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Source: Division for Palestinian Rights (DPR)
2 September 1988



FIFTH UNITED NATIONS INTERNATIONAL NGO MEETING

ON THE QUESTION OF PALESTINE

Palais des Nations, Geneva

31 August - 2 September 1988




CONTENTS

Introduction

Opening session

Panel presentations


Annexes


INTRODUCTION

The Fifth United Nations International NGO Meeting on the Question of Palestine was held under the auspices of the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People at the United Nations Office at Geneva from 31 August to 2 September 1988. The Meeting was convened in pursuance of General Assembly resolution 42/66 B of 2 December 1987.

The Meeting was attended by a total number of 278 non-governmental organizations (NGOs), of whom 138 attended as observers. It was also attended by Mr. Joseph Verner Reed, Under-Secretary-General for Political and General Assembly Affairs and Secretariat Services, representative of the Secretary-General, and by several observers from Governments, intergovernmental organizations, United Nations bodies, and the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO).

The Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People was represented by a delegation composed of H.E. Mrs. Absa Claude Diallo (Senegal), Committee Chairman, H.E. Mr. Mohammad Dost (Afghanistan), Committee Vice-Chairman, H.E. Mr. Guennadi Oudovenko (Ukrainian SSR), and Mr. Zuhdi Labib Terzi (PLO).

The programme for the Meeting was elaborated by the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People in consultation with the International Co-ordinating Committee for NGOs on the Question of Palestine (ICCP). Its main theme was "The consequences of the uprising in the occupied Palestinian territories and the new urgency of convening the International Peace Conference on the Middle East in accordance with United Nations General Assembly resolution 38/58 C".

A panel of the same title was established and presentations were made by the following eminent personalities:

The following panelists presented papers on the second panel entitled "The consequences of occupation - witnesses from the occupied territories - what has happened":
Five workshops were established on the following topics: (a) protecting the human rights and security of the Palestinian people; (b) mobilizing to meet special needs: health, education and welfare in the occupied territories; (c) new ideas for political mobilization for a just peace; (d) meeting the socio-economic crisis in the occupied territories; and (e) supporting Palestinian women and children. A number of special interest groups were also organized during the Meeting.

The Meeting adopted a final declaration as well as action-oriented proposals emanating from the workshops (see annexes I and II).


OPENING SESSION

The Meeting was opened by H.E. Mrs. Absa Claude Diallo (Senegal), Chairman of the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People.

In his statement on behalf of the Secretary-General of the United Nations, Mr. Joseph Verner Reed, Under-Secretary-General for Political and General Assembly Affairs and Secretariat Services, stressed the Secretary-General's concern over the current situation and his commitment to the search for a settlement of the Palestinian question. The activities of NGOs could play a very important role in helping to bring about this goal (see annex III).

The Meeting was then addressed by Mr. Farouk Kaddoumi, Head of the Political Department of the PLO. Mr. Kaddoumi stressed the determination of the Palestinian people to attain independence and freedom-. The uprising had unmasked the real character of Israeli occupation. The NGOs had an important role to play in educating and mobilizing international public opinion. Certain sectors of Israeli society had begun to oppose the policies and practices in the occupied territories. However, the Israeli leadership had continued to ignore the changes brought about by the uprising and extremist elements were increasingly calling for driving the Palestinians out. The

United Nations and the international community as a whole had a responsibility not only to strive towards a peaceful solution but also to seek ways to provide protection to the Palestinian people. A special responsibility rested with those countries that had contributed to the creation of Israel.

In her statement, H.E. Mrs. Absa Claude Diallo, Chairman of the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People, stressed the urgency of the situation in view of Israel's repression of Palestinians. The progress made in other regional conflicts made it clear that the United Nations had a vital role to play in efforts for a peaceful settlement of the Palestinian question. The Committee had continued to give the highest priority to the convening of the International Peace Conference on the Middle East in accordance with General Assembly resolution 38/58 C. The Committee was gratified by the intensification of NGO activities since the beginning of the uprising and by their influence on public opinion and looked forward to increased co-operation with them in pursuit of the common objectives.

In a message addressed to the participants at the Meeting, Mr. Yasser Arafat, Chairman of the Executive Committee of the PLO, stressed the gravity of the situation in the occupied Palestinian territories and called for the territories to be placed under United Nations supervision in preparation for Israeli withdrawal and with a view to facilitating the holding of the International Peace Conference on the Middle East in accordance with General Assembly resolution 38/58 C (see annex IV).

Mr. Donald Betz, Chairman of the International Co-ordinating Committee for NGOs on the Question of Palestine (ICCP), stressed the sense of self-determination and empowerment which Palestinians in the occupied territories had derived from the intifadah and pledged strengthened efforts by the NGO community in their support. He also submitted a report on ICCP activities since the Fourth International Meeting.


PANEL PRESENTATIONS

In his presentation, H.E. Mr. Rikhi Jaipal (India) pointed out that the Palestinian uprising was clearly a struggle against the Jewish colonization of Palestine and for its liberation from Israeli occupation.' The normal process of decolonization in Palestine had been subverted by British policies despite the fact that the Mandate of the League of Nations had declared the readiness of the Palestinian community to be provisionally recognized as an independent nation. By its unilateral decision to establish "a national home for the Jewish people" in Palestine, the British Government had laid the basis for the present Jewish sovereign State of Israel.

Through the partition plan of 1947, the United Nations had sanctioned the creation of two States, one Jewish and one Arab, and the right of Palestinians to establish their sovereign independent State as approved by the United Nations remained valid. Israeli occupation of Palestinian territory in excess of what was sanctioned by the United Nations was tantamount to violation of international law and the United Nations Charter. The withdrawal of Israel from the occupied territories was the first step towards peace and could not be made subject to any conditions.

A special responsibility rested with the permanent members of the Security Council, particularly those who were friends of Israel, as they were also parties to the decision to partition Palestine. They were expected to co-operate with the United Nations in securing Israeli withdrawal from the occupied territories. The convening of the International Peace Conference on the Middle East, in accordance with General Assembly resolution 38/58 C, had become an urgent political necessity. The purpose of the Conference should be to recover the occupied territories, to offer Israel security guarantees, and to re-establish the independent Arab State of Palestine with international guarantees for its own security.

Apolinar Diaz-Callejas (Colombia) stressed the kinship between the Latin American and Caribbean peoples and the Palestinian people.

Historically, the indigenous peoples of the Americas and the Black slaves had repeatedly revolted against the subjugation and exploitation by the European colonizers. The struggle for political and economic independence was still continuing. The peoples of Latin America and the Caribbean therefore supported the Palestinian people and the decisions of the United Nations recognizing its inalienable rights.

The rights of the Palestinian people were protected by the international legal system recognized by Member States of the United Nations. Rebellion in order to achieve those rights was in itself a legitimate right. Israeli repression of the uprising was contrary to international norms and a threat to peace. The political and military support given to Israel by the United States was to be deplored, .

The current uprising in the occupied territories was a high point in the struggle by the Palestinian people to attain its inalienable rights. Its effects had been extraordinary both for nation-building and in terms of gaining world-wide public support. The time had possibly never been more appropriate for convening the International Peace Conference on the Middle East in accordance with General Assembly resolution 38/58 C. The recent weapons agreements and the ongoing efforts to solve various regional conflicts through political means created a favourable set of circumstances which made it urgently necessary to convene the Conference. However-, Israel's continued repression of the uprising and refusal to abide by United Nations resolutions made it essential for NGOs and peace-loving people to mobilize throughout the world and demand the convening of the Conference.

Mr. Paul Findley (United States) expressed admiration for the courage of the Palestinians involved in the uprising and deplored Israel's brutality. Four realities had to be taken into account in analyzing the Palestinian crisis. Firstly, a primary battle for justice for the Palestinians must be fought and won in the United States as without the letter's support, Israel would be forced to come quickly to terms with its neighbours. Secondly, the perception of the PLO in the United States was a negative one and based on stereotypes which were the result of a long and racist campaign by Israel and its friends. Thirdly, Americans tended naturally to support victims of injustice and up to one-half already favoured the establishment of a Palestinian State in contrast to the position of the United States Government. Many however remained unsympathetic, thanks to the effectiveness of the Israeli lobby. The fourth reality was that Americans who supported the establishment of a Palestinian State did so only if such a State did not jeopardize Israel's existence within the pre-1967 borders. If forced to choose between Israel and the new Palestine, most Americans would choose Israel.

Mr. Findley went on to state that in order to win broader support in the United States, the Palestinians themselves, along with their growing number of American friends must take the offensive with vision, practicality and vigour. A PLO initiative to announce the existence of the State of Palestine in the West Bank and Gaza and the establishment of a provisional Government pending United Nations-supervised free elections would be met with a positive and powerful reaction in the United States. Such an initiative would defeat existing false stereotypes of the PLO, render present prohibitions against it inoperative and create a new Palestinian image, particularly through the actions and statements of officials of the provisional government aiming to achieve a negotiated peace. Thousands of United States citizens would consequently campaign vigorously for American recognition of the new Palestine and for the withdrawal of Israeli forces.

The Rt. Hon. Gerald Kaufman (United Kingdom) pointed out that the uprising was the direct outcome of the unacceptable situation which had now prevailed in the occupied territories for a full generation. The British Labour Party had committed itself to seeking a stable peace in the Middle Bast which protects the security of Israel and recognizes the right of Palestinians to self-determination.

Mr. Kaufman said that he had held talks with all the leaders concerned in pursuit of that commitment. The only logical basis for a settlement was the continuation of the State of Israel as a Jewish homeland with a properly enfranchised Arab minority, together with a Palestinian entity, with arrangements for self-determination and in which Jews were free to live if they accepted such arrangements. The Arab countries and the Palestinians had come to terms with the existence of the State of Israel and were ready to negotiate within the framework of an international conference, under the auspices of the five permanent members of the Security Council.

The Israeli Labour Party also believed that a settlement could be reached within an international conference and should include withdrawal from the occupied territories on a scale and on conditions to be decided within the context of the conference. Questions relating to procedure and participation could be settled once the conference was agreed in principle by all parties. The Palestinian people should be suitably represented at the conference after proper consideration by Arab Governments, keeping in mind that in the absence of free elections, the only available and internationally recognized body representing the Palestinians was the PLO.

In the view of the British Labour Party, continued occupation was a potentially lethal threat to Israeli security rather than a safeguard of such security. Continuation of the present situation would further isolate Israel and undermine its internal integrity as its Arab citizens would increasingly express their solidarity with the Palestinians and many Israeli Jews would oppose the repression. The best hope for peace was accordingly the election in Israel of a Labour Party Government committed to accept an international conference and ready to negotiate appropriate withdrawal in exchange for guaranteed security.

Mr. Vladimir Vinogradov (USSR) pointed out that the uprising in the occupied territories and Jordan's decision to rupture its administrative and juridical ties to the West Bank demonstrated that the destiny of the Palestinians should be decided by the Palestinians themselves. There was now a good chance for resolving the conflict. It was clear that the Palestinian people would continue fighting for their rights and that world support for their cause was growing. The position of Israel and its supporters was morally wrong and out of touch with the times. It was impossible and inadmissible for a State to exist by suppressing other States and nations.

