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UNITED
NATIONS
A

        General Assembly
Distr.
GENERAL
A/48/278
10 August 1993

ORIGINAL: ENGLISH

Forty-eighth session
Item 86 of the provisional agenda*



REPORT OF THE SPECIAL COMMITTEE TO INVESTIGATE ISRAELI PRACTICES
AFFECTING THE HUMAN RIGHTS OF THE PALESTINIAN PEOPLE
AND OTHER ARABS OF THE OCCUPIED TERRITORIES


Note by the Secretary-General


The Secretary-General has the honour to transmit to the Members of the General Assembly the attached periodic report covering the period from 1 December 1992 to 31 March 1993, which was submitted to him, in accordance with paragraphs 16 and 17 of Assembly resolution 47/70 A of 14 December 1992, by the Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices Affecting the Human Rights of the Palestinian People and Other Arabs of the Occupied Territories.




___________

A/48/150.






ParagraphsPage
LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL ...........................................
4
I.

II.
INTRODUCTION ...............................................

INFORMATION RECEIVED BY THE SPECIAL COMMITTEE ..............
1 - 5

6 - 537
5

6
A.General situation .....................................6 - 2216
1.

2.

General developments and policy statements .......

Incidents linked with the uprising of the
Palestinian population against the occupation ....
6 - 61


6 - 221
6


19
(a)


(b)


(c)
List of Palestinians killed by
troops or Israeli civilians ................

List of other Palestinians killed
as a result of the occupation ..............

Other incidents linked with the uprising ...
62


62

63 - 221
19


36

41
B.

Administration of justice, including the right
to a fair trial .......................................
222 - 227
74
1.

2.
Palestinian population ...........................

Israelis .........................................
222 - 264

265 - 277
74

81
C.
Treatment of civilians ................................
278 - 498
82
1.
General developments .............................
278 - 425
82
(a)

(b)
Harassment and physical ill-treatment ......

Collective punishment ......................
278 - 282

283 - 382
82

83
(i)


(ii)


(iii)

List of houses or rooms that
were demolished or sealed ...........

Imposition of curfews, sealing
off or closing areas .................

Other forms of collective
punishment ...........................
283 -308


309 - 378


379 - 382
83


87


94
(c)
Expulsions .................................
383 - 410
94
(i)


(ii)

Mass deportation of
Palestinians on 17 December 1992 .....

Other information concerning
expulsions ...........................
383 - 405


406 - 410
94


99
(d)

(e)
Economic and social situation ..............

Other developments .........................
411 - 424

425
100

103
2.

Measures affecting certain
fundamental freedoms .............................
426 - 464
103
(a)

(b)

(c)

(d)
Freedom of movement ........................

Freedom of education .......................

Freedom of expression ......................

Freedom of religion ........................
426 - 440

441 - 453

454 - 460

461 - 464
103

105

107

107
3.

Information on settlers' activities
affecting the civilian population ................
465 - 498
108
D.

E.

F.
Treatment of detainees ................................

Annexation and settlement .............................

Information concerning the occupied
Syrian Arab Golan .....................................
499 - 514

515 - 529


530 - 537
113

115


118





LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL


22 July 1993

Sir,

The Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices Affecting the Human Rights of the Palestinian People and Other Arabs of the Occupied Territories has the honour to transmit to you herewith, in accordance with paragraphs 16 and 17 of General Assembly resolution 47/70 A, a periodic report updating information contained in the periodic report it adopted and presented to you on 8 January 1993 (A/48/96). The present periodic report has been prepared in order to bring to your attention, and to the attention of the General Assembly, updated information on the human rights situation in the occupied territories.

The present periodic report covers the period from 1 December 1992 to 31 March 1993. It is based on written information gathered from various sources among which the Special Committee has selected relevant excerpts and summaries, which are reflected in the report.

Accept, Sir, the assurances of my highest consideration.



(Signed) Stanley KALPAGE
Chairman of the Special Committee to
Investigate Israeli Practices
Affecting the Human Rights of the
Palestinian People and Other Arabs
of the Occupied Territories

His Excellency
Mr. Boutros Boutros-Ghali
Secretary-General of the United Nations
New York

I. INTRODUCTION

By its resolution 47/70 A of 14 December 1992, the General Assembly:

"16. Requests the Special Committee, pending early termination of the Israeli occupation, to continue to investigate Israeli policies and practices in the occupied Palestinian territory, including Jerusalem, and other Arab territories occupied by Israel since 1967, to consult, as appropriate, with the International Committee of the Red Cross according to its regulations in order to ensure that the welfare and human rights of the peoples of the occupied territories are safeguarded and to report to the Secretary-General as soon as possible and whenever the need arises thereafter;

"17. Also requests the Special Committee to submit regularly to the Secretary-General periodic reports on the present situation in the occupied Palestinian territory;

"18. Further requests the Special Committee to continue to investigate the treatment of prisoners in the occupied Palestinian territory, including Jerusalem, and other Arab territories occupied by Israel since 1967;".

The Special Committee continued its work under the rules of procedure contained in its first report to the Secretary-General and held the second of a series of meetings from 28 April to 8 May 1993 at Damascus, Amman and Cairo. Mr. Stanley Kalpagé (Sri Lanka) continued to be Chairman. The meetings were also attended by Mr. Chams E. Ndoye (Senegal). In view of General Assembly resolution 47/1 of 22 September 1992, Mr. Dragan Jovanic (Yugoslavia) did not attend the meetings. In this connection, the Special Committee, on 8 January 1993, had addressed a letter to the President of the General Assembly in which it drew attention to the fact that as a consequence of General Assembly resolution 47/1, Mr. Dragan Jovanic (Yugoslavia) no longer participated in its deliberations, a situation which considerably curtailed the Special Committee's ability to function effectively. The Special Committee therefore requested the President of the General Assembly to resolve this problem with a view to enabling it to continue to discharge the mandate given to it by the General Assembly in the best manner possible.

At the time of its second series of meetings, the Special Committee was informed that the President of the General Assembly had held consultations with regional groups with a view to possibly replacing Yugoslavia by another Member State, but that these efforts had not yet yielded any results. The members of the Special Committee present at the second series of meetings regret that the Committee was thus not able to carry out its field mission duly constituted.

Section II of the present report describes the situation in the Arab territories occupied by Israel as it affects the human rights of the civilian population. The information contained in the report reflects written information received by the Special Committee during the period from 1 December 1992 to 31 March 1993. The Special Committee has also followed the situation in the occupied territories on a day-to-day basis through reports appearing in the Israeli and Palestinian press; it has also examined a number of communications and reports from Governments, organizations and individuals pertaining to the period covered by the present report.

5. The geographical names as well as the terminology employed in the present report reflect the usage in the original sources and do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Special Committee or the Secretariat of the United Nations.


II. INFORMATION RECEIVED BY THE SPECIAL COMMITTEE


A. General situation


1. General developments and Policy statements


6. On 1 December 1992, it was reported that the General Security Service (GSS) and Israel Defence Forces (IDF) soldiers had recently broken up several "terrorist" cells affiliated with the Islamic Jihad (this information has also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 7 December 1992). GSS agents also arrested 30 residents of the West Bank (Ramallah, Hebron and Nablus). (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 1 December 1992)

7. On 2 December 1992, on its first reading of the Knesset, the Government approved by a narrow margin, 37 to 36 votes, of a bill abolishing the ban, instituted in 1986, concerning unauthorized meetings with the PLO. With regard to contact between Israelis and the PLO, Justice Minister David Libai indicated that members of the State security had been and would continue to be protected by the Penal Code, which outlaws contacts with foreign agents that threaten the safety of the country. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 3 December 1992; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 3 December 1992; Al-Fajr, 7 December 1992)

8. On 2 December 1992, the Organization for Legal Studies on Land and Water published a comparative report on Israeli violations regarding land confiscation, the uprooting of trees and house demolition. During the last seven months of the Likud Government, 5,067 trees were uprooted and 43 houses were demolished as compared with 2,730 trees and 60 houses in the first five months of the Labour Administration. The report also indicates that the Likud Government confiscated 27,880 dunams of land, 25,830 dunams of which were considered as State land. Out of a total of 11,088 dunams confiscated under the Labour Government, only 5,906 were considered as State land. The report noted that security and public welfare were often used as pretexts by the Labour Government to justify land confiscation. (Al-Tali'ah, 3 December 1992)

9. On 6 December 1992, in a statement summarizing the five years of the uprising, the IDF spokesman indicated that the growing use of guns and explosives in uprising-related incidents in the territories in 1992 had led to a sharp increase in the number of deaths both among Israelis and Palestinians. Eleven Israeli civilians and eight soldiers were killed in the territories in 1992, one of whom by friendly fire. This was in comparison to six civilians and one soldier killed in 1991, and one civilian and two soldiers in 1990. The number of Palestinians killed had also risen. In 1992, 90 Arabs in the territories were killed by security forces, while 215 were killed by other Arabs. Known members of "terrorist" gangs, such as the "Black Panthers", accounted for an increased proportion of the killings by security forces. Since the beginning of the uprising and as of the end of November 1992, 813 Palestinians had been killed by security forces and 15,935 injured. Eighteen soldiers and 29 Israeli civilians were killed and 4,152 soldiers and 1,625 civilians were injured in the territories, during the same period. Eight hundred and nine Palestinians were killed by fellow Palestinians. (Jerusalem Post, 6 December 1992; Ha'aretz, 7 December 1992)

10. On 7 December 1992, it was reported that non-resident wives of Palestinians whose husbands are residents of the territories as well as children under the age of 18, would be able to renew their visitors visas without having to leave the country. These new changes are the result of a petition to the Israeli High Court by the Association for Civil Rights in Israel (ACRI) . In the past, non-resident spouses and children had to leave the country in order to renew their visas, which would only be done for a period of three months. Non-resident spouses who renewed their visas would be entitled to enroll their children in schools in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip, obtain health insurance and work in the occupied territories. (Al-Fajr, 7 December 1992)

11. On 7 December 1992, the Al-Quds Arab newspaper reported figures which were provided by the Israeli army concerning intifadah-related casualties. Since the outbreak of the intifadah five years ago, 831 Palestinians were reportedly killed (West Bank: 536; Gaza Strip: 295) and 15,935 wounded (West Bank: 9,438; Gaza Strip: 6,497). As for the Israelis, 18 soldiers were reportedly killed (West Bank: 12; Gaza Strip: 6) and 4,152 wounded (West Bank: 1,905; Gaza Strip: 2,247). Twenty-nine (West Bank: 22; Gaza Strip: 7) Israeli civilians were also killed during this period, while 1,625 (West Bank: 1,508; Gaza Strip: 117) were wounded. It should be noted that these figures do not take into account the number of Palestinians who died as a result of tear-gas inhalation or beating by Israeli soldiers. (Al-Fajr, 14 December 1992)

12. On 8 December 1§92, the Jerusalem police reported that uprising-related violence had increased significantly in Jerusalem in 1992, after having decreased dramatically in 1991. Over 3,000 stone-throwing incidents were recorded through to November 1992, compared with fewer than 2,500 in 1991; nearly 400 cars were burned as opposed to slightly just over 300; and 24 stabbings had taken place compared with 18 the year before. (Jerusalem Post, December 1992)

13. On 8 December 1992, the human rights group B'Tselem charged that widespread human rights violations in the territories had continued despite the Rabin Government's promise to improve conditions for Palestinians. At a press conference held in Jerusalem to mark the publication of its report entitled "Human rights in the occupied territories during the fifth year of the intifadah", B'Tselem representatives stated that Palestinians were being killed by security forces at the same rate under the Labour Government as when the Likud was in power. The report stated that 41 Palestinians had been killed by security forces between 1 August and 6 December 1992 (under Rabin's Government), adding that in at least 16 cases, soldiers had opened fire in situations that were not life-threatening. (On 10 December 1992, Al-Tali'ah reported that 26 Palestinians had been killed since October 1992, 7 of whom were children under the age of 16.) Seventeen of the Palestinians killed during that period were shot dead by undercover soldiers. Nine hundred and twenty-three Palestinian residents of the territories were reportedly killed by Israeli security forces during the five years of the uprising until 6 December 1992, among whom 186 children under the age of 16. B'Tselem maintained that GSS interrogators had continued routinely to use "internationally unacceptable measures such as sleep deprivation, verbal insults and abuse, tying up in painful positions, ... and beatings." The report did mention the "goodwill gestures" the Government had implemented to improve conditions for Palestinians in the territories, including the release of 500 Palestinian prisoners, and the lowering from 60 to 55 of the age at which Palestinians could enter Israel without a permit. The report stated that, under the Rabin Government, security forces had not demolished any buildings and had sealed only two houses, compared with over 400 demolitions and 300 sealings since the start of the uprising. However, according to B'Tselem researcher Yuval Ginbar, "overall, the Government has failed to take the necessary action to improve the human rights situation of Palestinians in the occupied territories". The organization also announced that it would soon release a report on violence within the Palestinian community, breaking with the group's long-standing policy of only reporting on Israeli human rights violations in the territories. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 9 December 1992)

14. On 8 December 1992, the Israeli Minister of Police, Moshe Shahal, reportedly agreed to the setting up by settlers of special security units in the Ariel, Maaleh Adumin and Ja'fat Zaiv settlements. The Jerusalem Post, which also reported the news, added that the issue of a Palestinian police force to be established during the period of transition was also discussed during the meeting with leaders of the West Bank and Gaza Strip Settlements Council. The Council leaders expressed their opposition to the creation of such a force. (Al-Tali'ah, 10 December 1992)

15. On 8 December 1992, two Palestinian human rights groups, the Al Haq and the Palestine Human Rights Information Centre (PHRIC) held a symposium at East Jerusalem and presented the following figures in relation to the five years of theintifadah: 1,110 Palestinians were killed; 54,000 were injured and treated in hospitals; 83,000 were detained for more than three days; 15,300 were held in administrative detention; 66 were expelled from the territories; 474 houses were demolished and 341 houses were sealed for security reasons. Al Haq is still investigating the cases of 111 Palestinians who have been killed. The report noted that 12,500 Palestinians are currently detained in Israeli prisons. It also mentioned that 16,000 houses have been demolished since 1967 on the grounds that they were built without a permit. The group also criticized the work of the Israeli special units which are responsible for at least 22 of a total of 50 Palestinian deaths over the past five months. (Al-Tali'ah, 10 December 1992; Al-Fajr, 14 December 1992)

16. On 13 December 1992, it was reported that the Southern Command had formulated six months earlier a plan for using anti-tank missiles to force wanted and armed activists out of their hideouts after civilians had been evacuated. The decision followed the 4 April raid on a house in Khan Younis where armed activists were hiding, in which a Shimshon undercover unit soldier was killed and two of his comrades wounded. The orders stipulated that in cases when wanted and armed activists hid inside a house and refused to surrender or started shooting, it would be permitted to fire anti-tank missiles from personal rocket launchers. All civilians would first be evacuated from the house. These orders comply with the IDF open-fire procedures in the territories that permit shooting at armed suspected activists without warning. (Jerusalem Post, 13 December 1992)

17. On 16 December 1992, it was reported that soldiers had arrested some 1,200 fundamentalists in the territories. Among the detainees were suspected activists and supporters of the Hamas and Islamic Jihad movements. From 450 to 600 Palestinians had been arrested in the previous two days in the Gaza district. Most of them were on the army's lists for Khan Younis, the Nuseirat refugee camp and Gaza City's Sheikh Radwan neighbourhood. In the West Bank, the 600 to 750 persons arrested included many sheikhs and imams. Troops also arrested dozens of suspects in Hebron. The city and the surrounding villages were known as Hamas strongholds. (Ha'aretz, 15 December 1992; Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 16 December 1992)

18. On 22 December 1992, the "Meretz" party submitted a list of proposals to Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, which should be implemented in the near future, in order to alleviate the plight of Palestinians in the administered territories.

(a) Change the criteria for family unification so that all first-degree family members would be allowed to come and live in the territories as Permanent residents;

(b) Transfer the authority to grant building licences from the military government to the local leadership;

(c) Remove the limitations applied to Palestinians leaving the territories;

(d) Reduce to a minimum the number of licences and permits demanded of Palestinians;

(e) Abolish the issuing of green identification cards to Palestinians who are former prisoners;

(f) Abolish excessive taxation rates;

(g) In accordance with the same principles applied to Israelis, invest in the territories, the National Insurance deductions obtained from Palestinians;

(h) Release long-standing and elderly Palestinian prisoners in return for their commitment not to engage in hostile activity;

(i) Allow deportees who were expelled many years earlier and who no longer pose a threat to return to their homes;

(j) Permit Palestinians to sell some of their products in Israel, especially agricultural produce;

(k) Enhance industrial development in the territories by providing financial guarantees and encouraging the establishment of industrial zones for local entrepreneurs. (Jerusalem Post, 23 December 1992)

19. On 23 December 1992, the residents of Gaza claimed that since the killing of three IDF soldiers on 7 December, the open-fire orders issued to soldiers had been changed and the soldiers were now using live ammunition, even in relatively minor incidents such as stoning. They stated that this explained the large number of residents who were wounded by live fire. The IDF spokesman denied that there had been a modification in open-fire regulations, but indicated the IDF had reserved the right to respond to attacks in whatever way commanders in the field felt it was necessary, depending on the circumstances. The day before, the head of the Israeli-Palestinian Doctors' Association, Nir Gordon, sent a letter to Prime Minister and Defence Minister Yitzhak Rabin asking him whether there had been any changes in open-fire orders issued to soldiers in view of the high number of casualties and the type of injuries sustained (in the chest and head area). (Ha'aretz, 23 December 1992; Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 24 December 1992)

20. On 23 December 1992, Dedi Zucker, the Chairman of the Knesset Law Committee, announced that the repeal of the ban on meetings with PLO officials was to be put off for a few weeks in order to enable senior intelligence and security officials to express their views on whether the repeal would adversely affect any state interests. The announcement was made following requests from Likud and Labour party members not to rush the legislation through but to allow more time for its examination. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 24 December 1992)

21. On 27 December 1992, it was indicated at a Cabinet meeting that if more funds were not allocated to assist the Palestinian population in the territories in order to offset the shortfall of $650 million in lost remittances from Arabs abroad, Islamic radicalization could increase. According to Major-General Danny Rothschild, the coordinator of activities in the territories, Hamas, an opponent of the peace negotiations, was the only organization that was seeking to fill the financial vacuum left by the cut in Arab financial support which followed the Gulf war. Several ministers backed Rothschild's proposal that support for Palestinians in the territories be raised from approximately $95,420,000 to about $152,670,000. Rothschild noted that 80 per cent of the current sum came from taxes paid by Palestinians. In addition, Minister of Health Hai'm Ramon, called for all direct and indirect taxes collected from Palestinians to be invested back in the Civil Administration in the territories and not to be spent within Israel. According to the Civil Administration, foreign investors, especially Palestinian businessmen, had invested $50 million to $70 million in various projects (schools, sewage systems, factories) in the territories in 1992. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 28 December 1992; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 31 December 1992)

22. On 31 December 1992, the B'Tselem human rights group informed a Jerusalem press conference that since the publication of its last report in early December, there had been an increase in killings, in the imposition of curfews and the number of arrests, the denial of medical treatment, the massive deportation of activists and in other harmful actions. The group issued a preliminary educational system report on deportations and an extensive study of alleged human rights violations by the army in Khan Younis. In December, 100,000 residents of Khan Younis were under curfew for 17 days, while 23 residents were included in the mass deportation. Of the 11 who were killed in the ensuing clashes, four were children and, according to B'Tselem, the 11 persons did not pose an immediate threat to the troops, as the army had claimed. B'Tselem called for an immediate reform of the IDF open-fire regulations in order to reduce civilian casualties. In response, the IDF spokesman stated that contrary to reports, open-fire orders had remained unchanged and allowed soldiers to shoot only when their lives were in danger and when fleeing suspects refused to obey orders to halt. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 1 January 1993)

23. On 5 January 1993, the Gaza Centre for Rights and Law, an affiliate of the Geneva-based International Commission of Jurists, indicated in a report that the number of casualties and injuries in December 1992 was the highest monthly total in two years. In December, 17 persons were shot dead by Israeli soldiers in Gaza, seven of whom were minors under the age of 16. All had been shot above the waist with live ammunition. Nine were not participating in demonstrations, but were either bystanders or passers-by. A total of 978 Palestinians were treated at local clinics and hospitals for injuries caused by live ammunition, plastic-coated bullets, beating and tear-gas inhalation. Out of the total of wounded persons, 105 were under the age of 14. The Gaza Strip was sealed off between 7 and 23 December (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 11 January 1993). All schools were closed from 17 December 1992 to 4 January 1993 by military order. Anti-tank missiles and grenades were used on two occasions to demolish civilian houses during searches for fugitives: the homes of the al-Jabour family in Khan Younis and of the al-Moussader family in Deir el-Balah. One of the houses was destroyed completely. (Jerusalem Post, 6 and 19 January 1993)

24. On 6 January 1993, a member of the Knesset, Dedi Zucker, claimed that the number of Palestinians who were killed in the territories had more than tripled over the past few months, clearly indicating that the army had changed its open-fire regulations. In a letter addressed to Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin, Zucker presented figures showing that 16 Palestinians had been killed in October, 14 in November and 23 in December, as compared with 5 in August and 7 in September. He also pointed out that fewer Palestinian fugitives and more youths under the age of 16 had been killed over the past three months, and that the special undercover units entrusted with seeking out wanted fugitives were responsible for the decline in the number of killing. According to Zucker, these three factors were in direct relation with open-fire regulations and were characteristic of a number of events which did not present a threat for the life of the soldiers. Another feature of the killings during the past three months was that the victims were unarmed and that the threat they posed was relatively small, both because of the persons' relatively young age and the fact that they were killed during demonstrations rather than in more violent incidents. Zucker's figures showed that 16 out of the 23 Palestinians killed in December had been shot during demonstrations while three were shot during stone-throwing incidents. Seven of the persons had who were killed were 16 years old or younger, and only one was a fugitive. (Jerusalem Post, 7 January 1993)

25. On 12 January 1993, it was reported that, according to Palestinian sources, 860 Palestinians had been killed by other Palestinians since the beginning of the uprising. (Ha'aretz, 12 January 1993)

26. On 19 January 1993, the coalition swept aside dozens of draft amendments, to pass a law repealing the ban on meetings with officials of organizations classified as "terrorist" by the Government. The Knesset approved by a majority of 39 to 20 votes the bill in accordance with the wording drafted by the Government. (Jerusalem Post, 20 January 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 25 January 1993)

27. On 25 January 1993, Environment Minister Yossi Sarid told a caucus of the "Meretz" faction to which he belongs that Chief of General Staff Lt. Gen. Ehud Barak would be attending future weekly Cabinet sessions in order to report on violent incidents in the territories. He would also report on IDF investigations probes into the killing of Palestinians. Sarid stated that he had demanded at the Cabinet session on 24 January 1993 that the IDF submit a report on every investigation into the killing of a Palestinian in the territories and not limit itself to merely stating that an investigation was under way. (Ha'aretz, 26 January 1993)

28. On 26 January 1993, the Gaza Centre for Rights and Law reported that five youths under the age of 16 had been shot dead by soldiers in demonstrations during the month of January (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 25 January 1993). There was no apparent explanation for the increase in the number of casualties among young persons. Military sources stated that open-fire regulations had not been changed while Palestinian sources claimed that there had not been an increase in the number of children taking part in demonstrations. Palestinian sources noted that the 10 children who died recently were all killed by regular troops during demonstrations and not by undercover units. (Jerusalem Post, 26 January 1993)

29. On 26 January 1993, it was reported that more than 300 wanted fugitives had been arrested in the territories in 1992. A number of them turned themselves in to the police. Also on 26 January 1993, Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin told the Knesset Foreign Affairs and Defence Committee that the "Fatah" had recently resumed "terrorist" operations in the Gaza Strip and that men from the "Fatah" were more numerous on their wanted lists than before. According to Rabin, "Fatah" units had also resumed with executions of fellow Palestinians. A senior IDF intelligence officer provided the committee with figures showing that Palestinian casualties in the territories resulting from IDF operations had fallen from 270 in 1989 to 108 in 1992, while Palestinian executions of fellow Palestinians had increased from 110 in 1989 to 248 in 1992. (Ha'aretz, 26 January 1993; Jerusalem Post, 27 January 1993)

30. On 27 January 1993, Palestinian monitoring groups reported that the IDF had killed nearly four times as many young people aged under 17 in the six months since the Labour party has been in power than in a corresponding period under the Likud Administration. The charges that the human rights situation was worse than at any time during "the past two years" were made at a press conference held in East Jerusalem by the Palestinian head of delegation at the peace talks, Dr. Haidar Abdel-Shafi. It was indicated that 88 people, including 25 youths, had been killed over the past six months while 53 people, including 7 youths, were killed by Israelis between July 1991 and January 1992, under the Likud Administration. It stated that 23 youths had been killed during the past four months. The deaths of all nine youths who were killed since the deportation of 17 December 1992 occurred in the Gaza Strip. The figures were used as the basis for a claim that "the tendency of killing children is on the rise", as a result of "an unwritten modification of the policy governing open-fire regulations". In response, the IDF stated that "it would not argue over the numbers" but that open-fire regulations specifically "indicate that there should be no fire directed against children". Abdel-Shafi also noted the recent introduction of anti-tank missiles to destroy homes in which the IDF suspected armed fugitives to be hiding. The IDF stated that it had adopted the tactic of shelling houses where fugitives were suspected to be hiding in order to decrease the danger to troops, after several soldiers were killed in direct confrontations with armed fugitives. (Jerusalem Post, 27 January 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 28 January 1993)

31. On 2 February 1993, the Council of Jewish Communities in the West Bank and Gaza Strip and police spokesmen confirmed that the establishment of civil guard units in the territories, originally planned for the beginning of 1993, had been put off indefinitely. (Jerusalem Post, 2 February 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 4 February 1993)

32. On 6 February 1993, a military spokesman stated that there had been no change in regulations which banned firing regular bullets at stone throwers in crowds because stones "were not considered life-threatening". However, iron bars and bricks were considered life-threatening and soldiers could open fire with regular ammunition if such heavy objects were dropped on or thrown at them. (Jerusalem Post, 8 February 1993)

33. On 7 February 1993, according to an Israeli Television report, the B'Tselem human rights organization indicated that 20 per cent more Palestinians were killed during the premiership of Yitzhak Rabin compared with the last six months of the Likud Government. It stated that the number of individuals aged under 16 who had been killed had increased by 108 per cent. A Palestinian reporter who frequently attended demonstrations indicated that children aged 8 to 15 were the most active in demonstrations and that there was a greater participation of young children than before. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 8 February 1993)

34. On 9 February 1993, it was reported that Brig. Gen. Freddie Zach, Deputy Government Coordinator for Economic Affairs in the territories told a news conference that in addition to three-year tax breaks, 173 factories had opened in the territories in 1992 and that more Arab banks and the first non-Israeli insurance firms were also being authorized. (Jerusalem Post, 9 February 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 22 February 1993)

