician, public health inspector and assistant pharmacist courses in Agency training centres. Of these, 26 university students and 96 trainees, either successfully completed their courses of study or were expected to pass their qualifying examinations.

133. Scholarships for basic nursing education are funded from donations received from voluntary agencies for the purpose. While UNRWA's need for nursing staff is very great, the Agency has no means of providing nursing training itself and relies entirely on outside sources. It is becoming more and more difficult to fill vacant posts with properly qualified staff.

134. Intensive in-service training was carried out by the Department of Health for its own staff in the various disciplines of the programme. Within the framework of a WHO-sponsored training and fellowship programme for health personnel, one graduate nurse was granted a fellowship by the WHO Eastern Mediterranean Regional. Office to attend a teacher-training programme (diploma course) in the academic year 1981/82, and four medical officers successfully completed a one-year WHO fellowship in public health training in 1981. Study leave was also authorized to two medical officers in the academic year 1981/82, to enable them to complete their studies for the Master's Degree in pediatrics. Two senior staff nurses (one each from Syria and the Gaza Strip) completed a one-year post-basic midwifery training course in Cairo, and two (one each from Jordan and the Gaza Strip) were following a similar course of training in Amman. Two other senior staff nurses from Gaza completed a one-year course of training in Cairo, one in public health nursing and the other in midwifery teacher-training. The basic midwifery programme for 18 students in Gaza, which commenced in the previous reporting period, was continued.

C. Relief services

135. The Agency's relief services comprise the distribution of basic rations; the provision of or assistance with, shelter in individual cases of special hardship or in such exceptional circumstances as the displacement of refugees or destruction of or damage to shelters; and hardship and welfare assistance. Services are provided for registered Palestine refugees according to eligibility; in addition, a small measure of humanitarian assistance is still provided for persons displaced as a result of the June 1967 hostilities.

136. The unsettled situation in Lebanon disrupted the relief programme throughout the period under review, culminating in the Israeli Invasion on 6 June 1962. The invasion had a direct effect on the relief services provided to some 197,000 out of the almost 239,000 persons registered in Lebanon. At the end of the reporting period, UNRWA had been unable to assess the extent of the damage to refugee shelters in the camps and to UNRWA installations, although preliminary estimates indicated that the damage is extensive. Further damage to the camps on the outskirts of Beirut was being sustained as a result of the continuing Israeli siege of the city.

137. The Commissioner-General made an early decision that UNRWA should provide assistance to all Palestinians in need as a result of the conflict, irrespective of whether they were registered refugees or not. UNRWA commenced distributing foodstuffs, blankets and household items from stocks held in its warehouses in Lebanon, Syria, Jordan, the West Bank and Gaza Strip, and donations in kind received from OXFAM (UK), the Norwegian Refugee Council, Radda Barnen, (Sweden) and World Vision (US) on 13 June. By the end of June approximately 30,000 persons (6,000 families) had been assisted. UNRWA also provided logistical support and other aid to sister United Nations organizations and voluntary Agencies, e.g., UNICEF, the International Committee of the Red Cross and the Palestine Red Crescent.

138. Although accurate figures of the number of Palestinians who required assistance were difficult to ascertain, given the confused state of affairs in south Lebanon and the continuing state of war around Beirut, UNRWA estimated that between 150,000 and 200,000 Palestinians would be in need of the Agency’s emergency relief until at least the end of 1982.

139. In the Gaza Strip and the West Bank, the relief services were sporadically interrupted by local unrest with increasing frequency during the period under review. Eleven refugees have been reported killed and 323 wounded by Israeli soldiers and armed Israeli civilians during the period under review.

140. Fighting in the Syrian city of Hama during February 1982 resulted in some interruption to the relief programme. Five refugees, including one Agency staff member, were reported killed during this action. The building accommodating the UNRWA camp office, supplementary feeding centre and ration distribution point in Hama refugee camp was badly damaged, and some refugee shelters received minor damage.

141. At the request of the Jordan Government, and in accordance with General Assembly resolution 2252 (ES-V) of 4 July 1967, (and subsequent resolutions up to and including, 36/146 D) requesting the Agency to provide humanitarian assistance, as far as practicable, on an emergency basis and as a temporary measure to persons displaced as a result of the June 1967 hostilities who were not registered with UNRWA as refugees, the Agency has continued to distribute rations in Jordan on behalf of the Government to some 193,500 such persons, and to provide schooling, supplementary feeding, milk, and medical, sanitation and other, camp services to those residing in the post-1967 refugee camps. The Government reimburses the Agency for the cost of supplies used in the supplementary feeding and milk programmes and, until April 1981, half the cost of distributing basic rations to displaced persons. Since 1 April 1981, for financial reasons, the Agency has been obliged to charge the Government for the full cost of this distribution.

1. Eligibility and registration

142. The number of refugees registered with, the Agency on 30 June 1982 was 1,925,726 which, compared with 1,884,896 on 30 June 1981, represents an increase of 2.17 per cent. The eligibility of refugees for Agency services as continually revised to the extent possible. However, except for its own employees and their dependants (estimated to total 80,000 refugees), the Agency is unable without the agreement and co-operation of the authorities within its area of operations, to investigate employment status and income to the extent necessary to establish eligibility, for Agency services, which is governed by need.
2. Rations

143. Because of difficulties in rectifying ration rolls and the potential financial burden attendant upon lack of success, an absolute ceiling on the number of ration recipients was introduced in Jordan in 1952 and the increase in the other fields was limited to 2 per cent per annum until 1963, when it was necessary to impose a ceiling there, too. New beneficiaries can be added only when deletions are made. As a result, with the natural increase in the refugee population, the percentage of registered refugees receiving rations has fallen (it is now 43.45), and the number of nationally eligible children of refugees aged one-year and over (some of whom are now adults) for whom no ration is permanently available within the ceiling continues to grow. By June 1982, this category totaled 642,714: 343,171 in Jordan; 98,392 in the West Bank; 64,420 in Lebanon; 85,302 in the Syrian Arab Republic; and 51,429 in the Gaza Strip. The average number of rations issued by the Agency in 1981 was 826,769, including issues made on an emergency basis; this compares with 824,317 in 1980. Deletions on grounds of false and duplicate registration, death, absence, employment or graduation from UNRWA training centres were largely offset by the addition of children not previously receiving rations because of ration "ceilings".

144. Despite UNRWA’s continuing efforts to rectify the ration rolls (over a million persons have been removed from the rolls since 1950), there has never been a reliable list of those in need of food aid because it is very difficult in the face of resistance from the refugees and the opposition of the host Governments to establish the individual refugee's need of rations. In the early days of UNRWA's operations, when mass indigence was evident, the basic ration programme was a means - albeit a rough and ready one - of distributing support widely among the refugee community (even today, two thirds of all refugee families receive one or more rations). However, in recent years work opportunities in Arab oil-producing countries, the mobility and skills of the Palestinian labor force and economic in a high level of employment, and development in the host countries have resulted today nearly, all refugee families are self-supporting. This change in the economic circumstances of the refugees has gathered pace over a period in which UNRWA's financial resources have been placed under increasing strain by inflation and the struggle to keep pace with school enrolment.

145. Obliged in early 1978, for financial reasons, to reduce the content of the basic ration issued to more than 825,000 refugees each month, UNRWA took measures to protect the nutritional status of those families in which family composition, age or sickness made self-support impracticable: the "special hardship cases". This category of refugee, which includes widows, orphans, the aged, the physically and mentally handicapped and the chronically sick, has been given extra basic rations, assistance in the repair and reconstruction of shelters, token cash grants, blankets, clothing and preferential access to vocational and teacher training. The programme of assistance for special hardship cases began in east Jordan the West Bank and the Gaza Strip in the summer of 1978 and was introduced in Lebanon in 1981 in respect of widow and divorced women with young children. By the end of June 1982, 42,687 refugees were benefiting. Needy refugees have to apply for this assistance, which is given after verification (and periodic re-verification) of the family's means by Agency staff. The present level of UNRWA support still leaves special hardship case families dependent on relatives and neighbours. The programme has not been introduced in the Syrian Arab Republic because of opposition from the Government; the Government of Jordan has also voiced objections. The number of cases eligible for the programme was projected to be 60,000-70,000 Agency-wide.

146. Persons registered as special hardship cases are-eligible to receive a larger ration than other basic ration recipients and in 1981 each person so registered received, by Field, the following:

FieldFlourRiceSugarCooking
oil
Skim milk
powder
Gaza
West Bank
Jordan
Lebanon
Kilograms per annum
120.000
120.000
124.0000
115.000
9.000
6.000
3.400
-
12.000
7.200
12.000
7.200
6.000
4.500
3.750
4.500
-
-
4.000
4.000


Basic ration recipients received, by Field, the following:

FieldFlour RiceSugarCooking
oil
Kilograms per annum
Gaza
West Bank
Jordan
Syrian Arab Republic
Lebanon
60.000
60.000
60.000
60.000
60.000
5.000
2.000
2.200
-
-
7.200
7.200
7.200
7.200
7.200
4.500
3.000
3.000
3.750
3.000

147. In its decision 36/462 of 16 March 1982, inter alia, the General Assembly called upon Governments and organization making contributions in kind to UNRWA either to give cash instead or to allow UNRWA to sell their contributions for cash. A positive response by donors to this call will release funds for the higher-priority education programme. The Agency will still require certain quantities of foodstuffs for rations for special hardship cases for the supplementary feeding programme, (mainly for mothers and, infants) and for catering in residential, training centres. However, the basic ration programme for over 800,000 eligible persons will be phased out.

3. Camps and shelters

148. The population of the 51 camps established before 1967 increased from 547,048 to 557,198. In the 10 post-1967 camps (six in east Jordan and four in the Syrian Arab Republic), accommodating refugees displaced as a result of the 1967 hostilities, the population also showed an increase, from 162,256 last year to 165,272 at present. The number of registered refugees living in camps represented 35.11 per cent of the registered refugee population, varying from 55.31 per cent in the Gaza Strip and 51.72 per cent in Lebanon to only 25.30 per cent in the West Bank, because of the continuing presence in east Jordan of many former West Bank refugees who fled the West Bank in 1967/68 and are prevented by the Government of Israel from returning.