An approach based on the necessity to ensure the security of all States and nations in the region should be used in a future Middle East settlement. That settlement must be multilateral, i.e. through the convening of an international conference under United Nations auspices, with the participation of all parties, including the PLO, on an equal footing, and the permanent members of the Security Council. Matters of procedure should preferably be settled before the opening of the conference.

The conference should work on a permanent basis until a comprehensive settlement of the conflict was reached. Its work could be carried out in plenary meetings, working groups for the consideration of common problems, and geographical bilateral working groups. It was very important to proceed from the balance of interests among the parties and not allow the conference to be used as a screen for imposing unjust solutions unacceptable to the parties.

In his view, the time was now ripe to start working out the modalities of the conference and should call on the permanent members of the Security Council to begin such preparations in consultation with the parties. The Meeting should also call on Israel to respond positively to the decisions of the United Nations concerning the convening of the conference.

Mr. Ghassan El-Khatib (Palestinian) spoke on agricultural development and marketing in the occupied territories. He stated that since its beginning in 1967, the Israeli occupation had had two major goals: the economic exploitation of the human and material resources of the occupied territories, and the pacification of the local population. Agriculture was one of the main sectors in the economy of the occupied territories but Israel had pursued policies designed to encourage or force Palestinian farmers to leave their land for wage labour with Israeli companies.

The challenge to the Palestinians had therefore been to develop an agricultural development strategy which could be implemented under the specific conditions of occupation, with the manpower and resources available. An outstanding initiative in this regard was the creation five years ago of the Palestinian Agricultural Relief Committee (PARC), a network of more than 100 agricultural engineers working mainly as volunteers to promote efficient crop production by Palestinian farmers. Recently, with support from the European Economic Community (EEC) and European NGOs, PARC had promoted the establishment of the United Agricultural Company (UAC), a Palestinian marketing company for agricultural produce designed to help small farmers.

In its efforts to crush the uprising, Israel had taken a series of measures intended to damage the agricultural sector in the occupied territories. However, the uprising had seen a mass return to the land of Palestinians seeking to reduce their economic dependency on Israel. Local "popular" management committees had been created to provide some services to the population affected by curfews and other repressive measures, as well as by the near collapse of government services. PARC had successfully experimented with co-ordinating farmers' and consumers' committees and it was hoped that UAC could develop and systematize and direct marketing operations on a large scale and organize exports. Support by sympathetic NGOs and direct co-operation with such self-help undertakings by Palestinians was extremely important.

Mr. Emile Habibi (Israel) stressed that the Palestinian people could not rely on illusions of outside help in its struggle. Fate had put the Palestinians in the same boat with Israelis with whom they wanted to live in peace and equality. The Israeli leaders had miscalculated and had been surprised by the outbreak of the intifadah.

The intifadah was the greatest Palestinian uprising since the great Palestinian catastrophe of 1948. It was the result of comprehending the rich experience gained through the last 40 years. It was irreversible and demonstrated the capacity of Palestinians to overcome mistakes which had allowed their enemies to deny their national right to self-determination. The intifadah had exposed the falsification of Palestinian history by those who opposed the Palestinian right to independence.

Mr. Habibi went on to say that it was not true that the Palestinian people had rejected the United Nations partition plan in 1948 or later. It had been forcibly denied its right of national expression and self-determination through massacres and the forced expulsion of one million Palestinians in 1948. The Israeli leadership had to understand, as the Palestinian leadership had already done, that the security of each people and State depended on that of the other.

Ms. Samar Hawash (Palestinian) stressed the importance of international solidarity for the people involved in the uprising. Since the beginning of the uprising, people had been engaged in various forms of strikes. A general strike was currently taking place in the West Bank and Gaza to protest detentions and expulsions. Nablus, her city, was under curfew and so were several other areas and refugee camps and several persons had been wounded in the last few days. She called upon the participants in the International Meeting to do all in their power to stop the massacres carried out by the Israeli occupation forces.

Over the last 21 years, the occupation had attempted to destroy and extirpate the Palestinian people and had practised all manner of oppression in order to prevent its development. Thousands of Palestinians had been jailed under the most inhumane conditions. A blatant example was the Ansar III detention centre, where more than 3,500 detainees had been placed, where two Palestinians had recently been killed and dozens wounded, and where medical care was non-existent. The occupation authorities had also continued to demolish houses, administer beatings and close down Palestinian institutions in an effort to break Palestinian opposition and obliterate their identity.

The uprising had not been a random event but had arisen as a natural consequence of the enormous accumulation of sacrifices and suffering during the occupation. Through the uprising, the Palestinian people was reaffirming the fact that it refused to accept the fait accompli which the Israeli authorities were attempting to impose, and was stressing its insistence on the restoration of its inalienable national rights. The uprising was characterized by its comprehensiveness and its broad mass character. The Palestinian people had become fully convinced that it was not possible to have any future or make any progress until it established its own independent State in Palestine.

Dr. Allam Jarrar (Palestinian) stated that the Israeli policy since occupation was aimed at displacing the Palestinian people from its land. The occupation authorities had systematically attempted to destroy totally the social and economic infrastructure of Palestinian society. The situation in the occupied territories had continued to deteriorate, causing many social problems. Particularly in the field of health and education, there were severe shortages. The occupation authorities had pursued a policy of promoting intellectual backwardness throughout the territories; teachers had been dismissed, schools closed, educational facilities neglected. The health sector had suffered more than any other from the occupation, and health institutions had been the object of severe repression since the beginning of the uprising, including raids, arrests of doctors and patients, and confiscation of medical equipment.

Dr. Jarrar went on to say that the only solution was for Palestinian services to free themselves from the hegemony of the occupation authorities and to become fully independent. People's committees had been formed in various health, agricultural and social fields in the occupied territories and had begun to develop and expand as real institutions of the Palestinian people, with the help and support of a large number of international development institutions with which they maintained close links. The establishment of such committees was one of the principal features of the uprising and the Minister of Defence of Israel had declared them illegal.

The uprising had confirmed that a broad-based popular struggle was the most appropriate form of struggle in the occupied territories, and that those territories were the principal and decisive arena for the Palestinian struggle. It also provided proof that Palestinians were capable of united action and of proposing a realistic political programme. There was accordingly an urgent need for an equitable solution based on the right of the Palestinian people to self-determination, the establishment of its independent State in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, and the solution of the refugee problem in accordance with United Nations resolutions.

Dr. Jumana Odeh (Palestine) stated that since early December 1987, Palestinian in the West Bank and Gaza had been living in a state of military siege. Despite the brutal Israeli crackdown, the size and strength of the uprising had continued to grow as more and more people chose to resist actively the occupation.

Based on a three-month study of injuries from shootings and beatings conducted at Fara'a refugee camp, and in view of the subsequent continuation of the pattern of brutality, it was estimated that the total number of injured was not less than 50,000 persons. Such injuries were the result of officially endorsed army policy and not individual aberrations. The army had also harassed medical institutions, arrested patients, beaten staff and destroyed equipment. Repeated large-scale curfews had hampered the provision of medical care and had also had damaging psychological effects on the population.

The Union of Medical Relief Committees had launched a relief effort with the co-operation of volunteers from the medical professions as well as many grass-root committees in the West Bank and Gaza. Their efforts had prevented the health services, which were already inadequate for the needs of Palestinians living under occupation, from collapsing under the burden of serious casualties during the uprising. These activities, however, were increasingly under attack by the Israeli authorities and many health workers had been jailed, and charitable and medical societies had been closed down. One major demand at present was to release public hospitals from the control of the Israeli occupying authorities and if possible place them under the protection of a United Nations authority. There was an increased need for support from the medical and international community to protect the work of Palestinian medical institutions and to help those who suffered from health problems to receive adequate care.

Dr. Amnon Zichroni (Israel) stated that the contribution of the intifadah to the peace process had been that the Israelis were slowly beginning to understand that the PLO is the legitimate representative of the Palestinian people and the only true partner for negotiations for peace in the region. Another coalition government was likely to emerge from the Israeli elections because of the essential ideological similarity of the two major parties. That closeness of ideology could allow for the recognition of Palestinian rights to filter from the Israeli public upward to the political ruling level. This, together with international pressure and possible political action by the Palestinian leaders, could bring about real changes.

In his view, the process begun by the intifadah must now be completed by political means. It was now incumbent upon the PLO to take a public undivided stand which would be a departure from the Palestinian Covenant, recognizing the State of Israel and forming a Government in exile. That Government should put forward a detailed peace plan—relating, inter alia, to the border issue, the refugee issue and the recognition of the pre-1967 armistice lines.

In conclusion Mr. Zichroni pointed to a draft peace agreement between Israel and the PLO which he had circulated to the Second International NGO Meeting in 1985, and expressed the hope that a similar agreement could soon be signed, with the super-Powers as guarantors.


***

The Meeting also heard a statement by Mr. Khaled Al Hassan, Chairman of the Political Affairs Committee of the Palestine National Council. He stressed the importance of the role of NGOs in enlightening public opinion about the Palestine question. The intifadah was the end result of the Israeli policy of enforced stability in the occupied territories. Peace, however, had to be based on justice and could only be attained through negotiations with participation of all parties on an equal footing. This was the position of the Palestinian people and its representative, the PLO.

The Palestinian problem had international roots and therefore had to be resolved through international action. The International Peace Conference on the Middle East was the only practical way to achieve peace through negotiations. Direct negotiations would become possible only if the Israeli authorities were to declare that they recognized the Palestinian people and were ready to accept an independent Palestinian State alongside Israel and co-existing peacefully with it. However, in view of the present Israeli policy, the International Conference was the only possible avenue for negotiations.

The leadership, parties and people of Israel needed to realize that Palestinians and Israelis had to live together in peace and that the process of history could not be stopped. Israel needed to overcome its fears and understand the Palestinians could not live without rights, identity and a State of their own. Either peace would be achieved through negotiations, or the Palestinians would continue their struggle. He expected that the Palestine National Council, at its forthcoming meeting, would adopt a declaration of independence and decide to form a Government in exile or a provisional Government, and expressed the hope that this would end all objections against the participation of the Palestinian people in the Peace Conference.


* * *

In her concluding remarks, the Chairman of the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People stated that it was clear that the situation in the occupied territories had reached dramatic proportions and could not be allowed to continue. Two goals must now motivate the activities of Governments and intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations: the urgent search for ways and means to ensure protection of the Palestinians in the occupied territories, and intensification of efforts at all levels to promote a peaceful settlement in accordance with United Nations resolutions.

She expressed the Committee's satisfaction at the activities by NGOs aimed at ensuring respect for the Fourth Geneva Convention, and in support of the convening of the International Peace Conference on the Middle East. The Committee had been particularly impressed by NGO efforts to mobilize specific constituencies and by the great expansion of the network of NGOs, including many from Israel and the Jewish communities in Europe and North America. The Committee called on all NGOs to continue to do their utmost to mobilize even greater numbers for peace in the region.