35. On 10 February 1993, Justice Minister David Liba'i denied reports that a ministerial committee which was investigating the confidential recommendations of the 1987 Landau Commission report on the General Security Service had considered granting GSS interrogators immunity from prosecution. (Jerusalem Post, 11 February 1993)

36. On 11 February 1993, a meeting between the Israeli Minister of Police, Moshe Shahal, and Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin was reportedly scheduled in order to take a decision regarding the establishment of civil guard units in the Maaleh Adumim settlement. (Al-Tali'ah, 11 February 1993)

37. On 11 February 1993, according to a report published two days earlier by the British daily The Guardian, it was reported that an estimated 200 Palestinian children had been killed or injured in the occupied territories over the previous two months. (Al-Tali'ah, 11 February 1993)

38. On 12 February 1993, it was reported that some 18 Arab residents of the Gaza Strip, including wanted fugitives, were arrested during a major military operation which involved the use of helicopters and the blowing up of houses. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 12 February 1993)

39. On 12 February 1993, it was reported that the Chief of General Staff, Lt. Gen. Ehud Barak apparently supplied incorrect information to the Knesset Foreign Affairs and Defence Committee on 9 February 1993, when he stated that there had been only a marginal increase in the number of Palestinians killed by soldiers in 1992. Official army statistics released on 11 February 1993 showed that there was a rise of 51 per cent over the 1991 figure. Barak told the Committee that 88 Palestinians were shot dead by the army last year as compared with 82 in 1991. However, the latest IDF figures showed that 121 persons died last year as compared with 80 in 1991. Barak informed the Committee that casualties traditionally increased between December and February because of numerous uprising-related anniversaries. Unofficial IDF figures for casualties in December, January and the first 12 days of February already reached 32 per cent of last year's IDF computed fatalities. A comparison with previous years showed that deaths during those three months from 1988-1991 did not exceed 27 per cent of the annual total. In 1989, they amounted to only 18 per cent of the annual total. Barak attended the Committee session in order to respond to an accusation made by B'Tselem, the human rights organization, concerning a 180 per cent increase in the number of children and youths killed during first six months of Prime minister Yitzhak Rabin's tenure, as compared with the last six months of the Likud Administration. (Ha'aretz, 10 February 1993; Jerusalem Post, 10 and 12 February 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 11 February 1993; Al-Fajr, 15 February 1993)

40. On 15 February 1993, it was reported that 13 Palestinians had been killed during the first 11 days of the month. Five of the 13 were under the age of 16. The director of B'Tselem, Yizhar Be'er, told Al-Fajr that when the Rabin Government came to power, it had announced, as a goodwill gesture, that the homes of Palestinians convicted of anti-occupation activities would no longer be demolished. However, the military authorities have introduced a new measure which involves the blowing up of Palestinian houses with anti-tank missiles under the pretext of looking for wanted Palestinian activists. Be'er pointed out that Israeli soldiers did not need to receive military order to carry out a demolition and could make an on-the-spot decision to destroy a house with missiles. A number of Palestinian human rights organizations estimated the number of homes destroyed with anti-tank missiles at almost 60, not including at least 18 houses which had been destroyed during the previous few days in the Gaza Strip. (Al-Fajr, 15 February 1993)

41. On 18 February 1993, the European Community (EC) protested against what it described as the "rapidly deteriorating situation in the occupied territories", including an increase in IDF killings of Palestinians which also Include children. The protest was voiced by four European ambassadors representing the rotating leadership of the EC before Deputy Foreign Minister Yossi Beilin. (Jerusalem Post, 19 February 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 22 February 1993)

42. On 19 February 1993, Palestinians and Israelis met in Jerusalem's Talpiot neighbourhood to talk about peace. It was the first such meeting since the December deportation of Islamic activists. (Jerusalem Post, 22 February 1993)

43. On 23 February 1993, the newly appointed border police commander Yitzhak Aharonovtz stated in a press conference in Jerusalem that the massive increase in armed attacks on border policemen in the administered territories had continued even after the deportation of Islamic activists in December 1992. He stated that border police units had captured some 30 armed activists in the territories in 1992. Several machine-guns, more than 100 grenades and more than 200 rifles and pistols were found in their possession. He also indicated that the uprising had taken on a new character, with a large increase in the number of armed attacks and a decline in disturbances. Border policemen serving in the territories were fired at 50 times in 1992, compared with only 7 times in 1991. However, border policemen were called in to quell rioting on only 993 occasions in 1992, as compared with over 4,500 in 1991. According to figures released by the border police spokesman, 5 border policemen were killed and over 700 injured by activists in 1992 while on duty. (Jerusalem Post, 24 February 1993)

44. On 27 February 1993, the $302 million 1993 budget for the territories was announced publicly for the first time by the Office of the Government Coordinator in the territories. It was made up of $263.5 million in taxes raised in the territories and $38.5 million, which amounted to the "participation of the State of Israel". (Ha'aretz, 28 February 1993; Jerusalem Post, 1 March 1993)

45. On 1 March 1993, according to the Arabic newspaper An Nahar, it was reported that settlers from the West Bank had been granted limited police powers which included the right to search, pursue and arrest suspects while on guard duty. This was stated in an agreement concluded between the Attorney General of Israel and the representative of the Ariel settlement. (Al-Fajr, 8 March 1993)

46. On 4 March 1993, the Israeli newspaper Ha'aretz reported that according to military sources, the Israeli authorities were planning to reduce by 50 per cent the number of work permits granted to Arab workers from the Gaza Strip. Palestinian workers in Israel pointed out that this measure was in line with statements made by Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin on 23 February 1993 regarding unemployment in Israel, in which he referred to the need to reduce the number of Palestinian workers from the occupied territories working in Israel. (Al-Tali'ah, 4 March 1993)

47. On 10 March 1993, it was reported that the army had recently begun deploying regular units instead of reservists in Gaza. (Jerusalem Post, 10 March 1993)

48. On 10 March 1993, the outgoing OC Central Command Major-General Danny Yatom told reporters that 304 fugitives had been captured in 1992 and that 143 had surrendered. An additional 21 fugitives had been deported to Jordan for a fixed period instead of serving prison sentences. Yatom also indicated that the IDF had rejected offers of surrender made by a number of gunmen who demanded the right to leave for Jordan as a condition for giving themselves up. Twenty-eight fugitives were killed while attempting to escape. (Jerusalem Post, 11 March 1993)

49. On 12 and 13 March 1993, as the current wave of terror claimed two more victims, Police Inspector General Ya'acov Terner called on citizens who had licences to carry weapons to do so at all times in order "to contribute to their own security and the security of their surroundings". (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 14 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 22 March 1993)

50. On 14 March 1993, it was reported that 15 major attacks on Israelis had occurred in 1993. Nine took place during the past week. Ten Israelis (seven civilians and three soldiers) died, and 21 were wounded. Six attacks took place inside the Green Line (inside Israel), one in eastern Jerusalem, seven in Gaza and two in Hebron. (Jerusalem Post, 14 March 1993)

51. On 14 March 1993, Police Minister Moshe Shahal and several other ministers criticized Inspector General Ya'acov Terner for recommending that civilians who had the authorization to do so begin carrying their guns. (Jerusalem Post, 15 March 1993)

52. On 14 March 1993, in response to the attacks on the army, in the Gaza Strip, Deputy Defence Minister Mordechai Gur instructed the IDF to implement immediately plans to install a security fence and a warning system around the Gush Katif settlements. (Jerusalem Post, 15 March 1993)

53. On 15 March 1993, it was reported that the fundamentalist Israeli-Arab movement was helping to support thousands of "uprising victims" in the territories by providing assistance to orphans and needy families. A report by the movement's Islamic Aid Committee on its activities during 1992 stated that financial assistance was given to approximately 1,000 orphans and 600 families. According to the report, each orphan received a minimum of $36 per month, while an overall average of approximately $73,000 a month was given to families. For the Muslim feast of the sacrifice holiday in 1992, the Committee had distributed meat to nearly 40,000 families mainly in the Gaza district, as well as to families living in the towns and villages in the West Bank. According to the report, each family received around five kilograms of meat. Similarly, 10,500 food parcels were, distributed to needy families in the territories during the last 10 days of the month-long Ramadan fast in 1992, when practising Muslims eat only in the evening. The Committee, a non-profit organization established in 1991, also helped to channel food, clothing, medicine and other essential items to the sick, elderly and handicapped residents of the territories throughout the year. It also arranged visits by Israeli Arabs to the needy. (Jerusalem Post, 15 March 1993)

54. On 16 March 1993, the IDF has confirmed the validity of standing orders requiring soldiers to carry their weapons in the territories at all times and to avoid hitchhiking. (Jerusalem Post, 16 March 1993)

55. On 21 March 1993, it was reported that, according to IDF figures, some 27 IDF soldiers were killed and 4,336 injured; 37 Israeli civilians were killed and 1,698 were injured in the territories since the beginning of the uprising until the middle of March 1993. According to the same source, during the same period, 884 Palestinians were killed and 16,256 injured by the security forces . Eight hundred fifty-six Palestinians were killed by other Palestinians and 2,227 were injured. (Ha'aretz, 21 March 1993)

56. On 22 March 1993, it was reported that Ministers belonging to the Meretz political party had presented a plan whose cost would be some $292 million, to employ Palestinians from Gaza on public works in the district and to also introduce welfare payments. The Minister of Communication, Amnon Rubinstein, stated that this could solve the employment problems of some 10,000 to 20,000 Palestinians and was in keeping with Prime Minister Rabin's call that fewer Palestinians be employed in Israel. (Jerusalem Post, 22 March 1993)

57. On 22 March 1993, according to a monthly report by the Gaza Centre for Rights and Law, 39 Palestinians were killed in Gaza by IDF soldiers between December 1992 and the end of February 1993. The report also indicated that February 1993 witnessed the worst attacks with anti-tank missiles on Palestinian houses, with 10 houses completely destroyed and 9 others partially damaged. Also in February, 361 Palestinians were reportedly injured by live bullets which included 134 children under 15; 259 were injured by plastic and rubber-coated metal bullets; 182 were treated for beatings by soldiers; and 196 were treated for tear-gas inhalation. (Al-Fajr, 22 March 1993)

58. On 29 March 1993, it was reported that only three months after the 1993 State budget was passed in the Knesset, the Cabinet had decided to create a larger police force at the expense of other government operations. The Cabinet cut a total of approximately $18,250,000 from the budgets of a number of ministries to finance the salaries of 1,000 additional policemen, in an effort to curb the increase in acts of "terrorism" perpetrated by Palestinians. The 1993 State budget already included allocations for 550 additional police posts in comparison with 1992. (Jerusalem Post, 29 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 1 April 1993)

59. On 31 March 1993, it was reported that the army would implement new measures, including the opening of fire without warning at armed Palestinians. According to the instructions issued by the IDF Judge Advocate-General's office, soldiers and other security personnel would now be authorized to shoot Palestinians carrying guns even if they did not actually threaten to open fire at them. Soldiers have reportedly also been ordered to shoot in all cases of riots. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 31 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 1 April 1993)

60. On 31 March 1993, it was reported that IDF forces in Gaza had been reinforced with special units, including commando and infantry troops, and that special operations aimed at pressuring "terrorists" in specific localities had been launched. The army was also reinforced in the West Bank. Also on 31 March, hundreds of Palestinians were detained for violating the closure of the territories. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 1 April 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 1 April 1993)

61. On 1 April 1993, it was reported that the Ministry of Justice would present guidelines for the use of weapons in self-defence by civilians to Prime Minister and Defence Minister Yitzhak Rabin. The guidelines would be made public after his approval. They would specify when it would be permissible to use a weapon in a life-threatening situation. Justice Minister David Liba'i indicated that the guidelines would be in accordance with the law and with decisions of the High Court. (Jerusalem Post, 1 April 1993)


(a) List of Palestinians killed by troops or Israeli civilians

62. The following abbreviations of the names of newspapers are used in the tables:

H: Ha'aretz

JP: Jerusalem Post

AF: Al-Fajr

AT: Al-Tali'ah


Date
Name and age
Place of residence
Remarks and source
1 Dec. 1992Amer Yussef Abu Sharkh, 12, or Yussuf Amr Abu Sharar, 14Gaza City
(Gaza Strip)
According to Palestinian sources, killed during a demonstration in the Sheikh Radawan neighbourhood while he was shopping with his mother in the local market. Shot in the back, head and neck. Investigation is under way. (H, JP, 2 Dec. 1992; also referred to in AT, 3 Dec. 1992; AF, 7 Dec. 1992)
2 Dec. 1992Khaled (Hussan) al-Ustaz, 23Gaza (Gaza Strip)Died of wounds sustained on 1 Dec. 1992 during clashes with the army in Gaza City. (H, 3 Dec. 1992; also referred to in AT, 3 Dec. 1992; AF, 7 Dec. 1992)
4-5 Dec. 1992Issam Barbakh, 15Khan Younis
(Gaza Strip)
According to Palestinian sources, killed in his high school classroom while troops were shooting at stone throwers. The schoolchildren were shouting at the army from school windows and soldiers apparently fired at them. (JP, 6 Dec. 1992; also referred to in AF, 14 Dec. 1992)
8 Dec. 1992Ahmed Abdel Rahman Uzmoun or Hassan Ahmed Abdel Rahman al-Uzmoun, 18 or 20Beit Sahur
(West Bank)
Shot by soldiers writing graffiti on walls and ignoring an order to halt. He was wearing the IDF uniform. (H, JP, 9 Dec. 1992; also referred to in AT, 10 Dec. 1992; Af, 14 Dec. 1992)
8 Dec. 1992Naji Abu NajaRafah (Gaza Strip)Shot after he threw a fire-bomb/stones at a border police patrol in Silat el-Hartiya. (H, JP, 10 Dec. 1992; also referred to in AT, 10 Dec. 1992; AF, 14 Dec. 1992)
9 Dec. 1992Hassan Fari Khat,
15 or 20
Jenin (West Bank)Shot after he tried to throw a fire-bomb at an IDF patrol and refused to obey orders to stop. (H, JP, 9 Dec. 1992)
10 Dec. 1992Issam (Mussa) Baharmas Bahrame, or Barahma, 29Anzah (West Bank)Killed by return fire in a gun battle. A wanted fugitive, he was the head of the Islamic Jihad cells in the Jenin area. (H, JP, 11 Dec. 1992); H, JP, 13 Dec. 1992; also referred to in AF, 14 Dec. 1992)
11-12 Dec.1992Khaled (Mohammed) (al-) Askari, 27Jabalia refugee camp (Gaza Strip)Shot when rioters threw rocks at the army. (H, JP, 13 Dec. 1992; also referred to in AF, 21 Dec. 1992)
11-12 Dec.1992Omar Sair Sidar, or Ammar Sidr, 17 or 18Hebron (West Bank)Shot by solders after throwing stones and refusing orders to halt. (H, 13 Dec. 1992; also referred to in AF, 14 Dec. 1992)
11-12 Dec.1992Hassan Ismail Mahmud Hadur, or Khadoui, 24Bani Naïm
(West Bank)
Shot by the army when he and other masked youths refused orders to halt. (H, 13 Dec. 1992; also referred to in AF, 21 Dec. 1992)
13 Dec. 1992Shaaban (Abdel Fatah) Abu Ayada, 22Nuseirat refugee camp (Gaza Strip)He was shot during demonstrations. (H, JP, 14 Dec. 1992; also referred to in AF, 21 Dec. 1992)
18 Dec. 1992Amal Abu Thayer (Tuyur), 8, femaleKhan Younis
(Gaza Strip)
They were shot by the army when rioting broke out after a curfew which had been imposed on the city was partially lifted. (H, JP, 20 Dec. 1992; also referred to in AF, 28 Dec. 1992)
"Rezek/Rizak (Salah) al-Far'a or Al Karrah, 16/20""

"Wa'el Khassi or Wael Muhammed al-Kissi, 17""
"Abdel Abu Hadied or Adel Jaber Hadayat,22""
"Maher Umran, 24, 27 or 30""
"Najeh al-Majar or Naji al-Najar, 22""
18 Dec. 1992Bassar Abu Sahav, 18Askar refugee camp (West Bank)Shot by the army when camp residents threw large cinder blocks at a patrol. (JP, 20 Dec. 1992)
18 Dec. 1992Omar Said (Banat) Ali Hajaja/Hadj, 17 or 18el-Arroub refugee camp (West Bank)Shot by soldiers quelling a demonstration with two other masked youths after they refused to obey orders to halt. One youth was apparently armed. (H, JP, 20 Dec. 1992; also referred to in AF, 28 Dec. 1992)
21 Dec. 1992Mohammed Salem Ahmed Abu Moussa, 17Khan Younis
(Gaza Strip)
Died of wounds sustained during riots on 19 Dec. 1992.(H, JP, 22 Dec. 1992; also referred to in AF, 28 Dec. 1992)
21 Dec. 1992Ayman Sobhi Abu Amer, 10Khan Younis refugee camp (Gaza Strip)Shot during riots which apparently erupted following the death of Moussa Abu Amar, the brother of a Hamas deportee. (H, JP, 22 Dec. 1992; also referred to in AF, 28 Dec. 1992)
23 Dec. 1992Ismail Younis Abdeen, 27Khan Younis
(Gaza Strip)
The two brothers were killed when soldiers opened fire when their jeep was stoned. Ismail was shot in the chest, his brother in the head. According to Palestinian sources, neither was involved in the stone- throwing incident but were standing on the roof of their house. (H, JP, 24 Dec. 1992; H, 25 Dec. 1992; also referred to in AT, 24 Dec. 1992; AF, 28 Dec. 1992)
"
Naim Mahmud Abdeen, 30/32
"
26 Dec. 1992Mohammed Hussein Ali Zaatar, 15Shati' refugee camp (Gaza Strip)Shot and killed under unclear circumstances. He apparently had stoned IDF troops. (H, JP, 27 Dec. 1992; also referred to in AF, 4 Jan. 1993)
3 Jan. 1993Yasser Sofi or Ashraf Hamed (Soufi) Asofi, 18Rafah (Gaza Strip)Shot and killed while throwing stones at a patrolling IDF jeep. (JP, 4 Jan. 1993; also referred to in AF, 11 Jan. 1993)
6 Jan. 1993Ziad Ahmed el-Matour or Abdel Fatahk Moutour, 17 or 23Sair (West Bank)Shot while throwing stones at an IDF patrol in the village of Sair. Died on his way to hospital. (H, JP, 7 Jan. 1993; also referred to in AT, 7 Jan. 1993; AF, 11 Jan. 1993)
11 Jan. 1993Iyad (or Id Ahmed Abd el-Karim) Samar, 22Yamoun (West Bank)Wanted, unarmed fugitive. Shot as he tried to escape from security forces in the village of Yamoun. Arab newspaper contradicted this version stating that the man had surrendered to the soldiers when they fired at random, hitting him at various parts of his body. Investigation under way. (H, JP, 12 Jan. 1993; also referred to in AT, 14 Jan. 1993; AF, 18 Jan. 1993)
14 Jan. 1993Mohammed Ahmed Abdin, 14Khan Younis
(Gaza Strip)
Killed when soldiers opened fire to disperse rioters, who threw fire- bombs at them. (H, JP, 15 Jan. 1993; also referred to in AF, 18 Jan. 1993)
14 Jan. 1993Ali Marian or Ali Ikab Abu Mariam Ali Akab Ali Haij Mahmoud, 24 or 25Idira/Meithaloun
(West Bank)
Fugitive "Black Panthers" cell leader, unarmed. Shot dead when he tried to run away from undercover soldiers. (H, JP, 15 Jan. 1993; also referred to in Af, 18 Jan. 1993)
14 Jan. 1993Mohammed Abu Qwata Salah Abu Qweita or Mohammed Abu Gatta, 60 or 65Deir el-Balah
(Gaza Strip)
Almost deaf. Did not hear the soldiers' calls to halt when he left his home located some 300 m away from the house where "terrorists" were allegedly hiding. (H, 15 Jan. 1993; H, JP, 17 Jan. 1993; also referred to in AF, 18 Jan. 1993)
15 Jan. 1993Fachri Dachduch or Fachri Dahduch, 24Gaza (Gaza Strip)Stabbed and injured four persons in Tel Aviv's central bus station before being shot by a civil guard volunteer. (H, JP, 17 Jan. 1993)
15 or 16
Jan. 1993
Shireen Hussein (Burda), 11 (female)Jabalia refugee camp (Gaza Strip)Shot by soldiers in the stomach during a stone-throwing incident in the camp. Died at hospital. (H, JP, 17 Jan. 1993; also referred to in AF, 25 Jan. 1993)
17 Jan. 1993Mazen Dababish, 14Shati' refugee camp (Gaza Strip)Shot in the head during demonstrations. (H, JP, 18 Jan. 1993; also referred to in AF, 25 Jan. 1993)
18 Jan. 1993Hamdi Abu Hasira, 14 or 15Shati' refugee camp (Gaza Strip)Both died at hospital from wounds sustained after being shot by soldiers during demonstrations. (JP, 19 Jan. 1993; also referred to in AF, 25 Jan. 1993)
"
Jihad Mohammed Mohesin or Jihad Mahmoud
"
(H, JP, 19 Jan. 1993)

19 Jan. 1993Liwa Rafik Bekron or Nouar Rafik Bagron, 14Gaza City
(Gaza Strip)
Killed by shots fired from an Israeli civilian car after it had been stoned. A man from the Atzmara settlement turned himself in to the police on 20 Jan. 1993 in connection with the incident. (H, 20, 22 Jan. 1993; JP, 20, 21 Jan. 1993; also referred to in AF, 25 Jan. 1993)
20 Jan. 1993Murad SalahNablusDied as a result of wounds sustained on 1 Jan. 1993 when he was shot in the neck by soldiers. (AF, 25 Jan. 1993)
22 or 23
Jan. 1993
Liait Rabhi or Laith Ribhi Arar, 19Karawet Bani Zaid (West Bank)Killed when soldiers, who had been stoned, fired at the crowd, after ordering the stone-throwers to stop. (H, JP, 24 Jan. 1993; also referred to in AF, 1 Feb. 1993)
22 or 23
Jan. 1993
Ali Fahmi Sharafy, 25 or 29Jabalia
(Gaza Strip)
Taken to Shifa Hospital after inhaling tear-gas during a protest staged on 14 Jan. Died at the hospital. (H, JP, 24 Jan. 1993; also referred to in AF, 25 Jan. 1993)
27 Jan. 1993Omar Ulah or Khamis Ghouleh or Omar Hamis Yusuf, 20Gaza City
(Gaza Strip)
Wanted fugitive. Killed during a routine search of a Gaza neighbourhood by soldiers when he pulled out a gun while trying to run away from soldiers. Was also carrying a grenade. (H, JP, 28 Jan. 1993; also referred to in AT, 28 Jan. 1993; AF, 1 Feb. 1993)
31 Jan. 1993
or 1 Feb. 1993
Nasser Sarousi,
22
Beit Iba
Nablus (West Bank)
Both were shot by the IDF when the driver of the stolen car they were in turned it around at a roadblock near Fahmah, south-west of Jenin, and tried to drive away when soldiers ordered him to stop. (H, 1 Feb. 1993; H, JP, 2 Feb. 1993; also referred to in AF, 8 Feb. 1993)