149. UNRWA provides services to Palestine refugees whether they live in camps or not. The camps were constructed on government land or on private land made available (with one or two minor exceptions) by the Governments, which remained responsible for the maintenance of law and order and similar governmental functions as part of their normal responsibilities towards the population within their borders. It is desirable to distinguish between three categories of buildings in camps: installations constructed or rented by the Agency (for example, schools, clinics and stores) which are in the possession of the Agency and used by it for the purpose indicated); shelters (huts) constructed by the Agency, which are the dwellings of and in the possession of refugees, who have maintained them in repair and in many cases added to and improved them) and houses and other buildings constructed and occupied or otherwise used by refugees (or others), for some of which the Agency may at most have given some assistance at the time they were constructed. It should be noted, too, that some camps contain large numbers of persons who are not registered refugees or even registered camp inhabitants. The camps established on the edges of towns have, in the course of time, tended to merge with the towns and to be indistinguishable for other parts of them.

150. The Agency assisted 339 families registered as special hardship cases in repairing or reconstructing their camp shelters during 1981, at a cost of $55,343.

151. Absolutely essential maintenance of Agency buildings and installations continued to be carried out, but much important maintenance work (e.g. external painting, repair of roads) was not executed because of lack of funds. This deferral adds to the problems in the following financial year, when the maintenance required may well be more serious and costs have risen.

152. Many self-help projects were completed, with the Agency contributing part of the cost and the refugee communities, municipalities or other local sources contributing the remainder, in the form of labor, materials or cash (see para. 123). The Governments of Jordan and the Syrian Arab Republic, the Palestine Liberation Organization in Lebanon, the Joint Jordanian-Palestinian Fund in respect of the Gaza Strip and the Jordanian Government in respect of the West Bank contributed to or carried out various work for the improvement of living conditions and facilities in the camps.

153. Extensive damage has been caused to Nuweimeh camp in the West Bank in the course of military exercises carried out in the camp by the Israeli army. The camp has been unoccupied since the exodus of refugees to Jordan in 1967.

154. Since the re-establishment of the border between the Sinai and the Gaza Strip on the return of the Sinai to the Egyptian Government by the Israeli Government, 515 rooms housing 173 families (1,060 persons) have so far been demolished by, or on the order of the Israeli occupation authorities. About twice these numbers are expected to be affected in order to complete the border Security zone. Compensation has been paid by the Israeli occupation authorities to all the families whose shelters were demolished, and they have all taken advantage of the Israeli, offer of plots of land in a housing project developed by the authorities. A consequence of the erection of a border fence by Egypt and Israel has been to deny access to Agency services in Rafah to refugees living in the Sinai, most of whom have built or purchased houses in a housing project there; this deprivation affects some 70,000 refugees.

155. Details of the housing situation of refugees whose shelters were demolished by the Israeli authorities in the Gaza Strip in 1971 are given in the Secretary-General's report to the General Assembly (A/37/425). Some of these refugees are among those who have moved into new housing in projects developed by the Israeli authorities. Other refugees have purchased plots of land in these housing developments and built their own homes. In the year under review, according to UNRWA's records, 393 refugee families (2,424 persons) moved into homes built on land they had purchased. The Agency acknowledges that the accommodation provided in the projects is superior to the shelters in which these families were formerly living. But the over-all shortage of housing for refugees on the Gaza Strip persists, partly because families moving from camps into the housing projects are required by the Israeli authorities, as a pre-condition, to demolish the rooms they previously occupied. In the year under review, 314 rooms (excluding those mentioned in para. 154) were demolished for this reason, and were therefore not available to alleviate overcrowded conditions in the camps. A programme to replace unsuitable and dilapidated ex-army barracks housing 381 families in the Gaza Strip by more suitable accommodation commenced in 1980. One hundred and eleven families have so far been provided with 214 new rooms under this programme, which was funded initially by the Japan Shipbuilding Industry Foundation. OXFAM has contributed funds towards a similar though smaller programme in the Syrian Arab Republic.

156. Financial aid was given to refugees in south Lebanon to assist them in repairing their shelters damaged during the first half of 1981 by shelling and bombing by Israeli forces and Lebanese irregular militia. Cash grants from OXFAM and CARITAS contributed towards the cost of this aid.

4. Welfare

157. A pilot project started with the co-operation and financial support of OXFAM during the International Year of Disabled Persons, with the aim of showing a camp community in Jordan how the disabled can be assisted in the community by the community, has been making slow but steady progress.

158. The number of families registered with UNRWA as welfare cases totaled 21,298, comprising 40,229 persons. Small cash grants totaling $150,085 were given to 62,359 persons, while assistance in other forms was given to 56,985 persons. Welfare workers helped solve individual and family problems through counseling and guidance. Prosthetic devices were issued to 565 persons, 118 destitute persons, 152 aged persons and 834 orphans were placed in institutions, mainly free of charge. Voluntary Agencies donated 44 tons of used clothing to UNRWA for distribution to refugee welfare cases.

159. Pre-school activities for children are directed to the particular needs of the three to six-year-olds and aimed at developing their potential through play periods supervised by trained teachers. Of the 51 centres serving 4,626, children, the American Friends Service Committee financed 15 UNRWA-operated centres in the Gaza Strip and the Holy Land Christian Mission financed and operated six in the West Bank. The remaining centres were financed either by local groups or other voluntary agencies.

160. Youth activities were carried out in co-operation with the World Alliance of Young Men's Christian Associations in 34 refugee camps and 11,036 young refugees participated. There were 930 boys under 16 years of age who participated in self-help projects and recreational programmes. Sixteen projects were completed on a self-help basis by the member of youth activities centres.

161. Activities for women are carried on during the afternoons in 14 centres operated by the Agency. The object of the programme is to give refugee girls and women living in camps a chance to develop skills which will help them to raise their standard of living. The Agency also organizes training activities outside schools to equip with basic skills young refugees who would not otherwise receive vocational training or further education. These activities include 33 sewing centres for 831 refugee women and girls and, in the West Bank, three carpentry centres where 34 young refugees attend a one-year course. Special training was provided for 201 disabled refugee children to integrate them into the life of their community; 53 of them were trained at the centre for the Blind in Gaza, which is operated for refugees by the Agency and financed by the Pontifical Mission for Palestine, and the others in similar specialized institutions in the area.

D. Personnel and administrative matters

1. Location of UNRWA headquarters

162. The General Assembly reiterated at its thirty-sixth session its request to the Commissioner-General to reunify his headquarters in UNRWA's area of operations as soon as practicable (para. 3 of resolution 36/146 F of 16 December 1981). He has every intention of complying with this request, since he fully accepts the desirability of reducing the distance between his main Headquarters (located at Vienna since the summer of 1978) and the five Field offices. Unfortunately, there has been no change in the situation reported last year, 1/ and it does not now seem likely that it will be possible to reunify Headquarters as a whole in the near future. A review has been made to determine whether it would be feasible in the meantime to transfer some units or parts of units from the main Headquarters in Vienna to that part of Headquarters located in Amman, but it was concluded that this would not be practicable. At the meeting of the Advisory Commission on 27 August 1981, the Lebanese representative, on behalf of Lebanon, Jordan and the Syrian Arab Republic, expressed the hope that Headquarters would be reunified in Beirut.

2. Joint Inspection Unit study of UNRWA

163. The Commissioner-General welcomed the General Assembly, decision 36/462 of 16 March 1982, which, inter alia, requested the Joint Inspection Unit to carry out a comprehensive study of the Agency's organization and programmes. The study, which began in April 1982, is being conducted in two phases. The first phase, scheduled for completion in 1982, will concentrate on Headquarters. In the second phase, in 1983, the Joint Inspection Unit will turn its attention to the Field operations. It is expected that the final report and recommendations will be presented to the General Assembly at its thirty-eighth session, in 1983.

164. The Joint Inspection Unit has been particularly requested by the Commissioner- General to advise on means of facilitating decision making, for example, through streamlined administrative procedures, a more rational grouping of functions and greater delegation of authority, particularly from Headquarters to Field offices.

3. Changes in the staffing table

165. During the period under review, there was an increase of 110 posts in the staffing table:

30 June 198130 June 1982
(a)International posts
(i)
(ii)

(iii)
UNRWA
UNESCO (filled on
non-reimbursable loan)
WHO (filled on non-
reimbursable loan)
95

20

5
95

21 a/

5
Sub-total 120 121
(b)Local posts17 053 b/17 162 b/
Total17 173
======
17 283
======
_________

a/ Including one post reimbursed by the Japanese Government.

b/ See annex I, Statistical information, table 8 for details of the distribution of local posts.


The number of staff actually in service increased by 47:

30 June 198130 June 1982
(a)International staff
(i)UNRWA
Male
Female
89
78
11
93
81
12
(ii)UNESCO
Male
Female
10
8
2
11
9
2
(iii)WHO
Male
Female
5
3
2
5
3
2
(b)



(c)
Local staff
Male
Female

Total staff
Male
Female
16 626
10 929
5 697

16 730
11 018
5 712
16 668
10 957
5 711

16 777
11 050
5 727


166. The increase in the number of local posts almost entirely represents the recruitment of additional teachers to accommodate the growth in the school population. There has been no increase in UNRWA international posts. Until the seven new posts reported last year 2/ have been included in the international staff table financed from the United Nations regular budget the Agency will endeavor to reduce the number of international staff from 93 to 88. 3/

167. Throughout the reporting period, all the posts of WHO staff on non-reimbursable loan were occupied. But the long-standing and alarmingly high vacancy rate in posts funded by UNESCO continues to be of considerable concern, as it adversely affects the quality of the Agency's education programme.

168. Despite continuing efforts to increase the proportion of female staff members at all levels, the results are still disappointing. The proportion of female staff members to the total staff complement at the end of the last three reporting periods was:
30 June 198030 June 198130 June 1982
International

Local
12.6%

33.6%
14.4%

34.3%
14.8%

34.3%

4. Implementation of ICSC common system job classification master standards

169. Implementation of the ICSC job classification standards for international posts is several months behind schedule, but the appropriate grade for nearly all posts will have been determined by 1 July 1982. However, unless the Commissioner-General decides it would be justified to meet any increased costs from voluntary contributions, it will not be possible to implement immediately all grade adjustments warranted, because of the time required to obtain United Nations budgetary approval.

