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Débat général de 66e GA/Demande d’admission de la Palestine à l’ONU/Déclarations - Communiqué de presse de l’AG Français
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Source: Department of Public Information (DPI)
26 September 2011

General Assembly
GA/11154

        Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Sixty-sixth General Assembly
Plenary
25th, 26th & 27th Meetings (AM, PM & Night)


GENERAL ASSEMBLY DEBATE CONSIDERS GLOBAL DEVELOPMENT AT CROSSROADS,

AS LEAST DEVELOPED COUNTRIES BUCKLE UNDER STRAIN OF MEETING MOST BASIC NEEDS

Reeling from Economic Downturn, Poorest Nations Pin Hopes on Global Strategies,
Cooperation; Ways Outlined to Ease Horn of Africa Crisis, Enhance Food Security

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Background

The General Assembly met today to continue its general debate.

Statements

MOMPATI S. MERAFHE, Vice-President of Botswana, ...

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... It also called on both the Palestinians and the Israelis to remain engaged in negotiations on the basis of a two-State solution.

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MOHAMED WAHEED, Vice-President of the Maldives, ...

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The Maldives stood “shoulder to shoulder” with the Palestinian people. It believed that the time for them to join the international family of nations was long overdue, and welcomed its application for statehood; the Maldives also valued and supported the right of the people of Israel to live in peace and security. ...

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DANILO ASTORI, Vice-President of Uruguay, ... Welcoming South Sudan, he also noted that Uruguay had, in March 2011, recognized the State of Palestine. It believed that all the necessary conditions existed for that recognition to become universal and for the two-State solution, supported by Uruguay since 1947, to become effective. The Palestinian people had a legitimate and full right to constitute itself as a State; meanwhile, the Jewish people had the undeniable right to live in peace, inhabiting a safe country free of terrorist attacks. ...

AJA ISATOU NJIE-SAIDY, Vice-President of Gambia, ...

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... Further, it not only supported but recognized an independent and sovereign Palestinian State within the confines of the 1967 borders. ...

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EDWARD KIWANUKA SSEKANDI, Vice-President of Uganda, ...

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... Finally, he urged the Israeli and Palestinian parties to urgently resume negotiations in order to reach a two-State solution that will guarantee a durable peace.

HAJI AL-MUHTADEE BILLAH, Crown Prince and Senior Minister at the Prime Minister’s Office of Brunei Darussalam, .. In that context, he welcomed South Sudan as the newest United Nations Member State and commended all parties involved in that process. He hoped that the same sentiments would soon be expressed to the parties involved in efforts to reach a fair and equitable two-State solution to the situation in Palestine.

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EAMON GILMORE, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Foreign Affairs and Trade of Ireland,...

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In the Middle East, he said, that unless the deadlock in the Arab-Israeli conflict was broken, opportunities for another generation would be destroyed. The situation was urgent. It was more pressing than ever to get negotiations under way that would address all the core issues and culminate in a two-State solution. Ireland had long advocated the establishment of a sovereign, independent Palestinian State within the 1967 borders and strongly opposed actions that hindered or delayed negotiations, such as attacks on civilians or Israel’s illegal settlement of occupied Palestinian territory. Palestine had the same right to United Nations membership as any other Member State. If the borders of Palestine were still a matter for negotiation, then so, by definition, were those of Israel, which was rightly a full Member State.

But United Nations membership would not change the unstable situation on the ground, he said. The General Assembly would likely be asked to vote on a proposal to admit Palestine as a Member State, or perhaps, as a non-Member observer State, and he expected Ireland to give full support. “In Ireland, we know from our own experience that peace does not come easily,” he said. It required compromise. Israel must halt all settlement expansion and end the blockade of Gaza. ...

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KENNETH BAUGH, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Foreign Affairs and Foreign Trade of Jamaica, ... Concerning the resolution of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, which was “long overdue”, he stressed that the occupation of the Palestinian territory must end. Jamaica supported a solution that recognized the Palestinian State within the 1967 borders and assured the security of Israel. Central to that solution must be Israel’s cessation of settlement building and expansion, and renunciation of violence by the Palestinians.

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HAILEMARIAM DESALEGN, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Foreign Affairs of Ethiopia, ...

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Ethiopia continued to call for the reform of the Security Council and the revitalization of the General Assembly, the true representative of the people of the world. In the same spirit, Ethiopia believed in the need for peaceful negotiations and mutual accommodation from the parties to the Arab-Israeli conflict. It was not enough that the right of the Palestinians to a viable State be acknowledged or given lip-service, he stressed. Real, tangible and practical steps must be taken. Noting that the world was passing through a period of uncertainty, he added that such periods needed to be “handled delicately”. Therefore, more attention needed to be paid to the prevention of conflicts and mediation.