"
Mohammed (Mahmoud) Amin Dabbous Abousi, 22
1 Feb. 1993Hayil Abu Mokheimer, or Yusuf Mohammed, 12Khan Younis refugee camp (Gaza Strip)Died in hospital of wounds sustained three days earlier during clashes with troops in the camp. (H, JP, 2 Feb. 1993)
1 Feb. 1993Name not reportedJeninBoth were shot dead by the IDF when they tried to drive away from a roadblock when ordered to stop by soldiers. (H, JP, 2 Feb. 1993; also referred to in AF, 8 Feb. 1993)
"
"
"
5-6 Feb. 1993Abdel Rahman Salama, 18Jabalia refugee camp (Gaza Strip)Shot by soldiers at a roadblock near the el-Bureij (or Nuseirat) refugee camp when soldiers noticed several gun barrels inside their car. Submachine-guns and one Kalashnikov rifle with ammunition were found in the car. (H, JP, 7 Feb. 1993; also referred to in AF, 8, 15 Feb. 1993)
"
Osama (Khaled) Herez, 27Gaza (Gaza Strip)
"
Barakat (Ahmed Talab) Herez, 25Gaza (Gaza Strip)
5-6 Feb. 1993Khaled Itawi, 17 (or Khali Ataneh) or Khalil Abu Watna, 18Nuseirat refugee camp (Gaza Strip)Shot during clashes. Cause of death unclear. Body snatched from hospital and buried without autopsy. (JP, 7 Feb. 1993; also referred to in AF, 8 Feb. 1993)
5-6 Feb. 1993Ashraf Da'ur, 17 or Ashraf Abd el-Hamid, 16 or 19Jabalia (Gaza Strip)Shot by soldiers during a riot. (JP, 7 Feb. 1993; also referred to in AF, 15 Feb. 1993)
6 Feb. 1993Said Ijeihi, 23Rafah (Gaza Strip)Shot by soldiers during a riot. (AF, 8 Feb. 1993)
7 Feb. 1993Riyad Abdel Nabi,
16-16
Shu'fat refugee camp (West Bank)Shot during rioting sparked either when a border police jeep struct a pregnant woman (according to Palestinian sources) or when border police entered the camp following the burning of tyres and stoning of the police by youths at the entrance of the camp. (H, JP, 8 Feb. 1993; also referred to in AF, 15 Feb. 1993)
8 Feb. 1993Mithkal Yousef Darajmeh, 17Tubas (West Bank)Shot while he was leading a demonstration. According to the IDF, troops opened fire when he did not stop as ordered. Died at hospital. (H, JP, 9 Feb. 1993; also referred to in AF, 15 Feb. 1993)
8 Feb. 1993Emad Bani Oudeh, 18 or 19Tammoun (West Bank)
Both were shot dead after youths threw stones at soldiers who were leading away a captured fugitive. (H, JP, 9 Feb. 1993; also referred to in AT, 11 Feb. 1993; AF, 15 Feb. 1993)
"
Alaa Majed Bani Oudeh, 14
10 Feb. 1993Basil Hourani, 15Nuseirat refugee camp (Gaza Strip)According to the army they were shot dead after trying to attack soldiers with axes and knives. They were masked. Palestinian sources indicated that they were surprised while writing graffiti and were shot by plainclothes soldiers. (H, JP, 11 Feb. 1993; also referred to in AT, 11 Feb. 1993; AF, 15 Feb. 1993)
"
Ahad al-Diab, 15
"
14 Feb. 1993Amjad (Masud) Mashaki, 16Yasid (West Bank)Shot while with a group of youths who threw stones at an army patrol. Investigation under way. (JP, 15 Feb. 1993; also referred to in AF, 22 Feb. 1993)
17 Feb. 1993Salem Hassan al-Jazzar, or Abd el-LatifAl-Askar refugee camp (West Bank)Shot by soldiers when he was with other youths. Some fled while others threw stones instead of obeying orders to give themselves up. (JP, 18 Feb. 1993; also referred to in AF, 22 Feb. 1993)
17 Feb. 1993Ghassan Abdelhadi Al Barghouthy, 13Kafr Ayn (West Bank)According to Palestinian sources, he was shot and killed by troops. The IDF stated that there had been incidents in the village but that "definitely no one was shot". (JP, 19 Feb. 1993; also referred to in AT, 18 Feb. 1993; AF, 22 Feb. 1993)
18 Feb. 1993Jaffer Asrawi, 17Allar (West Bank)Shot by soldiers on an "initiated action". (H, JP, 19 Feb. 1993; also referred to in AF, 22 Feb. 1993)
18 Feb. 1993Khaled Kamsun, 26 or Khaled Abu Al Kumsan, 27Gaza (Gaza Strip)Troops shot at three suspects when they fled after being ordered to stop. He was unarmed. Died later. (H, JP, 19 Feb. 1993; also referred to in AF, 22 Feb. 1993)
18 Feb. 1993Mahmoud Abdallah Salim, 16Tulkarm refugee camp (West Bank)Shot when he did not obey orders to halt. Masked and in possession of firearms. (H, JP, 21 Feb. 1993); also referred to in AF, 22 Feb. 1993)
23 Feb. 1993Awad Ali al-Surdir, 28Rafah (Gaza Strip)Killed when he came with an ambulance to remove wounded people. The body was taken away and buried, preventing an army inquiry into the cause of death. (H, JP, 24 Feb. 1993; also referred to in AT, 25 Feb. 1993; AF, 1 Mar. 1993)
28 Feb. 1993Haider (Khrais), 25Gaza (Gaza Strip)Died in hospital of wounds sustained on 25 Feb. when border police pursued a fleeing car whose occupants had reportedly fired at a police vehicle. During the chase, the police fired several shots, one of which apparently hit him while he was working on the roof of a nearby building. (H, JP, 1 Mar. 1993); also referred to in AF, 8 Mar. 1993)
2 Mar. 1993Jumaa Abdel Aziz Misk, 60 or 75Ras el-Amed (East Jerusalem)Shot dead by a settler driving through the neighbourhood. The driver apparently opened fire after he was stoned. Investigation under way. (H, 3,4,5 Mar. 1993; JP, 3, 14 Mar. 1993; also referred to in AT, 4 Mar. 1993; AF, 8 Mar. 1993)
8 Mar. 1993Teysir Jum'ah Abu Jaliur (or Ghaliua)Nur Shams (or Tulkarm) refugee camp (West Bank)Mortally wounded by army gunfire after he threw stones at an Israeli car and an "Egged" company bus carrying soldiers. (H, JP, 9 Mar. 1993; also referred to in AT, 11 Mar. 1993)
8 Mar. 1993Naim Mahmud el-Madhun, 22Jabalia (Gaza Strip)Shot in a clash between settlers and Palestinian workers near the Erez checkpoint. A settler from Ganei Tal gave himself up to the police. Investigation under process. (H, JP, 9, 10 Mar. 1993; JP, 14 Mar. 1993; also referred to in AT, 11 Mar. 1993; AF, 15 Mar. 1993)
10 Mar. 1993Majad Mustafa al-Haja, 17 or 19Burka (West Bank)Reportedly killed by soldiers from the undercover "Duvdevan" unit, when high school students threw stones at passing Israeli vehicles in Beit Hanina. Investigation under way. (H, JP, 11 Mar. 1993; JP, 14 Mar. 1993; also referred to in AT, 11 Mar. 1993; AF, 15 Mar. 1993)
12 or 13
Mar. 1993
Musa Himouni, 15 or 17Hebron (West Bank)Shot after he threw stones at a military jeep and refused to obey orders to stop. Died in hospital. (H, JP, 14 Mar. 1993; JP, 15 Mar. 1993; also referred to in AF, 15 Mar. 1993)
14 Mar. 1993Huda Siyaj, 3Hebron (West Bank)Hit by a bullet when soldiers fired at her father's car as he tried to evade a roadblock during curfew in the town. (JP, 15 Mar. 1993; also referred to in AT, AF, 22 Mar. 1993)
16 Mar. 1993Said Musa al-Salmi, 13 or 17Khan Younis (Gaza Strip)Shot dead during disturbances. (H, JP, 17 Mar. 1993; also referred to in AT, 18 Mar. 1993; AF, 22 Mar. 1993)
16 Mar. 1993Fayez Said Al Bayouk, 19Khan Younis (Gaza Strip)Shod dead by border police who clashed with a group of stone-throwing youths. Investigation under way. (H, JP, 17 Mar. 1993; also referred to in AT, 18 Mar. 1993; AF, 22 Mar. 1993)
18 Mar. 1993Name not reportedKhan YounisBoth were killed during the third consecutive day of clashes. (H, JP, 19 Mar. 1993; AF, 22 March 1993)
"
"
"
19 or 20
Mar. 1993
Maher (or Majab) (al-) Majayda, 7 or 10Khan Younis (Gaza Strip)Both were hit by IDF gunfire and taken to hospital where they succumbed to their wounds. (H, JP, 21 Mar. 1993)
"
Talab Hamadani or Talab Harab al-Hourani, 16
"
"


20 Mar. 1993Maher Majaideh, 10Khan YounisBoth were hit by IDF gunfire and taken to hospital where they succumbed to their wounds. (AF, 29 Mar. 1993)
"
Taleb Fares Hamrani, 16
"
21 Mar. 1993Salam Shourab, 12Khan Younis (Gaza Strip)Both were shot in the chest during clashes with the army. (H, JP, 22 Mar. 1993; also referred to in AF, 29 Mar. 1993)
"
Ali Abu Yunis, 22
"
22 Mar. 1993Mohammed al-Jarbuah, 11Rafah (Gaza Strip)Shot dead by soldiers at a military post when he pointed a toy rifle which they mistook for a real weapon. Was mentally disturbed. Investigation under way. (H, JP, 23, 24 Mar. 1993; also referred to in AF, 29 Mar. 1993)
22 Mar. 1993Bassam Salhi, 10Nuseirat refugee camp (Gaza Strip)Shot when undercover units raided a feast attended by masked men. Was watching youths point slogans on the walls. Died later in hospital. Investigation under way. (H, JP, 23 Mar. 1993; also referred to in AF, 29 Mar. 1993)
22 Mar. 1993Yasser Majdalawi, 16Nuseirat refugee camp (Gaza Strip)Killed while being in a crowd which threw stones at soldiers. (H, JP, 23 Mar. 1993; also referred to in AF, 29 March 1993)
22 Mar. 1993Jihad Sadaq, 23Khan Younis (Gaza Strip)Killed during a clash near an IDF outpost in Khan Younis. (H, 23 Mar. 1993; also referred to in AF, 29 Mar. 1993)
23 Mar. 1993Moussa Abu Sabha, 20Yatta (West Bank)Shot dead, with his hands and feet bound, by a Ma'aleh Hever settler after he had stabbed a resident of Sussya and was captured. (H, JP, 24, 25 Mar. 1993; also referred to in AF, 29 Mar. 1993)
23 Mar. 1993Khaled Masalmeh, 22Beit Anwa (West Bank)Died in hospital of wounds sustained the previous evening during a clash between undercover soldiers and masked men in Beit Anwa, near Hebron. (H, 24 Mar. 1993; JP, 25 Mar. 1993; also referred to in AF, 29 Mar. 1993)
24 Mar. 1993Bassam Wadhayfi, 18Nablus (West Bank)Was part of a group of youths that formed a procession in order to visit the city graveyard as part of a holiday tradition. They threw rocks at an Israeli bus and refused to obey orders to halt. Investigation under way. (H, JP, 25 Mar. 1993; also referred to in AF, 29 Mar. 1993)
24 Mar. 1993Akram Al Shaer, 17Khan YounisDied of wounds sustained two years earlier. Soldiers shot him when he was 15, causing total paralysis. (AF, 29 Mar. 1993)
24 Mar. 193Ibrahim Zamri, 33Sheikh Radwan (Gaza Strip)Stabbed while being in a crowd in a Hamas-led Id al-Fitr march, when soldiers dispersed the crowd. According to Palestinians, was shot by border police while participating in the march. (H, JP, 25 Mar. 1993; also referred to in AF, 29 Mar. 1993)
25 Mar. 1993Hazam Imzeini (or Lamazian), 19Beit Lahiya (Gaza Strip)Shot dead after he stabbed a soldier with a penknife outside the Gaza Central Prison. (H, JP, 26 Mar. 1993; also referred to in AF, 29 Mar. 1993)
28 Mar. 1993Sami (Ziad Ahmed) Ghoul, 22Sheikh Radwan (Gaza Strip)Wanted Fatah gunman. Was in a car which appeared to speed away from an IDF patrol that chased after it. When cornered, Ghoul got out of the car, fired at the patrol and was shot dead. Two Kalashnikov assault rifles and a pistol were found in the car. (H, JP, 29 Mar. 1993; also referred to in AF, 5 Apr. 1993)
29 Mar. 1993Ahmed Sharaika, 20Jalazoun refugee camp (West Bank)Fatally wounded by army gunfire during a clash between Arab youths and soldiers. Died in hospital. (H, 31 Mar. 1993; JP, 30 Mar. 1993; also referred to in AF, 5 Apr. 1993)
(b) List of other Palestinians killed as a result of the occupation
Date
Name and age
Place of residence
Remarks and source
3 Dec. 1992Abdel (or Ahmed) Rahman Ribhi Mansur, 16 or 17Balata refugee camp (West Bank)Killed when the bomb he was preparing exploded. (H, JP, 4 Dec. 1992; also referred to in AF, 7 Dec. 1992)
4-5 Dec. 1992Othman Shar'on or Othman Abd el-Rahman Shahawan, 27Khan Younis (Gaza Strip)Stabbed to death by masked men. (H, JP, 6 Dec. 1992)
4-5 Dec. 1992Yussef Bak'r IwanBurham (West Bank)Shot by masked men at home. (JP, 6 Dec. 1992)
16 Dec. 1992Name not reported, 70Hebron (West Bank)Found strangled and beaten. Investigation in process. (H, 17 Dec. 1992)
24 Dec. 1992Riyad Riyad Aziz Husseini, 30Ubeidiya (West Bank)Shot by three masked men at home. (H, 25 Dec. 1992)
25/26
Dec. 1992
Mohammed Jabashak or Mohammed Ali Hassan Jabasha, 22Dir Albasha (West Bank)Shot by an unknown assailant as he walked down the street. (H, JP, 27 Dec. 1992)
28 Dec. 1992Nahed Abu Varda, 29/35Gaza City (Gaza Strip)Shot to death by three masked men while he was standing on the balcony of his home. (H, JP, 29 Dec. 1992)
29 Dec. 1992Atallah Nasser al-Issi, 26Rafah (Gaza Strip)Shot dead. (H, 30 Dec. 1992)
3 Jan. 1993Mahroum (or Mahrous) Dahir, 45Rafah (Gaza Strip)Died at hospital from gunshot wounds inflicted by masked men. (H, JP, 4 Jan. 1993)
3 Jan. 1993Mou'in Shoukri Younis Abu SakfaSheikh Radwan (Gaza Strip)Shot by masked men. (H, 4 Jan. 1993)
4 Jan. 1993Iyad Uda Salah Sultana, 18Rafah (Gaza Strip)Found hanging from a tree after being kidnapped by the "Fatah Eagles" the same morning. (H, JP, 5 Jan. 1993)
5 Jan. 1993Astilo Kabityo, 32Ramallah (West Bank)Shot in the head. Body found near his car. (JP, 6 Jan. 1993)
8 or 9
Jan. 1993
Meisara Halifa, 25Khan Younis
(Gaza Strip)
Shot dead by masked men. (H, JP, 10 Jan. 1993)
8 or 9
Jan. 1993
Yakub Jarba or Jarada, 48Gaza City (Gaza Strip)Shot dead by masked men. (H, JP, 10 Jan. 1993)
"
Name not reported
"
"
8 or 9
Jan. 1993
Ahmed Abu Salama, 35Gaza City (Gaza Strip)Shot dead by masked men. (H, JP, 10 Jan. 1993)
8 or 9
Jan. 1993
Ahmed Rajib, 22Khan Younis refugee camp (Gaza Strip)Shot dead by masked men. (H, JP, 10 Jan. 1993)
18 or 19
Jan. 1993
Ziad Za'ouri or Ashraf, 19Khan Younis (Gaza Strip)Shot dead by masked men. (H, JP, 10 Jan. 1993)
11 Jan. 1993Muan Abed Rabbu, 35 or 37Jabalia refugee camp (Gaza Strip)Taken by masked men and killed. (H, JP, 12 Jan. 1993)
5-6 Feb. 1993Said Ijali, 22 or Said Musa Izali, 18Rafah (Gaza Strip)Shot dead. The IDF denied responsibility for his death saying that soldiers had arrived to disperse demonstrators after he was shot. (H, JP, 7 Feb. 1993)
9 Feb. 1993Sabar A-Satri or Jabber Stih, 48Rafah refugee camp (Gaza Strip)Shot by masked men. (H, 10 Feb. 1993; JP, 11 Feb. 1993)
9 Feb. 1993Samih MohammedRafah refugee camp (Gaza Strip)Shot by masked men. (H, 10 Feb. 1993; JP, 11 Feb. 1993)
11 Feb. 1993Khaled Jamil Mahmoud ShafiDeir el-Balah (Gaza Strip)Shot by masked men. (H, 12 Feb. 1993)
15 Feb. 1993Samir Karim, 34Beersheba jailFound hanging in his cell. (JP, 17 Feb. 1993)
26-27
Feb. 1993
Suleiman Sharatah, 40 or Suleiman Ibrahim Suleiman, 42Jabalia (Gaza Strip)Shot. (H, JP, 28 Feb. 1993)

26-27
Feb. 1993
Yusra Salima, 25 or Yusra Mussa Salara, 34 (female)Khan Younis (Gaza Strip)Shot in the head. (H, JP, 28 Feb. 1993)
26-27
Feb. 1993
Nasser Salim, 32 or Nasser Abd el-Khaleq Salim, 23Gaza (Gaza Strip)Stabbed. (H, JP, 28 Feb. 1993)

26-27
Feb. 1993
Aziz Abu Warda, 39 or Aziz Khalil Muhammed Ward, 40Jabalia refugee camp (Gaza Strip)(H, JP, 28 Feb. 1993)

26-27
Feb. 1993
Ahmed Abdul KariaSheikh Radwan (Gaza Strip)Shot. (JP, 28 Feb. 1993)
26-27
Feb. 1993
Kamal AkhramMaghazi refugee camp (Gaza Strip)Shot. (JP, 28 Feb. 1993)
28 Feb. 1993Mustafa Ramda or Mustafa KarmoutBeit Lahia (Gaza Strip)Stabbed. (H, 1 Mar. 1993)
28 Feb. 1993Name not reportedGaza StripDied of gunshot wounds inflicted by masked men sustained several days earlier. (H, 1 Mar. 1993)
8 Mar. 1993Muhammed Ali Abu ShabaqJabalia refugee camp (Gaza Strip)Shot dead by masked men. (H, 9 Mar. 1993)
9 Mar. 1993Ismail Safi, 35Khan Younis refugee camp (Gaza Strip)Found shot dead after masked men abducted him from his home. (JP, 10 Mar. 1993)
10 Mar. 1993Mazen Afra, 23Zeitoun (Gaza Strip)Shot dead by masked men. (JP, 11 Mar. 1993)
12 or 13
Mar. 1993
Nasser Rajai, 20Deir el-Balah refugee camp (Gaza Strip)Shot dead by masked men. (JP, 14 Mar. 1993)
12 or 13
Mar. 1993
Nidal Hussein Nasser, 24Beit Hanoun (Gaza Strip)Killed by an explosive device he was handling. (H, 14 Mar. 1993)
16 Mar. 1993Nasser (Ali) Abu Aishe, 24Nur Shams refugee camp (Gaza Strip)Body found by settlers on the road near the refugee camp. Palestinians suspected the settlers of committing the crime. The settlers denied. Investigation under way. (H, JP, 17 Mar. 1993; also referred to in AT, 18 Mar. 1993; AF, 22 Mar. 1993)
18 Mar. 1993Ra'ed Ishana or Raid Muhammed al-Shana, 19 or 20Khan Younis (Gaza Strip)Shot during disturbances. IDF denied responsibility for the death. (H, JP, 19 March 1993)
18 March 1993Yusuf Ghareeb Ibrahim, 45Rafah (Gaza Strip)Was participating in a supper held to mark the end of the mourning period of a senior Fatah leader when he was hit in the head by a bullet. According to Israeli security experts, the man was not hit by IDF fire and Israeli soldiers were not involved in the shooting. (H, JP, 19, 21 Mar. 1993; JP, 22 Mar. 1993)
22 Mar. 1993Mohammed Rehan or Abdel LatifJabalia refugee campHamas claimed responsibility for stabbing him to death. (H, JP, 23 Mar. 1993)
23 Mar. 1993Mahmud Hassan Ganem, 20El-Bureij refugee camp (Gaza Strip)Shot by masked men. (H, 24 Mar. 1993)
23 Mar. 1993Mohammed Hassan al-Cored, 20Deir el-Balah (Gaza Strip)Axed to death. (H, 24 Mar. 1993)
24 Mar. 1993Yussuf Ahssan DarabiyaAbada (Gaza Strip)Shot dead. (H, 25 Mar. 1993)
"
Name not reportedWest BankShot deal (H, JP, 25 Mar. 1993)
26 or 27
Mar. 1993
Zuher (Issa Abdel) Dugmush, 45Gaza (Gaza Strip)Shot several times by masked men. (H, JP, 29 Mar. 1993)
31 Mar. 1993Mahmoud Ghouj, 36Halad al-Luz (West Bank)Shot in the head. (H, JP, 1 Apr. 1993)
31 Mar. 1993Mahmoud Abu Zamar, 65Halad al-Luz (West Bank)Shot in the abdomen. (H, JP, 1 Apr. 1993)


(c) Other incidents linked with the uprising

63. On 1 December 1992, a young boy was shot dead (see list) and 20 to 35 other persons were wounded in heavy clashes in Gaza City (this incident has also been referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 3 December 1992). Eight to 10 soldiers were also injured in the clashes (this incident has also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 7 December 1992). A soldier was lightly injured when an Arab driver tried to run him over at the Erez checkpoint in Gaza. In Hebron, soldiers who were escorting an "Egged" company bus in a jeep reported that a number of shots were fired at them. No one was injured. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 2 December 1992)

64. On 1 December 1992, five petrol bombs were thrown at military patrols and vehicles in four separate incidents, in Yabud near Jenin, and in the Gaza Strip (the Rafah, Khan Younis, Askar Al Jedid and Jabalia refugee camps). A vehicle was burned but no injuries were reported. Soldiers shot and injured a 15-year-old boy in Tayasir, near Jenin. A curfew was imposed on the Amari refugee camp near Ramallah after youths opened fire at a passing "Egged" company bus. (Al-Tali'ah, 3 December 1992, Al-Fajr, 7 December 1992)

65. On 2 December 1992, a resident of Gaza died of wounds sustained on 1 December 1992 (see list). Five residents of the Gaza Strip and two border policemen were wounded during clashes in Jabalia and Sheikh Radwan. (Ha'aretz, 3 December 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 7 December 1992)

66. On 3 December 1992, a resident of the Balata refugee camp was killed (see list) and another wounded when the bomb they were preparing exploded. East of Hebron a fire-bomb was thrown at a bus carrying children. The bus caught fire, but no one was hurt (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 7 December 1992). An "Egged" company bus driver was lightly injured by glass fragments when his bus was stoned north of Jerusalem. Palestinian sources reported several incidents in the Gaza Strip (refugee camps of Shabura, Khan Younis and Shati') and that four residents were injured (Jabalia refugee camp: 2 and Shabura: 2). (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 4 December 1992)

67. On 3 December 1992, an Israeli car was burned in Issawiya village near Jerusalem. A Molotov cocktail was thrown at an army vehicle as it passed through the Jabalia refugee camp, causing no damage. Two youths were injured by IDF soldiers dispersing demonstrators in the camp. A petrol bomb was thrown at the bus station of the Navi Yacov settlement north of Jerusalem, causing no damage. (Al-Fajr, 7 December 1992)

68. On 4 and 5 December 1992, a schoolboy was shot by the army in his classroom (see list). The clash began when troops surprised five masked men armed with axes and knives and opened fire at them. The commotion attracted the attention of schoolchildren who shouted at the army from the school windows, came out into the street and started throwing stones at the soldiers. The boy was killed when the soldiers shot at the school. According to local sources, a teacher and another pupil were also injured. When troop reinforcements arrived, the clashes spread to include shoppers in a nearby market and up to 23 or 30 residents were injured. Two other students remained in critical condition: Hamdi Tanbara, 15, was shot in the head and abdomen while Ziad Abu Arab, 16, was shot in the head (Al-Fajr, 14 December 1992).
Two other Palestinians were killed by armed vigilantes. In Beit Sahur, a masked man who was part of a gang that was rioting in the village was shot and wounded by soldiers. The driver of a military van and three children were lightly injured in two separate incidents, in Nablus and in Jerusalem's Old City, when their vehicles were stoned. A bottle filled with acid was thrown at border policemen who were guarding the Muslim quarter home of MK Ariel Sharon. No one was injured. Police used tear-gas to break up demonstrations in East Jerusalem. They were dispersed without the occurrence of injuries. Clashes were also reported in Gaza and in the Jabalia refugee camp. Eight vehicles were set on fire in Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 6 December 1992)

69. On 6 December 1992, a general strike was organized in the territories to mark the fifth anniversary of the beginning of the uprising. The strike covered virtually all the areas. In the Gaza district, a number of few disturbances occurred in the Sheikh Radwan neighbourhood, in Gaza City and in the Jabalia refugee camp. Two residents were reportedly injured. Two soldiers on patrol in Gaza City were lightly wounded by glass fragments when stones thrown at their vehicle broke a window. No disturbances were reported in the West Bank (also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 10 December 1992; Al-Fajr, 14 December 1992). A pre-dawn fire believed to have been set by uprising activists damaged the Transport Ministry Licensing Office in Jerusalem, causing extensive damage. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 7 December 1992)

70. On 7 December 1992, three soldiers were shot and killed before dawn in Gaza when Palestinian gunmen attacked their jeep on a main road near Beit Lahiya. They were Hagai Amit, 24; Yehuda Zamir, 23 and Shalom Tzabari, 38. The gunmen managed to get part of the numerous roadblocks. Nine petrol bombs were thrown at military vehicles and at an "Egged" company bus in four separate incidents in Sama village, near Ramallah, and in East Jerusalem. There were no injuries or damage. Several stone-throwing incidents were reported in the West Bank, in the refugee camps and the main cities (Ramallah, Nablus, and Jenin). An Israeli woman was slightly injured when her car was stoned in Bidu village on the Green Line. Processions were staged throughout the territories to mark the fifth anniversary of the uprising. Palestinian sources reported several incidents during which seven residents were injured (Khan Younis: 3. Jenin: 1. and Jabalia: 3). A car was burned in East Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 8 December 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 14 December 1992)

71. On 8 December 1992, two men were shot dead by the army in Rafah and in Beit Sahur (see list). A border policeman was injured by stones thrown by rioters. Palestinian sources reported that three (or four) residents were injured during clashes in the Gaza Strip. (Khan Younis: 2 and Jabalia: 1). (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 9 December 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 14 December 1992)

72. On 8 December 1992, a petrol bomb was thrown at a settler's vehicle near the Jalazone refugee camp, on the road between Ramallah and Jerusalem. The IDF Patrol which was escorting the vehicle opened fire and sealed the area. (Al-Tali'ah, 10 December 1992)

73. On 9 December 1992, soldiers shot dead a Palestinian youth who threw a firebomb at an army patrol near Jenin (see list). An accomplice managed to escape. A strike marking the fifth anniversary of the uprising was widely observed with practically all businesses and schools in the territories and East Jerusalem closed. No major rioting was reported in the territories, owing to an increased presence of security forces. Nevertheless, eight petrol bombs were thrown at IDF vehicles and at an Israeli bus in Nablus and Jericho. No one was injured in the incidents. Five Palestinians and one border policeman were injured during the breaking up of demonstrations in Gaza City. The five residents were slightly injured by rubber bullets. A reserve soldier was lightly wounded by a stone near el-Jib, north of Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 10 December 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 14 December 1992)

74. On 10 December 1992, four soldiers and one border policeman were shot and wounded during a hunt for wanted persons in Anzah, near Jenin. During the gun battle which lasted for several hours, a fugitive was killed by return fire (see list). Anti-tank missiles had been fired previously on the house where the fugitive was hiding, after civilian residents had been evacuated. In Kalkilia, soldiers opened fire at the Saadiya Salem Secondary School with rubber bullets and tear-gas and entered the school grounds to break up a demonstration in which an estimated 200 to 750 Palestinians, mostly pupils and teachers, were participating. Local Palestinian sources reported at least 10 wounded and about 60 arrests. Military sources reported six casualties. The army reported that six more Palestinians were hurt when soldiers fired on demonstrators in Gaza City. Soldiers opened fire at two stone-throwers, hitting one in the leg, at the A-Ram junction, north of Jerusalem. Both men managed to escape. Two petrol bombs were thrown at the police station in Ramallah. There was no damage. Stone-throwing incidents were reported in Ramallah, Jenin and Hebron. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 11 December 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 12 December 1992)

75. On 11 and 12 December 1992, a Palestinian was shot by the army (see list) as hundreds of rioters threw stones at soldiers and border police in the Jabalia refugee camp and in Gaza City. Some 40 to 60 or 93 Palestinians were slightly wounded in the riots (and admitted to hospitals), as well as in clashes in Nuseirat, Rafah, Khan Younis and el-Bureij. The injuries were mostly caused by tear-gas inhalation and rubber bullets. Ten border policemen and a soldier were treated after being hit by stones. Two other residents were killed in the West Bank in IDF shooting, in separate incidents (see list). Border policeman Sasson Morduch, 30, who was injured on 10 December 1992 in Anzah, died of his wounds. A car bomb exploded under a four-storey building in Jerusalem's Talpiot neighbourhood, causing no injuries and only minor damage. Several petrol bombs were thrown at IDF outposts in two separate incidents, in Azun village and in Dheisheh (or Dhehireyeh) without causing harm. Five Israelis were slightly injured by stones thrown in various localities of the West Bank (Bethlehem, Ramallah, East Jerusalem). Four cars were burned in East Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 13 December 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 21 December 1992)

76. On 13 December 1992, a soldier, Yuval Tutanji, 24, was killed and two others wounded when gunmen fired on their jeep near Hebron. One man was shot dead in the Nuseirat refugee camp (see list) and up to 40 were wounded during heavy clashes marking the fifth anniversary of the founding of the Hamas movement. Six border policemen and one soldier were also injured. According to local sources, an attempt to hold a pro-Hamas demonstration in Gaza City was suppressed with up to 14 to 20 persons wounded. In the West Bank, several incidents were reported during which two residents of Ramallah were injured. The army sealed off the territories following the abduction of a border policeman in the centre of Israel (Lod) by members of Hamas (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 21 December 1992). Soldiers reported that shots were fired at their vehicle near Tel Rumeida in Hebron, puncturing a tyre. A vehicle tried to run over a soldier near a military outpost in Beit Jalla. The windshields of eight cars were smashed in East Talpiot (East Jerusalem) by stones thrown by masked men from the neighbouring Jebbel Mukaber. A strike was partially observed in the Gaza Strip. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 14 December 1992)