5. Pay administration

170. Under the Agency's new system of remuneration for locally-recruited staff, 4/ comprehensive pay surveys were completed by ICSC in Lebanon and the Syrian Arab Republic and the results have been implemented. Remuneration was increased by an average of 20 per cent for staff in Lebanon and an average of 5.5 per cent for staff in Syria. In addition there were substantial improvements to other conditions of service, as warranted by the survey findings. In accordance with the formula recommended by ICSC for interim adjustments between surveys there have been subsequent increases in cost-of-living allowances for staff in Lebanon and Syria. The average cost-of-living increase for staff in Lebanon was 15 per cent and for staff in Syria 6 per cent.

171. Discussions are now under way with the Jordan staff concerning a survey in Jordan, the only Field which is still on the old remuneration system.

6. Threatened termination of teachers

172. In early 1982, the Agency's financial position was so serious that it appeared there would be no alternative but to close all schools and dismiss the teachers in Syria, Jordan, the West Bank and Gaza by 31 May 1982, and in Lebanon by 30 June 1982. By the end of April the outlook had improved sufficiently for the Commissioner-General to decide to keep the schools open for the remainder of the calendar year. His decision was based not only on a certain improvement in the Agency's financial position, but also on the expectation of additional cash contributions.

173. The constant financial threat in recent years to the UNRWA school system is causing considerable anxiety among teachers, students, the host Governments and the refugee population at large. The increased apprehension of teachers over job security helps explain the growing number of resignations: 5.1 per cent in 1981 compared with 3.8 per cent in 1980.
7. Staff-management consultations

174. Representatives of the local staff and the administration have met periodically to discuss a new Memorandum of Agreement. Part of the package proposal is the establishment of a joint study group to develop recommendations to the Commissioner- General on a new job classification system based on occupational groupings.

175. At the end of the reporting period, the staff representatives had accepted the new Memorandum of Agreement. If signed, the Agreement would provide, inter alia, for improvements in disability benefits, working hours, overtime, consider that annual leave, maternity leave, education assistance etc. The staff consider that the Agreement does not make sufficient provision for improvements in their social security benefits, but the Agency feels unable to offer more at this time.

8. Sex discrimination

176. As foreseen in last year’s report, 5/ the 1982 budget contained provision for $1.4 million to cover the estimated cost, of removing from the area (local) staff regulations, rules and personnel directives those provisions which result in inequitable treatment of female staff members by, comparison with their male colleagues. This has not been implemented for lack of funds. The estimated cost is included in the 1983 budget estimates, but implementation will depend on funds becoming available for the purpose.


E. Legal matters
1. Agency staff

177. Twenty-eight staff were arrested and detained without charge or trial in the period under review; 6/ the particulars are given in the table below:

GazaWest
Bank
JordanSyrian Arab
Republic
Released without
charge or trial
charged and sentenced
Still detained without
charges
5
-

-
16
2

-
-
1

-
3
-

1


178. The Agency continues to face difficulties in obtaining adequate and timely information from the governments or authorities concerned on the reasons for the arrest and detention of its staff. In the absence of such information, UNRWA cannot ascertain whether the staff member's official functions are involved and is consequently hampered in giving effect to the rights and duties of the staff member and the Agency itself under the United Nations Charter and the Convention on Privileges and Immunities of the United Nations, 1946.

179. No progress has been made in securing the first-arrival privileges for expatriate staff members in Jordan mentioned in paragraph 220 of last year's report.

180. The Israeli Government has withdrawn its objections to the travel on duty to the West Bank and the Gaza Strip of one of the three international staff and one of the two locally-recruited staff members affected. The remaining cases are being pursued.7/

181. The Israeli occupation authorities in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip have continued to summon Agency staff for interrogation; some staff in Gaza have been summoned twice daily. So far as the Agency is aware, there are no charges against these staff but only charges – or suspicion about - some relative of each one of them. The Agency has taken this up with the Israeli authorities, as it views the practice with great concern.
2. Agency services and premises

182. Agency services in the West Bank and Gaza Strip were placed under severe strain at various times in the reporting period, particularly in November-December 1981 and March-May 1982. Most camps in the West Bank - except those in the Jericho area - and in the Gaza Strip - except Maghazi and Deir El Balah camps - were under curfew at one time or another, the maximum being in the West Bank, 11 consecutive days at Dheisheh camp and, in the Gaza Strip, 10 consecutive days at the Jabalia camp. The Agency made ad hoc arrangements during this period to try to maintain essential services. In several instances, Israeli military personnel entered Agency premises in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip, e.g., on the grounds that students had acted in breach of the peace by erecting road-blocks or throwing stones. Armed Israeli civilians broke windows in the two Agency schools in the West Bank and severely beat a head-teacher and an attendant at one of these schools. Protests have been lodged with the Israeli authorities.

183. Two Agency schools and three youth activities centres in the West Bank closed temporarily for varying periods at the instance of the Israeli authorities, who invoked grounds of security. A serious violation of the Agency's privileges and immunities was the temporary take-over of an Agency youth activities centre at Jalazone camp by Israeli soldiers, who flew Israeli flags over the building for several days. Following strong protests by the Agency, including an oral protest by the Commissioner-General at his meeting with Israeli officials on 13 May 1982, the Israeli soldiers withdrew.

184. In the Gaza Strip, the Israeli authorities are seeking to impose new restrictions on construction by the Agency of installations in the refugee camps. The authorities have now invoked local, legislation which, however, was never, applied to UNRWA before 1967 by the Egyptian authorities nor subsequently by the Israeli authorities themselves. Two new constructions by the Agency have been stopped, including work on a project to help disabled refugees in the Khan Younis camp. The Agency has protested against these actions and opposed the imposition of these new restrictions, drawing attention to the obligations of Israel to the Agency.

185. Agency services were disrupted by the fighting in Hama, in the Syrian Arab Republic, in February 1982, and premises used by the Agency as an office and a distribution and supplementary, feeding centre were severely damaged. The Agency will make an appropriate claim in respect of the damage incurred.

3. Refugee shelters

186. Last year's report mentioned the demolition on punitive grounds by the Israeli authorities of refugee shelters in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip. Failing a response to the Agency's repeated requests that the Israeli authorities facilitate the prompt re-housing of the refugee families concerned, and having regard to the onset of winter, the Agency constructed replacement shelters for those families from the Jabalia and Bureij camps whose shelters had been demolished. Subsequently, the Agency was informed by the Israeli Minister of Defense that, on humanitarian grounds, instructions had been given to resettle these families within the framework of a housing project in the Gaza Strip. The families whose shelters were demolished in September 1980 in the Jenin camp in the West Bank and those affected by the punitive demolitions in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip in 1979/80 have not yet been re-housed. The Agency has not been compensated for the demolition of these shelters.

4. Lebanon

187. The Israeli military action starting in June 1982 in Lebanon has caused substantial damage to Agency property, the extent of which is being surveyed. Agency services have inevitably been affected, as mentioned elsewhere in this report.

188. In the wake of this military action, the Israeli authorities have made a protest to the Agency alleging that it has knowingly allowed certain of its premises in south Lebanon, particularly the Agency's Training Centre at Siblin, to be misused for military purposes. The Agency has denied this allegation but, because of its serious nature, has embarked on a thorough investigation.

5. Claims against Governments

189. The Government of Israel has yet to complete the examination of the claims filed by the Agency in 1969 relating to loss and damage caused in the hostilities in June 1967. 8/ The matter is being followed up by the Agency.

190. The Government of Jordan has responded to the Agency’s proposal that discussions be held between officials of the Government and of the Agency regarding various pending claims. 9/ The matter is being followed up and it is expected that these discussions will commence soon.

F. Financial operations

191. The financial accounts of UNRWA are published separately, together with the related report of the Board of Auditors. a/ The following is a summary of the Agency's financial operations in 1981:
(Thousands of United States dollars)
Sources of income for 1981
Governments
United Nations agencies
Non-governmental sources
Joint Jordanian-Palestinian Fund
OPEC Fund
Miscellaneous income
Exchange adjustments

Total income
Less income from Joint Jordanian-
Palestinian Fund
Income reported in the Annual
Accounts
171 386
6 322
2 192
818
263
6 240
3 701

190 922

(818) b/
190 104
Expenditure in 1981


Recurrent
operations
Non-recurrent
operations
Total
Education services
Health services
Relief services
Other costs
103 152
31 049
36 124
-
2 187
396
261
_ 8 378
105 339
31 445
36 385
8 378
Total expenditure 170 325 11 222181 547
Less expenditure on
behalf of the
Joint Jordanian
Palestinian Fund

Expenditure reported in
the Annual Accounts
(644)


169 681
(174)


11 048
(181) b/

180 729
Excess of income over expenditure 9 375 c/

_____________

a/ UNRWA accounts for 1981, together with the corresponding report of the Board of Auditors, will be submitted to the General Assembly at its thirty-seventh session (see Official Records of the General Assembly, Thirty-seventh Session,Supplement No. 5C (A/37/5/Add.3).

b/ Part of the contributions from this Fund were applied to items outside the regular budgeted programme although within the Agency's mandate. As a result, their receipt and expenditure were not incorporated as an integral part of the accounts of the Agency's operations produced for audit.

c/ This figure is the excess of income over the amount actually expended or committed by the end of 1981. The Agency's revised budget, however, was $238,667,000, against which income fell short by $48,563,000, necessitating reductions in the planned level of operations.