Annex I

DECLARATION OF THE NON-GOVERNMENTAL ORGANIZATIONS AT THE

FIFTH UNITED NATIONS INTERNATIONAL NGO MEETING

ON THE QUESTION OF PALESTINE,

held at Geneva from 31 August to 2 September 1988


1. We, the non-governmental organizations (NGOs) participating in the Fifth United Nations International NGO Meeting on the Question of Palestine, are gathering at a time when the Palestinian struggle has entered a decisive stage. We admire and support the determination of the Palestinian people in the struggle for independence and the securing of its own State.

2. Last year, the Fourth United Nations International NGO Meeting on the Question of Palestine expressed its grave concern that any further delay in convening the International Peace Conference on the Middle East, in accordance with General Assembly resolutions 38/58 C and 41/43 D, would worsen conflict in the Middle East and intensify the suffering and oppression to which the Palestinian people were daily subjected. Noting that the International Conference has still not been convened in spite of our warning, we now draw attention, with all the power at our command, to the murderous intensification of the daily and continuing suffering and oppression of the Palestinian people since December 1987. We vigorously renew our call for the Conference.

3. We salute the brave people of the occupied territories for their courage, endurance and solidarity throughout the intifadah (uprising) and we note that they have done more during the months of the intifadah to focus attention on the injustices suffered by the Palestinian people than the entire world community had done in the previous 40 years.

4. We condemn all deportations and all other manifestations of the systematic destruction of Palestinian society and the attempts by the occupation forces to eliminate Palestinian society for the future. We condemn all infringements of human rights and international law such as administrative detentions, imprisonment, arbitrary arrests, collective punishments, and demolition of houses, the closing of schools and educational institutions, the confiscation of property and the killing of innocent people. We warn the international community that plans for mass expulsions and population transfer (expulsions) of Palestinians are being seriously discussed in Israel. Even as we were assembling, trade union headquarters and charitable institutions were closed down. All these actions are wholly and specifically contrary to Articles 47, 49 and 50 of the Fourth Geneva Convention of 1949. We call upon all Governments to state categorically that their bilateral relations with Israel will be affected by these breaches of the Geneva Convention and that relations will be reconsidered if these and all breaches of the Geneva Convention are not ended.

5. In accordance with the suggestions made by the United Nations Secretary- General in his report to the Security Council (S/19443) of 21 January 1988, we urge the United Nations, the five permanent members of the Security Council and the entire international community to help to ensure the protection of the Palestinian people in the occupied territories. This should include physical protection, legal protection, general assistance to resist the violations of their rights and protection by publicity through the international media. We request the Secretary-General to send a fact-finding mission to the occupied territories to assess the needs of the Palestinians there.

6. We call upon the United Nations to exercise its full responsibility for the Palestine question. The United Nations should place observer teams and/or any other United Nations body in the occupied Palestinian territories of the West Bank and Gaza Strip without delay to help protect the people there from continuing human rights violations and Israeli war crimes. We specifically request the Secretary-General to establish immediately a special commission to investigate the repeated occurrence of maltreatment, beatings, toxic gassing, torture and shooting and killing of Palestinian children by Israeli troops, prison authorities and settlers.

7. We note that the intifadah has greatly strengthened the international consensus in favour of the Peace Conference. Accordingly, we call on all Governments to support the immediate convening of the Conference under United Nations auspices, in accordance with General Assembly resolutions 38/58 C and 41/43 D, with the participants including the five permanent members of the Security Council, the PLO, Israel, the Arab States party to the conflict, and other concerned States, on an equal footing and with equal rights. The object must be to reach a peaceful settlement between the Palestinian State to be established and Israel as conducive to the overall settlement in the Middle East.

8. Noting that the people of the intifadah are not just protesting against oppression but are calling for the self-determination, independence and right to return which is their right in accordance with the fundamental principles of the Charter of the United Nations, we call on all Governments to recognize that right and to uphold it. Recent events have created a new situation where there is no recognized sovereign authority over the Palestinian territories occupied since 1967 except that of the Palestinian people. Therefore, we call for the immediate end of the occupation. We also call on the United Nations to assist the Palestinian people in securing the right to exercise sovereignty there, according to United Nations resolutions.

9. Reaffirming the international consensus that the PLO is the sole and legitimate representative of the Palestinian people, we note that the consensus is greatly strengthened by the unequivocal support for the PLO by the people of the intifadah and by the United National Leadership of the intifadah. We therefore call on all Governments fully to recognize the PLO.

10. We demand immediate Israeli withdrawal from southern Lebanon in accordance with United Nations Security Council resolutions 425 (1978), 508 (1982) and 509 (1982). We demand the ending of the inhumane Israeli air raids and all other attacks on targets in Lebanon. We call for an end to all attempts to destabilize Lebanon and for full recognition of its unity, sovereignty and democratic development. We ask ICCP to co-ordinate the sending of delegations to Lebanon as a way to protect the Palestinian population there from the occupying authorities.

11. We condemn the introduction by Israel of nuclear weapons into the Middle East and the threat to regional and world peace which those weapons constitute. We call for the implementation of a nuclear- weapon-free zone in the Middle East and for Israel to sign the Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, to dismantle its nuclear and chemical weapons and open its nuclear facilities to international inspection. We especially deplore the creation of new nuclear threats in the Middle East at a time when the United States and the Soviet Union have embarked upon reductions in nuclear weapons. We demand the immediate release of Mordechai Vanunu.

12. We express our strong support for the forces of peace in Israel which favour the International Peace Conference and the establishment of a Palestinian State. We strongly condemn the closing down of newspapers and the harassment of journalists. We express support for those who refuse military service in occupied Palestinian territories and other occupied territories of Arab countries and we call upon the Israeli Government to release the imprisoned soldiers, to drop the investigation by its security services against Yesh Gvul and to recognize the right of Israelis to conscientious objection. We strongly urge the Israeli Parliament to rescind the law of August 1986 which prohibits contact between Israeli citizens and representatives of Palestinian organizations.

13. A major objective of this Meeting was to plan and co-ordinate NGO activities and much of our work was conducted in workshops and in special interest group meetings. We affirm their conclusions and suggestions for action as appended herewith. In so doing, we draw attention to the fact that NGO opinion has been more progressive and creative than official governmental thinking. We urge all Governments, in the interest of peace and justice, to consider seriously the options defined by NGOs.

14. It is important that NGO effectiveness be further increased.

Accordingly, we call for NGO liaison offices to be established in every United Nations designated region and we urge the United Nations to convene an annual NGO regional symposium in every region. We urge the United Nations to convene an international meeting in Vienna in the first week of September 1989, the format to be decided, like the format for this present meeting, in co-operation with ICCP.

15. We call upon all our fellow NGOs to provide every material, medical and other assistance to the Palestinian people.

16. We affirm the organization and work of ICCP and its secretariat in Geneva. We call upon the United Nations to offer every possible assistance to ICCP and its secretariat.

17. We urge the Chairman of the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People to convey this Declaration to the General Assembly at its forty-third session as part of the Committee's report. We urge that the results of this meeting be disseminated as widely as possible to NGOs unable to attend, to Governments and the media.

18. We thank the United Nations Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People for convening this Meeting and we appreciate the presence of the members and observers of that body. We thank the Chief of the Division for Palestinian Rights, the NGO Liaison officer and staff of the Division, and the Department of Conference Services, including the interpreters, for their assistance in this meeting. We express our appreciation to the distinguished experts who spoke here.


Annex II

A. WORKSHOP REPORTS

Workshop 1: Protecting the human rights and security of the Palestinian People

Judicial and legal system


Israeli occupation has abolished the judicial and legal system in the occupied territories and instead implemented the Israeli military judicial system and administrative and emergency laws of 1945. All this is in contravention to both the Fourth Geneva Convention of 1949 and the The Hague Convention of 1907. Palestinians always fought for their own legal protection and security. They were given only some material support through the United Nations and Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA). Unanimously accepted, Security Council resolutions 605 (1987) of 22 December 1987, 607 (1988) of 5 January 1988 and 608 (1988) of 14 January 1988 called for the international protection of the Palestinians in the occupied areas.

The report of the United Nations Secretary-General to the Security Council also demanded international protection for the Palestinian people in four ways:

(1) Physical protection;

(2) Legal protection;

(3) Protection in the form of assistance by foreign agencies;

(4) Protection through publicity.

We demand at this Meeting the support and the protection of the Palestinian people in its struggle for its human rights and security. We urge the United Nations, through this Meeting, to ask NGOs to consider the adoption of the following practical actions towards securing the human rights and the security of the Palestinian people:

(1) Open human rights offices in the occupied areas and Lebanon run by foreign and local staff, to be living witnesses;

(2) Open information offices as agents who will gather information about the inhuman activities and practices of the Israeli authorities. This information is to be published and sent to embassies, other NGOs, the United Nations, mass media, etc.;

(3) Support Palestinian-Jewish dialogue existing in the area and encourage and support new dialogue groups;

(4) Urge the United Nations, through this Meeting, to impose sanctions and boycotts against Israel to force it to abide by international conventions and United Nations resolutions. In view of the similarity between South Africa and Israel, the United Nations should take the same steps and measures;

(5) Urge the General Assembly to request the Security Council to take measures under Chapter VII of the United Nations Charter to order Israel to withdraw its forces from the West Bank and the Gaza Strip and to replace them with United Nations forces as the interim force pending the exercise by the Palestinian people of its inalienable right to self-determination and statehood. The General Assembly should appoint a United Nations committee to help the Palestinians in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip to set up an administration for the exercise of their right of self-determination.

(1) To develop a strategy to place Western monitors, witnesses and skilled professional volunteers in the occupied areas carefully co-ordinated with local Palestinians and the PLO;

(2) To involve Western Jewish groups and individuals with rotation participants to be witnesses for peace. All volunteers should be self-sufficient;

(3) To work for the reconstruction of Shatila and Burj el Barajneh;

(4) To urge the United Nations to take up its responsibility towards ensuring the protection of Palestinians in Lebanon.


We demand the abolition of such laws and urge the United Nations and the international community to put an end to such practices and support committees and organizations in Israel which fight against the policy of expropriation such as the National Committee for the Defence of Arab Land in Israel.

Transfer

Since the uprising, over 300 Palestinians were killed, thousands detained, and more than 50 Palestinians deported from their homeland. Mass transfer is the fashion talk among some Israeli politicians. Therefore, we urge the United Nations to use international publicity to make known the transfer plans of Israel among all countries and to protest the policy of dismantling Palestinian institutions and the socio-economic structure as preparation for transfer.

Education

1. Protests concerning the closure of educational institutions in the occupied territories should be made by NGOs to their respective Governments as well as to the Israeli authorities. The harassment of teachers and students by the Israeli army, the police and the settlers should be strongly condemned.

2. Contacts with teachers' and students' unions, and other related bodies in their respective countries should be made by NGOs to interest them in the situation of Palestinian teachers and students, and to urge them to take action regarding the harassment.

3. Educational aid is needed for schools, in the way of teaching material, laboratory equipment, running costs, etc. There is also a great need for vocational training. As for universities, support is needed not only for applied but also for basic research.

4. Educational activities that serve mutual reinforcement between the university and the community should be encouraged.

5. Organizations such as the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) must be involved in the working out of a national system of education for the Palestinians under occupation. Non­governmental UNESCO clubs should be encouraged to play an active role in assisting the educational process in the occupied territories.