77. On 14 December 1992, an army officer was shot and injured when gunmen fired at his jeep near the police station in the center of Hebron. Four residents were wounded during clashes with soldiers in the Gaza Strip. Several petrol bombs were thrown at a military outpost in Kfare Tubas, in the Jenin area, and at two IDF patrols in Ramallah (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 21 December 1992). Fourteen Israeli vehicles were stoned near Ein Yabrud, north of Ramallah, and stones were also thrown at the police station in Bethlehem. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 15 December 1992)

78. On 14 December 1992, an Israeli soldier was shot and injured in the centre of Nablus. Six soldiers were reportedly stoned and injured in other incidents in the Gaza Strip. (Al-Fajr, 21 December 1992)

79. On 15 December 1992, the body of the border policeman who had been abducted, Nissim Toledano, 29, was found near Kfar Adumim, south of Jerusalem. Despite the curfew which was in force, incidents were reported in the Gaza Strip, and two residents were injured in Jabalia and Shati'. Two petrol bombs were thrown at an IDF patrol in Nablus. They did not cause injuries or damage. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 16 December 1992; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 17 December 1992

80. On 15 December 1992, a home-made explosive device was thrown at an Israeli bus near the village of Al Khedr in the Bethlehem area. A petrol bomb was thrown at a military outpost in Tubas, near Jenin. No casualties were reported. Israeli sources reported that an Israeli driver was injured when his bus was stoned near the village of Ein Yabrud in the Ramallah area. (Al-Fajr, 21 December 1992)

81. On 16 December 1992, a resident of Hebron was found dead (see list). Palestinian sources reported that despite the curfew in force in the refugee camps of the Gaza Strip, there were disturbances and two residents were injured in Rafah and Khan Younis. Border police used plastic bullets and tear-gas to disperse demonstrations in the Shuafat refugee camp. (Ha'aretz, 17 December 1992)

82. On 17 December 1992, a masked Palestinian youth was shot and critically wounded by IDF fire in the Nablus area. The youth was running away from an IDF patrol after throwing stones and refused to obey orders to halt. According to Palestinian sources, two residents of the southern Gaza Strip were injured during incidents. Shots were fired at an army patrol in Nablus. There were no injuries or damage. A soldier was slightly injured by glass fragments after his vehicle was stoned near Jericho (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 21 December 1992). A commercial strike was declared in Nablus to protest the deportation of the Hamas and Islamic Jihad activists. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 18 December 1992)

83. On 18 December 1992, during confrontations in the Askar refugee camp, Israeli soldiers shot and severely injured in the head Bashar Hasheim Shanab, 18. The camp was placed under curfew. (Al-Fajr, 21 December 1992)

84. On 18 and 19 December 1992, eight Palestinians were shot and killed (see list) in the territories over the weekend by IDF troops in disturbances sparked off by the massive deportation of 415 activists to Lebanon. Over 30 people were injured. Six residents were shot dead in Khan Younis when rioting broke out after the curfew which had been imposed on the city and the adjoining refugee camp was partially lifted, allowing women to purchase food and other goods. Stone roadblocks were erected and tyres set on fire. The army responded by bringing in additional forces to reimpose the curfew. One resident of the Askar refugee camp was shot and fatally wounded by soldiers after camp residents threw large cinder blocks at a patrol and soldiers responded by opening fire. Two other youths were also injured in the incident. A masked man from the el-Arroub refugee camp was shot dead by an IDF patrol when he refused orders to halt. Two masked youths were also seriously wounded in the incident. In the Shu'fat refugee camp, youths tried to block roads with stones and metal bars, and stoned border policemen. The police responded by firing rubber bullets and tear-gas and broke up the unrest. No injuries were reported. Shots were fired at soldiers manning a roadblock near the village of Yatta, near Hebron. There were no injuries. Six cars were burned in Jerusalem, and a firebomb was thrown at a border police patrol in A-Tur without causing harm. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 20 December 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 28 December 1992)

85. On 20 December 1992, the Gaza Strip remained tense, and six people were slightly injured in the Jabalia, Khan Younis and Shati' refugee camps when soldiers broke up disturbances. Clashes were also reported in the Shu'fat refugee camp in northern Jerusalem, where several hundred youths blocked the IMP roads, burned tyres and stoned a border police patrol. Border policemen red rubber bullets over the heads of the demonstrators. A general strike was observed to protest against the deportation. Two petrol bombs were thrown at an army patrol in Kabatiya, south of Jenin. No injuries were reported. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 21 December 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 28 December 1992)

86. On 21 December 1992, a 10-year-old boy was shot and killed (see list) during riots in the Khan Younis refugee camp in the Gaza district. The riots apparently erupted when the residents heard that a Palestinian who had been injured in the camp on 19 December 1992, had died (see list). In Tulkarm/Jalazone, a nine-year-old girl was lightly wounded when soldiers shot at stone-throwers. Two residents of the village of Tal in the Nablus area were wounded when soldiers fired plastic bullets at stone-throwers. In Jericho, three masked men slightly injured a policeman and snatched his revolver. They were arrested and the weapon was retrieved. Four Israelis were lightly injured when their vehicles were stoned in two separate incidents at the A-Ram junction, north of Jerusalem, and north of Hebron. Two petrol bombs were thrown at an Israeli bus in Nablus. Damage was reported. Dozens of Palestinians demonstrated in Bethlehem to protest the deportation. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 22 December 1992; Al-Fajr, 28 December 1992)

87. On 22 December 1992, a partial commercial strike was observed in the West Bank. Vigils protesting the deportation were reportedly stationed in front of the Red Cross Offices in Bethlehem, Hebron and Tulkarm. An Arab youth who threw stones at patrolling soldiers was shot and lightly wounded in the al-Amari refugee camp south of Ramallah. Clashes with the IDF were reported in the refugee camps of Khan Younis, Jabalia, Shati' and Rafah, and four residents were injured according to Palestinian sources. Several residents were also injured in Hebron and Jenin. Three fire-bombs and empty bottles were thrown at Israeli vehicles in two separate incidents in eastern Jerusalem. Both vehicles, one of which was military, were slightly damaged and one policeman was slightly injured (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 28 December 1992). In Bethlehem, a petrol bomb was thrown at an Israeli vehicle without causing harm. A hand-grenade was thrown at an Israeli bus near the el-Azza refugee camp, in the Bethlehem district. The grenade hit another car and slightly damaged it but did not cause any injuries. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 23 December 1992; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 24 December 1992)

88. On 23 December 1992, two brothers from Khan Younis were shot dead (see list) by IDF troops which were quelling disturbances. Another youth was reportedly also wounded by gunfire. Serious disturbances were reported in the Gaza Strip, where some 50 residents were wounded. Forty of them were injured in Gaza City according to Arab sources. The IDF reported that only 12 persons were wounded. Clashes also took place in Deir el-Balah and in Jabalia. Stone-throwing incidents were reported in the West Bank (Nablus, Ramallah and Hebron). A shot was fired at border policemen on patrol in the Balata refugee camp near Nablus. Soldiers fired back. The assailant managed to escape. A fire-bomb was thrown at an Israeli truck near Jericho, causing slight damage. Four people were slightly injured in a car accident near the A-Ram junction, when an Israeli van was stoned and the driver stopped suddenly. The two vehicles behind the van were unable to stop in time and crashed into it. An Israeli Arab was slightly injured by glass fragments when his vehicle was stoned in the Ramallah area. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 24 December 1992; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 24 December 1992; Al-Fajr, 28 December 1992)

89. On 24 December 1992, a resident of the West Bank was shot by masked men (see list). Eight residents of the Gaza Strip were shot and injured during clashes in Gaza City and in the Shati' and Deir el-Balah refugee camps. In el-Arroub near Hebron (or in Dura), soldiers opened fire at youths who were throwing stones after having ordered them to halt. Two 15-year-olds were injured, one of whom seriously. According to Palestinian sources, two other residents were injured by IDF shooting in Ramallah and in Hebron (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 28 December 1992). Two border policemen were hit by stones and slightly injured in the Gaza Strip. A fire-bomb was thrown at an "Egged" company bus at the A-Ram junction, north of Jerusalem. There were no injuries or damage. (Ha'aretz, and Jerusalem Post, 25 December 1992)

90. On 25 and 26 December 1992, a man from Dir Albasha, near Kabatiya, was murdered by an unknown assailant (see list). A boy was killed by soldiers in unclear circumstances in the Shati' refugee camp (see list) (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 4 January 1993). According to Palestinian sources, more than 25 residents of the Gaza Strip were injured in rioting while the army reported only five injuries. In Gaza City, four people were reportedly injured by plastic bullets fired by border policemen, during a procession staged to protest the expulsion. Four Israelis (both civilian and military) were injured by stones thrown at their vehicle in Beit Omar (north of Hebron), in Wad Joz and in East Jerusalem (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 28 December 1992). Near Ramallah, a border policeman narrowly escaped being run over by a car that drove through the roadblock he was manning. The vehicle managed to escape. A fire-bomb was thrown at border policemen in A-Tur but, did not cause any injuries or damage. Six cars were set on fire in eastern Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 27 December 1992)

91. On 27 December 1992, four or five Palestinians were lightly wounded by soldiers in clashes in the el-Bureij and Jabalia refugee camps in Gaza (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 4 January 1993). Except for a few disturbances and sporadic stone-throwing (in Khan Younis, Shati' and Shaboura), the Gaza area was relatively quiet. Three petrol bombs were thrown at an Israeli vehicle (1) in the Ramallah district, and at an IDF outpost (2) in Tubas village, in the Jenin district, without causing any harm. A tourist bus was stoned and the driver slightly injured in the center of Jericho. Four cars were set on fire in eastern Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 28 December 1992)

92. On 28 December 1992, a resident of the Gaza Strip was shot to death by masked men (see list). Two Palestinians were slightly-hurt as soldiers dispersed riots in the Jabalia refugee camp (a total of eight Palestinians were reportedly shot and injured). Three Palestinians were reportedly injured during incidents in the Khan Younis area (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 4 January 1993). An IDF lieutenant was shot and lightly wounded near the el-Bureij refugee camp when Palestinian gunmen ambushed his jeep. The other soldiers in the jeep fired back but the assailants managed to get away. A petrol bomb was thrown at a border police patrol in the A-Tur neighbourhood without causing harm. Soldiers were stoned in Gaza, but no one was injured. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 29 December 1992)

93. On 29 December 1992, a Rafah resident was shot dead (see list). Five residents were reportedly injured in the Gaza Strip and two in the West Bank. Stone-throwing incidents were reported in the refugee camps of the southern Gaza Strip, in Gaza City, in Ramallah and in Jenin. Soldiers fired in the air when an "Egged" company bus they were escorting was stoned in Hebron. Two Israeli cars were damaged by stones near Kochav Y'air, but no one was hurt. Shots were fired at an IDF patrol in the Kabatia area, in the Jenin district. No one was injured and no damage occurred. A woman from Gaza tried to stab a soldier and injured him. The woman was arrested. A petrol bomb was thrown at a military vehicle near the Balata refugee camp, in the Nablus district. Soldiers fired at the assailants. No one was injured. Two cars were set on fire in Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 30 December 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 4 January 1993)

94. On 30 December 1992, OC Southern Command Major-General Matan Vilnai announced that more than 100 wanted fugitives had been captured in the Gaza area in 1992. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 31 December 1992)

95. On 30 December 1992, two incidents of shooting at IDF patrols were reported, one in the Gaza Strip and one in the West Bank. There were no injuries or damage. Nine petrol bombs were thrown at IDF forces in Hebron (5) and in the Nablus area (2), and at an Israeli vehicle (2), west of Kfar Saba. They did not cause any injuries (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 3 January 1993). An IDF soldier was slightly injured by stones thrown at his vehicle in the Tulkarm area. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 31 December 1992)

96. On 30 December 1992, clashes were reported in el-Bireh and Ramallah. Several houses were damaged in Jericho, when soldiers threw burning tyres in the Al Khedewi neighbourhood. Petrol bombs had been thrown at military patrols in the same neighbourhood the previous day. (Al-Tali'ah, 31 December 1992)

97. On 31 December 1992, according to Palestinian sources, two residents were injured in Gaza City. Incidents were also reported in Khan Younis, Jabalia and Rafah where three residents were wounded. Disturbances in which stones thrown at Israeli vehicles were reported in Hebron. Stone-throwing incidents were also reported in the refugee camps of the West Bank. One resident of Ramallah was injured. (Ha'aretz, 1 January 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 11 January 1993)

98. On 1 and 2 January 1993, there were no disturbances in the Gaza district, which had been under full curfew since 30 December 1992, except for processions marking the "Fatah" Day held in the Shati', Muazzi, Jabalia and Khan Younis refugee camps where three persons were reportedly injured. Clashes with soldiers that did not result in any injuries were reported when dozens of youths staged a procession in the Askar and Balata refugee camps near Nablus. Flags were flown, rocks and bottles were thrown at IDF soldiers and tyres were burned during processions in Ramallah which were later dispersed. Three residents were wounded by army gunfire during demonstrations and processions in Nablus. Minor rioting broke out in the A-Tur and Abu Tor neighbourhoods in East Jerusalem. Police used tear-gas and rubber bullets to disperse the participants. No injuries were reported. In Tulkarm, soldiers shot and seriously injured an Arab driver who tried to flee in his vehicle after being ordered to. halt. A gas grenade used by the IDF was thrown at a police station in Ramallah. An Arab resident was possibly injured. Four cars were burned in East Jerusalem, in the East Talpiot and French Hill neighbourhoods. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 3 January 1993)

99. On 3 January 1993, a man who threw stones at an IDF jeep was shot and killed by the army (see list). The driver lost control over the vehicle and it turned over (the Al-Fajr newspaper reported on 11 January 1993 that 11 persons were shot and injured by random shooting). A woman was shot and injured by the IDF during the incident. Two Palestinians were also shot by masked men (see list). Haim Nahmani, 25, a GSS agent, was stabbed and beaten to death in a Jerusalem apartment serving as "safe house", where he apparently conducted operations for the Service. A Jewish carpenter was stabbed and injured on a building site in Holon, near Tel Aviv, apparently by an Arab labourer from Hebron. Ten Arab workers were arrested and questioned by the police. Some 20 persons were injured in the riots in the Gaza district (in the refugee camps of Rafah, Muazzi, Nuseirat and Shati' and in Gaza City, which followed the lifting of a four-day curfew (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 11 January 1993). In the West Bank, masked men burned the vehicle of a resident of Tayyiba who was driving workers home to the Balata refugee camp. Incidents were also reported in the refugee camps of the West Bank, in Ramallah and in Jenin. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 4 January 1993)

100. On 4 January 1993, a resident of Rafah was murdered by a gang belonging to the "Fatah Eagles" (see list). According to Palestinian sources, some 10 residents of the Gaza Strip were injured during clashes with the IDF (refugee camps of Jabalia: 3; of Muazzi and Nuseirat: 7). Two masked men were also reportedly injured by IDF fire in the Khan Younis area. A youth was badly injured in Khan Younis by masked men gunshots. Two boys, both aged about nine, and a man were lightly wounded by IDF gunfire in Kabatiya, near Jenin. They were injured when an IDF patrol returned fire. Clashes with the army were reported in the refugee camps of Nablus and Ramallah; one resident was injured. Two petrol bombs were thrown without causing any harm at a bus in Nablus. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 5 January 1993; also referred to in 11 January 1993)

101. On 5 January 1993, the body of an Arab man was found by the residents of Ramallah (see list). An Arab youth was wounded when soldiers quelled disturbances in the Shati' refugee camp. A 12-year-old girl was injured by glass fragments when the bus she was in was stoned on the road between Jerusalem and Neve Yaacov. Four fire-bombs were thrown at an "Egged" company bus and two additional fire-bombs were thrown at an IDF outpost in Hebron. No One was hurt in either case. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 6 January 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 7 January 1993)

102. On 5 January 1993, two explosive devices were thrown at a military patrol in Khan Younis. No injuries or damage were reported. Three Palestinians were shot and injured during clashes in the Jabalia refugee camp (2) and in Nablus (1). Similar clashes were also reported in Gaza City and in Khan Younis. In Ramallah, clashes occurred when soldiers raided shops in order to collect taxes from the merchants. (Al-Tali'ah, 7 January 1993; Al-Fajr, 11 January 1993)

103. On 6 January 1993, a Palestinian youth was shot dead by soldiers (see list) when an IDF patrol which entered Sair village, near Hebron, was attacked with bottles and stones. The soldiers opened fire. Three other youths were moderately wounded. According to different sources, between 5 and 20 persons were injured in clashes which took place in the Gaza Strip. Nine persons were injured in the Shati' refugee camp when soldiers fired rubber bullets to quell the disturbances, 10 persons were injured in Jabalia and 2 (or 3) in Gaza City. Two children were hospitalized after inhaling tear-gas in Gaza City. A home-made bomb was discovered near the Civil Administration building in Hebron (also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 7 January 1993). Two petrol bombs were thrown at an Israeli vehicle near the Brakha settlement in the Nablus district. The bombs exploded on the road without causing injuries or damage. A commercial strike was partially observed in the territories. (Ha'aretz, 7 and 8 January 1993, Jerusalem Post, 7 January 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 11 January 1993)

104. On 7 January 1993, it was reported that an important Hamas "terrorist" cell had been discovered by the General Security Service in Hebron but that many of the "terrorist group members belonging to Izzedin el-Kassam" were still at large. Some 22 members of this cell were arrested during a December crackdown on Hamas and Islamic Jihad activists. (Jerusalem Post, 7 January 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 7 January 1993)

105. On 7 January 1993, Palestinian sources reported several incidents in the refugee camps of the southern Gaza Strip (Khan Younis and Rafah), during which five residents were injured. An IDF patrol was shot at in the Jabalia refugee camp. Soldiers fired back but there were no injuries or damage. Disturbances were reported in which three (or six) residents were injured despite the curfew which was imposed on the camp. Four (or six) Israeli cars were set on fire in the Abu Tor neighbourhood of East Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz, 8 January 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 11 January 1993)

106. On 7 January 1993, a locally made explosive device was thrown at an Israeli military post in Deir el-Balah, (Gaza Strip). A bottle of acid was thrown at a military patrol in Kabatiya, near Jenin. The centre of the town was ordered closed following the incident. (Al-Fajr, 11 January 1993)

107. On 8 and 9 January 1993, five Arab residents of the Gaza district were killed over the weekend, apparently by other Palestinians (see list). Palestinian sources reported that some 14 residents were injured in the Gaza Strip in the Jabalia and Shati' refugee camps and in a number of Gaza City neighbourhoods. Military sources reported six injuries in the Gaza Strip. Two cars were burned in eastern Jerusalem, while the attempted burning of two additional cars failed. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 10 January 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 11, 18 January 1993)

108. On 10 January 1993, several clashes were reported in the Gaza Strip in the Jabalia refugee camp, in Khan Younis, in Shati' and in Gaza City. Eleven residents were injured by IDF shooting and eight were beaten. Palestinian sources reported incidents in the West Bank, in Ramallah, Nablus, Jenin and Hebron. Two residents were injured. A strike was observed in the Gaza Strip. (Ha'aretz, 11 January 1993)

109. On 11 January 1993, it was reported that at least 40 residents of West Bank villages were arrested following the murder of a GSS agent on 3 January 1993. Also on 11 January 1993, it was reported that, according to the Sha'ar Hanegev Regional Council, Head of the Shai Hermesh, some $5,700,000 worth of damage was done by hostile elements to State property and settlements bordering the Gaza district in 1992. Security officials in the region believed that the construction of a new fence along the Gaza border would allow for continual observation of the area by security forces and would thereby reduce the damage (Al-Fajr reported on 11 January 1993 that it would be possible to leave and enter the Gaza Strip only at the Erez checkpoint). Significantly, the 52 km-long fence would cost approximately $2,280,000. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 11 January 1993)

110. On 11 January 1993, a wanted fugitive was shot dead by security forces in the West Bank (see list). Another man was shot dead by other Palestinians in Gaza (see list). Three or four residents were wounded during disturbances in the Gaza Strip which occurred in the Jabalia refugee camp, in el-Bureij, in Khan Younis, in Shati' and in Rafah. A resident of the Deir Abu Mishal village, west of Ramallah, was wounded when soldiers fired at stone-throwers (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 18 January 1993). Shots were fired at an Israeli car in Gush Katif. No one was hurt and there was no damage. (Ha'aretz, 12 and 13 January 1993, Jerusalem Post, 13 January 1993)

111. On 11 January 1993, the Arabic daily Al-Ittihad published an account of the killing of wanted fugitive Iyad Samar in the village of Yamoun which contradicts the official version (see list). Arab newspapers contradicted this version stating that the man had surrendered to the soldiers when they fired at random, hitting him on various parts of his body. According to the Arab press, eyewitnesses stated that Samar was on his way to the village of Arqah, in the Jenin area. When he arrived at a military checkpoint, he got Out of his car and surrendered to the soldiers, who fired at random, hitting him on the legs, hands and other parts of the body. A military ambulance escorted by eight military vehicles subsequently arrived at the scene of the incident. Samar, who was bleeding, was taken to the military headquarters where he reportedly died one and a half hours later. (Al-Fajr, 18 January 1993)

112. On 12 January 1993, a vegetable merchant from Tel Aviv was stabbed and moderately wounded in Kalkilia by two youths carrying broken bottles (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 18 January 1993). An Israeli press photographer was roughed up by soldiers in the Shati' refugee camp, as he was taking pictures of children with slingshots. A resident of Beersheba was injured by stones in Gush Katif. An Israeli car was hit by an automatic gun causing slight damage as it drove past Kafr Aboud, north of Ramallah. No injuries were reported (these incidents have also been referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 14 January 1993). Twelve residents of the territories were injured during clashes with the IDF (Shati' refugee camp: 4; Jabalia refugee camp: 2; southern Gaza Strip: 4 and Ramallah: 2). Incidents were also reported in Jenin. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 13 January 1993)

113. On 12 January 1993, an Israeli man was lightly injured when his car was stoned in the el-Bureij refugee camp (Gaza Strip). Clashes which did not result in injuries were reported in Halhul, near Hebron. (Al-Fajr, 18 January 1993)

114. On 13 January 1993, four teenagers were shot and injured (two of whom seriously) by soldiers during a stone-throwing incident in Burka, near Nablus. According to Palestinian sources, at least two additional residents were injured in the incident. An IDF officer who was attacked in the Kalkilia market by an Arab armed with a knife, opened fire to defend himself, slightly injuring the assailant (also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 14 January 1993; Al-Fajr, 18 January 1993). Masked men tried to stab another man in the Gaza Strip. Four residents were injured during clashes in the Jabalia refugee camp. No major disturbances were reported in Gaza. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 14 January 1993)

115. On 13 January 1993, a Palestinian youth was shot and injured during a stone-throwing incident in Ramallah. Confrontations were also reported in Hebron and in Jenin. (Al-Fajr, 18 January 1993)

116. On 14 January 1993, a 14-year-old boy was killed (see list) and some 40 to 45 Palestinians were injured when soldiers opened fire to disperse rioters in Khan Younis. According to the army, the rioters threw 19 fire-bombs at soldiers. The clash began when troops carried out a raid during a memorial service for an Arab who had been killed by fellow Palestinians a month earlier (the Al-Fajr newspaper reported on 18 January 1993 that the aim of the raid was to search for wanted youths. The patrol reportedly fired rockets at a four-storey building, causing serious damage). A fugitive "Black Panthers" activist was shot dead (see list) when he tried to escape from undercover soldiers in the West Bank. Soldiers fired anti-tank rockets and threw grenades into a house after evacuating civilians in order to force a fugitive and a fellow gang member out of the house, which they were using as a hide-out. Another member of the "Black Panthers" who left the home with his hands raised was also arrested during the raid (these incidents have also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 18 January 1993). The incident sparked off a minor disturbance and resulted in a general strike in the Jenin area. A man from Gaza was killed by soldiers (see list) who were trying to capture wanted activists. An Israeli bus was stoned in Hebron. The driver was slightly injured by glass fragments when the windshield was smashed. Stones were thrown at soldiers in the Dheisheh refugee camp. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 15 January 1993; Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 17 January 1993)

117. On 15 and 16 January 1993, a man from Gaza stabbed and injured four people at the Central Bus Station in Tel Aviv before being shot by a Civil Guard volunteer (see list). A girl from Gaza was shot dead (see list) by soldiers during a stone-throwing incident allegedly as she was standing at the school entrance. Hundreds of residents rioted against the IDF in Jabalia and two were injured by army gunfire. Earlier in the day, 8 to 12 residents were injured during clashes. Several Palestinians were injured during disturbances in a number of other localities (Shati': 2, Khan Younis and Rafah: 5) (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 25 January 1993). Masked activists forced Arab workers to get off a bus near Hebron, and proceeded to burn the vehicle. Earlier on, not far from this site, an Arab man was injured when the bus he and other Arab workers were taking to their jobs in Israel was stoned by masked youths (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 18 January 1993). Several petrol bombs were thrown at an IDF patrol (1) in Abu Dis; at a border police base (2) in Kalkilia; at a bus carrying tourists (1) near Ma'aleh Adumim and at an Arab resident's home (3) in the Bethlehem district. No injuries or damage were reported in any of the incidents. Two vehicles were set on fire in East Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 17 January 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 16 January 1993)

118. On 17 January 1993, troops shot and killed a 14-year-old boy during demonstrations staged in the Shati' refugee camp (see list) to mark a general strike that had been called by the Hamas movement to protest the deportation of Islamic activists. When news. of the boy's death had spread, hundreds of persons emerged from the camp's alley-ways and soldiers withdrew behind barriers made up of barrels filled with stones. Eleven young men were reportedly wounded in the incident. Five other residents were also injured during clashes with the army in Gaza, Khan Younis and Jabalia. More than 1,000 demonstrators marched in order to express their solidarity with the deportees in the Sheikh Radwan neighbourhood. An IDF jeep escorting an "Egged" company bus was fired at south of Hebron (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 25 January 1993). The soldiers returned fire. No one was hurt. An "Egged" company bus was stoned in East Jerusalem and the driver slightly injured. Two Petrol bombs were thrown at an Israeli vehicle north of Ramallah. An Israeli car was set on fire in East Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 18 January 1993)

119. On 18 January 1993, two Palestinians, one of whom was a minor, died in hospital from wounds sustained during demonstrations staged earlier in the day by Hamas in the Shati' refugee camp in Gaza (see list). Sixteen Palestinian residents were wounded during clashes with the army (Gaza Strip: 14, Ramallah: 2). Palestinian sources reported disturbances in the Shati' and Jabalia refugee camps, in Khan Younis and in Gaza City. Two petrol bombs were thrown at an Israeli vehicle near the el-Arroub refugee camp without causing harm. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 19 January 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 25 January 1993)