THONGLOUN SISOULITH, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Foreign Affairs of the Lao People’s Democratic Republic, ...

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Over the last year, the world had seen challenges caused by regional conflict, spreading social unrest, economic crisis and natural disasters, he said, and the United Nations, as the only universal organization, should enhance its role to address those problems in a more timely and just manner. The reform process must be accelerated, notably to allow the Organization to better maintain international peace and security by carrying out its duty to address regional conflicts, such as the situation in the Middle East. The United Nations should play a more effective facilitating role in urging all parties to realize the vision of two States — Israel and Palestine — living side by side in peace and security within internationally recognized borders. The Lao People’s Democratic Republic supported Palestine’s application for full United Nations membership. Also, it was time to lift the United States embargo on the Cuban people.

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YANG JIECHI, Minister for Foreign Affairs of China, ...

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On the Middle East, China supported efforts to achieve the “two-State solution” through political negotiations to establish an independent Palestinian State, he said. ...

TAÏB FASSI FIHRI, Minister for Foreign Affairs and Cooperation of Morocco, ...

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... With the question of Palestine at an historical turning point, the United Nations must enable the Palestinian people to achieve their national legitimate rights, particularly through their admission as a sovereign State on the basis of the 1967 border, with east Jerusalem as its capital. Morocco also welcomed the positive signals in the recent statement by the Quartet (United Nations, United States, United Kingdom and Russian Federation). ...

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GUIDO WESTERWELLE, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Germany, ...

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His country backed a two-state solution to the Middle East conflict, with the creation of a State where Palestinians could live in dignity and self-determination, which was independent, sovereign, contiguous, democratic and politically and economically viable. Germany had been involved in the very practical development of the State, in building administration and vocational training, as well as politically through the German-Palestinian Steering Committee. Nonetheless, he said, Israel’s security was also one of the “fundamental principles” that guided Germany. The statement issued by the Quartet last week identified the milestones along the way; Germany had worked hard for that statement and staunchly supported it. Moreover, the recent confrontation of words must not be allowed to lead to an escalation of violence in the Middle East. He called on the parties to make use of the impetus provided by the intensive efforts in New York for the benefit of both peoples.

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YOUSEF BIN AL-ALAWI BIN ABDULLA, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Oman, stressed that, with negotiations between the Palestinian Authority and the Government of Israel at a standstill, the world, and the United Nations in particular, must act to find a just and comprehensive solution. His delegation believed that the establishment of a Palestinian State on the 4 June 1967 border, as well as its recognition as a Member State of the United Nations, would lead to serious negotiations that would reach just such a solution. ...

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WALID AL-MOUALEM, Minister for Foreign Affairs and Expatriates of Syria, said that the positions and circumstances of States were governed by their geopolitical realities and by the constraints and demands stemming from them. As a State in the heart of the Middle East, for many decades, Syria faced major challenges and stood firmly against attempts to curtail its role and divert the national course it had chartered for itself. It was no secret that Syria had upheld its national sovereignty and the independence of its decisions. Meanwhile, it had spared no effort in supporting the legitimate struggle of the Palestinian people and championed resistance movements. Syria upheld its right to liberate the Syrian Golan to the lines of June 1967. At the same time, Syria extended a hand of friendship to all States and built its national relations on mutual respect and reinforcing interests. It used its leverage to serve and promote the centrepiece of Syrian national prerogatives, namely the Middle East question to liberate land and restore rights.

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ÖSSUR SKARPHÉÐINSSON, Minister for Foreign Affairs and External Trade of Iceland, ...

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On the same principle that had led Iceland to recognize the Baltic States in 1991, his country today also supported the Palestinian struggle for statehood. Iceland would welcome Palestine as a new United Nations Member State, based on pre-1967 borders, exactly the same criteria laid down by the European Union, the Quartet and, lately, by United States President Barack Obama in a speech in May. “I have been to Gaza,” he said. “I have talked to the people, the fishermen that no longer can ply their trade, the young people that have no employment, the families that need a roof over their heads. I have also been to the West Bank. I have seen with my own eyes how the land of the Palestinians is literally cut to pieces by horrible walls of separation. This is wrong. This is unjust. This is against every moral code that Iceland has ever stood for as a guardian of human rights.”

Palestine was doing the same as Israel had done in 1947 — and Iceland had supported it, he said. Israel had taken its case to the United Nations and emerged with statehood. Palestine deserved the same. “It is hypocrisy to suggest otherwise,” he asserted, adding: “It would be foolish to deny Palestine her right to statehood.” Iceland, therefore, would vote “yes” when a resolution on the Palestinian statehood came to a vote in the General Assembly. The Icelandic Government was determined to fully recognize Palestine and would put to the Parliament of Iceland next week a resolution on the recognition of Palestine as a sovereign and independent State.

MOURAD MEDELCI, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Algeria, ...