6. NGOs should attempt to utilize governmental aid for educational projects in the occupied territories.

7. International as well as national institutions should be alerted that while all the children of the world are sitting happily in their classrooms, Palestinian children under Israeli occupation are deprived of this basic human right ensured by the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Pressure should be brought to bear on Israel to ensure the opening of schools in the West Bank and Gaza Strip.

Health

1. The work and experiences of grass-root organizations in the occupied territories must be utilized and supported without the security of those organizations being jeopardized. It is known that the delivery of health care is a multi-level project that needs support and co-ordination at primary, secondary and tertiary levels. In this respect, supporting hospitals with specialist volunteers to deal with injuries including bullet wounds and related injuries is essential. Physical and psychological rehabilitation is also needed.

2. Co-operation and co-ordination of Palestinian medical and health NGOs in the occupied territories is important for facilitating the work of international NGOs in that field.

3. Pressure should be applied by NGOs and other international bodies to reopen clinics, allow mobile clinics to operate, and ensure the safety of health institutions from military harassment.

4. Pressure should also be applied by NGOs on their respective Governments to take active measures, including sanctions, in protest against the harassment, imprisonment and detention of health, educational and social workers in the occupied territories.

5. Action should be taken by NGOs to ensure adequate medical care for prisoners and detainees through contacting the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC), the League of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies and other agencies.

6. Specialized and professional material is required for the occupied territories for the mobilization of professionals by different NGOs, for example on the subject of toxic gas, eye injuries, etc.

7. Israeli health-workers should be encouraged to support their Palestinian counterparts. In this respect, the report submitted by the Association of Israel-Palestinian Physicians on the, findings of Israeli doctors in the occupied territories is to be circulated.

8. An NGO sub-committee to deal with the new challenges facing the health of Palestinians under occupation was called for, but differing points of view were expressed. There was consensus, however, on the need for some form of co-ordination to take place. ICCP is therefore asked to focus its attention on co-ordinating the health work of NGOs in the occupied territories.

9. The problem of Dr. Jan Cools, who has been missing in the south of Lebanon for over three months, and the interrogation and threatening of a British volunteer health-worker in the occupied territories were outlined. It was suggested that a body be established to monitor the safety and security of all health-workers. The text of the following proposal for an appeal to help Dr. Cools was approved. It is hoped that all member NGOs will take up the case of Dr. Cools and appeal for his safe return.


"Proposal submitted by the Norwegian Aid Committee (NORWAC) and

the Palestinian Red Crescent Society (PRCS)

1. The work of humanitarian NGOs with the Palestinians in the occupied territories of Palestine, Lebanon and elsewhere is an essential part of supporting people under oppression;

2. The security of humanitarian volunteers is not only a concern but also a responsibility of all authorities and organizations in whose vicinity these volunteers are working;

3. A European medical volunteer, Dr. Jan Cools, has been missing in the south of Lebanon where he was working as a medical doctor with the Norwegian Aid Committee (NORWAC) in projects involving both Palestinian and Lebanese populations.

(a) H.E. Mr. Hafaz el Assad, President of the Syrian Arab Republic;

(b) H.E. Amin Gemayel, President of Lebanon;

(c) Mr. Yasser Arafat, Chairman of the Executive Committee of the PLO;

(d) Mr. Nabih Berri, Amal Movement;

(e) Sheikh Hussein Fadlallah, Hesbollah;

(f) Mr. Walid Jumblatt, P.S.P.

(g) Mr. Mustafa Saad, President, Nasserite Popular Movement.


A number of concrete proposals arising from the consensus of the workshop are listed below. It was, however, felt that given the urgency of the situation, certain appeals should be made by all NGOs in unison. We therefore call upon the United Nations:

(1) To assume responsibility for the implementation of its resolutions concerning the Palestinian question;

(2) To take legal custody of the occupied Palestinian territories as a transitional step in the wake of the Jordanian renunciation of claims to sovereignty over the West Bank;

(3) To assume a protective role as regards the population of the West Bank and Gaza in the face of the brutalization of the Israeli occupation;

(4) To hasten its preparations for the International Peace Conference under General Assembly resolution 38/58 C. Participants stressed that such a Conference must deal with the question of the right of return of the Palestinian refugees in accordance with United Nations resolutions.

(1) Emphasis was placed on the important role of the United States in effecting an end to the occupation. Political mobilization should focus on changing public opinion in the United States to bring pressure to bear on Israel for meeting the just demands of the intifadah. The same applies to other NGOs around the world;

(2) Efforts should be made to strengthen the work of the Israeli peace movement, including NGOs, in their struggle against the occupation and for a just peace between Israel and Palestine. Among the actions commended were daily demonstrations in front of the prisons where Palestinians are detained and the refusal of growing numbers of Israeli reserve soldiers to serve in the occupied Palestinian territories - actions which are having a concrete impact on public opinion;

(3) NGOs should conduct simultaneous international activities on the following dates:

(a) 17 September - the anniversary of the Sabra and Shatila massacres;

(b) 18 December - the first anniversary of the intifadah.

(4) A campaign must be waged by NGOs in each country to call on their Governments to recognize the new Palestinian State when it is proclaimed and to have it accepted as a Member State of the United Nations;

(5) In support of the urgent need to convene the International Peace Conference on the Middle East, NGOs should organize a world-wide campaign in different forms, including:

(a) A mass collection of signatures in support of an appeal for the Conference to be issued at this Meeting;

(b) The sending of petitions to the Secretary-General of the United Nations, the five permanent members of the Security Council and the parties to the conflict to start immediate preparatory work;

(c) Organizing an international pop music concert in favour of the Palestinian uprising and the International Peace Conference;

(6) NGOs should develop their communication activities through the use of data-base networks;

(7) Whenever possible, NGOs should send fact-finding missions to the occupied territories;

(8) As a symbolic gesture of solidarity, Israeli NGOs could host Palestinian refugees in Israeli homes;

(9) The workshop supports the non-violent ceremony of the laying of a wreath of peace in front of the plaque commemorating the departure of the Exodus in the harbour of State in southern France as a gesture of support for the intifadah;

(10) Workshop participants commended a number of proposals made at the recent meeting of the European Co-ordinating Committee for NGOs on the Question of Palestine (ECCP), and agreed to incorporate the following initiatives in their own work:

(a) The organization of a peace march from Europe to Palestine in conjunction with the re-launch of the Palestinian boat of return (Al-Awda Peace Ship) in 1989;

(b) A campaign to repeal the tax-exempt status of contributions through fund-raising bodies to Israel;

(11) A delegation should be sent from this meeting via ICCP to present the Meeting's decisions to the Israeli Government. Background

The Israeli occupation of the West Bank and Gaza is of direct economic benefit to Israel and a direct economic handicap to the Palestinians. Israel uses the resources of water, land and cheap labour while severely restricting any indigenous Palestinian economic development.

Therefore, economic resistance in the present situation has two major advantages:

Therefore, the twin initiatives taken by EEC to support independent Palestinian economic development, including exports to Europe, and the Jordanian decision to remove its control from the West Bank, thereby underlining the concept of an independent Palestinian entity have immense importance;

Therefore, this meeting underlines the importance of building truly indigenous Palestinian economic structures and opposes Israeli methods of economic repression such as outlawing the popular committees, imprisoning trade unionists and harassing workers.

Recommendations

(1) Find ways of supporting alternative structures such as small-scale co-operatives, training and education in agriculture, industry, marketing and services;

(2) Avoid any projects which are under the control of the military authorities;

(3) Encourage Governments to use political pressure to ensure development assistance and funds provided by NGOs and Governments to flow into the occupied territories;

(4) Encourage United Nations agencies to increase and expand involvement in development activities in the occupied territories in co-operation and consultation with Palestinian organizations;

(5) Increase the number of volunteers and other witnesses who can observe at first hand the effects of economic repression;

(6) Promote the development of links and co-operation between Palestinian and other trade unions worldwide.


Workshop 5: Supporting women and children

The workshop on supporting women and children heard moving testimonies by Palestinian women panelists about the situation, the changing role, and the activities of women and children in the uprising in the occupied Palestinian territories. Participants from various countries who had visited the occupied territories described their experiences and told of solidarity actions in their countries. Israeli women related accounts of activities against the occupation and for peace and justice for both peoples. The discussion focused on concrete actions that should be intensified or initiated in solidarity with Palestinian women and children as follows:

(1) Organize special delegations of prominent women with Palestinian women to visit government ministries and intergovernmental organizations around the world, and the United Nations Secretary-General- to provide information about the situation of women in the occupied territories and to present concrete proposals for assistance. The United Nations Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People is urged to assist in carrying this out;

(2) More women's organizations should send fact-finding missions to the occupied territories, and speaking tours for women from the occupied territories should be arranged in other countries. Some women thought that it would be helpful to continue to organize joint teams of Israeli and Palestinian women to speak in Western countries. Women lawyers who specialize in international law should visit the occupied territories to observe trials, collect information on detainees, and launch campaigns for their release. Women's organizations should adopt prisoners and detainees.

(3) International Women's Day, 8 March 1989, should be used as a day of solidarity with Palestinian women in every country, and an international seminar should be organized;

(4) Women's organizations should be stimulated to participate in campaigns against expulsion orders, the demolition of homes and the destruction of farmland, and all forms of collective punishment; campaigns against torture, intimidation and assassination of prisoners; campaigns against the closure of schools, universities, and charitable societies; campaigns against the use of tear gas, live ammunition, and rubber or plastic bullets; and campaigns against Israeli violations of the Fourth Geneva Convention and other international laws, specifically those related to women;

(5) Women's organizations should actively take part in campaigns for an independent Palestinian State, for the rights of the Palestinian people to self-determination and return, and for the convening of the International Peace Conference on the Middle East under the auspices of the United Nations;

(6) There were suggestions for the twining of kindergartens and nursery schools in the occupied territories with their counterparts around the world. Women's groups should assist kindergarten and nursery teachers to go abroad to study, and make experts available to teach inside the occupied territories. Since schools were closed for much of last year and can be expected to be closed for much of the coming year, women's committees are organizing popular schools. Material resources should be made available to assist women's organizations, federations, and committees in this endeavour. Scholarships should be made available for students to continue their education abroad;

(7) Women's committees, federations and organizations should be assisted with capital to establish small-scale sewing, food processing and textile projects to generate jobs for women and further economic self-reliance;

(8) Funds and supplies for medical treatment of injured women and children, including prostheses and rehabilitation, both in the occupied territories and abroad, should be made available;

(9) Programmes to sponsor children or families victimized during the uprising should be encouraged;

(10) Palestinian women in refugee camps in Lebanon should be assisted in the reconstruction of their camps;

(11) ICCP is urged to disseminate information on the situation of Palestinian women and children. ICCP should also establish an emergency information network for urgent cases requiring immediate action. ICCP should complete lists of audiovisual resources on the uprising, the role of women and children, and the solidarity movement in Israel for distribution;

(12) Women should co-ordinate the organization of simultaneous demonstrations and pickets around the world in support of the Palestinian people;

(13) Next year's International NGO Meeting on the Question of Palestine should address the question of women and children in the plenary session, and a special session should be organized to review implementation of the suggestions put forward this year;

(14) It was suggested that 8 December be declared Intifadah Day.