120. On 19 January 1993, a 14-year-old boy was killed by shots fired from an Israeli civilian car after it was stoned in Gaza City (see list). Following the death of the youth, serious clashes erupted in the neighbourhood where the incident had occurred. Two or three residents and a 10-year-old boy were reportedly injured in the Nuseirat refugee camp. A security guard was shot in the face by an Arab assailant in the office of a Beit Sahur gas station (also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 21 January 1993). Shots were fired at IDF troops patrolling the Egyptian border from the Rafah refugee camp. The jeep was damaged but no one was hurt. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 20 January 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 25 January 1993)

121. On 20 January 1993, some 30 residents of the territories were injured during clashes with troops. Arab sources reported violent clashes in the refugee camp of Jabalia (14 or 25 injuries), in the Nuseirat refugee camp (10 injuries), in the Rimal neighbourhood of Gaza (4 injuries) and in the refugee camp of el-Bureij (2 injuries). Two fire-bombs were thrown at an Israeli vehicle near Deir Istiya, in the Tulkarm district. No injuries were reported. Incidents took place in the refugee camps of the West Bank, in Ramallah and Jenin. An explosive charge was thrown at a gas station near the A-Ram junction, north of Jerusalem. There were no injuries or damage. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 21 January 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 25 January 1993)

122. On 20 January 1993, a Palestinian died from wounds sustained on 1 January 1993 (see list). Armed youths opened fire at an Israeli vehicle near the Haja settlement, in the Dura area (Hebron), and an incendiary bottle was thrown at another Israeli vehicle as it passed the Daniel settlement near Al Khedr (Bethlehem). (Al-Tali'ah, 21 January 1993)

123. On 21 January 1993, clashes occurred in almost all the refugee camps in the territories. Palestinian sources reported that five residents were injured by the army in the refugee camps of Jabalia and Khan Younis. Two residents were injured by IDF shooting in Nablus. The IDF spokesman reported that the two residents had been wounded by the border police in Jenin after a stone-throwing incident. A third resident was slightly injured while trying to escape. According to Arab sources, five residents were injured during this incident. The same sources also reported processions in Ramallah and Jenin, and clashes in Hebron. An Israeli vehicle was stoned and its driver slightly injured by glass fragments near a gas station, in Dheisheh. A petrol bomb was thrown at a police station in the center of Ramallah, without causing any harm. (Ha'aretz, 22 January 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 25 January 1993)

124. On 21 January 1993, Israeli soldiers beat and arrested at least four journalists who were covering the clashes in the Jabalia refugee camp. Their films and cameras were confiscated. A Molotov cocktail was thrown at a military vehicle near Allar, in the Tulkarm area. No damage was reported. Settlers' cars were stoned in the village of Ain Arik, near Ramallah. One settler was reportedly injured. Soldiers looking for stone-throwers broke into the houses in the village. In nearby Deir Ibzi and Al Janieh, soldiers went on a rampage breaking windows and smashing the windshields of cars. (Al-Fajr, 25 January 1993)

125. On 22 and 23 January 1993, a resident of the West Bank was killed when soldiers fired at stone-throwers (see list). Between 11 and 35 people were wounded, I of whom critically, in demonstrations in Jabalia to protest the death of a man from tear-gas inhalation (see list). Between 29 and 70 persons were injured in protests over the weekend. The IDF indicated that troops had wounded 29 persons during weekend demonstrations in the Jabalia, Khan Younis and el-Bureij refugee camps. Palestinians indicated that the figure between 51 and 70 persons had been wounded, including in localities such as Rafah, in the Sheikh Radwan neighbourhood and in the Shati' refugee camp. Two persons were reportedly injured during clashes in the West Bank. A 25- or 26-year-old Palestinian, Isa Masalma, was hospitalized with a serious gunshot wound in the chest inflicted by a soldier whose car was stoned by Arabs in East Jerusalem (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 25 January 1993, 1 February 1993). A 10-month-old baby girl required hospitalization after being injured by fragments of glass in East Jerusalem, when the car she was in was stoned. (Ha'aretz, 24 January 1993, Jerusalem Post, 24, 25, 26 January 1993)

126. On 24 January 1993, security forces in Gaza captured two armed fugitives who fired at an army patrol from a moving car. Both were shot and wounded. A third man managed to escape. Clashes took place in the Jabalia refugee camp and in Gaza City. According to Palestinian sources, soldiers used tear-gas and plastic bullets to break tip the disturbances. Between 3 and 14 residents are said to have been lightly injured in Jabalia. The army reported that three persons had been injured in the Gaza Strip. Two persons were injured in Ramallah. A petrol bomb was thrown at an army unit in Hebron near Beit Romano. There were no injuries or damage. A commercial strike was partially observed in Gaza City. (Ha'aretz, 25 and 26 January 1993; Jerusalem Post, 25 January 1993)

127. On 24 January 1993, several clashes in the Jenin area during which two soldiers were stoned and injured were reported. A Molotov cocktail was thrown at an Israeli bus in Shi'fat, north of Jerusalem. (Al-Fajr, 1 February 1993)

128. On 25 January 1993, soldiers shot and wounded between 7 and 15 people during demonstrations in the Jabalia refugee camp in the Gaza Strip. Local sources, who estimated the number of wounded at 15, indicated that 10 among them were under 16 years of age. A 17-year-old youth was seriously wounded by a rubber bullet during demonstrations in Gaza City. Three persons were reportedly wounded by IDF shooting during clashes in the village of Beita and in the Balata refugee camp in the Nablus area. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 26 January 1993)

129. On 25 January 1993, Radio Israel reported that shots were fired at a military patrol from a local car near the Jabalia refugee camp. Soldiers shot back, injuring two of the car's passengers who managed to escape. (Al-Fajr, 1 February 1993)

130. On 26 January 1993, 13 people were reportedly shot and injured by soldiers in various parts of the Gaza Strip. In Gaza, an Israeli settler was stoned and injured in the head near Beit Lahia. The settler was taken to hospital for treatment. Five petrol bombs were thrown at Israeli vehicles in the West Bank: in the Ramallah area (4), in Shufat (1). A truck was slightly damaged. The driver of an Israeli bus was wounded lightly when he was hit by stones near the Rafidya neighbourhood of Nablus. (Al-Fajr, 1 February 1993)

131. On 27 January 1993, troops killed a man who pulled out a pistol while trying to run away from them in Gaza City (see list). A 17-year-old youth was shot in Nablus when he threw stones at an Israeli bus and ignored subsequent orders to halt. A resident was injured by IDF shooting in Ramallah. Palestinian sources indicated that 8 (or 20) residents were injured in the Jabalia refugee camp, Khan Younis and Shati' in the Gaza Strip. The IDF did not report any injuries in the Gaza Strip. Two petrol bombs were thrown at an "Egged" company bus in the area of Ramallah, and at the vehicle of a resident of el-Bireh. A youth was wounded by glass fragments in the second attack. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 28 January 1993; these incidents have also been referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 28 January 1993; Al-Fajr, 1 February 1993)

132. On 27 January 1993, the testimony of a Palestinian eyewitness contradicted the Israeli version of the killing of Omar Khamis Ghouleh in Gaza. According to the eyewitness, Israeli soldiers beat and arrested Ghouleh, who was not armed and offered no resistance. After dragging the man into the street, they opened fire and shot him first in the lower part of the body, then in the upper part and finally in the head. The Israelis claimed that Ghouleh was about to open fire at soldiers when they shot him dead. Stones and empty bottles were thrown at a military outpost in the Nur Shams refugee camp. No one was injured. Clashes between soldiers and Palestinian pupils were reported in Bethlehem. Israeli cars were stoned in Jericho. An Israeli car was set on fire in Jerusalem. Two Molotov cocktails were thrown at a military patrol in Hebron. Two wanted youths were reportedly arrested in Jenin while a third one was arrested in the village of Yamoun, near Jenin. (Al-Tali'ah, 28 January 1993; Al-Fajr, 1 February 1993)

133. On 28 January 1993, several stone-throwing incidents were reported in Nablus, Ramallah, Jerusalem, Hebron and in the Jenin refugee camp. Two Israelis were lightly wounded. In Jerusalem, an Israeli car was set on fire. (Al-Fajr, 1 February 1993)

134. On 29 January 1993, six Palestinians were shot and injured in Khan Younis during violent demonstrations. One of the injured was an 11-year-old boy. Three Palestinians sustained gunshot wounds in Rafah. (Al-Fajr, 1 February 1993)

135. On 29 and 30 January 1993, a soldier threw a stun grenade at an Israeli television crew that had come to Hebron to record the reactions of Palestinians to decision of the High Court concerning deportees. According to Palestinian sources, 13 residents of the territories were injured in different clashes (Gaza City: 2; Khan Younis; 12; Jabalia refugee camp: 6; Rafah: 4 and Hebron: 1). A wanted fugitive shot at an IDF patrol in Khan Younis. The IDF fired back. The assailant managed to escape. A petrol bomb was thrown at an IDF patrol near Beit Romano, in Hebron. There were no injuries or damage. Clashes were also reported in Ramallah and Jenin (these incidents have also been referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 1 February 1992). Also on 29 and 30 January 1993, two soldiers, Arik Arfi and Suleiman al-Hul, a Bedouin tracker, were killed and a third soldier was lightly wounded when Hamas gunmen opened fire at an IDF jeep patrolling the Jewish settlement of Ganei Tal, near Khan Younis. The assailants managed to escape. The passengers of a vehicle opened fire at an IDF post in the Jabalia refugee camp. No one was hurt. The attackers managed to escape. Arab sources reported that a five-year-old girl was shot and wounded in the ear when troops opened fire on persons breaking the curfew in Jabalia. Between 9 and 13 other Palestinians were reportedly wounded by gunfire or beating during clashes in the source refugee camp. Two additional persons were wounded in Gaza City during stone-throwing incidents. Arab sources reported clashes in the refugee camps of Khan Younis and Shati' as well as in Ramallah and Jenin where four people were injured. A resident of Kfar Samaria, in the Tulkarm district, was badly injured by masked men. His brother was also slightly injured. Two Israeli cars were burned and a truck was stoned in East Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 29, 31 January 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 8 February 1993)

136. On 31 January 1993, it was reported that two Arab-Americans, believed to be high-ranking Hamas activists in the United States (Mohammed Jarad, 36, and Mohammed Salah, 40), were arrested in Israel a week earlier by the General Security Service. They were suspected of distributing hundreds of thousands of dollars in an effort to rebuild the organization in the territories. Large sums of money in cash, lists of activists and plans for "terrorist" attacks were found in the possession of the two persons. Security agents also arrested more than 40 Palestinians thought to be high-ranking Hamas activists. A third Arab-American has reportedly also been arrested. (Ha'aretz, 31 January 1993, Jerusalem Post, 1 February 1993)

137. On 31 January 1993, two residents of Nablus were shot dead by IDF soldiers (see list) when they tried to bypass a checkpoint. The driver, who was injured, managed to escape. According to Palestinian sources, five residents were injured during clashes in the Gaza Strip (Jabalia refugee camp: 2; Khan Younis, Muazzi and Shati' refugee camps: 3) Stone-throwing incidents were reported in Ramallah, Hebron and Jenin. Two petrol bombs were thrown in Samuah village, in the Hebron district, and one was thrown at an Israeli bus near the el-Arroub refugee camp. There were no injuries or damage in either incident. An Israeli vehicle was stoned and an Israeli man slightly injured in the area of Jericho. An Israeli bus was stoned and damaged in East Jerusalem. A woman passenger was slightly wounded. Three Israeli cars were burned in Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 1 February 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 8 February 1993)

138. On 1 February 1993, two residents of the Jenin area were shot dead by the IDF (see list) as they tried to drive away when soldiers ordered them to stop. The driver of the vehicle managed to escape but bloodstains on the road showed that he was wounded. A young resident of Gaza died of wounds sustained three days earlier during clashes with the IDF (see list) (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 2 February 1993). Clashes with the IDF were reported in the refugee camps of Jabalia and Khan Younis and five residents were injured. Incidents also took place in the el-Bureij refugee camp, in Khan Younis and in Gaza. In the West Bank, incidents occurred in Ramallah, Jenin and Hebron. A car was burned in East Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 2 February 1993)

139. On 2 February 1993, a hand-made explosive device was found near the Tel Rumeida neighbourhood in Hebron. The device was deactivated without causing harm. (Jerusalem Post, 3 February 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 8 February 1993)

140. On 3 February 1993, Uri Dromi, Director of the Government Press Office, reported that the 40 suspected Hamas activists who were arrested during the past week, "were more important" than the deportees "from a functional point of view", as they had closer links to the actual murders of Sgt. Maj. Nissim Toledano. The arrest of the 40 activists followed the arrest of 2 Palestinian-Americans. (Jerusalem Post, 3 February 1993)

141. On 3 February 1993, an 85-year-old man, Shalom Vashdi, was found clubbed to death in his home in Tel Aviv. Hot houses at Moshav Nizanei Oz were vandalized and graffiti written claiming that the act had been committed by the Hamas movement. (Ha'aretz, 5 February 1993; Jerusalem Post, 4 and 21 February 1993). Also on 3 February, stones were thrown at military patrols in the city of Jenin. In the Jenin refugee camp, soldiers used live ammunition and tear-gas to disperse demonstrators. Several houses were raided by soldiers who were allegedly in search of wanted persons in Kabatiya and in the villages of Burkin, Jalkamus and Moghayer. Confrontations with residents were also reported in these localities. (Al-Fajr, 8 February 1993)

142. On 4 February 1993, an Israeli woman suffered moderate injuries when she was hit by stones while riding in an army vehicle near Ramallah. Assailants also threw a fire-bomb at a private car that was driving in front of the army vehicle. Another fire-bomb was thrown at an army patrol in downtown Ramallah. Several shots were fired at an IDF patrol in Gaza. Two women fled their vehicle in East Jerusalem after being stoned by Arab youths, who later set the abandoned car on fire. Another Israeli vehicle was torched in East Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz, 5 and 7 February 1993; Jerusalem Post, 5 February 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 8 February 1993)

143. On 5 and 6 February 1993, six Palestinians died in weekend violence in the Gaza Strip, three of whom were gunmen shot by soldiers at a roadblock while three others were shot in demonstrations that erupted afterwards (see list). In the disturbances in the el-Bureij, Nusseirat, Rafah and Jabalia refugee camps, the IDF reported 21 wounded, of whom 18 were released from hospitals after treatment. Palestinian sources reported that 53 to 55 persons had been wounded. Two border policemen were slightly wounded by stones in Jabalia. Also in Jabalia soldiers fired regular bullets after rioters threw large bricks and iron bars at them. In the West Bank, four residents were injured in Jenin and Ramallah. Three petrol bombs were thrown at Israeli vehicles, one near Yabed village and two in Hebron. There were no injuries or damage. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 7 February 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 8 February 1993)

144. On 7 February 1993, border policemen shot and killed an Arab teenager during rioting in the Shuaat refugee camp in northern Jerusalem (see list). During clashes in the el-Bureij and Jabalia refugee camps and in Gaza, Palestinians reported that 14 persons were wounded while the army stated that only 3 persons had been hurt. A 17 year old was shot and badly wounded in Nablus after youths threw stones at soldiers and a 15 year old was slightly wounded in Jenin in a similar incident. Two grenades were thrown at an Israeli bus at Beit Jalla. No one was injured and there was no damage. A petrol bomb was thrown into the courtyard of a house in East Talpiot (eastern Jerusalem), without causing harm. Stones and a bottle of acid were thrown at an IDF jeep in Hebron (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 15 February 1993). Soldiers opened fire but no one was injured. A man was injured when his car was stoned in eastern Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 8 February 1993)

145. On 8 February 1993, troops shot and killed three teenagers following disturbances in the villages of Tubas and Tamoun, in the West Bank (see list). During the incident in Tubas, another youth was also hit in the leg. In the Gaza Strip, between 6 and 15 people were injured in confrontations (in the Jabalia, Khan Younis, Shati', el-Bureij and Nuseirat refugee camps and in Gaza City). Two additional residents were injured in Ramallah . Three fire-bombs were thrown at military vehicles near the village of Na'alin west of Ramallah (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 15 February 1993). Fire-bombs were also thrown at an IDF vehicle escorting an "Egged" company bus on the road linking Kiryat Arba and Hebron and at a civilian car near the village of Kuchin in the Nablus area. No injuries or damage were reported. A grenade was thrown and exploded near a border police jeep at the Erez checkpoint in the Gaza Strip. The explosion damaged the vehicle of a resident of the Gaza Strip. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 9 February 1993)

146. On 9 February 1993, a vegetable wholesaler from Holon, Yehezkiel Avraham, 50, was shot dead by four or five masked men near Khan Younis, in a bedouin agricultural area. The attackers managed to escape. Two residents of Rafah were shot dead by masked men (see list). Hothouses at Moshav Shadmot Mehda, in the Jordan Valley, were badly damaged. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 10 and 11 February 1993). Also on 9 February, a general strike was observed throughout the occupied territories in order to mark the beginning of the sixty-third month of the intifadah. At least five persons were reportedly shot and injured in the el-Bureij refugee camp when youths-pelted soldiers with stones. A Molotov cocktail was thrown at a military patrol in Khan Younis. No damage was reported. (Al-Fajr, 15 February 1993)

147. On 10 February 1993, soldiers shot dead two (masked) youths in the Gaza Strip (see list). After the shooting, disturbances erupted in the Deir el-Balah and Nusseirat refugee camps, where between 4 and 44 people were injured by IDF shooting, according to different sources. In Silwad, near Ramallah, four (or seven) youths were wounded by army gunshots, one of whom seriously, when a patrol came across stone-throwers who refused to stop when ordered to do so. Police fired tear-gas and rubber bullets in order to quell unrest in East Jerusalem. One person was slightly injured. The rioting broke out after police had detained a handicapped youth who stoned an "Egged" company bus. A crowd gathered subsequently and began throwing stones while youths set fire to tyres and threw metal bars, blocks and stones. The rioters damaged four vehicles (these incidents have also been referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 11 February 1993). An Israeli truck was stoned and its driver slightly injured by glass fragments in the Nablus area. A petrol bomb was thrown at an IDF patrol in the Ramallah district. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 11 February 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 15 February 1993)

148. On 10 February 1993, fierce clashes were reported in the Jabalia refugee camp and in Khan Younis. At least 35 persons were shot and injured. Three Israeli cars were attacked with Molotov cocktails in the Jerusalem area. No damage was reported. One settler was injured by a stone north of Jerusalem. (Al-Fajr, 15 February 1993)

149. On 11 February 1993, a resident of Deir el-Balah was shot dead by masked men (see list). During an operation in Barta'a village, near Jenin, which is located on both sides of the Green Line, soldiers opened fire when three members of a wanted fugitive's family threw stones at troops and wounded one man in the leg. Some 10 residents were injured during the breaking-up of demonstrations in the refugee camps of el-Bureij, Nusseirat and Jabalia. An IDF jeep was stoned in the Jabalia refugee camp and soldiers responded by firing rubber bullets. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 12 February 1993)

150. On 12 February 1993, it was reported that following the arrest of 2 Palestinian-Americans in late December, more than 50 Palestinians had been arrested on suspicion of maintaining close links to Hamas "terrorists". (Jerusalem Post, 12 February 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 8 February 1993)

151. On 12 and 13 February 1993, a soldier was shot in the chest by gunmen believed to be Hamas supporters, as he was driving in a civilian car in Gaza City. The same gunmen fired from their own car at an army jeep shortly afterwards, narrowly missing the driver who was slightly wounded by glass splinters. The assailants managed to escape (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 15 February 1993). Six (to 35) residents of the Gaza Strip were injured during clashes with the IDF (Khan Younis: 2; Gaza City: 4) (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 22 February 1993). Two additional residents were injured in Ramallah and Jenin. Sporadic unrest which broke out in eastern Jerusalem left a tourist slightly injured while four Israeli vehicles were burned. The IDF reported that border police heard shots in Khan Younis and that minutes later an activated grenade was found near a border police post. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 14 February 1993)

152. On 14 February 1993, a 16-year-old boy was shot dead by soldiers in the West Bank (see list). Two other persons were injured in the incident when stones were thrown at an army patrol. Between two and eight people were reported wounded in Gaza during the dispersal of demonstrations and nine others during clashes with the IDF, in the refugee camps of Jabalia, Shati' and Maghazi. Gunmen opened fire from a car at a Jewish couple that was driving from Kiryat Arba to Jerusalem. Both the man and the woman were wounded (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 22 February 1993). Two Arab-Israelis reported that shots were fired at them in the southern Gaza Strip. A car was burned in eastern Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz,Jerusalem Post, 15 February 1993)

153. On 15 February 1993, Yehezkel Mizrahi, 35, was fatally stabbed and two other persons injured by an Arab assailant, as they waited at a bus stop in East Talpiot, in eastern Jerusalem. A Palestinian detainee was found hanging in his cell in Beersheba prison (see list). A Jewish baby girl was seriously injured when her family's car was stoned at the A-Ram junction in northern Jerusalem. According to Palestinian sources, six residents of the Gaza Strip were injured during clashes with the IDF in Khan Younis and the Jabalia, Maghazi and Shati' refugee camps. Clashes were also reported in Ramallah and Jenin. A 20-year-old masked youth was shot and injured by the IDF in Slafit, in the Nablus district, after he reportedly refused to obey orders to halt. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 16 February 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 22 February 1992)

154. On 16 February 1993, a security guard, Izhar Mantzur, 23, was shot to death at the Arka factory in Petah Tikva. He may have been killed for nationalistic reasons. An Arab girl from Azariya stabbed a policeman near the Temple Mount, but his protective jacket kept him from sustaining serious injuries. Three residents of the Gaza Strip were reportedly injured during clashes. Incidents during which no injuries were reported took place in the Jabalia refugee camp, in Shati', in Khan Younis and in the West Bank (Jenin, Ramallah and Hebron). (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 17 February 1993)

155. On 16 February 1993, the car of the former Likud minister David Levy was stoned and attacked with iron bars in Jericho. According to Israeli sources, the driver was slightly injured. In Jabalia (Gaza Strip), a Molotov cocktail was thrown at a military patrol. No damage was reported. (Al-Fajr, 22 February 1993)

156. On 16 February 1993, an armed, wanted Arab fugitive, Ussama Haled Silawi, 20, of Jenin, reported to be the commander of the "Black Panthers" gang in Jenin, was caught. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 17 February 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 22 February 1993)

157. On 17 February 1993, Palestinians claimed that soldiers shot dead a 13-year-old boy in the West Bank (see list). A masked youth was killed (see list) and three others were wounded in the Askar refugee camp when they ignored orders to surrender. In Nablus, Malek Itilal Abdo, a 15-year-old boy, was wounded in the stomach by soldiers who opened fire at stone-throwers. According to Palestinian sources, five other residents were also injured during the incident. Palestinians reported that five residents were injured by IDF shooting during clashes in the refugee camps of the Gaza Strip (Jabalia, Khan Younis, Shati' and Nuseirat). A petrol bomb was thrown at a military vehicle in Araba village, in the Jenin district. The bomb exploded on the road. A strike was observed throughout the territories to mark the second month since the deportation of Islamic activists to Lebanon. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 18 February 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 18 February 1993; Al-Fajr, 22 February 1993)

158. On 17 February 1993, an incendiary bottle was thrown at a military patrol in the Jabalia refugee camp. No damage was reported. The Israeli authorities searched the area. (Al-Tali'ah, 18 February 1993)

159. On 18 February 1993, it was reported that the Jerusalem police detained a gang of Arab high school students from the A-Ram area, thought to be responsible for dozens of stonings. Six-students between the ages of 14 and 17 from A-Ram and Ramallah have been detained so far. (Jerusalem Post, 18 February 1993)

160. On 18 February 1993, soldiers shot dead two Palestinians near Tulkarm and in Gaza City (see list) and seriously wounded a third youth during the Gaza incident, while trying to arrest suspects who fled when ordered to stop. Disturbances in which five persons were reportedly injured erupted in the Gaza Strip after the incident. A total of 12 residents of the territories were reportedly injured. A 21-year-old youth was injured by IDF shooting in the Balata refugee camp, after masked men threw stones at an IDF patrol. There were serious clashes in all the refugee camps of the Gaza Strip as well as in the main cities of the West Bank. Two petrol bombs were thrown at an Israeli vehicle near Yabed village, in the Jenin district. There was no damage or injuries. A general strike was full observed in the Gaza Strip and partially in the West Bank, to mark the second month since the deportation. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 19 February 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 22 February 1993)

161. On 18 February 1993, a Molotov cocktail was thrown at a military car in the town of Beitunia, near Ramallah. No damage was reported. An Israeli car was set on fire in Jerusalem and was destroyed completely. (Al-Fajr, 22 February 1993)

162. On 19 and 20 February 1993, 1 Palestinian was killed (see list) and 7 to 14 others were injured in the territories over the weekend. Violent clashes with the army were reported in the Gaza Strip, in the refugee camps of Jabalia, Khan Younis, Shati and Rafah and in Gaza City. A Jewish man was slightly injured by three residents of East Jerusalem who managed to escape. Two Arab women and a small Arab girl were attacked by Jewish youths while waiting at a bus stop in Jebel Mukaber (eastern Jerusalem). Three fire-bombs were thrown in the Balata refugee camp at a vehicle which belongs to the Civil Administration. No one was injured and no damage occurred. The occupants of the car responded by firing at the assailants. A hand-grenade was thrown at an IDF post in el-Bireh, near Ramallah. An explosive charge went off near an IDF patrol in the Rafah area. Arab youths threw battles and stones at a border police patrol on the Nablus road. Between six and eight vehicles were burned in Jerusalem, including one which was apparently set on fire by Jewish extremists, in retaliation for the "terrorist" attacks perpetrated in East Talpiot on 15 February 1993. An Israeli bus carrying workers to their job was completely burned by masked men near Khan Younis. (Ha'aretz, 21 and 23 February 1993; Jerusalem Post, 21 February 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 22 February 1993 and 1 March 1993)

163. On 21 February 1993, Palestinian sources reported that three were injured by IDF shooting in Ramallah and Jenin (or Nablus) during stone-throwing incidents. According to the same sources, clashes took place in all the refugee camps of the Gaza Strip where nine residents were injured by IDF shooting (Jabalia refugee camp: 4; Khan Younis: 2; Rafah: 3). The IDF spokesman did not report any injuries. During the incident in Nablus a one-year-old girl and a young pregnant woman were wounded when soldiers fired at stone-throwers (also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 25 February 1993). A passenger was lightly wounded in the leg when an "Egged" company bus travelling on the Trans-Samaria highway was struck by several bullets (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 1 March 1993). A fire-bomb was thrown at an IDF post in the Tulkarm refugee camp but exploded harmlessly on the road without causing harm. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 22 February 1993)

164. On 21 February 1993, a Molotov cocktail was thrown at a Jewish house in the Old City of Jerusalem while another one was thrown at a military patrol in Khan Younis. Two additional incendiary bottles were thrown at a military car in Hebron. No casualties were reported. A bomb exploded in Rafah (Gaza Strip) when a military patrol passed by it. (Al-Fajr, 1 February 1993)