192. The following is a projection of the Agency’s financial operations for the current year, as at 30 June 1982:


(Thousands of United States dollars)
Sources of income for 1982 (pledged and
expected)
Governments
United Nations agencies
Non-governmental sources
Joint Jordanian-Palestinian Fund
OPEC Fund
Miscellaneous

Total income
178 319
7 187
1 700
1 543
238
3 500

191 487


Budgeted expenditure in 1982

Recurrent
operations
Non-recurrent
operations
Total
Education services
Health services
Relief services
Other costs
123 277
38 046
50 963
1 400
8 730
1 440
1 409
_ 8 251
132 007
39 486
52 372
9 661
Total expenditure 213 686
========
19 840
========
233 526
=======
To meet budgeted expenditure in full would involve a deficit in excess of $42 million, despite special contributions and increased regular pledges of nearly $17.5 million in response to appeals by the United Nations Secretary-General, the Commissioner-General, Heads of State, the Chairman of the Palestine Liberation Organization and the Secretary-General of the Arab League. Early in 1982, it appeared that the only way of maintaining the Agency’s solvency would be a full or partial curtailment of the education programme, the only one where savings of the magnitude required could be realized. With the receipt of the additional pledges and cutbacks in both recurrent and non-recurrent expenditure, it was decided to keep the schools open in all Fields. It is hoped that the programme can be maintained throughout 1982. But if no further increase in income is received, this will make inescapable a serious draw-down of the Agency's cash by the end of 1982.

193. The cash balance at 1 January 1981 was $22.1 million, which would-not have covered two month's operations; however, expeditious payment of pledges by major donors averted a cash crisis at that time. By vigorous cost containment throughout 1981, including significant staff reductions in the non-educational sectors, the Agency avoided any suspension of operations. The year-end cash balance on 31 December 1981 was approximately $39.7 million, the increase over the opening balance reflecting a major donor’s pre-payment of its 1982 contribution in December 1981, investment Income on cash in hand and exchange rate gains.

194. The level of the cash balance is an important factor in calculating the ability of UNRWA to meet its liabilities until the end of the year. The Agency must have regard to the monthly cash outlay, currently averaging $12 million. In addition, it must attempt to ensure that, in the event of the curtailment of programmes and the redundancy of the staff who run them, there will be sufficient cash to meet separation benefits. It was originally envisaged that UNRWA would continue to operate until a general political settlement of the Palestine question made its further existence unnecessary. Provision was therefore made to cover these benefits for about half of the Agency's locally-recruited employees on the assumption that at least the other half of the staff who are mainly teachers, would be offered employment by whatever successor authorities took over responsibility for the Agency programme on its ceasing its operation. About three years ago, it became apparent that it was more likely that UNRWA would be forced to make large numbers of its staff redundant through shortage of income than that it would cease to employ them on their transfer to a successor employer. The Agency has therefore gradually increased, and is increasing, the provision for separation benefits, until by the end of the reporting period this provision represented about 80 per cent of the total contingent liability. However, funds have not been set aside to meet this liability, although to the extent stated it is covered by the Agency's assets. These assets are only partly in the form of current bank balances; mostly they are in the form of accounts receivable and inventories such as sacks of flour in the Agency's warehouses, which could only become available for conversion into cash on liquidation of the Agency. In such circumstances, they could not be expected to realize their full book value. In the event, for instance, of the closure of schools in one or more Fields, the Agency would require sufficient cash to meet the separation benefits of thousands of staff. The total liability for all locally-recruited staff, which must be taken into account when the Commissioner- General established the period of continued financial viability of the Agency, was approximately $57.3 million at 30 June 1982, and the figure increases by some $260,000 every month. The cash available to the Agency can be used either for meeting the costs of the programmes or for paying separation benefits but not for both. If net savings on staff costs are to be made by closing down programmes, the closure must take place at least by mid-year, because by the autumn the savings on salaries are exceeded by the size of the separation benefits. Because of this burden on UNRWA's financial viability the Commissioner-General advocated, during the thirty-sixth session of the General Assembly, that the liability for separation benefits in the event of mass redundancies should be placed on the regular, budget of the United Nations. The Commissioner-General's suggestion was not adopted.

195. In its report to the General Assembly, the Working Group on the Financing of UNRWA recognized the vital importance of maximizing the freely disposable cash income available to the Agency. The recommendations of the Working Group, endorsed by the General Assembly in decision 36/462 on 16 March 1982, included a call to "Governments and organizations making contributions in kind either to give cash instead or to allow the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East to sell their contributions for cash".

196. A part of UNRWA’s total income is represented by gifts in kind, particularly food-stuffs, cash tied to the transport and distribution of these food-stuffs under the Agency's relief programme, and services rendered to UNRKA by Governments. That part of UNRWA's income which is derived from the United Nations, WHO and UNESCO ($7.2 million in 1982) covers the cost of the international staff. The remainder is available to meet the costs of the education and health programmes and certain- cash costs of the relief programme, and it is the size of this freely disposable cash income that determines whether UNRWA can meet programme costs of its schools and health centres. Of the total income of $191.5 million expected as at 30 June 1982 for the current year, approximately $121 million only is freely disposable cash.


IV. BUDGET FOR 1983 AND REVISED BUDGET FOR 1982

A. Budget provisions

197. This section of the report presents the proposed budget for 1983 and the budget for 1982 (revised as of June 1982). The original budget estimates for 1962 were submitted in last year's report. 10/ The budget proposed for 1983 is $271.4 million, compared with a revised budget of $233.5 million for 1982.

198. The budget for 1982 has decreased by $32.1 million since the original estimates were prepared. This is the result of decreases in staff costs ($23.7 million, as the combined effect of reductions in the anticipated rates of local inflation and gains in currency exchange), decreases in the valuation of contributions in kind ($4.9 million, matched by reduction of income estimates), a decrease in the provision for exchange losses ($3.7 million) and deferral of non-recurrent costs ($0.3 million). These decreases are partly offset by miscellaneous additional costs ($0.5 million) related to expenditure on behalf of the Joint Jordanian-Palestinian Fund.

199. In the proposed budget for 1983, recurrent costs 11/ are estimated at $31.1 million more than in 1982, as explained in the following paragraph; there is also an increase in the non-recurrent cost estimates of $6.8 million (see para. 201 below), resulting in a total increase of $37.9 million over the adjusted budget for 1982.

200. The budget proposed for recurrent costs in 1983 is $244.8 million compared with $213.7 million for 1982. The increase of $31.1 million provides principally for the following: normal programme increases ($1.8 million, mainly for education services as a result of the natural growth in school population); normal salary increments ($3.2 million); higher staff costs due to continued inflation ($22.6 million); provision for improvements in services ($1.5 million, principally for special hardship assistance); continued inflation in non-staff costs ($1.2 million, including a provision for increases in hospital subsidies) and a net increase in basic commodity costs ($0.8 million).

201. The budget proposed for non-recurrent costs in 1983 is $26.6 million compared with a provision of $19.8 million in the budget for 1982, an increase of $6.8 million. The estimate for 1983 includes provision for the following: replacement of unserviceable vehicles and equipment ($1.1 million); classrooms for additional pupils ($0.5 million); urgently needed capital additions or improvements, particularly in education, shelter, medical and environmental sanitation facilities ($9.3 million); and for increases in the provisions for local staff separation benefits and repatriation costs ($15.7 million), as summarized in paragraph 212 below.

202. The provision for increased staff costs calls for a word of explanation. The greater part of the Agency's assistance to the refugees takes the form of personal services, particularly those provided by teachers and health personnel. Staff costs therefore constitute by far the largest item of expenditure in the Agency's budget (some 65 per cent in 1982 and an estimated 71 per cent in 1983). Consequently, the effects of high inflation on staff costs, and hence on the total budget, are much greater than on non-staff costs.

203. Apart from the, effect of inflation on staff costs, the Agency foresees an increase in the number of staff, mainly to provide the additional teachers and supervisors, required to cater for about 5,250 more pupils than in 1982.

204. In 1983, education services will account for approximately 57 per cent of the total budget, compared with 16 per cent for health services, 21 per cent for relief services and 6 per cent for other costs. (Comparable figures for the 1982 budget are 57 per cent for education services, 17 per cent for health services, 22 per cent for relief services, and 4 per cent for other costs.)

205. The budget for education services provides for continuation of the Agency's general education programme and the costs of vocational, technical and pre-service teacher-training courses conducted in Agency centres, including provision for the natural growth in these programmes. Youth activities conducted outside UNRWA’s schools, adult craft training, the training of physically handicapped children, some vocational training outside UNRWA centres and other minor activities are also budgeted under education services, as is a provision for scholarships at universities, in or near the Agency's area of operations. The budget for non-recurrent costs includes provision for construction and equipment of classrooms to avoid triple-shifting, for construction and equipment of additional multi-purpose rooms, school libraries and science laboratories and for extraordinary maintenance and structure repairs to older schools and there buildings.

206. The proposed budget for health services, which incorporates the medical services, supplementary feeding and environmental sanitation programmes, includes provision for the basic needs of a slightly larger refugee population in 1983. The objective has always been that the Agency’s health services should not fall below the level of those provided by the Governments of the host countries for their own citizens. With the rapid increase in hospital costs and in the cost of supplies, utilities and staff required for UNRWA’s own health centres, the Agency continues to find it extremely difficult to achieve this objective. (The environmental sanitation programme provides only for the minimum requirements considered- necessary to maintain essential community sanitation and water supply services at reasonably safe levels in camps inhabited by refugees.)

207. Staff and other costs in the health services programmes are expected to be greater than in 1982, essentially due to inflation as there will be a minimal increase in the number of staff required. Provision is also made for essential replacement of equipment in medical and camp sanitation installations, and highly desirable improvements in facilities (including surface water drainage, sewage and refuse disposal and water supply systems). Camp sanitation improvement schemes also include self-help projects, in which the refugee beneficiaries participate substantially alongside the Agency.

208. In the budget for relief services, comprising the basic rations, shelter and the special hardship assistance programmes, provision has been made for the continuation of services in 1983 at the same level as in 1982, except for an expansion of the milk distribution programme, improvements in the special hardship assistance programme, and some increases in the numbers of beneficiaries. Recurrent costs are therefore expected to be higher than in the previous year, attributable, to the foregoing, to inflation, and to provision for increases in cost-of-living allowances and related remuneration of staff. The estimates for non-recurrent costs provide mainly for improvements in shelter facilities and extraordinary road maintenance and improvements.