The determination of the intifadah should be met by intensified efforts by women and men everywhere to implement the above suggestions in order to provide assistance and international protection to the Palestinian people.


B. REPORTS OF SPECIAL INTEREST GROUPS a/

Special interest group 1: The prisoners of the intifadah


Since the beginning of the intifadah, the number of cases of unlawful arrest and imprisonment without trial has been increasing. More than 10,000 Palestinians are now being held in detention, often in solitary confinement and deprived of all their legal rights.

The practice of administrative detention is becoming a rule and today applies to several thousand persons whose only offence is to have expressed their views or worked to organize social life.


(b) Jewish diaspora solidarity with the intifadah and the Israeli peace camp;

(c) Women's solidarity with Palestinian women; (d) Arab NGO activities.

All social and occupational categories are affected, and elderly persons and children are not being spared.

By transforming the occupied Palestinian territories into a vast prison, the Israeli authorities intend to pursue collective reprisals and terror as the only response to the Palestinian people's desire for emancipation.

The consequences on the everyday life of the civilian population are innumerable and are aimed at weakening social and family structures with a view to dismantling Palestinian society.

Conditions of detention are becoming increasingly harsh; the purpose of this is to destroy the prisoners physically and psychologically by beatings, torture, collective punishment, humiliation and intimidation, lack of hygiene and of medical assistance.

Overcrowding of existing detention centres in the occupied Palestinian territories has led to the proliferation of new internment camps (nine have been set up since the start of the uprising), some of them in Israel, in flagrant violation of the rules of international law.

Quite apart from any political considerations, the most basic humanitarian duty must be the liberation of the Palestinian prisoners detained in such conditions and without trial.

This Meeting should demand that the Israeli Government release immediately all the prisoners who are in fact prisoners of opinion.

We call on ICCP to co-ordinate the sending of fact-finding and observer missions to the prison's, internment camps and tribunals.

We also call on NGOs to organize an international campaign of information and protest.

Takes special note and reaffirms the decisions of the United Nations concerning the right of Palestinians to return to Palestine, in particular resolution 194 (III) of 1948, and further notes that the implementation of the right of Palestinian return is a pre-requisite for Israel's membership in the United Nations;

Emphasizes that the denial of the Palestinian right of return is institutionalized by the Knesset in the Absentees Property Law (1950); and

(1) Call upon the Israeli Government to comply with its obligations under international law and the terms of its admission to the United Nations and (a) abolish the Absentees Property Law (1950); and (b) implement the right of the Palestinian people to return to their homeland;

(2) Call upon all NGOs to focus attention on the violation by Israel of its international legal obligation in this regard, to mobilize and campaign in support of the Palestinian right of return on the basis of all relevant United Nations resolutions, in particular resolution 194 (III) of 1948;

(3) Call upon all NGOs to assist and support the PLO in the re-launch of the Palestinian boat of return, the Al-Awdah Peace Ship, as well as peace marches of Palestinian refugees' return across territorial borders toward Palestine;

(4) Promote twining between refugee communities from destroyed Palestinian villages, towns and communities, on the one hand, and organizations in our own countries, such as municipal councils, church organizations, professional associations and solidarity organizations, on the other, as exemplified by the efforts in Switzerland to mobilize support for the reconstruction of the destroyed village of Emmaus.


Special interest groups 3 and 9: Demolition of homes and expulsions

The joint special interest group on expulsions and house demolitions calls on participating NGOs to adopt the following resolutions against expulsion and displacement and for the right of the Palestinians to return to their homeland:

(1) As NGOs we should actively campaign at all levels - legal, governmental, popular - and by all available means, on the question of the illegal deportation of Palestinians from their national homeland;

(2) NGOs should invite Palestinian deportees on speaking tours to explain the nature and experience of expulsion and exile and to support national campaigns against deportation;

(3) We further call on NGOs to support the work of the Committee of Families of Deportees in the occupied Palestinian territories;

(4) We call on all member parties of the Socialist International to demand that the Israeli Labour Party cease its policy of expulsions, and respect the Fourth Geneva Convention, or that it should be expelled from the Socialist International if it does not. We ask all relevant NGOs actively to lobby their national parties on this matter. The Israeli participants in the workshop wish to stress their strong opposition to the Israeli policy of expulsions. Many of those expelled are well-known to us, as they are leaders of their people who seek to, and have, established a dialogue for peace and justice with the Israeli peace forces. Achieving peace in our region demands the recognition of the leadership of the Palestinian people and the return of all those expelled to their homeland;

(5) NGOs should call on the United Nations, the Security Council and all signatories of the Fourth Geneva Convention to enforce the Convention with regard to Israeli policy and to enforce the Security Council resolutions condemning expulsions, and if necessary, to adopt economic and political sanctions and other measures - such as the sponsorship of the "Boat of Return" - until Israel complies;

(6) Concerning the demolition of Palestinian houses, once again we condemn the Israeli collective punishment of demolishing and sealing houses and call upon all participating NGOs to campaign against these policies and the resulting displacement of Palestinian families from their homes and land;

(7) We call upon NGOs to adopt a co-ordinated strategy for emergency relief and assistance to displaced families and to initiate efforts to reconstruct Palestinian homes and to ensure the return of the Palestinian families to them;

(8) We call on all NGOs with observer status at, or whose countries are members of, the United Nations Commission on Human Settlements, to initiate actions to implement the resolution on the reconstruction of Palestinian homes adopted at the Commission's eleventh session and to take an active role in its twelfth session to be held in the spring of 1989 in Colombia.

The first speaker, from Bir Zeit University, described the Israeli authorities' current attempts to strangle Palestinian culture by closing all schools and institutions of higher education and many other institutions of cultural and intellectual importance. They also imprison and deport or threaten to deport students, academics, and cultural leaders. These attacks must be interpreted not merely as attempts to suppress the intifadah, but rather as a long-term systematic effort to undermine the cultural foundations of the Palestinian people, ultimately leading to its "transfer". The speaker made an urgent appeal to the international community to make every effort to bring about the reversal of this policy.

The second speaker, from the Palestine Human Rights Campaign, in the United States, described the activities to date of the "Urgent Action Network to Defend Palestinian Institutions", which was formed in June 1988 following the closure of In'Ash El-Usra.

The four panelists agreed that the priority should be the re-opening of schools, since their closure has the most detrimental long-term effect on Palestinian society. Palestinian children have the right to education: if formal education is interrupted, the community should be allowed to set up alternative educational programmes, but these can never be a satisfactory substitute for the work of schools and colleges.

An appeal from /the Executive Committee for Higher Education in the Occupied Territories was read out:

From the ensuing discussion, the following recommendations and suggestions emerged:

(1) UNESCO' should be involved, both as a resource and as an influential intergovernmental agency;

(2) Taxpayers in a countries should be alerted that the work of UNRWA, to which they contribute, is being obstructed by the Israeli authorities;

(3) Governments should be urged to adhere to any United Nations resolutions supporting educational and other rights of Palestinians;

(4) Fact-finding missions of university faculty members to the occupied territories should be arranged, and their reports widely distributed among the academic community worldwide;

(5) International academic and scientific bodies should be encouraged to put pressure on Israeli academic institutions until Palestinian schools and institutions are reopened;

(6) Twinning arrangements between schools worldwide and in the occupied territories could make a significant educational impact;

(7) Regarding information and campaigning, workshops and exhibitions should be organized. Relevant institutions and organizations worldwide should campaign immediately, demanding the re-opening of Palestinian schools, using every means available, such as postcard campaigns, and writing to Israeli and national Government representatives and ministries;

(8) An information committee in the occupied territories will pass information to ICCP for distribution among member NGOs. Campaigning potential of all existing organizations should be co-ordinated.

Special interest group 5: Support for the Israeli peace movement Items discussed:

(1) Ways to fight the law forbidding contact between Israelis and members of the PLO;

(2) Ways to fight the harassment of Palestinians who meet Israelis;

(3) How to fight against the expulsion of Palestinians from their homeland.

We decided to form a co-ordinating committee of Israeli, American and European NGOs which will implement our proposals.

(1) We urge the Government of Israel to repeal in its entirety the law that prohibits Israelis to meet with Palestinian members of the PLO;

(2) We further urge the Government and courts to dismiss the charges and sentences of the four Israelis who met in Romania with members of the PLO to discuss methods for peace: Reuven Kaminer, Yael Cotan, Latif Dori and Eliezer Feiler;

(3) We also urge the Government of Israel to cease the harassment of Palestinians engaged in dialogue with Israelis and to release Palestinians imprisoned for that reason, such as Feisal Husseini of East Jerusalem;

(4) The meeting urges ICCP to organize in the coming year a public meeting or meetings between Israeli peace activists and PLO delegations;

(5) The meeting expresses its solidarity with the 35 Israeli soldiers who have been imprisoned for their refusal to participate in putting down the Palestinian uprising and calls upon the Israeli Government to drop the investigation by its security services against the soldier support organization "Mesh Gevul";

(6) The meeting condemns the expulsion of Palestinians from their homeland. We call for the immediate return of all those Palestinians expelled from the occupied territories and we ask for an immediate stop to any future expulsions.


Special interest group 6: The Hanitzotz/Sharara

The recent arrest of four journalists and the closure of Hanitzotz/Sharara newspapers, which have been working on the basis of the Arab-Jewish co-operation towards the establishment of an independent Palestinian State under the leadership of the PLO, and for equality of rights in Israel, represents a serious threat to all democratic opposition within Israel.

We understand that this is part of a massive campaign to silence the democratic forces in Israel and a dangerous precedent that should be denounced, for it is meant to delegitimize their political action by equating it with terrorism.

We strongly condemn this political harassment and call on all NGOs to increase their efforts in solidarity with all victims of this campaign.

(1) To call on other NGOs to arrange for journalists and observers to attend the trial which is to start on 8 September in Israel. These observers could, for example, be from bar associations, human rights associations and include eminent personalities;

(2) To call on all peace-loving forces in Israel to unite in their support for the detainees;

(3) To send telegrammes of protest to Israeli embassies around the world, and to the Israeli Bar Association;

(4) To approach human rights groups in our own countries, lobby members of Parliament, and to inform writers' and journalists' unions with a view to their taking protest action;

(5) To request delegations already scheduled to go to Israel, to protest to the Israeli Government about the detained from Hanitzotz/Sharara, as well as about other political detainees, and to attend the trial;

(6) To give financial support to cover the expenses of the trial.

Special interest group 7: Trade unions

The group discussed how to implement in practice the proposals made at the International Symposium on Practical Ways to Assist the Palestinian Trade Union Movement, held at Geneva on 28 August 1988.

(1) The participants agreed on the need for the widest possible distribution of the materials and information of the Symposium and the interest group proposals. It was proposed that ECCP and ICCP send the materials to all available trade union addresses;

(2) All participants were asked to provide as many addresses of trade unions as possible to the ICCP office in Geneva;

(3) It was considered to be important that trade unions co-ordinate their activities on the national level and whenever possible establish a national co-ordinating body of trade unions on Palestine. The responsibility of implementing these proposals was left to the trade unions in their own countries;

(4) The participants learned about the proposal to organize an international trade union conference on Palestine and expressed their support for it. It was felt important that trade unions from Western Europe should in the widest possible way participate in its preparations as well as in the conference itself;

(5) ECCP was asked by the Palestinian Trade Union Federation (PTUF) representatives to look at how to facilitate the co-ordination of trade union work between it and the Palestinian trade union movement. It was stressed that it is of crucial importance to the success of our work, that the Palestinian trade union movement continue to co-ordinate its work on all levels, including in the occupied Palestinian territories.