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... The tumultuous situation with Palestine was another source of deep concern. The blocking of the peace process in the Middle East and the continued building of settlements had made lasting peace more distant every day. That risk-laden situation was an affront to the peoples of the region. The human embargo on Gaza and its borders was a collective punishment. Palestine’s application for statehood was an opportunity to impose international law. ...

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Sheikh ABDULLAH BIN ZAYED AL NAHYAN, Minister for Foreign Affairs of the United Arab Emirates, ...

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Looking beyond national borders, he said his Government was closely monitoring the major complications surrounding the Palestinian issue, including those events that had led to the end of direct negotiations. It was high time for that issue to be resolved in a comprehensive manner. The United Arab Emirates condemned Israel’s continued evasion of its international obligations. It also particularly condemned Israel’s settlement policy in the Palestinian Territory. He believed that a comprehensive and just peace between Arab countries and Israel would greatly help to reduce tensions and keep the “voices of radicalism” from using that issue as a major justification for promoting extremism and violence.

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JOSÉ BADIA, Government Counsellor for External Affairs of Monaco, ... Monaco expressed solidarity with those who had fought for freedom and the rule of law, hoping there would be a viable, lasting solution that would see Israel and Palestine as two States, living side by side in peace.

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URI ROSENTHAL, Minister for Foreign Affairs of the Netherlands, ...

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He said freedom and security were at the heart of the Middle East peace process, and if everyone wanted peace, “we need direct negotiations now, not new resolutions at the United Nations”. The Netherlands endorsed the time frame outlined late last week by the diplomatic Quartet on the Middle East peace process, and stood ready to provide any assistance it could. The Netherlands supported the ambition of the Palestinian people to build a viable independent State, as it supported the need to ensure Israel’s security. Both sides must invest in mutual confidence-building and refrain from taking unilateral steps.

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MANUEL SALVADOR DOS RAMOS, Minister for Foreign Affairs and Communities of Sao Tome and Principe, ...

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... While the people of Bahrain, Syria and Yemen had demanded reforms in State institutions, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict continued. He reaffirmed support for the Palestinian people’s right to guide their destiny and advocated for the existence of a Jewish State. He appealed to the United States and the European Union to exert their influence in order for the Government of the State of Israel to stop the establishment of settlements in the occupied territories. ...

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MOHAMED MOULDI KEFI, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Tunisia, ...

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... Arab unity could only come from common and daring political decisions and consensus on League of Arab States’ concerns, on top of which was Palestine. Tunisia strongly supported the Palestinian bid for United Nations recognition, and called for support of its full membership, strongly condemning the illegal embargo on the Gaza Strip and Israel’s recent military aggression. ///

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MARTY NATALEGAWA, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Indonesia, ...

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He said that “waging” peace in the Middle East must first and foremost entailed the correction of an historic injustice against the people of Palestine that had been allowed to go on for too long. In that regard, Indonesia strongly supported Palestine’s present quest for full membership in the United Nations. Such membership was consistent with the vision of a two-State solution, and of a just and comprehensive peace in the Middle East.

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JOHN BAIRD, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Canada, said ... We supported the aspirations of those peoples who sought for themselves and their countries brighter futures during the Arab Spring that just passed. But we will not go along with the unilateral actions of the Palestinian Authority,” he said. “Our Government’s position has been clear — the only solution to this issue is one that is negotiated by the two parties themselves.”

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SAMUEL SANTOS LÓPEZ, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Nicaragua, ...

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Calling for a rejection of the unacceptable policies of the major Powers “aspiring to hegemony”, he wondered where those supposed defenders of oppressed peoples — “those self-proclaimed civilian protection apostles” — were when attempts were being made to recognize the inalienable rights of the Palestinian people. The double standard was clear — after 60 years of conflict, the Palestinians would be deprived of their right to an independent State, when, barely 10 days ago, “with unheard of haste”, the Assembly had recognized the National Transitional Council in Libya, even though that Council had not set up a Government. He called for the Assembly to proclaim Palestine the 194th Member of the United Nations, as such recognition was not only just, it would be a clear move to shore up peace and stability in the Middle East. He said both Palestine and Israel must exist and live in peace so that their peoples could work towards their own well-being and development.

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GEORGES REBELO CHIKOTI, Minister for External Relations of Angola, ...

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... Angola was concerned about the conflict in the Middle East and supported the creation of a Palestinian State that coexisted peacefully with the State of Israel. ...

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SURUJRATTAN RAMBACHAN, Minister for Foreign Affairs and Communications of Trinidad and Tobago, ...

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The Middle East conflict should be settled peacefully, he said. He supported the Palestinians’ quest for their own State within secure borders alongside Israel. The United Nations must continue to show leadership and work with the Arab League and other entities to resolve the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. ...

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For information media • not an official record


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