209. The budget for basic rations covers both the value of the basic rations themselves and the cost of their final distribution, but transport and warehousing of rations within the UNRWA area of operations are charged to supply and transport services (part of common costs). The budget provides for the issue of rations throughout the year to an average of 832,900 beneficiaries (1,900 more than in 1982). As in 1981 and 1982, basic ration distributions will be restricted to contributions in kind, no allowance being made for their purchase.

210. The special hardship assistance budget provides for relief assistance to refugees who are living in dire poverty, in addition to the basic ration. Assistance is limited to welfare case-work, small cash grants, blankets, used clothing, issues of skim milk, and supplementary flour, sugar and cooking oil rations. Unfortunately, in its present financial position, the Agency cannot provide further for the special needs of the aged, widows with minor children and the chronically ill. Only the most urgent cases can be assisted.

211. Under common costs, provision is made for the over-all support services and overhead activities, which directly and indirectly serve the operational programmes; these costs are categorized under three main headings as follows:

(a) Supply and transport services, covering the procurement, control and warehousing of supplies and equipment, port operations, and passenger and freight transport within the Agency's area of operations;

(b) Other internal services, covering investigation and determination of eligibility of refugees for Agency assistance; personnel and administrative services; translation, legal, financial and data processing services; internal and external audit services; technical (architectural and engineering) services; and protective services;

(c) General administration, cover general administration services at Agency headquarters at Vienna and Amman, in the five Field offices (including subordinate area and camp services offices), the Liaison Offices in New York and Cairo, and also the public information services.

212. Other costs in the 1983 budget are estimated at approximately $7.4 million more than in 1982, almost entirely because of adjustments in the provision for area staff separation costs, as summarized below. (The projected effect of increases in staff remuneration required in 1983 is greater than in 1982; hence the consequential adjustments to the provision for area staff separation costs are also expected to be higher in 1983.) The $1,499,000 in recurrent costs is to provide for realignment of family allowances. The estimate of $15,654,000 for non-recurrent costs is to cover adjustments in the provision for local staff separation costs necessitated by increased remuneration ($12,404,000, comprising increased cost-of-living allowances, $2,004,000, and cost of incorporation of a part of cost-of-living allowances into salaries, $10,400,000), an increase in the provision for termination indemnities for local staff in the event of closure of the Agency ($3,000,000) and an increase in the provision for eventual repatriation of local staff transferred to Vienna and Amman from Beirut ($250,000).

213. Attention must be drawn to an under-provision in the budget. For budgetary purposes, the Agency assumed in the past that, in the event of an orderly turnover of its responsibilities to Governments or other organizations, nearly half of its local staff of approximately 17,000 would be offered suitable continued employment. In this case, in accordance with the Agency's staff rules, only the remaining 50 per cent or so would be entitled to receive a termination indemnity (or retirement benefit for loss of employment. Prior to 1980, provision was made in the Agency’s accrued liabilities for only this number. However in the event of an abrupt suspension of the Agency's operations, for lack of income or any other cause, all local staff would be entitled to receive a separation benefit (termination indemnity or retirement benefit). Because the possibility of this happening now appears to the Agency to be serious, the estimates for the 1982 budget and for the proposed 1983 budget both include $3 million under “other costs", in implementation of the Agency's plan to establish the necessary additional provision in five annual installments, the first of which was made in 1980. If these installments are maintained the total provision as at the end of 1983 will still be some $3 million short of the full liability.

214. At the time of writing this report, it is not possible to make a reliable estimate of the costs of meeting the emergency situation which broke out in Lebanon in June. It is evident, though, that the amounts involved will be substantial. The Agency has begun issuing emergency relief, medical and other supplies wherever these are needed and can be delivered to the thousands of displaced refugees. The, consequential problem of re-housing and re-establishing schools, medical clinics and other services has also to be considered. Whatever the costs may be for the immediate life support of the displaced refugees and their eventual resettlement, it is hoped that the necessary funds will be received as special contributions for the purpose, in response to appeals already made and yet to be made. The Agency’s present finances cannot provide for such costs. In view of the foregoing, no attempt has been made to incorporate in this report any estimates either of costs or of special contributions.

B. Budget estimates

215. Tables 12 A, 12 B and 12 C in annex I to this report present in summary form the budget estimates for 1983, together with comparative data on the budget for 1982. Table 12 A shows the estimates of recurrent costs, table 12 B, the estimates of non-recurrent costs and table 12 C, the estimates of total costs.

C. Financing the budget - 1982 and 1983

216. The critical problems facing the Agency in financing the budget for 1982 and the proposed budget for 1983 will be appreciated from the summary below:
19831982 (at 30 June)
(Thousands of United States dollars)
Budgeted expenditure:

Estimated income available from:
271 352233 526
Governments
United Nations agencies
Non-governmental sources
Joint Jordanian-Palestinian Fund
OPEC Fund
Miscellaneous income (including
exchange adjustments)
Total estimated income
172 317
7 441
1 600
1 436
-

2 500
185 294178 319
7 187
1 700
1 543
238

2 500
191 487
Estimated surplus (deficit)(86 058)(42 039)


217. At the time the 1983 budget was prepared, pledges for that year had not yet been made by Governments and other contributors. The estimate of income for 1983 can therefore be little more than an extrapolation of contributions for 1982, excluding special contributions limited expressly or by implication to that year.




Notes

1/ Official Records of the General Assembly, Thirty-sixth Session SupplementNo. 13 (A/36/13 and Corr.1), paras. 199-201.

2/ Ibid., para. 204.

3/ The increase in the number of international staff since last year is due to the recruitment of two staff members as replacements for two staff members on terminal sick leave (making for temporary double occupancy of the posts concerned) and the recruitment of two staff members on short-term contracts in June 1982, to assist with the emergency operation in Lebanon.

4/ See Official Records of the General Assembly, Thirty-sixth Session, Supplement No. 13 (A/36/13 and Corr.1), paras. 208-211.

5/ Ibid., para. 214.

6/ The Government of Jordan has now indicated that the staff member mentioned in para. 217 of last year's report as being in detention as at 30 June 1981 was tried and convicted for a security offence. The two staff members mentioned in para. 218 of last year's report as being in detention in the Syrian Arab Republic as at 30 June 1981, one of which had been in detention since April 1980, continue to be detained so far as the Agency is aware.

7/ Official Records of the General Assembly, Thirty-fifth Session, Supplement No. 13 (A/35/13), para. 222.

8/ Ibid., para. 230.

9/ Ibid., para. 231.

10/ Ibid., Thirty-sixth Session, Supplement No. 13 (A/36/l3 and Corr.1), chap. III, sect. B.

11/ Recurrent costs include salaries, supplies, rents, subsidies and other costs incurred on a regularly recurring basis. Non-recurrent costs include construction and equipment and other items not regularly incurred, which, if necessary, can be deferred in most cases for a certain time without giving rise to immediate difficulty. They are also to a certain extent a function of special contributions. Recurrent costs, on the other hand, are a measure of the Agency’s basic programmes which it cannot easily reduce, even in the short run.




ANNEX I

Statistical information

Table

1. Number of, registered persons (as at 30 June each year)

2. Distribution of registered population

Chart: Elementary and preparatory pupils in UNRWA schools, 1950-1982

3. Distribution of refugee pupils receiving education

4. Training places in UNRWA training centres

5. University scholarship holders by faculty and country of study

6. Medical care services

Chart: Communicable diseases Agency-wide, 1967-1981

Chart: Infant mortality studies - West Bank camps, 1971-1981

7. Beneficiaries of UNRWA'S food-aid programmes, 1 July 1981-30 June 1982

8. Distribution of local UNRWA posts (as at 30 June each year)

9. Summary statement of income and expenditure, 1 May 1950-31 December 1982

10. Detailed statement of income to UNRWA; 1 May 1950-31 December 1982

11. Statement of income from non-governmental sources for the year ended 31 December 1981

12. Budget estimates for 1983 and revised budget for 1982

13. Direct assistance to Palestine refugees, 1 July 1981-30 June 1982

Further statistical information on UNRWA's education and health programmes is given in the following UNRWA publications:

(a) UNRWA-UNESCO Department of Education Statistical
Yearbook, 1980-1981;

(b) Annual Report of the Director of Health, 1981.

For more detailed information on the financing of the Agency's programmes, please see: Audited Financial Statements for the year ended 31 December 1981 and Report of the Board of Auditors, Official Records of the General Assembly, Thirty-seventh Session,Supplement No. 5C (A/37/5/Add.3).


Table 1

Number of registered persons (as at 30 June each year) a/
Field 1950 1955 1960 1965 1970 1975 1980 1982
Lebanon

Syrian Arab
Republic

Jordan

West Bank

Gaza Strip
127 600


82 194

506 200

-

198 227
100 820


88 330

502 135

-

214 701
136 561


115 043

613 743

-

255 542
159 810


135 971

688 089

-

296 953
175 958


158 717

506 038

272 692

311 814
196 855


184 042

625 857

292 922

333 031
226 554


209 362

716 372

324 035

367 995
238 667


220 572

748 552

340 643

377 292
Total960 021 b/905 9861 120 8891 280 8231 425 2191 623 7071 844 3181 925 726

a/ These statistics are based on the Agency’s registration records which do not necessarily reflect the actual population due to factors such as unreported births and deaths and false and duplicate registrations. The Agency presumes that the number of registered persons present in the area of UNRWA operations is less than the registered population.

b/ This total includes 45,800 persons receiving relief in Israel who were the responsibility of UNRWA until June 1952.


Table 2

Distribution of registered population
Field
Population
Number of
camps
Total camp
population a/
Registered persons not in camps
Percentage of
registered population not in camps
Lebanon

Syrian Arab
Republic

Jordan

West Bank

Gaza Strip
238 667


220 572

748 552

340 643

377 292
13


10

10

20

8
123 422


67 491

235 151

87 724

208 662
115 225


155 147

556 160

254 437

168 630
48.28


70.34

74.30

74.70

44.89
Total
1 925 726
61
722 470
1 249 599
64.89

a/ The total camp population is made up as follows:

676,127 registered persons;

14,048 persons who are neither registered persons nor displaced persons.