The presence of Oriental movements in the past few years at NGO conferences and other international assemblies points to the presence of a peace camp within the Oriental population of Israel.

The Israeli representatives of the NGOs today do not and cannot represent these Oriental peace forces.

Unfortunately, the participation of Oriental NGOs remains ineffective with no concrete role in the decision process of NGOs. This situation is a result of the continuing inter-party conflicts which prevent these new forces from fully expressing themselves on the Israeli-Palestinian issue.

We turn to the members of ICCP to unite over the legitimate demand of the Oriental peace camp to participate in the formation of the NGOs' policy on the question of Israeli-Palestinian peace, by having a delegate in ICCP.


Special interest group 11: The peace march

The proposal of the Finnish-Arab Friendship Society to hold a peace march from Europe to Jerusalem has become a recommendation of the Workshop on New Ideas for Political Mobilization (for a Just Peace) to this meeting. (1) The aim of the march is to support a just and lasting peace in the Middle East; the convening of a United Nations international peace conference; the withdrawal of Israeli forces from the occupied territories and the establishment of an independent Palestinian State alongside Israel;

(2) Furthermore, the aim of the march is to gain the widest possible publicity to this cause, involving a large number of public personalities and celebrities;

(3) In our view, the march should proceed along several routes from Europe and other areas during the period of about one month, and ending with a march to Jerusalem on the 5 June 1989, which is the twenty-second anniversary of the Israeli occupation in the Palestinian territories;

(4) The interest group recommends that NGOs start to prepare for the march on local, national and regional levels, informing ICCP and ECCP of their preparations.

We ask that ICCP and ECCP take responsibility for the international co-ordination of the march, including the circulation of information and guidelines.


Special interest group 14: The uprising: consequences for health

The Israeli authorities are clamping down in an unprecedented way on activities of Palestinian health professionals who are trying to meet the emergency medical needs of the population of the West Bank and Gaza Strip. Hospitals have been attacked; health professionals have been harassed, detained and arrested without charge; clinics have been closed; medical associations have been closed; foreign health workers have been harassed and detained. (1) To protest these actions by the Israelis;

(2) To write to their respective Governments urging their active support for the work of ICRC in the occupied territories and actively to support the expansion of ICRC's work in the light of the growing medical emergency;

(3) Actively to work to secure the safety and integrity of all health institutions and personnel working in the occupied territories;

(4) To call for an international action alert network to mobilize immediate responses to critical situations as they arise;

(5) To call upon the World Health Organization (WHO) and the United Nations International Children's Fund (UNICEF) to live up to their mission and responsibility to ensure unimpeded access to health care in the occupied territories.

The Association of Israeli-Palestinian Physicians protests the order giving the Financial Officer the right to decide which Palestinian gets treatment through authorization of funds for care and thereby refuses to collect fees before the treatment of wounded patients, demonstrating they will not allow themselves to be used as "tools of punishment" against Palestinians.

We call on you to write letters of protest to Israeli embassies in your region, to the Israeli Minister of Defence, and to the Israeli Medical Association so as to publicize the cases of harassment, abuses and arrests of Palestinian health institutions, health personnel and patients.

Special interest group 15: Western media and the Palestinians Reaction to media coverage

NGOs are called upon to complain about inaccurate, biased coverage, expose false propaganda and supply accurate information; praise good (quality- and quantity-wise) coverage, including cultivating good contacts with sympathetic journalists; and co-ordinate the complaints and/or praises.

Information from the area

It is important to get out good information quickly and distribute it widely through the network of NGOs and to establish good contacts with Palestinian information sources, e.g. the Jerusalem Media and Communications Centre, and supply Western journalists and visiting delegations with these contacts. We should also provide information about the activities of the Israeli peace movements.

(1) To understand the media in a wide sense, including, for example, publications of peace movements, trade unions, women's movements, local radio and television stations, etc. and offer information to them;

(2) To be imaginative in our approach to the media through activities that attract attention;

(3) To highlight different, often ignored issues like the work of the popular committees and the democratic structure of the uprising;

(4) To introduce the Palestinian issue in new ways through the activities of theatre groups, musicians, getting books reviewed, etc.

(5) To supply the NGO network with up-to-date catalogues of films, videos, exhibitions on the Palestinian issue. This could be done through ICCP;

(6) To organize a symposium on the subject of "The Palestinians and the media", maybe as part of next year's International NGO Meeting.

It might be helpful to organize discussions on stereotypes, enemy images, fears and emotional barriers, in order to bring about a greater awareness and action for peace and justice.

We wish to draw the attention and concern of international society again to the plight of the Palestinians in Lebanon, especially the children, who are deprived of assistance they should get under international conventions. We urge that the international agencies who have withdrawn should return forthwith to their field of endeavour and expand their services according to the current situation, in cooperation with UNRWA, UNICEF, popular committees in every camp, and other authorized agencies. Specific points are as follows:

(1) The urgent need in the face of the coming winter is at least the partial reconstruction and repairing of dwellings;

(2) Special care should be taken so that displaced Palestinians can receive the same consideration as registered refugees;

(3) Medical aid should be resumed and expanded to meet the urgent needs of the suffering Palestinians and destitute Lebanese;

(4) Self-help programmes should be devised and initiated especially in the sector of alimentation, in co-operation with the popular committees in the camps and the Palestinian Agency for Relief and Development Committee and others;

(5) There is an urgent need for the resumption of regular instruction in schools and similar educational measures for the displaced persons;

(6) Intensification and expansion of facilities for the handicapped and disabled are also needed;

(7) Appropriate measures for the relief of the aged, particularly those who have no relatives and need physical and spiritual support, should be taken.

Efforts should be made so that the plight of the Palestinians in Lebanon should not be forgotten, with due consideration to the delicate political situation. They must get more attention in order that assistance can be intensified. All the organizations concerned with the situation of the Palestinians must try to influence and pressure the national and international media to the above purpose. The plight of the Palestinians in Lebanon, an integral part of the Palestinian people, must not be forgotten.


Annex III

STATEMENT BY MR. JOSEPH VERNER REED, UNDER-SECRETARY-GENERAL

FOR POLITICAL AND GENERAL ASSEMBLY AFFAIRS AND SECRETARIAT SERVICES,

ON BEHALF OF THE SECRETARY-GENERAL OF THE UNITED NATIONS


It is an honour for me to welcome you, on behalf of the Secretary-General of the United Nations, to the Fifth International NGO Meeting on the Question of Palestine. This Meeting takes place at a critical time for the Palestinian people. The current dramatic situation in the occupied Palestinian territories makes it clear that urgent efforts are now required by the international community to promote an effective negotiating process and to help create the conditions necessary for it to succeed. Meetings such as this are a very important element in the efforts of the United Nations aimed at promoting such a settlement. Your network of organizations and individuals from all regions of the globe, devoted to the achievement of the inalienable rights of the Palestinian people in conformity with United Nations resolutions, have a pivotal role to play in this endeavour.

The Secretary-General remains extremely concerned by the situation in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip. The Security Council, in several resolutions adopted since December 1987, has strongly deplored the policies and practices of Israel, the occupying Power, which violate the human rights of the Palestinian people in the occupied territories; it has reaffirmed that the Geneva Convention relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War, of 12 August 1949, is applicable to the occupied Palestinian territories, including Jerusalem; and has called upon Israel to abide by the Convention immediately and scrupulously. The Council has also called upon Israel to rescind the order to deport Palestinian civilians and to ensure the safe and immediate return of those already deported.

In resolution 605 (1987), adopted on 22 December 1987, the Council also requested the Secretary-General to examine the situation in the occupied territories by all means available to him and to submit a report containing his recommendations on ways and means for ensuring the safety and protection of the Palestinian civilians under Israeli occupation.

In his report, the Secretary-General recommended that the international community should make a concerted effort to persuade Israel to accept the de jure applicability of the Fourth Geneva Convention to the occupied territories and to correct its policies in order to comply fully with the Convention.

While describing certain measures taken to deal with the emergency situation in the occupied territories, the Secretary-General also strongly emphasized that measures to enhance the safety and protection of the Palestinian people in the occupied territories, though urgently needed, will neither remove the causes of the recent tragic events nor bring peace to the region. The Secretary-General stressed that the underlying problem can only be resolved through a political settlement which responds both to the refusal of the Palestinian population of the territories to accept a future under Israeli occupation and to Israel's determination to ensure its security and the well-being of its people.

The dramatic situation in the occupied territories has again underscored the dangers and suffering inherent in the status quo and the urgent need to attain a solution to the Arab-Israeli conflict and its core - the question of Palestine. There is a widespread feeling in the international community, evidenced in many statements adopted by Governments and intergovernmental organizations in recent months, that the present situation is unsustainable and that renewed efforts must be made to activate a negotiating process. The search for a comprehensive, just and lasting settlement must continue and all meaningful efforts to that end deserve support.

There is no doubt that the persistent efforts of the United Nations, over the years, have produced a near-consensus on the fundamental elements required for such a settlement. There is a wide measure of agreement among the international community that peace in the Middle East can be best achieved through negotiations under United Nations auspices, involving all parties concerned, including the PLO, and leading to a comprehensive settlement. Such a settlement should be based on three elements, namely, the withdrawal of Israel from Arab territories occupied since 1967; respect for and acknowledgement of the sovereignty, territorial integrity and political independence of every State in the area and the right to live in peace within secure and recognized boundaries, free from threats or acts of force; and finally, a just settlement of the question of Palestine based on the recognition of the legitimate rights of the Palestinian people, including the right to self-determination. In this connection, the question of Jerusalem remains of primary importance.

In light of recent developments, the Secretary-General has reaffirmed his personal commitment to the search for a settlement of the Palestinian question and to contribute in any way he can to that objective.

You, as committed and experienced NGO representatives with broad-based grass-root constituencies, can do much to contribute to these efforts. Our joint work in preparing this important Meeting can stand as a model for future co-operation between the intergovernmental and the non-governmental sectors.

The Secretary-General has followed with interest and appreciation information on the many activities in which NGOs active on the question of Palestine have been engaged. The fact-finding missions from ICCP, BCC and the North American Co-ordinating Committee for NGOs on the Question of Palestine (NACC) which visited the West Bank and Gaza earlier this year have accomplished a valuable task by making the facts of the Palestine problem better known and by mobilizing public opinion throughout the world in support of the rights of the Palestinian people, and a just and comprehensive solution of the problem.

The Secretary-General continues to believe that an enlightened and mobilized public opinion, through the invaluable activities of NGOs, can play a very important role in helping to bring about a peaceful solution to this long-standing conflict. In this connection, the Division for Palestinian Rights, under the guidance of the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People, will continue to intensify its efforts in co-operation with the world-wide community of non-governmental organizations in order to promote our common objectives.