165. On 22 February 1993, four residents of the Gaza Strip were injured (Jabalia refugee camp: 2; Shati refugee camp: 2). Two fire-bombs were thrown at an IDF patrol in Hebron. They caused no damage or injury. Soldiers fired in the direction of the attackers and searched the area. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 23 February 1993). Also on 22 February, a youth was shot and injured by soldiers in Tulkarm refugee camp. An Israeli car was stoned by youths near Kalkilia. Two Molotov cocktails were thrown at military patrols in Jerusalem. An Israeli car was also set on fire in the city. (Al-Fajr, 1 March 1993)

166. On 23 February 1993, a local resident was shot to death by soldiers and 17 other persons were injured during disturbances in Rafah (see list). In Khan Younis, two border policemen and six Palestinians were injured during riots (these incidents have also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 1 March 1993). Disturbances, mostly consisting of stone-throwing at soldiers, were reported in the refugee camps of the Gaza Strip (Jabalia, Khan Younis and Shati') and in Nablus and Ramallah. Seven people were allegedly injured in the Shati' refugee camp and two in Ramallah. A border policeman was stoned and injured in eastern Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 24 February 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 25 February 1993)

167. On 24 February 1993, six residents of the Dheisheh refugee camp near Bethlehem were injured, four of whom by IDF fire, while two were injured in a brawl between rival clans. Palestinian sources reported stone-throwing incidents in Gaza and in the refugee camps of the Gaza Strip. A fire-bomb was thrown at an Israeli car in Hebron without causing harm. Clashes were reported in Jenin, Ramallah and Nablus. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 25 February 1993)

168. On 24 February 1993, a number of wanted youths were arrested in the cities of Rafah and Khan Younis. According to Israeli sources, the youths have been charged with attacking military targets and executing collaborators. (Al-Fajr, 1 March 1993)

169. On 25 February 1993, local sources announced that eight residents were wounded in demonstrations in the Khan Younis refugee camp. Five other residents of the Gaza Strip were reportedly also injured in Gaza and Jabalia. Two soldiers were reportedly also hurt in the incident. Soldiers shot and seriously wounded a 15-year-old youth during a stoning incident in Beit Fajar, near Bethlehem. Gunmen ambushed a police van in Gaza City, firing two bullets at the windshield and back fender of the vehicle. Neither of the two policemen in the van was hurt. The assailants managed to escape. A Yeshiva student was stabbed and lightly injured by an Arab youth in East Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 26 February 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 1 March 1993)

170. On 26 and 27 February 1993, six people were killed in the Gaza Strip over the weekend (see list). Hava Wechsberg, 11, of Kiriyat Arba, died two days after the car she was riding in had plunged down a hill in Gush Etzion, apparently following a stoning attack. Palestinian sources reported numerous clashes in which several persons were injured in the Gaza Strip (Jabalia refugee camp: 4; el-Bureij refugee camp: 3; Khan Younis: 2; Gaza: 1). In Akrabe, in the Nablus area, soldiers wounded two men during clashes following the arrest of a fugitive in an operation conducted by undercover troops. An Arab girl was injured when the car she was riding in was stoned in northern Hebron. A border policeman was stabbed and lightly injured while directing traffic in East Jerusalem (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 1 March 1993). Two guards were attacked and injured by a worker from Gaza at the Yivulim packing plant at Moshav Pardesya, in the Sharon region. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 28 February 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 8 March 1993)

171. On 28 February 1993, a man from Gaza, who had been wounded by border police gunfire several days earlier, died of his wounds (see list). Two residents of the Gaza Strip were murdered (see list). Several shots were reportedly fired at an "Egged" company bus near the Askar refugee camp in Nablus. An Israeli Arab woman was moderately injured when the taxi in which she was riding was stoned near Bethlehem. Five residents of the Gaza Strip were reportedly injured during clashes (Gaza: 3, Jabalia refugee camp: 2). Two petrol bombs were thrown harmlessly at an Israeli vehicle in el-Bireh and at an IDF outpost in Kalkilia, without causing harm. In Nablus, an IDF patrol was stoned and a border policeman was slightly injured. A bus was burned by masked men at the Sajaya junction in Gaza. A general strike was observed in the Gaza Strip. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 1 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 8 March 1993)

172. On 1 March 1993, Natan Azaria and Gregory Avramov died in a "terrorist" attack when a resident of Gaza who was armed with a commando knife and a smaller dagger ran amok on one of Tel Aviv's busiest streets (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 8 March 1993). The attacker managed to injure nine other persons before being beaten to the ground by an angry crowd. Two attacks were reported by bus drivers in the territories: one driver informed the IDF that shots were fired at his bus as he drove to the south of Jenin, while the second driver reported that a fire-bomb was thrown at his bus as it passed near the Deheishe refugee camp, near Bethlehem. No damage was caused in either incident. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 2 March 1993)

173. On 1 March 1993, soldiers shot several gas canisters at the secondary school for boys in Bethlehem, causing the suffocation of several students. Students were also attacked by soldiers armed with clubs. Several houses were raided in the town of Beit Arik, near Ramallah, and three persons were arrested. Several youths were beaten by soldiers during the incident. In Hebron, Muslim worshippers were forced by soldiers to clean streets and move barriers. Soldiers stationed on the roof of a house threw stones and rotten eggs at neighbouring houses. Six incendiary bottles were thrown at military targets: two at a car in the village of Deir Ibzi, and four at a patrol in Hebron. (Al-Fajr, 8 March 1993)

174. On 2 March 1993, a Tel Aviv accountant, Yehoshua Weissbrod, was murdered by Palestinians after he turned by mistake into the southern Gaza district town of Rafah. (According to other sources, Israeli Radio reportedly announced that Weissbrod had arranged a meeting with a Palestinian in Rafah). An Arab resident of Jerusalem was shot dead a few metres away from his home by an Israeli driving through the neighbourhood in Jerusalem (see list). An Israeli driver dropping off an Arab worker in Issawiya, an Arab neighbourhood of Jerusalem, opened fire on stone-throwers, damaging several cars. No one was hurt. Several shots were fired at the vehicle of a resident of Beit Haggai near the settlement. A stun grenade was thrown at an IDF outpost in Nablus without causing any harm. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 3 and 4 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 4 March 1993; Al-Fajr, 8 March 1993)

175. On 2 March 1993, three youths were shot and injured by soldiers in Khan Younis, in the Gaza Strip. Two fire-bombs were thrown at an Israeli car near the village of Deir Estiya, near Tulkarm. (Al-Fajr, 8 March 1993)

176. On 3 March 1993, two to six students of the Issawiya High School (north Jerusalem) were slightly injured in the school yard when border police opened fire with rubber bullets after they were stoned (this incident has also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 8 March 1993). According to Palestinian sources, soldiers shot and wounded eight Palestinian pupils who pelted them with stones in the Nuseirat refugee camp. Five other residents of the territories (Ramallah: 2, Gaza Strip: 3) were reportedly injured during clashes. There were disturbances in Gaza City and in the refugee camps of Jabalia and Shati'. A Palestinian woman stabbed and injured a security guard in Jerusalem's Old City. Five petrol bombs were thrown in the West Bank, three of which at a bus near Beit Amar, one at an IDF patrol in Nablus, and one at an IDF patrol in Wadi Tufah. No damage or injuries were reported. An automatic weapon was fired at an IDF patrol in Khan Younis. No one was injured. Seven Israeli buses were set on fire at the Erez checkpoint in the Gaza Strip and two police cars were damaged by stones. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 4 March 1993; Jerusalem Post, 5 March 1993)

177. On 3 March 1993, IDF troops rounded up some 200 to 210 Palestinians in Rafah and in the nearby refugee camp following the murder of an Israeli on 2 March. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 4 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 4 March 1993; Al-Fajr, 9 March 1993)

178. On 3 March 1993, incendiary bottles were thrown at Israeli vehicles passing by the village of Deir Estiya, near Tulkarm, and in Jenin. Settlers opened fire at Palestinians throwing stones at them in the Nur Shams refugee camp. IDF soldiers searched the area of the Dheisheh refugee camp when an explosive device exploded at the passage of an "Egged" company bus. (Al-Tali'ah, 4 March 1993 and Al-Fajr, 8 March 1993)

179. On 4 March 1993, a military ambulance was fired at twice in Tulkarm. Its windshield was damaged but there were no injuries. Four residents were injured during clashes in the Gaza Strip (Gaza: 2; Jabalia refugee camp: 2) and three in the West Bank (Bethlehem: 1; Ramallah: 2). Four petrol bombs were hurled at the building of the Education Ministry in Jerusalem. They did not explode. A Yeshiva student was stabbed apparently by an Arab youth in the Old City's Muslim quarter. A car was burned in East Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 5 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 8 March 1993)

180. On 5 March 1993, the IDF arrested Yusuf Abdul Hamid Rashid, 25, one of the leaders of the "Black Panthers" in the Jenin area, whom they had sought for several years. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 7 March 1993)

181. On 5 and 6 March 1993, five Palestinians were reportedly injured during clashes with the IDF in the refugee camps of the Gaza Strip. The IDF spokesman stated that the army had no record of injuries. Three petrol bombs were thrown harmlessly at a Jewish house in the Muslim quarter of Jerusalem's Old City (1) without causing harm; at an army patrol in Kafr Zivia, south of Tulkarm (1); and at an "Egged" company bus, south of Bethlehem (1). An Israeli taxi driver was beaten and thrown out of his taxi by three young Arab passengers after he drove them to Wadi Joz. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 7 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 8 March 1993)

182. On 5 and 6 March 1993, two Palestinians were reportedly injured when IDF soldiers opened fire at demonstrators in the Khan Younis refugee camp. (Al-Fajr, 8 March 1993)

183. On 7 March 1993, the border police captured Ahmed (al) Sitri, 23, from the Khan Younis refugee camp, the wanted "Red Eagles" commander of the central Gaza area. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 8 March 1993)

184. On 7 March 1993, the director of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) operations in the Gaza district described as "totally irresponsible" and "inaccurate" IDF claims that an UNRWA employee had ignored the murder of Yehoshua Weissbrod in the Rafah refugee camp on 2 March 1993. (Jerusalem Post, 7 and 8 March 1993)

185. On 7 March 1993, a Palestinian was wounded in Gaza when the car in which he was riding ran into an army roadblock. After several warning shots in the air, the soldiers shot at the car, hitting one of the passengers in the leg. Five Arab residents were reportedly injured in the Gaza Strip during clashes in Jabalia, Rafah, Nuseirat and el-Bureij. A soldier was slightly injured by a stone thrown at him in Gaza. Two people were injured in Ramallah. Stone-throwing incidents involving Israeli vehicles were reported in the West Bank. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 8 March 1993)

186. On 7 March 1993, a border policeman was stoned and slightly wounded in Al Ram, north of Jerusalem. Worshippers coming out of the local mosque were beaten by soldiers in Ein Yabrud village near Ramallah. (Al-Fajr, 15 March 1993)

187. On 8 March 1993, it is suspected that farm labourers from Khan Younis stabbed to death Uri Megidish, 39, of Moshav Gan Or in the Katif region of the Southern Gaza district. After his funeral, angry settlers clashed with Palestinian workers near the Erez checkpoint at the entrance to Gaza. One Palestinian was shot in the commotion and died on his way to Barzilai Hospital (see list). Another Palestinian was reportedly injured by settlers' shots (according to other sources, approximately 20 Palestinian workers were injured by stones and shattered glass from windshields). A youth who was throwing stones was killed by IDF fire in the West Bank (see list). A resident of Jabalia was shot dead by masked men (see list). A Palestinian woman tried to kill a border policeman with a knife outside the Damascus Gate in Jerusalem. NO one was injured. A home-made bomb was thrown at the Ramallah police station but fell on the road without exploding (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 15 March 1993). A small shopping centre in Ariel (West Bank) was set on fire. Five stores were damaged. An Israeli bus was stoned in northern Jerusalem. Its windshield was smashed. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 9 March 1993)

188. On 9 March 1993, a resident of the Gaza Strip was found shot dead (see list). An Arab resident of Hebron was slightly wounded by army gunfire when he tried to drive through an army roadblock in the town. Soldiers fired when the man ignored orders to stop. Four Palestinians were reportedly wounded in clashes with the army in the refugee camps of Khan Younis, Shati' and el-Bureij. A commercial strike was fully observed in the Gaza Strip. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 10 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 15 March 1993)

189. On 10 March 1993, the Foreign Ministry lodged a formal complaint with UNRWA charging that Katherine Striker, an official of the organization, had refused to help Yehoshua Weissbrod who was lynched by Palestinians on 2 March 1993. (Jerusalem Post, 11 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 15 March 1993)

190. On 10 March 1993, a Palestinian resident was shot dead by masked men (see list). Soldiers shot dead an Arab high school student (see list) and injured two other students during a stone-throwing incident in northern Jerusalem. Up to 20 Palestinians were wounded in clashes with troops in Rafah and Khan Younis (also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 11 March 1993). An army reservist was seriously wounded in a knife attack in Nazareth, near an IDF base. Two Gaza gunmen opened fire at a settler bus on its way to Gush Katif, slightly wounding the driver (these incidents have also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 15 March 1993). A soldier on the bus opened fire at the assailants who managed to escape. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 11 March 1993)

191. On 10 March 1993, 17 Molotov cocktails were reportedly thrown at military patrols in Rafah (13), Tulkarm (1) and at military targets in the Dheisheh refugee camp (3). Palestinian youths were fired at when they threw stones at a police station in Jericho. (Al-Tali'ah, 11 March 1993 and Al-Fajr, 15 March 1993)

192. On 11 March 1993, two Israelis were stabbed and injured in separate incidents, one in his hothouse near Rehovot, and the second near the Erez checkpoint (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 15 March 1993). Both assailants were Gazans. Gunfire was reportedly heard by the settlers from Kfar Darom, but there was no evidence that shots had been fired. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 12 March 1993)

193. On 11 March 1993, shots were fired at settlers' cars in the Gaza Strip. An Israeli car was stoned in Dhahiriya village, near Hebron, and one passenger was injured. IDF soldiers conducted searches in the towns of Kabatiya, Kufr Rai and Barta'a. Clashes were reported in the villages of Zababdeh, Silat Al Harthiyeh, Masiliah, Raba, Jalkamous, all of which are located in the Jenin area. (Al-Fajr, 15 March 1993)

194. On 12 March 1993, Osama Mughabi, 22, a wanted member of the Fatah, was captured in Beit Sahur by the army. (Jerusalem Post, 14 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 15 March 1993)

195. On 12 and 13 March 1993, Simha Levy, 45, was axed to death in her van in the Gaza Strip as she was picking up Arab workers from Khan Younis. The body of soldier Yehoshua Friedberg, 24, was found near the highway linking Jerusalem to Tel Aviv. He had been shot at point-blank range. Soldiers shot dead a Palestinian in Hebron in a stone-throwing incident (see list). In a similar incident, also in Hebron, another youth was injured, while the breaking up of disturbances (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 15 March 1993). Two Palestinian residents were killed, one of whom was killed when the explosive device he was handling went off (see list). Two soldiers were wounded in Hebron when gunmen attacked their jeep with automatic fire. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 14 March 1993)

196. On 13 March 1993, a Palestinian was shot and injured in clashes with the Israeli army in the Jabalia refugee camp. An Israeli car was set on fire in Jerusalem. Police headquarters were stoned in Bethlehem. A home-made bomb exploded in Tulkarm. No damage or injuries were reported. (Al-Fajr, 22 March 1993)

197. On 14 March 1993, a three-year-old girl. from Hebron died when she was hit by a bullet that soldiers had fired at her father's car when it evaded a roadblock during a curfew in the town (see list) (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 22 March 1993). Arab sources in Hebron claimed that following the funeral of a Palestinian who was shot on 12 March 1993, soldiers opened fire outside a building where a crowd of mourners had come to pay their respects to the family of the deceased. The sources indicated that three people were wounded. IDF sources claimed that they had no information about the alleged shooting and that they were checking the report. (Jerusalem Post, 15 March 1993)

198. On 14 March 1993, four Palestinians were shot and injured by soldiers in the Jabalia refugee camp. Three youths were injured by IDF gunshots in Beit Hanoun, in the Gaza Strip. Molotov cocktails were reportedly thrown at an Israeli bus near the Ibrahimi mosque in Hebron and at an Israeli bus in El Bireh. (Al-Fajr, 22 March 1993)

199. On 15 March 1993, two Israeli hitchhikers, Ya'acov Bracha, 27 or 28 and Ofer Cohen, 24 or 25, were run over and killed by an Arab-owned van near Eli settlement in the northern West Bank (also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 18 March 1993). A resident of Nablus stabbed and injured a recent immigrant in the centre of Afula. A resident of Beit Shemesh was stabbed and injured by an Arab, just outside his home. In Katzrin, on the Golan Heights, a settler shot and seriously wounded a Druze resident whom he thought was a "terrorist". Arab youths set fire to an "Egged" company bus which was parked at the East Jerusalem bus station, causing minor damage. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 16 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 22 March 1993)

200. On 16 March 1993, soldiers and border police shot dead two youths (see list) in Khan Younis and seriously wounded another man during a stone-throwing attack on soldiers. An additional 58 to 75 Palestinians were injured during the day in Khan Younis. According to local sources, the clash occurred shortly after people emerged from their houses after a four-day curfew in the town to see soldiers set up roof top observation posts. Youths started throwing stones, soldiers fired in the air but the clashes gradually became more violent. The body of a Palestinian was found on the road near the Nur Shams refugee camp in the vicinity of Tulkarm (see list). A home-made bomb was thrown at a military patrol in Khan Younis, causing no damage. A settler reportedly threw a stone at a car driven by a resident of Khan Younis on the Gush Katif road smashing its windshield and hitting a woman passenger. (A) security guard (s) shot and wounded a local man in Yatta, near Hebron, after stones were thrown at a fuel truck. In Jenin, border police shot masked Palestinians who were armed with axes, injuring two or three. At least three residents were injured during incidents which reportedly took place in the refugee camps of el-Bureij, Magghazi and Nuseirat. Shots were reportedly fired at an IDF patrol in Hebron. A demonstration was dispersed with tear-gas and rubber bullets in the Shuafat refugee camp. No injuries were reported. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 17 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 18 March 1993; Al-Fajr, 22 March 1993)

201. On 16 March 1993, 10 Palestinians were injured during clashes in Rafah. More than 15 people were reportedly also shot and injured and seven Molotov cocktails were thrown at military targets in other parts of the Gaza Strip. An IDF soldier was injured when a hand-grenade was thrown at him in the Burei refugee camp. A Palestinian was shot and injured in Hebron. (Al-Fajr, 22 March 1993)

202. On 17 March 1993, violent clashes erupted for the second consecutive day in Khan Younis. Between 35 and 60 residents were reportedly injured. The clashes reportedly began when youths threw stones at the top of the "Agha" building where soldiers were stationed at a new outpost located between the town and the refugee camp. Incidents also occurred in the refugee camps of Nuseirat (3), Jabalia (4), el-Bureij, Shati' and in Gaza City (1) (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 22 March 1993). In the West Bank, clashes were reported in Hebron and Ramallah (3). (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 18 March 1993)

203. On 17 March 1993, a strike called by Hamas to protest the expulsion of 413 Palestinians three months earlier was observed throughout the occupied territories. A Palestinian was shot and injured by soldiers in Ramallah for allegedly refusing to stop for an identification check. (Al-Fajr, 22 March 1993)

204. On 18 March 1993, two residents were killed (see list) and more than 40 to 50 injured (most of whom by rubber bullets) during the third consecutive day of clashes in Khan Younis. The clashes were reportedly prompted by the presence of an unusually high number of soldiers in the town. Military sources in Gaza indicated that a grenade had been thrown at the-new "al-Agha" new observation post in Khan Younis, but that it did not explode. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 19 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 22 March 1993)

205. On 19 March 1993, it was reported that a 27-year-old Egyptian tourist from Luxor had been arrested for throwing stones at the army in Gaza. Also on 19 March 1993, it was reported that three wanted fugitives with forged identity cards had escaped to Jordan through the Allenby bridge. (Ha'aretz, 19 March 1993)

206. On 19 and 20 March 1993, four armed fugitives (Iman Said Hassan Nazer, 23; Fathi Ali Hassan Abu Hajer, 22; Ashraf Ibrahim Halil (Salman or Galuman), 24; and Mohammed Hareb Abdel Kader Sabah, 23 or 33), each wanted for several murders, were arrested during a large-scale operation in the Deir el-Balah refugee camp in Gaza. Nine other Palestinians who had helped them were also arrested. A large stock of firearms was also discovered in the camp. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 21 March 1993)

207. On 19 and 20 March 1993, Yossef Shabtai, a soldier aged 21, was killed in the Jabalia refugee camp in a pre-dawn ambush on an army patrol by gunmen believed to be Hamas activists. An Israeli jeep was attacked with automatic gunfire in an ambush on the road between Ariel and the Arab village of Burkin, west of Jenin. One soldier, Gitai Avissar, was killed and two were injured. In Khan Younis, two young residents were shot dead (see list) during clashes between the local residents and the IDF. Some 10 to 14 residents were taken to hospital during the dispersal of disturbances (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 29 March 1993). The truck of a resident of Hebron was shot on the road between Jerusalem and Jericho (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 22 March 1993). Five fire-bombs were thrown at a patrol in Hebron. They exploded but caused no damage. An additional petrol bomb was thrown at an Israeli vehicle in the Ramallah area without causing harm. Clashes with the army in which one person was injured were reported in the refugee camps of Maghazi and Rafah. Stones were thrown in East Jerusalem, slightly injuring an Israeli guard. A Palestinian was injured in the West Bank. (Ha'aretz, 21 March 1993; Jerusalem Post, 21 and 22 March 1993)

208. On 20 March 1993, a Palestinian was shot and critically wounded by soldiers in the town of Bani Suheila, in the Gaza Strip. Israeli sources reported that at least four wanted Palestinians were arrested during an extensive search campaign in the Deir el-Balah refugee camp. (Al-Fajr, 29 March 1993)

209. On 21 March 1993, two residents were killed in Khan Younis during clashes that began when shots were fired at an IDF patrol, lightly wounding one soldier. No Palestinians were wounded in the first exchange of fire. The patrol later heard another shot. Soldiers fired back and fatally wounded two residents (see list) (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 29 March 1993). Shots were also reportedly fired at an IDF soldier in Hebron. The soldier was not injured. In the refugee camps of the Gaza Strip (Jabalia, Maghazi and in Gaza City) clashes were reported causing one injury. In Ramallah and Nablus, military and civilian Israeli cars were stoned. Two petrol bombs were thrown without causing harm at an Israeli bus in el-Bireh. An Arab from the northern West Bank who was carrying a knife was caught by soldiers at the central bus station in Afula, after he threatened a woman soldier. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 22 March 1993)

210. On 22 March 1993, a resident of Sawabra village, south of Jerusalem, slashed with a knife five high school students from the John F. Kennedy-Ort Apprenticeship School in Talpiot as well as their principal, before they fractured his skull despite the protests of teachers. After the attack, angry residents of the area beat an Arab passer-by and stoned passing Arab vehicles. A border policeman was injured by a stone thrown at an Arab vehicle. Four persons, including two children, died in clashes in the Gaza Strip (see list). One person was killed by masked men (see list). More than 20 to 30 persons were wounded in serious clashes in the Gaza district. In Khan Younis, gunmen fired at a police car but no one was hurt. The police fired back, but the gunmen managed to escape. Youths stoned an IDF patrol vehicle that came to collect soldiers from the rooftop post on al-Bahar street. According to local sources, soldiers wounded ten residents during the clash. Several persons were injured in the West Bank (Nablus: 5; Ramallah: 2; Hebron: 2) (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 29 March 1993). Three petrol bombs were thrown at a settler's car near Neveh Tsof, in the Ramallah area. There were no injuries or damage. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 23 March 1993)

211. On 23 March 1993, an Arab who stabbed a resident from Sussya, was shot dead by a settler after he was captured (see list). A resident of the West Bank died in hospital of wounds sustained during a clash with undercover soldiers (see list). Two persons were killed in the Gaza Strip (see list). In Beit Guvrin, two agricultural inspectors were shot and injured by two to three men armed with pistols, when they were examining produce to be sold in Israel. The activists who perpetrated the attack managed to escape. A soldier was lightly injured when gunshots were fired at an IDF patrol in the al-Maghazi refugee camp. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 24 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 29 March 1993)

212. On 23 March 1993, a bomb was found near the Nablus police station but was deactivated before exploding. (Al-Fajr, 29 March 1993)

213. On 24 March 1993, troops shot dead a Palestinian stone-thrower in the West Bank (see list). Another man was apparently shot by troops when they broke up a march in Gaza (see list). The Hamas-led Id al-Fitr march, in which approximately 2,000 persons, including masked men carrying knives, was reportedly dispersed by soldiers and four to nine residents were reportedly injured by IDF gunfire. A resident of the West Bank was shot dead (see list). Six Arab residents were reportedly injured during clashes with the IDF in the refugee camp of Nuseirat and Shati', in Khan Younis and in Gaza. Shots were fired at a military patrol near the Nuseirat refugee camps. Two petrol bombs were thrown at an Israeli bus in the Ramallah area causing no harm. An Israeli man was injured when his vehicle was stoned near the Kannei David settlement. Stone-throwing incidents were reported in Yatta village. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 25 March 1993)

214. On 25 March 1993, soldiers shot to death a Palestinian after he stabbed and slightly wounded a soldier outside the Gaza central prison (see list). Two bystanders were also wounded in the incident, which occurred as visitors were being checked at the main gate. Following the incident, disturbances were reported and four residents were injured in the Gaza Strip (Khan Younis: 2; Shati refugee camp: 2). Clashes also broke out in Gaza City, in Rafah, as well as in the West Bank, in Jenin, Ramallah and Hebron (two injuries). About 30 Palestinians attacked undercover soldiers who shot and injured a fugitive in the village of Fahme in Jenin area. During the commotion, a soldier accidentally fired a bullet which wounded two other soldiers in the leg. Three Palestinian residents were reportedly also injured. The wounded fugitive took advantage of the confusion to escape (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 29 March 1993). Two fire-bombs were thrown at a bus taking the children settlement to a school in Yehud. No one was injured. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 26 March 1993)

215. On 26 and 27 March 1993, Jamal Masalha, 19, a border policeman from Daburiyeh, was killed when a gunman opened fire at his jeep on a crowded street in Tulkarm. Other policemen in the jeep returned fire but the gunman managed to escape. Masalha was one of a group of Muslims who joined the border police six months earlier. Two local residents were also slightly injured by police shots during the incident. The body of one person was brought to Gaza hospital (see list). In Mazra'at al-Kabilia, in the Ramallah region, soldiers on patrol shot and wounded a stone-thrower when attacked by stone-throwers. Soldiers shot and wounded two youths in Hebron after they threw bottles and stones at an army patrol. Arab youths clashed with police in the Shu'fat refugee camp in northern Jerusalem. The youths stoned border policemen and blocked the main road into the camp with burning tyres. The police responded by firing rubber bullets, hitting one youth whose condition was unknown because he fled the scene. Several shots were fired at a police vehicle in Khan Younis but no damage was reported. Local sources reported disturbances in Khan Younis, Rafah, Shati' and Jabalia (four injuries), and in Ramallah (two injuries). Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 28 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 5 April 1993)