Table 3

Distribution of refugee pupils receiving education a/
Field
Number of UNRWA schools
Number of teachers
Number of pupils in elementary classes
at UNRWA schools b/
Number of pupils in preparatory classes
at UNRWA schools b/
Total number
of refugee
pupils in
UNRWA schools
Boys
Girls
Total
Boys
Girls
Total
Lebanon

Syrian Arab
Republic

Jordan

West Bank

Gaza Strip
87


111

208

99

140
1 261


1 422

3 760

1 265

2 108
13 412


17 324

49 770

13 365

30 794
12 839


16 010

46 933

15 206

27 445
26 251


33 334

96 703

28 571

58 239
5 249


7 683

20 559

5 361

11 139
5 360


6 707

17 962

5 485

9 783
10 609


14 390

38 521

10 846

20 922
36 860


47 724

135 224

39 417

79 161 c/
Total6459 816124 665118 433243 09849 99145 29795 288338 386

a/ Excluding 86,662 refugee pupils attending elementary, preparatory and secondary government and private schools.

b/ Including non-eligible children attending UNRWA schools, who now number 45,746. Of these 11,410 are registered children in the Gaza Strip, where all refugee children hive always been regarded in practice as eligible for education services.

c/ In addition, 1,300 refugee children attend 15 pre-school centres served by teachers.



Table 4

Training places in UNRWA training centres
Lebanon
Syrian
Arab
Republic
Jordan
West Bank
Gaza
Strip
Total
M F
Grand
Total
Siblin
Training Centre
M F
Damascus Vocational Training Centre
M F
Amman
Training Centre
M F
Wadi Seer Training Centre
M F
Kalandia Vocational Training Centre
M F
Ramallah Women's Training Centre
M F
Ramallah Men's
Teacher Training Centre
M F
Gaza Voca- tional Training Centre
M F
A.Vocational and technical education

1. Post-
preparatory
level
2. Post-
secondary
level
480


140
-


92
509


125
3


51
-


-
32


144
576


221
-


71
280


192
-


-
-


-
134


230
-


-
-


-
588


-
-


-
2 433


678
169


588
2 602 a/


1 266 b/
Total
620 92 634 54 - 176 797 71 472 - - 364 - -588 -3 111 757 3 868
B.Pre-service teacher training 25 95 - - 300 250 - - - - - 300 350 - - - 675 645 1 320
Grand Total
645 187 634 54 300 426 797 71 472 - - 664 350 -588 -3 7861 402 5 188
a/ Courses are offered In metal, electrical and building trades.
b/ Courses are offered in technical, commercial and para-medical fields.



Table 5

University scholarship holders by_faculty and country of study
Faculty
Lebanon
Syrian Arab
Republic
Jordan
West
Bank
Egypt
Others a/
Total
Grand Total
M
F
M
F
M
F
M
F
M
F
M
F
M
F
Engineering
Medical and
para-medical
Arts and
sciences
21

2

2
3

2

2
16

56

2
2

17

1
90

25

-
4

10

4
22

-

1
3

-

1
26

24

1
-

5

1
5

3

-
-

-

-
180

110

6
12

34

9
192

144

15
Total
25
7
74
20
115
18
23
4
51
6
8
-
296
55
351

Note: Additionally, during 1961/62 a total of 18 scholarships were awarded from various sources to refugees, mostly in response to an appeal by the General Assembly in its resolution 36/146 H of 12 February 1982.

a/ Other countries were: Iraq (two male students), Saudi Arabia (two male students), Turkey (three male students) and Sudan (one male student).



Table 6

Medical care services
Type of Service
Lebanon
Syrian
Arab
Rep.
Jordan
West
Bank
Gaza
Strip
Agency- wide
I.Out-patient care
A.Curative Services
1.
2.
No. of patients
No. of clinic attendances a/
96 310)
482 228)b/
116 836
590 715
247 176
1 200 839
104 913
786 795
101 922
1 159 881
667 157
4 220 458
B.Maternal and child health care
1.

2.

3.
4.
Pregnant women
(Average attendance)
Children below 3 years
(Average attendance)
School entrants examined
Routine immunizations
511)
)c/
6 858)

1 592)
27 203)b/
663

10 165

6 905
62 691
2 162

30 334

13 781
88 762
1 671

14 498

4 435
70 847
4 536

29 870

4 251
105 134
9 993

91 725

30 964
354 637
II.In-patient care
1.
2.
3.
Hospital beds available
No. of patients admitted
Annual patient days per 1,000 population ratio
241
3 940 b/

319
79
3 087

82
252
885 d/

14
274
11 856

444
614
27 517

435
1 460
47 285

198

a/ Includes attendance for medical consultation and treatment; injection/dressing and skin treatment; eye treatment and dental treatment.

b/ Total for 10 months.

c/ Average for 9 months.

d/ No report from Government hospitals.





Table 7

Numbers of beneficiaries of UNRWA's food aid programmes a/
(1 July 1981 - 30 June 1982)
Lebanon
Syrian Arab Republic
Jordan
West
Bank
Gaza
Strip
Total
I.Supplementary feeding
Mid-day meal for
beneficiaries below 15 years

Milk programme for
beneficiaries below 3 years

Extra dry rations
3 899)
)
)
4 513)
)
)
5 197


8 198
6 958 c/


18 646 d/
7 875


9 858
7 281


21 983
31 210


63 198
(i) pregnant and
nursing women
(ii) TB out-patients
)
1 536)
110)b/
2 972
26
7 397)
102)b/
6 494
138
12 060
279
30 459
655
II.Basic ration programme97 090 99 582302 989 131 474 200 594 831 729
III.Special hardship programme 647 - 9 558 11 540 17 181 38 926
a/ The figures in this table are average monthly numbers, except for the mid-day meal programme which is an average daily number.

b/ Average for 10 months.

c/ Includes 1,670 displaced persons in emergency camps, included at the request of the Government of Jordan an a reimbursable basis.

d/ Includes 1,371 displaced persons in emergency camps, included at the request of the Government of Jordan on a reimbursable basis.



Table 8
Distribution of local UNRWA posts (as of 30 June each year)
EDUCATION SERVICES
Head-
quarters
(Vienna)
Head-
quarters
(Amman)
Lebanon
Syrian Arab
Republic
Jordan
West Bank
Gaza Strip
Total
1981
1982
1981
1982
1981
1982
1981
1982
1981
1982
1981
1982
1981
1982
1981
1982
General
Teaching
Manual
Sub-total
12
-
-
12
10
2
-
12
32
16
1
48
30
16
-
46
37
1 372
159
1 568
37
1 376
160
1 573
35.5
1 488
152
1 675.5
35.5
1 524
153
1 712.5
78
3 892
345
4 315
82
3 953
349
4 384
77
1 406
202
1 685
67
1 428
204
1 699
28
2 262
214
2 504
28
2 284
216
2 528
299.5
10 436
1 072
11 807.5
289.5
10 583
1 082
11.954.5
HEALTH SERVICES
General
Manual
Sub-total
13
-
13
13
-
13
3
-
3
3
-
3
156.5
288
444.5
156.5
302
458.5
150.5
214
364.5
151.5
215
366.5
263
537
800
264
511
775
209.5
372
581.5
211.5
372
583.5
226
535
761
230
544
774
1 021.5
1 946
2 967.5
1 029.5
1 944
2 973.5
RELIEF SERVICES
General
Manual
Sub-total
-
-
-
-
-
-
6
-
6
3.5
-
3.5
25.5
18
43.5
24.5
18
42.5
23
15
38
23
15
38
46.5
111
157.5
46.5
111
157.5
34.5
28
62.5
37.5
28
65.5
33.5
63
96.5
33.5
63
96.5
169
235
404
168.5
235
403.5
COMMON COSTS
General
Manual
Sub-total
181
1
182
171 b/
1
172
16
2
18
12.5
2
14.5
244
70
314
243
70
313
203
50
253
204
50
254
265.5
78
343.5
260.5
77
337.5
254
127
381
250
126
376
237.5
145
382.5
234.5a
129
363.5
1 401
473
1 874
1 375.5
455
1 830.5
TOTAL
207
197
75
672 3702 3872 3312 3715 6165 6542 7102 7243 7443 76217 05317 162

a/ Includes 4 posts in Cairo Office.

b/ Excludes 4 posts in Cairo Office which were transferred to Gaza Field Office with effect from 1 January 1982.


Table 9

Summary statement of income and expenditures a/
(1 May 1950 - 31 December 1982)
(in United States dollars)

Income
Expenditure
Excess (shortage)of income over expenditure
Contributions by
Governments
Other
income
Total
income
1 May 1950 to 31 Dec. 1975
1 January to 31 Dec. 1976
1 January to 31 Dec. 1977
1 January to 31 Dec. 1978
1 January to 31 Dec. 1979
1 January to 31 Dec. 1980
1 January to 31 Dec. 1981
1 January to 31 Dec. 1982 g/
1 050 682 075
112 261 271b/
114 109 995c/
122 338 708
138 639 249d/
166 930 874e/
171 385 733
178 319 000
50 094 419
8 457 398
8 868 471
8 165 993
13 549 278
17 638 122
19 536 730f/
13 168 000
1 100 776 494
120 718 669b/
122 978 466
130 504 701
152 188 527d/
184 568 996
190 922 463
191 487 000h/
1 099 427 470
114 774 837
126 771 889
132 111 444
158 871 622
183 677 394
180 728 868
233 526 000
1 349 924
5 943 832
(3 793 423)
(1 606 743)
(6 683 095)
891 602
10 193 595
(42 039 000)i
Total2 054 666 905139 478 4112 194 145 3162 229 889 524
a/ The figures in this table reflect, for each year, the income and expenditure (including commitments) applicable to the budget for that year, regardless of when the income was received (except as Indicated in footnotes (b) and (d) below) or the expenditure incurred. The accumulated figures for the period 1 May 1950-31 December 1975 are provided for record purposes.

b/ Includes $6 million pledged for 1976 but too late to be reflected in the Agency's audited accounts for that year.

c/ Excludes $6 million (see (b) above) reflected in the Agency's audited accounts for 1977.

d/ Includes $6,044,034 pledged for 1979 but too late to be reflected in the Agency’s audited accounts for that year.

e/ Excludes the late pledge for 1979 (see (d) above) recorded in the Agency's audited accounts for 1980 an $6,035,215 (representing the value of the commodities actually received against the $6,044,034 pledged).

f/ Includes Joint Jordanian-Palestinian fund contribution of $818,563, which was not incorporated in the annual accounts for 1981 (see also footnote to table 11).

g/ Income as estimated, expenditure as budgeted.

h/ Excludes extraordinary contributions for emergency assistance in Lebanon or any contribution pledged towards these costs.

i/ This will be the position if budgeted expenditure to fully implemented and no additional income is received.