In conclusion, I would like to take this opportunity to express the Secretary-General's appreciation of the work of the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People which has carried out its mandate with dedication under the able leadership of its Chairman and its Bureau.

On behalf of the Secretary-General, and on my own behalf, I wish this Meeting all success.


Annex IV

MESSAGE FROM MR. YASSER ARAFAT,

CHAIRMAN OF THE EXECUTIVE COMMITTEE

OF THE PALESTINE LIBERATION ORGANIZATION


On behalf of our Palestinian people and in the name of my fellow members of the Executive Committee of the PLO, I wish to express to you all my deep gratitude and sincere appreciation for the firm and fundamental support that your NGOs have shown for the just struggle in which our people is engaged under the leadership of the PLO, its sole legitimate representative, with a view to putting an end to the Israeli occupation of its land and recovering and exercising its inalienable national rights, including its right to return, to self-determination and the establishment of its independent State.

I also wish to take this opportunity to express my gratitude and sincere appreciation to the United Nations, its Secretary-General, Mr. Javier Perez de Cuellar, its Division for Palestinian Rights and all its staff for the endeavours that they are making in support of our people's just struggle in furtherance of international legitimacy and of the Charter and resolutions of the United Nations with a view to the achievement of security, peace and stability in the region.

Since your meeting last year, the Palestinian scene has witnessed major and critical developments such as, in particular, the outbreak of our valiant Palestinian people's uprising in our occupied Palestinian land, with a view to putting an end to the Israeli occupation and establishing its independent Palestinian State. This popular uprising constitutes a continuation of the revolutionary movements in which our people has been engaged since the beginning of this century against imperialism and colonialism in our occupied land. The basic objective of all these movements has been to defend our people's national rights to freedom, independence and sovereignty in its homeland so that it can live like other free and sovereign peoples of the world.

During the present uprising, which is about to enter its tenth month, our people, with the support and solidarity of all its friends throughout the world, has been steadfastly and resolutely resisting the Israeli occupation authorities' well-known fascist "iron-fist" policy under which they have violated the sanctity of holy places, seized and confiscated land, committed acts of mass murder constituting crimes against humanity, imposed collective punishments and engaged in organized State terrorism, including assassinations, the most recent victim of which was my friend, comrade and deputy, Khalil al-Wazir (Abu Jihad), as you all know.

Realizing their inability to extinguish the flames of revolution and quell our people's uprising in our occupied land, the occupation authorities have intensified their fascist acts of repression and their aggressive policy in the hope of bringing the situation under control and curbing the uprising.

They have armed extremist Zionist settlers in the occupied territories to whom they have given free rein, in conjunction with the regular army of occupation, to continue their massacres of our people. They have burnt crops and olive trees, established settlements, usurped water resources and engaged in a policy of promoting intellectual backwardness through the closure of schools, institutes and universities, which have been turned into detention centres. They have cut off water and electricity supplies and assaulted women, children and aged persons, breaking their bones and even burying and burning people alive. They have also used internationally prohibited gases, as a result of which 1,600 pregnant women have so far died or miscarried. This means that they have also caused the deaths of at least 1,600 unborn children.

As a result of these crimes committed since the outbreak of the uprising, more than 430 persons have been killed and more than 11,000 wounded, of whom about 3,500 have been left with permanent disabilities. About 23,000 persons have been confined in seven mass detention centres that have been opened to counter the uprising. Dozens of members of our struggling people have also been expelled from their homeland and others have been threatened with expulsion. The popular committees, the youth committees and the student committees, and all persons associated with them, have been outlawed in the occupied territories.

While all the people and freedom, justice and peace-loving forces of the world have stood by our people in its just struggle and supported its uprising with a view to putting an end to the occupation, the United States Administration alone has supported official repression and organized terrorism by the Israelis, as well as their policy of denying the inalienable national rights of our people, thereby taking a stand against the Palestinian people and against the PLO. In addition to its unlimited support for the occupation, the United States Administration is attempting to rescue Israel from its predicament by taking its plans to quell the uprising of our people, as well as its constant attack by air, land and sea on our camps and Lebanese villages in southern Lebanon. We wish to emphasize our categorical rejection of these plans and schemes which are inconsistent with the rights of our people.

I wish to take this opportunity to thank you for sending fact-finding missions to the occupied territories during the last few months to look into this neo-fascism. As trustworthy witnesses, you faithfully transmitted what you yourselves had seen of the "iron-fist" policy in action to international public opinion in your friendly countries. You thereby demonstrated the just nature of our people's struggle against the occupation, encouraged support for that struggle and promoted sympathy among States and peoples for our people's struggle. You also clearly portrayed the serious situation arising from the continued Israeli occupation of our Palestinian land and the dangers that it poses to the peace, security and stability not only of our people but also of all the peoples of the region and the world as a whole.

Our people is struggling for a just and comprehensive peace based on international legitimacy. We wish to reaffirm today what we have previously stated before you, namely that a just and lasting peace in the region cannot be achieved by disregarding the inalienable national rights of our people or the PLO, its sole legitimate representative, nor can peace be established without full Israeli withdrawal from the occupied Palestinian territories. Accordingly, we are calling for these occupied territories to be placed under the supervision of the United Nations, in preparation for the Israeli withdrawal and with a view to facilitating the holding of the International Peace Conference on the Middle East, in accordance with United Nations General Assembly resolutions 38/58 C and 41/43 D, in which the five permanent members of the Security Council should participate, together with all the parties concerned in the dispute, including the PLO, on a footing of equality with the other parties.


In spite of the magnitude of these sufferings, ordeals and losses, and in spite of the severe Israeli repression of our people in the occupied land, our people, under the leadership of the PLO, assures you of its resolute determination to continue its just struggle for the achievement of a just peace in Palestine, the land of peace. Our people also declares before you that it is stretching out its hand to all the forces that are striving to achieve that just peace. That is why our Palestine National Council decided to initiate a dialogue with all the Jewish and Israeli democratic, progressive and peace-loving forces.

In this connection, I wish to salute those forces for their courage and their rejection of fascism, repression and the racial discrimination that the Israeli military clique is practising against our women and children. I also salute them for declaring their recognition of the national rights of our people, including its right to self-determination, like other peoples.

On this occasion, I also wish once again to express my gratitude to all the friendly peoples, forces and States that have taken a firm stand in support of our people's struggle. I am referring, in particular, to our friends in the socialist States, and especially in the Soviet Union and China, the non-aligned States, the Organization of the African Unity, the Organization of the Islamic Conference and all our friends in Western Europe, including individuals, forces and organizations.

Since your previous conference last year, you have provided splendid and important assistance for our people's struggle. We are confident that, at this meeting, you will study new ways and means to strengthen your solidarity with our people's just struggle and to give practical effect to that solidarity.

I thank you and salute you and wish your Meeting every success in the achievement of the objectives for which it is being held.

Participant NGOs

ABNA EL-BALAD MOVEMENT

ACADEMIC ASSOCIATION OF NAZARETH

AFRO-ASIAN PEOPLE'S SOLIDARITY ORGANIZATION AL-HADAF FOUNDATION

AL-JALEEL EDUCATIONAL FUND

ALL INDIA INDO-AFRICAN FRIENDSHIP ASSOCIATION ALL INDIA INDO-ARAB FRIENDSHIP ASSOCIATION ARAB COMMUNITY CENTRE IN TORONTO

ARAB INTERPARLIAMENTARY UNION

ARAB JOURNALISTS' ASSOCIATION

ARAB LAWYERS' UNION/UNION DES AVOCATS ARABES

ARAB ORGANIZATION FOR HUMAN RIGHTS - GENEVA OFFICE ARAB STUDIES SOCIETY

ARAB THOUGHT FORUM

ARAB %OMEN'S COUNCIL

ASOCIACION POR DERECHOS HUMANOS DE ESPANA

ASSOCIATION INTERNATIONALE POUR. LA DEFENSE DE LA LIBERTE RELIGIBUSE ASSOCIATION MAROCAINE POUR LE SOUTIEN A LA LUTTE DU PIMPLE PALESTINIENE ASSOCIATION MEDICALE FRANCO-PALESTINIENNE

ASSOCIATION NAJDEH

ASSOCIATION DE SOLIDARITY FRANCO-ARAB ASSOCIATION SUISSE-PALESTINE

BRITISH REFUGEE COUNCIL

CAMPUS

CANADA-PALESTINE ASSOCIATION

CANADIAN ARAB FEDERATION

CENTRE INTERNATIONALS D'INFORMATION SUR LES PRISONNIERS,

DEPORTES ET DISPARUS PALESTINIENS ET LIBANAIS CENTRO INTERNATIONALE CROCEVIA

CHILEAN HUMAN RIGHTS

CHURCH OF HUMANISM

CIMADE-SERVICE ORCUMNIQUE D'ENTRAIDE

CIRCOLO CULTURALE MONTESACRO-ROMA

COMITATO DI SOLIDARIETA CON IL POPOLO PALESTINESE

COMITE CATHOLIQUE CONTRE LA FA/M ET POUR LE DEVELOPMENT

COMITE PALESTINE ST ISRAEL VIVRONT

COMITE SUISSE ROMAND DE SOUTIEN A NAJDEH

COMMISSION OF CHURCHES ON INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS/WORLD COUNCIL OF CHURCHES COMMITTEE FOR DEFENSE OF ARAB LAND

COMMITTEE FOR ISRAELI-PALESTINIAN DIALOGUE COMMITTEE FOR PALESTINIAN AND JEWISH STUDIES

COMM/TTEE FOR SOCIAL AND MEDICAL RELIEF FOR PALESTINIANS

COMMITTEE OF YOUTH ORGANIZATIONS OF THE USSR

COUNCIL FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF ARAB-BRITISH UNDERSTANDING


NAJDA: WOMEN CONCERNED ABOUT THE MIDDLE EAST

NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF ARAB AMERICANS

NATIONAL COMMITTEE FOR THE PROTECTION OF ARAB LAND IN ISRAEL NATIONAL UNION OF ARAB STUDENTS

NEAR EAST CULTURAL AND EDUCATIONAL FOUNDATION OF CANADA

NEW JEWISH AGENDA

ORIENTAL FRONT

OXFAM

PALESTINE COMMITTEE FOR NGOs PALESTINE COMMITTEE OF NORWAY PALESTINE GROUPS IN NORWAY PALESTINE HUMAN RIGHTS CAMPAIGN PALESTINE RED CRESCENT SOCIETY PALESTINE SOLIDARITY CAMPAIGN PALESTINE SOLIDARITY COMMITTEE

PALESTINE STUDIES PROGRAMME, UNIVERSITY OF EXETER

PALESTINIAN CAMPAIGN/DENMARK

PARLIAMENTARY ASSOCIATION FOR EURO-ARAB COOPERATION

PEACE, SOLIDARITY AND FRIENDSHIP ORGANIZATION OF AFGHANISTAN (PSFO) PERSPECTIVES JUDEO-ARABES

POLISH COMMITTEE FOR SOLIDARITY WITH THE PEOPLES OF ASIA,

PORTUGUESE COMMITTEE FOR SOLIDARITY WITH PALESTINE

PORTUGUESE COUNCIL FOR PEACE AND COOPERATION

PRISONERS FRIENDS ASSOCIATION PROGRESSIVE LIST FOR PEACE PROGRESSIVE MOVEMENT FOR PEACE SOCIETY FOR AUSTRO-ARAB RELATIONS