216. On 28 March 1993, IDF troops captured a wanted activist, Mahmoud Hussein Darwish, 23, in the Gaza district's Nuseirat refugee camp. Darwish had been wanted for several murders and was arrested together with two other Palestinians who were suspected of assisting him. (Jerusalem Post, 29 March 1993)

217. On 28 March 1993, Yehuda Gawi, 49, a building contractor from Ashkelon, was stabbed to death as he was working on a house in Nissanit settlement in the Gaza. An IDF patrol shot dead a wanted Fatah gunman in the Sheikh Radwan section of Gaza (see list), and wounded two other armed men after chasing their car through streets and alleys. A resident of Jerusalem who was jogging was stabbed and seriously wounded near his home in Talpiot. Immediately after the attack, Jewish youths attacked an Arab man from Beit Sahour, stabbing him in the leg. Border police were attacked by gunmen in Gaza twice. A grenade was also thrown during the second incident but failed to explode. No injuries were reported. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 29 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 5 April 1993)

218. On 28 March 1993, an Israeli settler was stabbed and injured in the Armon Hanastseef settlement near Jerusalem allegedly by a Palestinian. Two Palestinian sisters were injured when a soldier jumped on the roof of their house in Rafah, causing it to cave in. (Al-Fajr, 5 April 1993)

219. On 29 March 1993, Shaya Deutsch, 39, a farmer from Gush Katif, was stabbed to death by an Arab worker in his greenhouse in Kfar Yam. A Jelayoun youth was killed in clash with the army (see list). Some five to twelve residents were reportedly wounded in clashes with the army in the Gaza Strip, in the refugee camps of Jabalia and el-Bureij, in Khan Younis, in Rafah and in Nuseirat. Two persons were wounded in Hebron in the West Bank. Six or eight Arab youths were reportedly injured by the army in eastern Jerusalem. A petrol bomb was thrown at IDF forces in the village of Beit Hurun (near el-Bireh) in the Ramallah district, two were thrown at an Israeli vehicle in Hebron and one at border police patrol in eastern Jerusalem. In all three cases, no injuries or damage were reported. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 30 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 5 April 1993)

220. On 30 March 1993, two policemen, Mordechai Yisrael, 35 from Haifa and Daniel Hazut, 32, from Afula, were gunned down in their patrol car near Moshav Talmei Elazar, north of Hadera. Up to 18 residents were reportedly injured in the territories, in Nuseirat, in the village of Beituna and in the Shati' refugee camp (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 5 April 1993). Fourteen residents were injured when demonstrations erupted after soldiers raided a tent outside the camp where numerous mourners had gathered were sitting to commemorate the death of an activist who was shot by the army on 28 March. An IDF patrol was stoned near the village of Rafadiya and two residents were reportedly injured when the soldiers fired back. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 31 March 1993)

221. On 31 March 1993, the bodies of two Palestinian residents were found near Bethlehem (see list). In Beitunia, northwest of Jerusalem, an Arab youth was wounded in the leg while throwing stones at soldiers (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 5 April 1993). Another youth was wounded by the army in a similar incident in Fahme. Three residents of the Shu'fat refugee camp were lightly injured (tear-gas inhalation and rubber bullets) during a surprise raid on the camp by border police and bailiffs. Two petrol bombs were thrown without causing harm at an Israeli bus near the Jalazone refugee camp in the Ramallah district. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 1 April 1993)

B. Administration of justice, including the right to a fair trial
1. Palestinian population


222. On 6 December 1992, four activists received prison sentences of up to 25 years for stabbing a man in a Tel Aviv park in 1989, and for organizing several arson attacks in the city. Nimar Mahmed, 29, of Beit Furikh who created the group and was its leader, was sentenced in Tel Aviv District Court to 25 years of imprisonment. Zacharia Ahwal, 25, of Gaza received a 12-year sentence, while Nadir Hanani, 27 and Mahmaoud-Nadar Hanani, 25 of Beith Furikh, were each sentenced to six years in jail and 18 months suspended. (Ha'aretz, and Jerusalem Post, 7 December 1992)

223. On 10 December 1992, Khedr Zeidat from Bani Naim and Ibrahim Abrigith from Beit Amr were placed in administrative detention for six and three months respectively. Detainee Ahmed Sa'dat Abd Al Rasoul, 40, from Ramallah, was also placed in administrative detention for six months, pending a decision by the Ramallah Military Court to release him on bail. (Al-Tali'ah, 10 December 1992)

224. On 13 December 1992, military judge Shlomo Izkson ordered Ahmed Qatamesh, who was arrested in September 1992 after being wanted for 16 years, freed on bail until his trial. The office of the Judge Advocate-General had asked for a 72-hour prolongation of his detention in order to appeal the decision. (Ha'aretz, 16 December 1992)

225. On 15 December 1992, the Supreme Court rejected the appeal of Hana Siniora, editor of the Al-Fajr newspaper. Siniora was convicted of non-presentation for censorship of an article on the PLO leader, Yasser Arafat, in 1986. (Ha'aretz, 16 December 1992)

226. On 20 December 1992, lawyers in the territories declared that they were on strike and would not appear before military courts in protest against the expulsion of 415 Palestinians to Lebanon. (Ha'aretz, 21 December 1992)

227. On 20 December 1992, it was reported that a new order which had been drafted with the agreement of the Attorney-General and the Judge Advocate-General, established a new procedure called "temporary deportation". The order defined this type of deportation as one not exceeding two years. In accordance with the order, it was now possible for officers in the territories to issue orders for temporary expulsion without prior warning, and to carry Out an immediate deportation without giving the deportee the right to appeal beforehand. The new order specified that the right to be heard would be accorded only after the deportation had taken place. After the deportation, the deportee could still apply within 60 days to an appeals committee chaired by a military judge. The new order established an appeal's committee which could annul or shorten the temporary deportation order. Under temporary deportation, the deportee is not deprived of his right to judicial review by the High Court of Justice should his appeal be rejected by the appeals committee. He would however, not be entitled to appeal personally before the Committee or High Court but would be represented by a lawyer or family member. (Jerusalem Post, 18 and 20 December 1992)

228. On 4 January 1993, the Lod Military Court sentenced Muhammad Basharat, 20, from Jiftlik village near Jericho, to life imprisonment plus 10 years for the killing, on 22 September 1992, of Staff-Sgt. Avinoam Peretz of the Jerusalem police anti-terrorist unit. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 5 January 1993)

229. On 5 January 1993, the Office of the State Attorney argued before the High Court of Justice that the head of the GSS Investigation Unit was justified, under national security regulations, in preventing Mahmoud (Ahmedal-Rahman) Rumhiya, a Hamas member from el-Bireh, from meeting with his lawyer. Rumhiya was arrested on 16 December 1992, together with other Hamas activists and he had been held in the GSS section of Hebron Prison since that time. The head of the GSS Investigation Unit had previously issued an order preventing Rumhiya from meeting his lawyer until 30 December, citing regional security and the conduct of the investigation as reasons. oil the same date, the order was extended to 9 January 1993 and the same reasons were cited; Rumhiya's remand was also extended by 30 days. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 6 January 1993)

230. On 7 January 1993, the Nablus Military Court sentenced seven residents of Beit Furik to terms ranging from two to seven years of imprisonment for the killing of Ali Yasser Hassan Nasralah, a local resident whom they suspected of collaboration with the Israeli authorities. (Ha'aretz, 8 January 1993)

231. On 7 January 1993, it was reported that the following 11 residents of the Balata refugee camp aged between 21 and 35 were placed under administrative detention for four months: Maher Hazma, Nasser Abu Rajah, Raed Al Haj, Mohammed Eshtewi, Hosam Abu Al Ades, Riad Abu Al Tenin, Mohammed Ammar, Jasser Al Assi, Sha'aban Abu Mustafa, Ghaleb Al Masri and Nimr Abu Awad. (Al-Tali'ah, 7 January 1993)

232. On 8 January 1993, it was reported that hundreds of lawyers from the territories were on strike for the third consecutive week to protest against the expulsion of 415 Islamic activists. Since prisoners were not represented by lawyers, no trials were held in military courts. In one case, seven men were sentenced to terms of imprisonment without having been represented by lawyers. The seven were accused of killing a suspected collaborator. (Ha'aretz, 8 January 1993)

233. On 10 January 1993, the Jenin Military Court sentenced "Black Panthers" activist Marwan Salim Zayyoud, 28, from Selat al-Hartiya, to three life imprisonment terms. He was convicted of the December 1990 killing of policeman Salam Nohar (or Salam el-Morad) from Tanan village, and of the killing of two suspected informers from his own village. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 12 January 1993)

234. On 14 January 1993, the Military Court of Appeals in Ramallah decided that Ahmed Qatamesh, who was arrested in October 1992 after being wanted for over 16 years as one of the leaders of the Popular Front in the West Bank, would continue to be detained until the end of the judicial proceedings against him. (Ha'aretz, 15 January 1993)

235. On 14 January 1993, the Tel-Aviv Magistrates Court sentenced Khaled Abu Assar, 21, of Gaza, to two years of imprisonment for transporting in his truck Riyad Rifi, who killed Ilanit Ohana and Abd el-Karim Abd el-Rani on 17 March 1992. (Ha'aretz, 15 January 1993)

236. On 27 January 1993, Ghassan Fahmi Jubaer, 22, from Kalkilia, was sentenced in Nablus Military Court to three life imprisonment terms plus 40 years for the killing of three Arabs, assault on other persons for giving courses in military training, and for the possession of firearms. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 28 January 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 1 February 1993)

237. On 29 January 1993, Fatmah Halil Shamali, 22, of el-Bireh, who was arrested while visiting a security prisoner in Beersheba jail on 28 January 1993 with a knife in her possession confessed to being a member of the "Fatah" organization. Her detention was subsequently extended. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 29 January 1993)

238. On 2 February 1993, it was reported that four Hamas activists who had been arrested following the murder of Nissim Toledano on 15 December 1992 would be released from administrative detention at the Ketziot detention centre. The four, represented by attorney Tamar Peleg of the Association for Civil Rights in Israel (ACRI), had appealed against their detention orders. Abd el-Fatah Ahmed Yusef Abu Madi, 27, and Raid Suleiman Mahmad Asasa, 25, were to be released on 2 February 1993. Naaman Dib Abd el-Fatah Mashawah, 36, and Jaber Ahmed Salah Samara, 38, were to be released on 23 February 1993. (Ha'aretz, 2 February 1993)

239. On 2 February 1993, a military judge in Ramallah remanded for 18 and 15 days respectively two Arab-Americans (Mohammmed Salah, 39, and Mohammed Jarad, 36) who were suspected of being Hamas agents who had distributed hundreds of thousands of dollars to the organization's activists in the territories. Both men were arrested on 25 December 1992. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 3 February 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 8 February 1993)

240. On 3 February 1993, the Nablus Military Court sentenced four Arab men to life imprisonment and three others to sentences of 20 years, for the murders of several residents of the territories suspected of collaboration. (Jerusalem Post, 4 February 1993)

241. On 5 February 1993, Ribhi Awad, 38, a money changer from Ramallah who was suspected of laundering money for the two Palestinian-Americans, was released from custody. He was detained on 26 January 1993 and his detention had been extended until 4 February 1993. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 3 and 5 February 1993)

242. On 11 February 1993, Mohammed Haja, 32, a third Palestinian-American, was ordered released without bail six days after he had been remanded for nine days by a military judge in Ramallah. (Ha'aretz, 5 February 1993; Jerusalem Post, 5 and 12 February 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 15 February 1993)

243. On 11 February 1993, it was reported that the Jenin Military Court had sentenced Ayman Sa'adi to three and a half years of effective imprisonment for membership in the "Red Eagles" group. (Al-Tali'ah, 11 February 1993)

244. On 15 February 1993, the High Court of Justice ruled that the army could not destroy the house of a convicted "terrorist" because of the suffering it would cause to the family members who were still living there. The Court thus accepted the petition of the mother of Mohammed Turknam from Jenin, who was convicted of killing Molti Biton in October 1992. The judges ruled, however, that two out of the three rooms in the house should to be sealed. (Jerusalem Post, 16 February 1993)

245. On 15 February 1993, it was reported that four Palestinian youths were released from prison the month before after spending six months in detention when it was discovered that another group of youths had confessed to having committed the same anti-occupation acts that the four youths had been accused of. The four had signed a document without knowing its contents, as none of them knew the Hebrew language. The military prosecutor cancelled all the charges against the youths and ordered an investigation in order to determine how their confessions had been obtained. (Al-Fajr, 15 February 1993)

246. On 17 February 1993, the Nablus Military Court sentenced Iad Hassein Jihad Freij, 20, from the Tulkarm refugee camp to five sentences of life imprisonment for his activities as head of the local "Black Panthers". Freij received four life sentences for murdering four Arab residents suspected of collaborating with the authorities and an additional life term for throwing two grenades at Israeli buses, throwing a fire-bomb, possession of weapons, membership in the "Black Panthers" and shooting at the IDF unit that arrested him and other members of the gang in April 1992. (Jerusalem Post, 18 February 1993)

247. On 17 February 1993, the two Arab-Americans who were suspected of being sent to reorganize the Hamas organization, were remanded at the Ramallah Military Court for a second time since their arrest a month earlier. Mohammed Jarad was remanded for 15 additional days and Mohammed Sahah for 16 additional days. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 18 February 1993)

248. On 18 February 1993, Mazen Ahmad Abu Hamad, 22, was sentenced to six life sentences and an additional 25 years in prison by the Gaza Military Court on charges of belonging to the Fatah and of killing collaborators. The Tulkarm Military Court sentenced Iyad Jawhar Faraj, 19, to five life sentences for membership in the "Black Panthers". (Al-Fajr, 1 March 1993)

249. On 22 February 1993, the Ramallah Military Court sentenced Mohammed Ahmed Issa Jalayta, 14, to four months of effective imprisonment and to a fine of 1,500 shekels for attacking a General Security Service soldier. (Al-Tali'ah , 25 February 1993)

250. On 24 February 1993, it was reported that Hani Amur (or Hani Ben Jamil Amir), 20, from Kafr Bala'a (West Bank), had confessed to the murder of Bechor Hajaj in August 1992. Amur was ordered detained on remand for seven days by the Tulkarm Military Court. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 24 February 1993)

251. On 25 February 1993, the Gaza Military Court sentenced Anouar Hashem Muhammed al-Jurif, 24, from Abassan, to nine terms of life imprisonment plus 25 years for murdering six Arab residents, for taking part in the killing of three others and for participating in shooting attacks on the security forces. (Ha'aretz, 26 February 1993)

252. On 25 February 1993, it was reported that three youths, Nasser Awad Abu Salah, Mahmoud Faleh Ali and Usama Mohammed Faris Hamarsha, from Tubas and Yabad had received prison sentences ranging from six months to 20 years for participating in anti-occupation activities. (Al-Tali'ah, 25 February 1993)

253. On 3 March 1993., the Tel Aviv District Court increased the sentence which had been pronounced against Mustafa Gad Allah, 21, from Nablus, who planned to kill a soldier with a knife that was found in his possession. Following the appeal, the judges sentenced him to 30 months of imprisonment plus one year suspended, instead of the 15 months plus 20 months suspended to which he had been sentenced by the Tel Aviv Magistrates Court. (Ha'aretz, 4 March 1993)

254. On 8 March 1993, the High Court of Justice rejected a petition requesting it to order the Government to allow the appeals of the persons deported to Lebanon to be heard in Israel and in the territories. The petition was filed by attorney Avigdor Feldman. (Jerusalem Post, 9 March 1993)

255. On 9 March 1993, Fatna Sh'abana, a resident of the territories with an Israeli identity card, lodged a complaint against the National Insurance at the Jerusalem Regional Labour Court when the insurers refused to consider her as a victim of "acts of hostility", therefore refusing to reimburse the expenses concerning her treatment and hospitalization. Sh'abana was injured in July 1992 by a stone which was thrown at the car (with Israeli licence plates) she was riding in the village of Aljib, near Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz, 10 March 1993)

256. On 11 March 1993, the Knesset narrowly (23 to 22) defeated in preliminary reading a proposal to temporarily suspend the right of Palestinian deportees to Petition the High Court of Justice before being expelled from the administered territories. (Jerusalem Post, 12 March 1993)

257. On 14 March 1993, Mohammed Salah Yared, one of the Arab-Americans arrested in January for bringing in funds to reorganize Hamas, was charged in Ramallah military court for being "a member of Hamas", the Islamic Resistance Movement, and of "executing services for Hamas activists". Salah was ordered held until the end of his trial. (Jerusalem Post, 15 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 22 March 1993)

258. On 16 March 1993, Mohammed Nijma, 21, from Nablus, who was suspected of participating in the attack in Afula on 15 March 1993, was remanded for 15 days in a special hearing of the Haifa Magistrates Court which was held in his cell at the Kishon detention centre. (Jerusalem Post, 17 March 1993)

259. On 16 March 1993, the Jerusalem Central Court decided to release Aseel Hasan Hasounah, 14, of Ras Al Amud, on a bail of $1,800 until her upcoming trial. The girl was arrested last November, charged with throwing an empty bottle at an "Egged" company bus, and imprisoned in Telmond prison. Earlier, the judge had refused to accept her testimony because of the methods used by the interrogators. Hasounah had been confined in a narrow space between two closets and was beaten by her interrogators in an attempt to force a confession. The judge decided to review the case and a verdict is to be issued by 4 May 1993. (Al-Fajr, 22 March 1993)

260. On 17 March 1993, Mohammed Adel (Karim Salam) Abu Atiyeh, 24, and Mohammed (Jumaa or Gamiso) Abu Ayish, 26, both from Gaza and members of the Hamas-affiliated "Ezzedin al-Kassem" gang, were sentenced to 17 consecutive life terms and four life terms in prison respectively by a military court in Gaza (this information has also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 22 March 1993). They had been convicted of numerous murders of Israelis and Palestinians. They were also found guilty of attempting to kill senior police officers. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 18 March 1993)

261. On 18 March 1993, the Tulkarm Military Court sentenced Makram Shadeed, 23, from Allar village, to 17 years in prison. Shadeed was convicted of intifadah activities, possession of a weapon and the interrogation of several Palestinian collaborators. (Al-Fajr, 22 March 1993)

262. On 21 March 1993, the Nazareth Magistrates Court imposed six-month prison sentences, three years' suspended sentences and fines of approximately $183 each on two brothers, Rassem and Bassem Mahmoud Awad, from Nazareth, who had employed two residents of the West Bank suspected of stabbing of an IDF reservist in Nazareth on 10 March 1993. They had allowed the suspects to sleep in their home even though they did not have permits to stay inside the Green Line overnight. The Court handed down a similar sentence to three other residents of Nazareth who had also employed residents of the territories and provided them with accommodation even although they did not have permits to remain within the Green Line. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 22 March 1993)

263. On 31 March 1993, it was reported that the Jerusalem District Court had aggravated the sentence pronounced against Hanan Sheikh Ahmed, 20, from Ramallah, who confessed to have decided to kill a Jew after she was found in possession of a knife. The judges initially sentenced her to 27 months' imprisonment instead of the eight months to which she had been sentenced initially by the Jerusalem Magistrates Court. She received a one-year suspended sentence from both courts. (Ha'aretz, 31 March 1993)

264. On 31 March 1993, an Israeli military court sentenced Saleh Musa Khalil, 24, from Silat al Harithiya, in the Jenin area, to 33 years in prison. He was charged with shooting and wounding a settler and membership in the Islamic Jihad movement. (Al-Fajr, 5 April 1993)

2. Israelis


265. On 3 December 1992, former border police officer Guy Sha'ar, 22, was sentenced to three months of community service by the Netanya Magistrates Court for beating a man from Tulkarm who was detained during a disturbance in 1990. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 4 December 1992)

266. On 9 December 1992, Attorney-General Yosef Harish asked the police to open files against the "Kach" and "Kahane Hai" movements for allegedly inciting "terrorism". After the November grenade killing of an Arab and the wounding of several others in Jerusalem's Old City, Minister of Energy Amnon Rubinstein complained to Harish that the two Jewish groups had issued statements supporting the perpetrators, according to the Minister's spokesperson, Orit Lerner. Lerner noted that paragraph 4 of the Prevention of Terror Ordinance provided for a three-year sentence for "verbal or oral praise, sympathy or encouragement of acts of violence calculated to cause a person's death". (Jerusalem Post, 10 December 1992)

267. On 19 January 1993, an Israeli army officer was sentenced to six months in prison by a military court for shooting and killing a Palestinian, Mahmoud Zakarneh, in Kabatiya in 1991. The sentence was light because the officer was convicted of "negligence" instead of manslaughter. (Al-Fajr, 25 January 1993)

268. On 7 February 1993, the Tel Aviv District Court sentenced Igal Sasson, 28, to six months of community service and one year suspended for causing the death of Moritafa Rulab, an Arab bus conductor, in Nablus on 6 February 1990. (Ha'aretz, 8 February 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 15 February 1993)

269. On 16 February 1993, it was reported that two border guards were found not guilty of killing a Palestinian youth. Said Nabwani, 35, and Lior Gorno, 29, had apparently been accused of torturing Zakaria Katshan, when they asked him to step out of his car in the Maghazi refugee camp in the Gaza Strip in January 1989. Katshan's mutilated body was later found in a nearby field. (Al-Fajr, 22 February 1993)

270. On 21 February 1993, policeman Issachar Magen, from Yarne, was sentenced to six months' community service after being convicted of brutally beating up an Arab suspect. (Jerusalem Post, 22 February 1993)

271. On 7 March 1993, Haim Danino, who was suspected of shooting dead an Arab luring a stoning incident in Ras el-Amud, was released on bail by the Jerusalem Police (around $1,460) (East Jerusalem) on 2 March 1993. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 7 March 1993; Jerusalem Post, 8 March 1993; also referred to Al-Fajr, 15 March 1993)

272. It was reported on 22 March 1993 that Military Order No. 841, issued in July 1992, explicitly stated that the investigation files of Israelis could be closed if the investigating officer feels that there is no sufficient "public interest" in the case, "insufficient evidence", or if the defendant "does not confess to the crime". (Al-Fajr, 22 March 1993)

273. On 23 March 1993, a Second Lieutenant was tried and sentenced to 14 days in prison for shooting to death a 12-year-old boy in Rafah on 22 March 1993. The IDF spokesman stated that the boy, Mohammed Jarbu'a (or Mahmoud Taoufik Abd el-Jarbura), who was known to be mentally disturbed, was shot and killed by mistake by the officer when he aimed a toy rifle at an IDF post located on a rooftop. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 24 March 1993)

274. On 24 March 1993, the Tel Aviv District Court sentenced four settlers, Einar Noked, 21; Eyal-Haim Noked, 22; Rehavia Piltz, 23, and Binyamin Lev, 21, all from Yitzhar in the northern West Bank, to six months' probation for going on a rampage on 27 June 1991 in the village of Imrin (or Umrin) near Nablus causing damage in the amount of thousands of shekels. In addition, Lev, who was also convicted of firing a weapon in a residential area, was sentenced to an additional six months' probation. The Nokeds were jointly fined approximately $365 while the other two defendants were each also fined approximately $365. (Jerusalem Post, 25 March 1993)

275. On 30 March 1993, Ya'acov Ohayon, 34, a Netivot man, was fined approximately $1,460 and given a three-month suspended sentence by the Beersheba Magistrates Court when Arabs from Gaza were found staying illegally in a warehouse which he owned. (Jerusalem Post, 31 March 1993)

276. On 30 March 1993, Menahem Fodor, a building contractor from Moshav Nir Yisrael, was given a six-month suspended sentence by the Ashkelon Magistrates Court after being found guilty of allowing two labourers from Gaza to stay overnight at the Moshav. He was also sentenced to pay a fine of approximately $2,920. (Jerusalem Post, 31 March 1993)

277. On 31 March 1993, the Acre Magistrate Court fined nine residents of Shfaram approximately $274 for providing sleeping accommodations for residents of the territories staying in the country without permits. Five of the accused were also placed on probation. (Jerusalem Post, 1 April 1993)

C. Treatment of civilians

1. General developments


(a) Harassment and physical ill-treatment


278. On 25 December 1992, two news photographers (Yassof Ahmed from Gaza; and another whose name is not reported) were reportedly beaten by IDF soldiers during a procession in Gaza. The procession was held in protest against the expulsion of activists to Lebanon. The IDF stated that they had no record of the incident. (Ha'aretz, 27 December 1992)

279. On 1 January 1993, the head of the Bar Association in Gaza, Freih Abu Middein, was stopped by an Israeli soldier as he was driving home. The soldier hit him in the face before checking his identification papers. Abu Middein filed a complaint and an investigation of the incident is expected to take place. Gaza lawyers decided to go on an open-ended strike to protest the attack on Abu Middein. (Al-Fajr, 11 January 1993)

280. On 5 January 1993, it was reported that the al-A'raj family from Khan Younis had complained that one of their sons, Omar, aged 23, was arrested on 4 December 1992 by the General Security Service and was held hostage until one of his brothers, who was wanted by the security forces, turned himself in to the police. Security officials denied the allegation and stated that the man was arrested on criminal charges relating to security. (Ha'aretz, 5 January 1993)

281. On 17 February 1993, it was reported that following the knife attack on three Israelis in East Talpiot on 15 February, the male residents of Sheikh Sayid, where police first believed that attacker was hiding, were reportedly rounded up and made to wait outdoors for almost six hours. About 20 persons were eventually detained, and all but 2 were released. (Jerusalem Post, 17 February 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 18 February 1993)

282. On 31 March 1993, border police and bailiffs launched a surprise raid on the Shuafat refugee camp and arrested over 20 wanted camp residents. Three residents were slightly injured during the operation which otherwise went smoothly, except for a number of instances when youths threw stones at border policemen, who responded with tear-gas and rubber bullets. According to the residents, collectors from the Income Tax Authority and the Broadcasting Authority confiscated television sets, videos and other property from the Houses of debtors. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 1 April 1993)


(b) Collective Punishment

(i) List of houses or rooms that were demolished or sealed


283. On 2 December 1992, municipal crews demolished, under heavy police protection, an illegal building, the home of Azmi Said, in the A-Tur neighbourhood of eastern Jerusalem (this information has also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 7 December 1992). According to zoning regulations, the 100-square-metre structure was built in a "green area" which is off limits for construction. (Jerusalem Post, 3 December 1992)

284. On 11 December 1992, soldiers opened fire, threw hand grenades and fired missiles at a home in Anza, near Jenin, where an armed youth was thought to be hiding. The youth and an Israeli soldier were killed. The house was razed. Two days later, nine houses were reportedly destroyed by soldiers in Ma'an, near Khan Younis, during searches for youths, none of whom were found. (Al-Fajr, 28 December 1992)