Table 10

Detailed statement of income to UNRWA
(1 May 1950 - 31 December 1982)
(in United States dollars)
Contributor
For the period 1 May 1950 to
31 December 1980
1981
1982 a/
Grand
Total
Cash
Contributions in kind and associated cash
Total
I. Contributions by Governments
Argentina
Australia
Austria
Bahamas
Bahrain
Barbados
Belgium
Benin
Bolivia
Brazil
Burma
Canada
Central African Empire
Chile
China
Congo
Cuba
Cyprus
Democratic Kampuchea
Democratic Yemen
Denmark
Dominican Republic
Egypt
El Salvador
Ethiopia
European Community
Finland
France
Gambia
Gaza authorities
Germany, Federal Rep. of
Ghana
Greece
Guinea
Haiti
Holy See
Honduras
Iceland
India
Indonesia
Iran
Iraq
Ireland
Israel
Italy
Jamaica
Japan
Jordan
Kuwait
Lao People's Democratic Rep.
Lebanon
Liberia
Libyan Arab Jamahiriya
Luxembourg
Madagascar
Malawi
Malaysia
Maldives
Malta
Mauritania
Mauritius
Mexico
Monaco
Morocco
Netherlands
New Zealand
Niger
Nigeria
Norway
Oman
Pakistan
Panama
Philippines
Portugal
Qatar
Republic of Korea
Romania
San Marino
Saudi Arabia
Senegal
Seychelles
Sierra Leone
Singapore
Spain
Sri Lanka
Sudan
Suriname
Swaziland
Sweden
Switzerland
Syrian Arab Republic
Thailand
Togo
Trinidad and Tobago
Tunisia
Turkey
United Arab Emirates
United Kingdom of Great
Britain and Northern Ireland
United Republic of Cameroon
United States of America
Upper Volta
Uruguay
Venezuela
Viet Nam
Yemen
Yugoslavia
Zaire
Zimbabwe
Sundry Governments through
the World Refugee Year
Stamp Plan
163 000
7 898 500
869 721
500
148 867
1 000
10 105 907
1 653
5 000
95 009
9 546
56 777 918
2 198
21 000
153 279c/
4 717
5 000
13 764
7 141
750
17 582 577
6 000
5 517 076
500
38 500
147 055 059
2 828 871
31 491 116
30
2 301 799
54 106 750
85 780
843 498
1 000
7 000
112 965
2 500
156 439
495 600
297 768
282 047
6 457 229
1 446 195
10 157 594
4 199 768
34 370
47 791 959
5 060 623
10 962 860
4 687
1 713 536
86 500
11 066 100
486 294
6 526
280
63 785
-
6 100
543
12 932
148 191
12 224
798 123
15 843 797
3 676 351
4 920
104 240
21 721 137
220 000
887 360
2 000
42 750
2 000
2 270 728
68 500
5 555
7 888
46 231 172
3 988
-
26 746
18 500
9 028 633
21 767
199 000
1 000
660
76 347 700
23 827 347
2 938 349
153 655
1 000
30 277
111 517
265 759
4 655 977d/

182 824 514
5 408
871 364 592
1 887
5 000
5 000
42 000
-
883 700
21 500
39 200


238 211
10 000
571 691
196 500
-
15 000
-
1 942 543
-
-
10 000
-
6 146 964
-
3 500
50 000
-
-
2 239
-
-
3 287 432
-
8 580
-
-
25 086 988
377 870
1 930 224
-
103 241
5 807 749
5 200
35 000
-
-
12 500
-
17 500
16 290
7 500
30 000
3 500 000
282 775
468 691
1 167 065
3 000
10 862 385
740 003
2 100 000
-
62 860
-
4 250 000
10 712
-
-
5 000
1 500
1 012
-
2 000
4 941
1 010
59 221
2 202 219
96 681
-
20 000
4 680 836
35 000
18 665
500
5 000
10 000
500 000
-
3 300
4 195
6 200 000
-
-
-
1 500
1 000 000
1 000
6 020
1 000
-
10 176 848
4 142 328
168 107
17 390
-
4 975
9 815
20 000
800 000

10 026 938
-
62 000 000
-
-
10 000
-
2 000
25 000
-
-


-
10 000
902 000
193 000
1 000
15 000
1 000
409 000
1 000
-
10 000
-
2 858 000
-
4 000
50 000
-
-
2 000
-
-
2 510 000
-
7 000
-
-
-
297 000
1 005 000
-
-
4 139 000
5 000
40 000
-
-
13 000
-
18 000
-
8 000
-
500 000
131 000
-
1 546 000
3 000
7 000 000
-
2 100 000
-
-
-
1 250 000
9 000
-
-
5 000
2 000
1 000
-
2 000
5 000
1 000
39 000
2 397 000
93 000
-
-
4 582 000
25 000
17 000
1 000
6 000
10 000
100 000
5 000
-
2 000
6 200 000
2 000
1 000
-
3 000
1 000 000
-
6 000
1 000
-
10 608 000
789 000
-
16 000
-
2 000
11 000
20 000
800 000

7 181 000
-
67 000 000
2 000
-
10 000
-
2 000
-
-
-


-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1 378 000
-
-
-
-
3 692 000 b/
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
33 585 000 b/
-
824 000
-
99 000
1 692 000
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
21 000
-
-
-
-
543 000
-
-
4 291 000
749 000
-
-
56 000
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
3 000
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1 000
-
-
-
-
3 441 000 b/
139 000
-
-
-
-
-
-

1 796 000 b/
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
25 000 b/
-
-


-
10 000
902 000
193 000
1 000
15 000
1 000
1 787 000

1 000
-
10 000
-
6 550 000
-
4 000
50 000
-
-
2 000
-
-
2 510 000
-
7 000
-
-
33 585 000
297 000
1 829 000
-
99 000
5 831 000
5 000
40 000
-
-
13 000
-
18 000
21 000
8 000
-
500 000
131 000
543 000
1 546 000
3 000
11 291 000
749 000
2 100 000
-
56 000
-
1 250 000
9 000
-
-
5 000
2 000
1 000
543
2 000
5 000
1 000
39 000
2 397 000
93 000
-
-
4 582 000
25 000
17 000
1 000
6 000
10 000
100 000
5 000
3 000
2 000
6 200 000
2 000
1 000
-
3 000
1 000 000
1 000
6 000
1 000
-
10 608 000
4 230 000
139 000
16 000
-
2 000
11 000
20 000
800 000

8 977 000
-
67 000 000
2 000
-
10 000
-
2 000
25 000
-
-


-
183 000
9 372 191
1 259 221
1 500
178 867
2 000
13 835 450
2 653
5 000
115 009
9 546
69 474 612
2 198
28 500
253 279
4 717
5 000
18 003
7 141
750
23 380 009
6 000
5 532 656
500
38 500
205 727 047
3 503 741
35 250 340
30
2 504 040
65 745 499
95 980
918 498
1 000
7 000
138 465
2 500
191 939
532 890
313 268
312 047
10 457 229
1 859 970
11 169 285
6 912 833
40 370
69 945 344
6 549 626
15 162 860
4 687
1 832 396
86 500
16 556 100
506 006
6 526
280
73 785
3 500
8 112
543
16 932
158 132
14 234
896 344
20 443 016
3 866 032
4 920
124 240
30 983 973
280 000
923 025
3 500
53 750
22 000
2 870 728
73 500
11 855
14 083
58 631 172
5 988
1 000
26 746
23 000
11 028 633
23 767
211 020
3 000
660
97 132 548
32 199 675
3 245 456
187 045
1 000
37 252
132 332
305 759
6 255 927

201 828 452
5 408
1 000 364
3 887
5 000
25 000
42 000
4 000
933 700
21 500
39 200


238 211
Unpaid pledges subsequently
written off for non-payment
1 704 164 999


797 173
171 385 733


-
125 984 000


-
52 335 000


-
178 319 000


-
2 053 869 732


797 173
1 704 962 172171 385 733125 984 000 52 335 000178 319 0002 054 666 905
II. Contributions by United Nations agencies
United Nations

United Nations
Children's Fund

United Nations
Educational,
Scientific and
Cultural Org.

United Nations Truce
Supervision
Organization in
Palestine

World Food Programme

World Health
Organization
24 455 417


30 000




13 079 262




300

1 650 866e/


2 954 515
5 300 164


-




715 960




-

-


305 400
5 974 000


-




-




-

-


-
-


-




815 000




-

-


398 000
5 974 000


-




815 000




-

-


398 000
35 729 581


30 000




14 610 222




300

1 650 866


3 657 915
42 170 360 6 321 524 5 974 000 1 213 000 7 187 000 55 678 884
III. Contributions by OPEC Fund

1 969 906
263 480 238 000 - 238 000 2 471 386
IV. Contributions from non-governmental sources

28 524 258
3 010 539f/ 3 143 000 100 000 3 243 000 34 777 797
V. Miscellaneous Income and exchange adjustments
34 109 157 9 941 187 2 500 000 - 2 500 000 46 550 344
TOTAL INCOME 1 811 735 853190 922 463 f/137 839 000 53 648 000191 487 000 2 194 145 316

a/ The figures represent confirmed and expected pledges, rounded off in thousands of dollars.

b/ Commodities at donor's valuation.

c/ Received up to 24 October 1971. By resolution 2758 (XXVI) of 25 October 1971, the General Assembly, inter alia, decided “to restore all its rights to the People's Republic of China and to recognize the representatives of its Government as the only legitimate representatives of China to the United Nations, and to expel forthwith the representatives of Chiang Kai-Shek from the place which they unlawfully occupy at the United Nations and In all the organizations related to It"

d/ Includes contributions made by Abu Dhabi and Dubai before being part of United Arab Emirates.

e/ Special contributions to the Government of Jordan (in 1971) and the Syrian Arab Republic (in 1977) or the benefit of the Palestine refugees, for which UNRWA acted as executing agent. As these contributions were used for purposes budgeted for by UNRWA, they have been included in the Agency's income and expenditure accounts.

f/ Includes Joint Jordanian-Palestinian Fund contribution of $818,563, which was not incorporated in the Annual Accounts for 1981 (see also footnote to Table 11).