SOCIETY FOR THE CARE OF THE HANDICAPPED IN THE GAZA STRIP SOLIDARITY COMMITTEE OF THE GERMAN DEMOCRATIC REPUBLIC

SOVIET AFRO-ASIAN SOLIDARITY COMMITTEE

SOVIET COMMITTEE OF FRIENDSHIP AND SOLIDARITY WITH THE

ARAB PEOPLE OF PALESTINE SOVIET WOMEN'S COMMITTEE

UNION OF ARAB JURISTS

UNION OF PALESTINE MEDICAL RELIEF COMMITTEES

UNION OF PALESTINIAN WORKING WOMEN COMMITTEES

UNITED HOLY LAND FUND

UNITED NATIONS ASSOCIATION OF GREAT BRITAIN

U.S. OMEN

WOMEN'S ASSOCIATION FOR PALESTINE RIGHTS

WOMEN'S INTERNATIONAL DEMOCRATIC FEDERATION

WOMEN'S INTERNATIONAL LEAGUE FOR PEACE AND FREEDOM

WORLD CONFERENCE OF ORGANIZATIONS OF THE TEACHING PROFESSION

WORLD CONFERENCE ON RELIGION AND PEACE

WORLD FEDERATION OF DES3CRATIC YOUTH WORLD FEDERATION OF TRADE UNIONS

WORLD FEDERATION OF UNITED NATIONS ASSOCIATION

WORLD MUSLIM CONGRESS

WORLD PEACE COUNCIL

WORLD YWCA

Observer NGOs

ABNA AL-TIRA ASSOCIATION

AL-ANSAR MOVEMENT

"AL-MAWAKEB ASSOCIATION"

AL-NAHDA MOVEMENT

AMERICAN SOCIETY FOR MEDICAL AID

ANTIIMPERLISTISCHES SOLIDARITATSKOMITTEE OF FRG (ASK)

ARAB CO-ORDINATING COMMITTEE OF AUSTRIA ARAB LABOUR ORGANIZATION

ARAB POPULAR GROUP

ARAB WOMEN SOLIDARITY COMMITTEE

ARAB WRITERS UNION IN ISRAEL

ASSOCIATION FOR THE SUPPORT AND DEFENSE OF BEDOUINS' RIGHTS IN ISRAEL ASSOCIATION ICELAND-PALESTINE

ASSOCIATION OF ISRAELI-PALESTINIAN PHYSICIANS ASSOCIATION POUR RECONSTRUIRE EMMAUS

BAHRAINI PEACE AND SOLIDARITY COMMITTEE BERLIN CONFERENCE OF EUROPEAN CATHOLICS BLACK PANTHER ORGANIZATION

BIR ZEIT UNIVERSITY - TEACHERS AND EMPLOYEES UNION

CENTRE D'ETUDIS ANTI-IMPERIALISTE (CEDETIM) CENTRE D'INFORMATION & CULTURE

CENTRO DE ESTUDIOS HUMANITARIOS (CEDHU)

CENTRO REGIONALE D'INTERVENTO PER LA COOPERAZ/ONE

CIRCLE PRANCE PAYS ARABES

CHURCH OF SWEDEN MISSION

CIRCLE OF ARAB ACADEMISTS

COMAE DE SOLIDARITE DES PEOPLES EGYPTIENS

COMITE ESPANOL DE ONGs SOBRE LA CUESTION DE PALESTINA

COMITE FRANCAIS POUR LE PATRIMOINE CULTUREL PALESTINIEN

COMMITTEE FOR A DEMOCRATIC PALESTINE

COMMITTEE FOR THE FREEDOM OF EXPRESSION OF PALESTINIANS AND ISRAELIS COMMITTEE FOR WOMEN'S EQUALITY AND PEACE

COMMITTEE OF EXPELLED PALESTINIANS CONFEDERATION DEMOCRATIQUE DU TRAVAIL (MAROC) CONTACT RESOURCES MEDIA REPRESENTATIVES CULTURAL CENTER

CYPRUS PEACE COUNCIL

CZECHOSLOVAK COMMITTEE OF SOLIDARITY WITH THE PEOPLES OF AFRICA,

DANISH PALESTINIAN FRIENDSHIP ASSOCIATION DEMOCRATIC ARAB ORGANIZATIONS

DEMOCRATIC TEACHERS UNION

DIALOG ISRAEL-PALESTINA

DOCTORS' COMMITTEE FOR AID AND INFORMATION DOWN WITH OCCUPATION (HALAA HAKIBBUSH) EAST FOR PEACE

EGYPTIAN COMMITTEE FOR SOLIDARITY WITH AFRO-ASIAN PEOPLES

ENOUGH WITH OCCUPATION (DAI LAKIBBUSH) FEDEFAM

FEDERAL NATIONAL COUNCIL OF UAE

FRANCE-PALESTINE

FREUNDINNEN DES PALASTINENSISCHEN

FRIENDS OF JERUSALEM (AMERICAN NETUREI KARTA) FRIENDS OF NAZARETH

FRIENDS OF THE ARAB COMMUNITY HOSPITAL, JERUSALEM GAMEIAT ALTANMYA AL EGTIMAIYA IN SHEFA-AMR

GENERAL FEDERATION OF LABOUR UNIONS IN THE WEST BANK GERMAN-PALESTINIAN SOCIETY

GREEK COMMITTEE FOR THE INTERNATIONAL DETENTE AND PEACE HADASH COMMITTEE OF MAYORS

HAOHALIM-ISRAEL

HIGHER PALESTINIAN COUNCIL FOR YOUTH AND SPORTS HUMAN RIGHTS ASSOCIATION

HUNGARIAN PEACE COUNCIL

INDIAN ASSOCIATION OF PARLIAMENTARIANS FOR ARABS INFORMATION OFFICE ON PALESTINE/BONN (F.R.G.) INTERNATIONAL COMMITTEE OF THE RED CROSS INTERNATIONAL DEVELOPMENT AND REFUGEE FOUNDATION INTERNATIONAL FORUM/PALESTINE GROUP

INTERNATIONAL FRUENDSHAFTSHEIM

INTERNATIONAL SECRETARIAT OF SOLIDARITY WITH THE

ARAB PEOPLE AND THEIR CENTRAL CAUSE PALESTINE ISRAEL-PALESTINE CENTRE FOR RESEARCH AND INFORMATION ISRAEL RESEARCH SOCIETY

ISRAEL SECULAR HUMANIST ASSOCIATION

JAFFA CENTRE

JAWIET AT-TANIAH AND AT-TATWEER

JERUSALEM AND PEACE SERVICE

JEWISH cowman FOR ISRAELI-PALESTINIAN PEACE JEWISH-PALESTINIAN DIALOGUE GROUP

JEWS FOR A JUST PEACE

LEAGUE FOR HUMAN RIGHTS AND FREEDOM

MEDICAL AID FOR THE THIRD WORLD

MEDICAL ASSOCIATION OF THE WEST BANK

MOUVEMENT SUISSE DE LA PAIX

NAJDEH

NAJDEH SHO

NAQAH ARABS' COMMITTEE

NATIONAL COMMITTEE OF ARAB HIGH SCHOOL STUDENTS NEW OUTLOOK IN DENMARK

NORMEGIAN AID COMMITTEE

ORGANISATION DE LA PAIX ET DE LA SOLIDARITE DE LA REPUBLIQUE D'AFGHANISTAN ORGANIZATION OF DEMOCRATIC TEACHERS

ORIENT FOR PEACE

PALEZRINA-KOMITEE/BERLIN WEST

PALESTINE INFORMATION AND CULTURE CENTER IN WEST BERLIN PALESTINE SOLIDARITY ASSOCIATION/SWEDEN

PALESTINE TRADE UNION FEDERATION

PALESTINE WRITERS ASSOCIATION

PALESTINIAN AGRICULTURAL RELIEF COMMITTEE PARTI SUISSE DU TRAVAIL

PARTNERSHIP

PEACE FRONT DIALOGUE

PERSPECTIVE

PROGRESSIVE FRONT FOR PEACE

RED LINE JEWS AND ARABS AGAINST THE OCCUPATION REGROUPEMENT POUR UN DIALOGUE ISRAEL-PALESTINE RETURN

ROOTS INTERNATIONAL

SCHWEIZERISCHE FRIEDENSBEWEGUNG

SERVICE UNIVERSITAIRE CANADIEN OUTREMER (SUCO) SHASI ISRAELI SOCIALIST LEFT

SOCIAL DEVELOPMENT COMMITTEE

SOCIETY OF FRIENDSHIP AND CULTURAL RELATIONS WITH ARAB COUNTRIES SUDAN PEACE AND SOLIDARITY COUNCIL

SUDANESE WRITERS' UNION

SUISSE-PALESTINE

SYNDICAT DU BATIMENT ET DU BOIS 01m0

TAMIA AND ATTATWERE ASSOCIATION

TERRE DES HOMES FRANCE

TERRE DES HOMES INTERNATIONAL FEDERATION THE 21ST YEAR

TOWN DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATION-HAIFA-ISRAEL TRADE UNION OF EGYPT

UMNO YOUTH MALAYSIA/INTERNATIONAL AFFAIRS BUREAU UNION OF PALESTINIAN-AMERICAN WOMEN

UNION OF PALESTINIAN.W0t4EN'S COMMITTEES IN THE OCCUPIED LAND UNION OF PALESTINIAN WORKING WOMEN


UNION OF THE SOVIET SOCIETIES FOR FRIENDSHIP AND

CULTURAL RELATIONS WITH FOREIGN COUNTRIES UNION OF WOMEN'S COMMITTEES FOR SOCIAL WORK WAR ON WANT

WOMEN FOR POLITICAL PRISONERS

WOMEN IN BLACK

WORLD GOODWILL

WORLD PEACEMAKERS

YEMEN COUNCIL FOR PEACE AND SOLIDARITY

YEMENI PEACE COUNCIL/SANA% UNIVERSITY

YOUNG COMMIS? LEAGUE OF ISRAEL

Eminent persons
H.E. Mr. Paul Findley (United States), Former United States Congressman Other panelists Mr. Emil Habibi (Israel), Chief Editor of Al-Ittihad Newspaper, Haifa Dr. Jumana Odeh (Palestinian), Union of Palestinian Medical Relief Committees Mr. Ibrahim Dakkak, Director, Arab Thought Forum, Jerusalem

Mr. Nabil Kassis, Vice-President of Academic Affairs, Bir Zeit University Mr. Khalil Mahahi, Head Master, Friends Boys School, Ramallah


Members and observers of the Committee on the Exercise

of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People

Afghanistan

Algeria

Bangladesh

Egypt

German Democratic Republic Ghana

Greece Hungary

Iraq

Jordan

Libyan Arab Jamahiriya

Malaysia

Pakistan

Senegal

Syrian Arab Republic

Ukrainian Soviet Socialist Republic Union of Soviet Socialist Republics Yemen


Intergovernmental organizations

League of Arab States


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