Table 11

Statement of income from non-governmental sources
for the year ended 31 December 1981

(in United States dollars)

Contributor Amount
American Friends Service Committee

ARAMC0, Saudi Arabia

Australians Care for Refugees (AUSTCARE)

Canadian Save the Children Fund

CARITAS, Austria

Council of organizations for Relief, Rehabilitation and
Development (CORSO) Inc., New Zealand

Joint Jordanian-Palestinian Fund a/

Norwegian Refugee Council

OXFAM, United Kingdom

Palestine Liberation Organization

Pontifical Mission for Palestine

Redd Barna, Norway

Save the Children Fund, United Kingdom

Swedish Save the Children Federation (Radda Harnen)

Syrian-Lebanese Mission

Sundry donors
408 787

200 000

5 411

30 682

25 800


30 000

818 563

230 949

186 403

62 180

143 613

91 240

7 875

524 660

5 118

239 258
Total

Less income from Joint Jordanian-Palestinian Fund a/

Total as reported in the Annual Accounts for 1981
3 010 539

(818 563)

2 191 976
==========

__________

a/ Although used within the Agency's mandate, part of the contribution from this Fund was applied to items outside the regular budgeted programme. Consequently, its receipt and expenditure were not integrated into the audited accounts of the Agency's operations in 1981.



Table 12

Budget estimates for 1983 and revised budget for 1982

A. Recurrent costs

(Thousands of United States dollars)
1983
proposed
budget_
1982
revised
budget_
Part I. Education services
General education
Vocational and professional training
Share of common costs from part IV
118 374
14 660
13 280
98 530
12 914
11 833
Total Part I146 314123 277
Part II. Health services
Medical services
Supplementary feeding
Environmental sanitation
Share of common costs from part IV
17 121
10 579
7 142
7 556
15 195
9 816
6 292
6 743
Total Part II 42 398 38 046
Part III. Relief services
Basic rations
Shelter
Special hardship assistance
Share of common costs from part IV
36 341
583
5 953
11 773
35 383
560
4 486
10 534
Total Part III 54 649 50 963
Part IV. Common costs
Supply and transport services
Other internal services
General administration
10 943
15 898
5 768
9 845
14 055
5 210
Costs allocated to programmesTotal Part IV 32 609
(32 609)
29 110
(29 110)
Part V. Other costs
Provision for realignment of family allowances
Adjustment in provision for local staff separation
costs necessitated by increased remuneration
Adjustment in provision for termination indemnities
for local staff in event of closure of the Agency
Adjustment in provision for repatriation
of local staff
Local disturbances

Total Part V
1 400

-

-

-
-

1 400
1 400

-

-

-
-

1 400
Grand Total 244 761
=======
213 686
=======
B. Non-recurrent costs

(Thousands of United States dollars)
Part I. Education services
General education
Vocational and professional training
Share of common costs from part IV
7 829
689
130
7 268
1 057
405
Total Part I 8 648 8 730
Part II. Health services
Medical services
Supplementary feeding
Environmental sanitation
Share of common costs from part IV
403
64
972
90
326
272
562
280
Total Part II 1 529 1 440
Part III. Relief services
Basic rations
Shelter
Special hardship assistance
Share of common costs from part IV
148
347
70
195
51
698
66
594
Total Part III 760 1 409
Part IV. Common costs
Supply and transport services
Other internal services
General administration
310
98
7
928
295
56
Costs allocated to programmesTotal Part IV 415
(415)
1 279
(1 279)
Part V. Other costs
Provision for realignment of family allowances
Adjustment in provision for local staff separation
costs necessitated by increased remuneration
Adjustment in provision for termination indemnities
for local staff in event of closure of the Agency
Adjustment in provision for repatriation
of local staff
Local disturbances

Total Part V
-

12 404

3 000

250
-

15 654

-

4 910

3 000

350
-

8 261
Grand Total 26 591
=======
19 840
=======
C. Total costs

(Thousands of United States dollars)
1983
proposed budget_
1982
revised
budget_
Part I. Education services
General education
Vocational and professional training
Share of common costs from part IV
126 203
15 349
13 410
105 798
13 971
12 238
Total Part I154 962132 007
Part II. Health services
Medical services
Supplementary feeding
Environmental sanitation
Share of common costs from part IV
17 524
10 643
8 114
7 646
15 521
10 088
6 854
7 023
Total Part II 43 927 39 486
Part III. Relief services
Basic rations
Shelter
Special hardship assistance
Share of common costs from part IV
36 489
929
6 023
11 968
35 434
1 258
4 552
11 128
Total Part III 55 409 52 372
Part IV. Common costs
Supply and transport services
Other internal services
General administration
11 253
15 996
5 775
10 773
14 350
5 226
Costs allocated to programmesTotal Part IV 33 024
(33 024)
30 389
(30 389)
Part V. Other costs
Provision for realignment of family allowances
Adjustment in provision for local staff separation
costs necessitated by increased remuneration
Adjustment in provision for termination indemnities
for local staff in event of closure of the Agency
Adjustment in provision for repatriation
of local staff
Local disturbances

Total Part V
1 400

12 404

3 000

250
-

17 054
1 400

4 910

3 000

350
1

9 661
Grand Total 271 352
=======
233 526
=======
Table 13
Direct assistance to Palestine-refugees a/
(1 July 1981-30 June 1982)

N.B. All data shown in the table below were provided by the Governments concerned and are expressed in United States dollars (computed by applying the Agency's accounting rates of exchange, which are based on official or free market rates, as appropriate) UNRWA is unable to verify them independently.

Egypt
Israel
Jordan
Lebanon
Syrian Arab
Republic
Education services

Social welfare services

Medical services

Housing

Security services

Miscellaneous services

Administrative costs
47 590 000

2 644 000

-

c/

-

c/

123 760 000
10 000 000

1 333 333

6 000 000

3 026 666

d/

d/

3 200 000
6 914 056

4 429 650

f/

e/

738 275

e/

18 356 470e/
f/

41 422

f/

196 863
f/

39 501

140 921
24 841 829

1 624 062

1 268 801

2 055 455

4 034 083

6 435 929

4 060 158
Total173 994 000 23 559 99930 438 451 418 707 44 321 017

a/ This assistance was rendered direct to the refugees, in addition to contributions to UNRWA (see table 10).

b/ Includes medical services.

c/ Housing and miscellaneous services are included in administrative costs.

d/ Security and miscellaneous services are included in administrative costs.

e/ Includes housing, miscellaneous services, administrative services and expenditure for displaced persons.

f/ No figure provided.



ANNEX II

Pertinent records of the General Assembly and other
United Nations bodies a/


1. General Assembly resolutions

Resolution No.

194 (III)
212 (III)
302 (IV)
393 (V)
513 (VI)
614 (VIII)
720 (VIII)
818 (IX)
916 (X)
1018 (XI)
1191 (XII)
1315 (XIII)
1456 (XIV)
1604 (XV)
1725 (XVI)
1856 (XVII)
1912 (XVIII)
2002 (XIX)
2052 (XX)
2154 (XXI)
2252 (ES-V)
Date of adoption

11 December 1948
19 November 1948
8 December 1949
2 December 1950
26 January 1952
6 November 1952
27 November 1953
4 December 1954
3 December 1955
28 February 1957
12 December 1957
12 December 1958
9 December 1959
21 April 1961
20 December 1961
20 December 1962
3 December 1963
10 February 1965
15 December 1965
17 November 1966
4 July 1967
Resolution No.

2341 (XXII)
2452 (XXIII)
2535 (XXIV)
2656 (XXV)
2672 (XXV)
2728 (XXV)
2791 (XXVI)
2792 A to E (XXVI)
2963 A to F (XXVII)
2964 (XXVII)
3089 A to E (XXVIII)
3090 (XXVIII)
3330 (XXIX)
3331 (XXIX)
3410 (XXX)
31/15 A to E
32/90 A to F
33/112 A to F
34/52 A to F
35/13 A to F
36/146 A to H
Date of adoption

19 December 1967
19 December 1968
10 December 1969
7 December 1970
8 December 1970
15 December 1970
6 December 1971
6 December 1971
13 December 1972
13 December 1972
7 December 1973
7 December 1973
17 December 1974
17 December 1974
8 December 1975
24 November l976
13 December 1977
18 December 1978
23 November 1979
3 November 1980
16 December 1981
2. General Assembly decision

Decision number Date of adoption

36/462 b/ 16 March 1982

3. Reports of the Commissioner-General of UNRWA
Supplement No. 13 (A/35/13).

1981: Ibid., Thirty-sixth Session, Supplement No. 13 (A/36/13 and Corr.1)

4. Reports of the Working Group on the Financing of UNRWA

5. Economic and Social Council resolution 1565 (L) of 3 May 1971

6. Reports of the Secretary-General

Notes

a/ Further information on pertinent reports and other documents of the General Assembly and other United Nations bodies concerning UNRWA can be found in the document UNRWA at the United Nations 1948-1982, available from the UNRWA Public Information Division.

b/ Decision reproduced at annex III.



ANNEX III
Financing of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for
Palestine Refugees in the Near East
(Decision 36/462 adopted without vote by the General Assembly on 16 March 1982)

The General Assembly, having considered the recommendations of the Working Group on the Financing of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East: a/

(a) Took note of the report of the Working Group; b/

(b) Urged the Commissioner-General of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East to continue his efforts to make the most efficient use of the resources of the Agency and requested the Joint Inspection Unit to carry out a comprehensive review of the Agency's organization, budget and operations with a view to assisting the Commissioner-General to make the most effective and economical use of the limited funds available to the Agency;

(c) Called upon:
Notes

a/ A/36/866 and Corr.1, para. 26.

b/ A/36/866 and Corr.1.

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