285. On 13 December 1992, a home in the Shu'fat neighbourhood was torn down by army crews under heavy police guard. The demolition was carried out after the in family lost a long legal battle that ended in a failed petition to the High Court of Justice. City officials indicated that the home was built without a permit on land which had not been yet zoned for construction, and that the family had been warned many times not to build their home in the area (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 21 December 1992). Also on 13 December 1992, a well-informed source within the Jerusalem municipality indicated that the city was stepping up its efforts to demolish illegally built homes in Arab neighbourhoods of the capital. However, the city officially denied that there had been any change in policy. The source stated that 16 new demolition orders were issued by the city in November, which constitute a sharp increase over the previous month. Twelve of the demolition orders were for the eastern Jerusalem neighbourhoods of Sur Bahir, A-Tur, Abu Tor and Beit Hanina; while four applied to buildings in western Jerusalem. (Jerusalem Post, 14 December 1992)

286. On 14 December 1992, the army burned the contents of the Kharaz family house in Nablus, during the night, while allegedly searching for an armed the fugitive. Soldiers broke into the house, ordered everyone out and then began throwing stun grenades into the rooms. According to military sources, no one was arrested but the Kharaz family indicated that two of their sons, Moussa and Ziad, were taken by the army. (Ha'aretz, 17 December 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 21 December 1992)

287. On 21 December 1992, soldiers sealed off the house of Abdalla Rabiya, after the Supreme Court rejected an appeal by his family. Rabiya admitted to killing another Palestinian and to taking part in torturing Palestinian suspects. (Jerusalem Post, 22 December 1992) The same day, soldiers demolished the house of Mahmud Nimr Assi from Beit Lakiya, near Ramallah and sealed the house of Abdel Karim Abdel Hamid Awda from Kafr Ein near Ramallah. (Al-Tali'ah, 24 December 1992)

288. On 22 December 1992, the army blew up a house where a wanted fugitive was hiding in the village of Ma'an, near Khan Younis. The man, Iman Uda (or Ayman Odeh) Salam Majdi (or Masri), 18, was subsequently arrested. According to Arab sources, the house was completely destroyed and several adjacent houses were also damaged. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 23 December 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 28 December 1992)

289. On 3 January 1993, it was reported that the Israeli authorities had given orders in December 1992 to demolish or seal 17 Palestinian houses (12 in the West Bank, 3 in the Gaza Strip and 2 in East Jerusalem) either for security reasons or for having been built without a permit. (Al-Fajr, 11 January 1993)

290. On 7 January 1993, Israeli soldiers raided a house in Taibe, near Jenin, and ordered its occupants to leave. They then detonated a bomb in the bathroom, destroying the walls and furniture. The raid was conducted during an alleged search for wanted persons. (Al-Fajr, 11 January 1993)

291. On 10 January 1993, it was reported that Palestinians had complained that soldiers fired rockets and damaged nine houses during a search for fugitives in Gaza City. The owners of the houses stated that money and jewelry were missing from their homes when they returned several hours later. The army had evacuated the occupants in order to search for the suspects. Military sources indicated that they were checking the reports concerning damages to the houses and the stealing of valuables. Two fugitives and five or six of their accomplices were arrested during the operation. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 10 January 1993)

292. On 13 January 1993, security forces sealed off the house of Nasser Ismail Suleiman from Daharia, Hebron district, West Bank, who was arrested in February 1992 and who admitted to participating in the attempted murder of Yoram Abragil in Moshav Barush. (Ha'aretz, 14 January 1993)

293. on 14 January 1993, soldiers fired anti-tank rockets and threw grenades at a home near Jenin, in order to force a fugitive to come out. The owner of the home, his wife and infant daughter were evacuated from the building. The fugitive was shot dead when he tried to escape. (Jerusalem Post, 15 January 1993; this information has also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 18 January 1993)

294. On 14 January 1993, a house in Deir el-Balah was destroyed and two to five neighbouring houses were badly damaged by anti-tank rockets and explosives used to force "terrorists" to come out. They were never found. (Jerusalem Post, 17 January 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 18 January 1993)

295. On 22 January 1993, security forces fired anti-tank rockets and completely destroyed one house, damaging six other apartments and houses while searching for fugitives in the Toufah quarter of Gaza. The IDF stated that the operation was part of a routine search for fugitives. (Ha'aretz, 24 and 25 January 1993, Jerusalem Post, 25 January 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 25 January 1993)

296. On 28 January 1993, it was reported that the "Peace Now" movement had requested the Government to stop immediately the practice of firing anti-tank missiles at houses in which wanted fugitives were believed to be hiding. Although the soldiers would previously issue a warning, it called the practice collective punishment and was described as cruel and illegal treatment. (Jerusalem Post, 28 January 1993)

297. On 18 February 1993, it was reported that three engineering professors from the Islamic University in Gaza City had estimated that $845,000 worth of the damage was done to 18 houses during the 11 February IDF operation against four Hamas gunmen who had organized a hold-up in Khan Younis. According to the engineers' report, the damage was less than was thought previously. Only nine houses were completely destroyed, four more were 50 per cent damaged, while five were less than 30 per cent damaged. The IDF had indicated that 17 houses were damaged and promised compensation to all those who would file a claim and were not connected with the gunmen. About 185 people lived in the 18 houses in question. Most of them are now living in tents or with neighbours. The Gaza Centre for Rights and Law maintained that the claims which were made in November, when eight houses were damaged during the first IDF operation in which anti-tank weapons were used to destroy the suspected hideouts of the fugitives, were still being examined by a military appeals board. The Centre also indicated that in previous cases where houses had been destroyed by accident or mistake, the IDF has accorded reasonable compensation. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 12 February 1993; Jerusalem Post, 14 February 1993; Ha'aretz, 16 February 1993; Jerusalem Post, 18 February 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 15 February 1993; Al-Tali'ah, 18 February 1993)

298. On 21 February 1993, it was reported that the security authorities would pay damages to families in the territories whose homes had been damaged by anti-tank missiles during military operations. The number of houses damaged or destroyed was estimated at 30 to 40. (Ha'aretz, 21 February 1993)

299. On 23 February 1993, a high-ranking source in the Southern Command stated that the army would investigate claims made by Palestinian residents that the soldiers had caused considerable damage to property during an operation aimed at arresting wanted fugitives in the Shabura neighbourhood in Rafah on 22 February 1993. According to Palestinian sources, three houses were damaged in the operation. (Jerusalem Post, 23 February 1993; Ha'aretz, 24 February 1993)

300. On 24 February 1993, it was reported that, according to a Civil Administration official, more than 30 houses were damaged during the last months in the Gaza Strip. Anti-tank missiles were also used in the West Bank. (Ha'aretz, 24 February 1993)

301. On 3 March 1993, troops sealed the home of brothers Iman and Amin Sha'at (or Sa'ad) from Rafah, who had reportedly participated actively in the murder of Yehoshua Weissbrod on 2 March 1993. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 5 March 1993; Jerusalem Post, 8 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 8 March 1993)

302. On 4 March 1993, Israeli authorities destroyed two rooms in a house in the Zeitoun neighbourhood of Gaza belonging to Fadl Mahmoud Hamed, 30. Hamed was arrested at the beginning of the year on charges of participating in military operations. (Al-Fajr, 8 March 1993)

303. On 5 March 1993, the security forces sealed the house of Ziad Salim Hosni Silmi, from the Zeitan neighbourhood in Gaza, who stabbed to death two Israelis on 1 March 1993 in Tel Aviv. (Ha'aretz, 7 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 8 March 1993)

304. On 9 March 1993, in the Rafah refugee camp, troops sealed the vicinity of the site where Yehoshua Weissbrod was killed on 2 March 1993, after he had entered the camp by mistake. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 10 March 1993)

305. On 15 March 1993, security forces sealed off the house of Imoun Subbi Muhammed Abu Ma'arouf, from Khan Younis, who was suspected of stabbing an Israeli in Rehovot on 11 March 1993. (Ha'aretz, 17 March 1993 also referred to in Al-Fajr, 22 March 1993)

306. On 20 March 1993, seven houses were reportedly damaged by anti-tank missiles during an operation against fugitives in the Deir el-Balah refugee camp. Two fortified underground bunkers were also discovered and blown up by the army. Nine (or 14) houses above them were reportedly destroyed as a result. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 21 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 29 March 1993)

307. On 22 March 1993, the security forces sealed off the rooms in which Nasser Shkirat was living in his parents' home, after he stabbed six persons in a high school in Talpiot. (Ha'aretz, 23 March 1993)

308. On 26 March 1993, soldiers destroyed a bunker in Rafah which was used for hiding and torturing suspected collaborators by Hamas "terrorists". Fearing that armed activists were still hiding in the cellar, the soldiers blew up the entire house after first evacuating its inhabitants. According to Palestinian sources, two houses were destroyed while one was damaged. (Jerusalem Post, 28 March 1993); (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 29 March 1993)


(ii) Imposition of curfews, sealing off or closing areas


309. On 1 December 1992, the curfew imposed on the Sheikh Radwan neighbourhood three days earlier was reinstated, following clashes which took place when it was lifted. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 2 December 1992)

310. On 2 December 1992, curfew remained in force in the Sheikh Radwan neighbourhood and in the Askar refugee camp near Ramallah. (Ha'aretz, 3 December 1992; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 3 December 1992)

311. On 4-5 December 1992, curfew remained in force in the Sheikh Radwan neighbourhood and the Jabalia refugee camp. (Ha'aretz, 6 December 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 7 December 1992)

312. On 6 December 1992, curfew remained in force in the Sheikh Radwan neighbourhood. A curfew was imposed on Khan Younis and the adjacent refugee camp and on the Jabalia and Shati' refugee camps. (Ha'aretz, 7 December 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 14 December 1992)

313. On 7 December 1992, Gaza district was sealed off following the killing of three soldiers near Beit Lahya. (Jerusalem Post, 6 December 1992; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 10 December 1992; Al-Fajr, 14 December 1992)

314. On 8 December 1992, Gaza district remained sealed off. Curfews were imposed on all major refugee camps in the Gaza Strip and the area's harbours, confining between 250,000 and 400,000 (or 600,000) persons to their homes. A curfew was imposed on Beit Sahur after a masked youth was shot dead by soldiers. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 9 December 1992; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 10 December 1992; Al-Fajr, 14 December 1992)

315. On 9 December 1992, much of Gaza remained under curfew. A curfew was also imposed on the area of Beit Omar, near Hebron, to prevent unrest. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 10 December 1992)

316. On 10 December 1992, the Gaza Strip remained closed. The closure prevented persons from leaving for work in Israel and fishermen from sailing out to sea. Gaza City was the only large population area in the Strip which was not under curfew. A curfew was imposed on Anzah following a shootout during which a fugitive was killed. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 11 December 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 14 December 1992)

317. On 11 and 12 December 1992, the IDF lifted the curfew imposed on the Jabalia refugee camp. However, the refugee camp and Beit Hanun village were placed back under curfew following clashes. A curfew was imposed on Bani Naim following the killing of a masked youth by the army. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 13 December 1992)

318. On 13 December 1992, a curfew was imposed on Hebron following the killing of a soldier in the area. The army sealed off the territories as security services continued the hunt for the activists who had kidnapped a border policeman in Lod. Nuseirat, Jabalia, the Sheikh Rodwan neighbourhood, Beit Hanun and the refugee camps of Shati' and el-Bureij remained under curfew. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 14 December 1992; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 17 December 1992; Al-Fajr, 21 December 1992)

319. On 14 December 1992, the closure of the territories continued as IDF soldiers and General Security Services combed the territories in search of the abducted policeman. Most of the cities and all the refugee camps of the Gaza Strip were placed under curfew. East Jerusalem was partially closed. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 15 December 1992; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 17 December 1992)

320. On 15 December 1992, curfews and general closure remained in force in all the refugee camps of the Gaza Strip in the territories. (Ha'aretz, 16 December 1992; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 17 December 1992)

321. On 16 December 1992, Arabs from the territories were still prevented from crossing into Israel. Deir el-Balah and several other localities were not under curfew. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 17 December 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 21 December 1992)

322. On 17 December 1992, a curfew was imposed on the Gaza district and the closure of the West Bank remained in force. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 18 December 1992)

323. On 18 and 19 December 1992, the curfew imposed on Khan Younis and the adjoining refugee camp was partially lifted around 3 p.m., allowing women to purchase food and other items. A curfew was imposed on Yatta village, near Hebron, following shots fired at the soldiers who were manning a roadblock. The closure on the Nablus, Jenin and Tulkarm areas was lifted. The rest of the West Bank remained closed. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 20 December 1992)

324. On 20 December 1992, the army lifted the closure order concerning a large part of the West Bank. The closure was lifted on the Jenin, Nablus and Tulkarm areas, while the residents of Ramallah and Bethlehem were still unable to cross into Israel. Hebron and the neighbouring town of Yatta remained under curfew. Refugee camps in the Gaza Strip also remained under curfew. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 21 December 1992)

325. On 21 December 1992, the IDF closure of the Gaza district was maintained, with more than half the population still affected by the curfew. The closure of the Ramallah area was lifted. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 22 December 1992)

326. On 22 December 1992, the closure of the northern Gaza Strip was lifted. (Ha'aretz, 23 December 1992)

327. On 23 December 1992, the closure of the Gaza district was lifted. Curfews imposed on most of the cities in the area were also lifted. After workers had left for jobs in Israel, the IDF imposed a curfew on the Jabalia, Shati', el-Bureij and Nuseirat refugee camps, on Gaza's Sheikh Radwan neighbourhood, as well as on Khan Younis and the refugee camps adjacent to it. The Balata refugee camp was placed under curfew following shots fired at border policemen. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 24 December 1992)

328. On 24 December 1992, all curfews in the Gaza Strip were lifted for the first time in two weeks. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 25 December 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 28 December 1992)

329. On 25 or 28 December 1992, the IDF decided to place the Shati' and Jabalia refugee camps as well as Palestine square and the Sheikh Radwan neighbourhood of Gaza City under curfew after disturbances following the killing of a resident on 25-26 December 1992. (Ha'aretz, 28 December 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 28 December 1992)

330. On 30 December 1992, a curfew was placed on the Abu Senan neighbourhood in Hebron, following the throwing of five petrol bombs at an IDF patrol. A curfew was imposed on most of the Gaza Strip during the afternoon, as the IDF and General Security Service prepared for possible "terrorist" attacks on 1 January, the anniversary of the founding of "Fatah". However, the workers were allowed to cross the Green Line. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 31 December 1992; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 31 December 1992; Al-Fajr, 4 January 1993)

331. On 31 December 1992, the Gaza Strip remained under curfew on the occasion of the "Fatah" day. Workers went to their jobs to Israel. (Ha'aretz, 1 January 1993)

332. On 1 and 2 January 1993, the Gaza Strip continued to be under full curfew since 30 December 1992 which was imposed in an effort to prevent unrest marking "Fatah" day (this information has also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 11 January 1993). Jerusalem was also closed to Palestinians from the territories on 1 January. Following disturbances, the IDF imposed a curfew on the area of the Khaled al-Amud mosque in Nablus. The Askar and Balata refugee camps were placed under curfew following clashes with the IDF. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 3 January 1993)

333. On 3 January 1993, the four-day curfew which had been imposed on the Gaza district was lifted. A curfew was imposed on the Balata refugee camp after the vehicle of a resident of Tayyiba was burned by masked men when he was driving workers back home from their jobs. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 4 January 1993)

334. On 3 January 1993, the IDF imposed a curfew on the Aida refugee camp and arrested several residents. (Al-Tali'ah, 7 January 1993)

335. On 5 January 1993, the IDF closed off the area near the Cave of the Patriarchs in Hebron after several petrol bombs were thrown at a bus. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 6 January 1993)

336. On 7 January 1993, a curfew was imposed in the Jabalia refugee camp following gunshots fired at an IDF patrol. (Ha'aretz, 8 January 1993; this information has also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 11 January 1993). Also on 7 January 1993, the town of Beit Ummar, near Hebron, was placed under curfew and a house-to-house search for alleged Hamas activists was conducted. (Al-Fajr, 11 January 1993)

337. On 12 January 1993, IDF troops sealed off the area and searched for attackers following the stabbing of an Israeli man in Kalkilia. Curfew was imposed on the Kafr Aboud village after shots were fired at an Israeli car. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 13 January 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 14 January 1993)

338. On 12 January 1993, Tulkarm was declared a closed military area. (Al-Fajr, 18 January 1993)

339. On 13 January 1993, the IDF sealed off for one week the area of the Kalkilia market in order to search for a man who attacked an IDF officer. (Ha'aretz, 14 January 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah 14 January 1993)

340. On 14 January 1993, the Dheisheh refugee camp was placed under curfew after stones were thrown at soldiers. The Deir-el-Balah refugee camp was placed under curfew for several hours while a search for fugitives was conducted. (Ha'aretz, 15 January 1993; Jerusalem Post, 17 January 1993)

341. On 17 January 1993, the Shati' refugee camp was placed under curfew following the killing of a youth during a demonstration. (Ha'aretz, 21 January 1993) Also on 17 January 1993, a curfew was imposed on Hebron following the shooting at an Israeli vehicle. (Al-Tali'ah, 21 January 1993).

342. On 18 January 1993, a curfew was imposed on the el-Arroub, Shati' and Jabalia refugee camps following the throwing of two petrol bombs at an Israeli vehicle. (Ha'aretz, 19 January 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 25 January 1993)

343. On 19 January 1993, a curfew was imposed on Beit Sahur village and the surrounding areas after a security guard was shot in the office of a Beit Sahur gas station. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 20 January 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 21 January 1993)

344. On 20 January 1993, the Shati' refugee camp as well as the Allar and Abeida villages remained under curfew. (Ha'aretz, 21 January 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah)

345. On 21 January 1993, a curfew was imposed on Ain Arik, near Ramallah, following the stoning of settlers' cars. (Al-Fajr, 25 January 1993)

346. On 25 January 1993, a curfew was imposed on one of the neighbourhoods of the Jabalia refugee camp following disturbances. (Ha'aretz, 26 January 1993)

347. On 28 January 1993, a curfew was placed on the Sajayah neighbourhood of Gaza. (Ha'aretz, 29 January 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 1 February 1993)

348. On 29 and 30 January 1993, a curfew was imposed on Khan Younis and the neighbouring areas in Gaza after two soldiers were killed in a nearby settlement. Kfar Samaria in the Tulkarm district was placed under curfew following the injuring of two Arab brothers. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 31 January 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 18 February 1993)

349. On 5-6 February 1993, the el-Bureij, Nuseirat and Jabalia refugee camps were placed under curfew following clashes. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 7 February 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 15 February 1993)

350. On 7 February 1993, the Beit Jalla area was placed under curfew following the throwing of two grenades at an Israeli bus. (Jerusalem Post, 8 February 1993)

351. On 9 February 1993, curfew remained in force in the Jabalia refugee camp for the fourth consecutive day. (Al-Fajr, 15 February 1993)

352. On 11 February 1993, the IDF placed Khan Younis under curfew in order to search for fugitives. (Ha'aretz, 12 February 1993)

353. On 15 February 1993, curfews were imposed for several hours on Arab villages in the East Talpiot area following the murder of an Israeli at a bus stop. (Jerusalem Post, 16 February 1993)

354. On 17 February 1993, a curfew was imposed on the el-Askar refugee camp, following the death of a masked youth who was shot by the army. (Jerusalem Post, 18 February 1993)

355. On 19 February 1993, the curfew which had been imposed on Hebron and the nearby villages was lifted. The curfew was imposed after shots were fired at a settler's car and its passengers were injured on 14 February 1993. (Al-Fajr, 22 February 1993)

356. On 21 February 1993, in order to defuse tension at the beginning of the Muslim holy month of Ramadan, the IDF announced shorter curfew hours in the Gaza district. To allow the Ramadan prayers on time, the nightly curfew on Gaza and Khan Younis was to start at 9 p.m. instead of 7 p.m. Near the Ta Puah junction, the IDF imposed a curfew on several Arab villages in the area, in order to search for the gunmen when an "Egged" company bus was struck by several bullets. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 22 February 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 1 March 1993)

357. On 22 February 1993, a curfew was imposed on the villages of Huwarah and Jama'in in the Nablus area. (Al-Fajr, 1 March 1993)

358. On 24 February 1993, a curfew was imposed on Rafah following the killing of a Palestinian youth by soldiers the day before. (Al-Tali'ah, 25 February 1993; Al-Fajr, 1 March 1993)

359. On 1 March 1993, the IDF sealed off the Gaza Strip following the "terrorist" attack in Tel Aviv in which two persons were killed. Workers were not allowed into Israel. (Jerusalem Post, 2 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 4 March 1993; Al-Fajr, 8 March 1993)

360. On 2 March 1993, the entire Gaza Strip remained closed. The army imposed a curfew on the Rafah area following the murder of an Israeli in the camp. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 3 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 4 March 1993; Al-Fajr, 8 March 1993)

361. On 3 March 1993, the Gaza district remained sealed, with a curfew in force in Rafah. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 4 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 4 March 1993)

362. On 4 March 1993, the Rafah refugee camp and the surrounding neighbourhoods remained under curfew. The Gaza Strip remained sealed. A curfew was imposed on the Tulkarm area following shooting at a military ambulance. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 5 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 8 March 1993)

363. On 5 March 1993, the curfew imposed on Tulkarm was lifted. However, curfew remained in force in Rafah for the fourth consecutive day. (Al-Fajr, 8 March 1993)

364. On 7 March 1993, the curfew imposed on Rafah and the surrounding neighbourhoods was lifted. The IDF spokesman announced that the closure of the Gaza district was to end on 8 March 1993 at 3 a.m. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 8 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 15 March 1993)

365. On 8 March 1993, troops sealed off the area of Khan Younis in order to search for the murderer of an Israeli who had been stabbed to death. (Jerusalem Post, 9 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 15 March 1993)

366. On 9 March 1993, a curfew was imposed on the Jabalia refugee camp where at least 10 Palestinians were shot and injured. (Al-Fajr, 15 March 1993)

367. On 12 and 13 March 1993, a curfew was imposed on Hebron after two soldiers were wounded when gunmen opened fire on their jeep. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 14 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 22 March 1993)

368. On 14 March 1993, Hebron remained under curfew. (Jerusalem Post, 15 March 1993)

369. On 15 March 1993, the curfew which had been imposed on Hebron was reportedly lifted. (Jerusalem Post, 15 March 1993)

370. On 16 March 1993, the curfew imposed on Khan Younis was lifted. (Jerusalem Post, 17 March 1993)

371. On 20 March 1993, the Jabalia refugee camp was placed under curfew and declared a closed military area following the killing of an Israeli soldier. Khan Younis and the adjacent refugee camp were placed under curfew during a search for wanted fugitives. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 21 March 1993)

372. On 22 March 1993, curfew remained in force in the villages of Kufr Deek, Burkin, Deir Ballout, Zawiyeh, Hareth and Kufl Harith for the second consecutive day. (Al-Fajr, 29 March 1993)

373. On 23 March 1993, a one-day curfew was imposed on Deir el-Balah. (Ha'aretz, 24 March 1993)

374. On 26 or 27 March 1993, a curfew was imposed on Tulkarm, its refugee camp and the nearby village of Danabeh following the shooting death of a border Policeman in the city. Rafah was placed under curfew following disturbances. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 28 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 5 April 1993)

375. On 28 March 1993, the IDF sealed the Gaza district, after an Israeli was stabbed to death in the Gaza settlement of Nissanit. Rafah reportedly remained under curfew. (Jerusalem Post, 29 March 1993; also referred to in 5 April 1993). Also on 28 March 1993, curfew was imposed on the Beit Lahia and Beit Hanoun areas. A curfew was also imposed on Rafah. (Al-Fajr, 5 April 1993)

376. On 29 March 1993, a curfew was imposed on Beit Hanoun following the Murder of an Israeli in Kfar Yam. A curfew remained in force in Block G of the Rafah refugee camp where fugitives were being sought, as well as in the Sheikh Radwan neighbourhood of Gaza after soldiers shot dead a Fatah fugitive. The curfew which had been imposed on Tulkarm and on the adjacent village of Danabeh was lifted. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 30 March 1993)

377. On 30 March 1993, the IDF sealed the West Bank following the murder of two Policemen near Hadera. (Ha'aretz, 31 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 5 April 1993)

378. On 31 March 1993, the Israeli Government decided to seal off the Occupied territories from East Jerusalem, Israel and the rest of the world. The current closure was reportedly stricter than the one imposed during the Gulf war since even persons with a special permit to enter Israel were not allowed in. (Al-Fajr, 5 April 1993)


(iii) Other forms of collective punishment


379. On 25 December 1992, Palestinian sources reported that the security forces had carried out preventive arrests of dozens of activists in Bethlehem on the occasion of the Christmas holidays. (Ha'aretz, 25 December 1992)

380. On 30 December 1992, security forces arrested approximatively 200 Fatah activists during preventive arrests on the occasion of the "Fatah Day", 1 January. (Ha'aretz, 31 December 1992; 1 January 1993)

381. On 8 March 1993, following the murder of an Israeli in the Gaza Strip, some 100 Palestinians were arrested and driven blindfolded to an improvised interrogation centre not far from the scene of the murder. General Security Service agents tried to determine whether the murderer had accomplices. Almost all of those questioned were later released. (Jerusalem Post, 9 March 1993)

382. On 8 March 1993, it was reported that Israeli security forces conducted thorough house-to-house searches in Rafah and have detained more than 200 Palestinians. According to the Gaza Centre for Rights and Law, nearly 100 detainees had confessed so far to stoning the car of Yehoshua Weissbrod. The authorities are also reported to have cut off water and electricity in Rafah and the surrounding refugee camps on the evening of 4 March 1993. Neither was restored until the following morning. (Al-Fajr, 8 March 1993)


(c) Expulsions


(i) Mass deportation of Palestinians on 17 December 1992


383. On 17 December 1992, Israel expelled 415 Palestinians. The expulsion order came after Hamas activists had kidnapped an Israeli border policeman in Lod on 13 December 1992, and demanded in exchange the release of the Hamas spiritual leader and founder, Sheikh Ahmed Yassin. The army launched a massive arrest campaign in the territories, detaining hundreds of persons allegedly affiliated with the Hamas and the Islamic Jihad movements. By the end of the week, 1,600 persons were in detention. Two days later, on 15 December, the policeman's body was found near the Kfar Adumim settlement. The following day, on 16 December, the Government decided to deport Islamic activists. The army rounded up 418 detainees from various detention centres and transported them, blindfolded and handcuffed, to a strip of land in southern Lebanon located between the so-called "security zone" and the rest of Lebanon. Joshua Schoffman, representing the "Association for Civil Rights in Israel" and attorneys Leah Tsemel and Andre Rosenthal, on behalf of some of families of the detainees, appealed immediately to the Israeli High Court of justice for a temporary restraining order, which was issued, arguing that the deportation was illegal because it denied the right of due process. However, the order was cancelled the following morning after the Court ruled that military commanders could order immediate expulsion for up to two years of any Palestinian in the occupied territories, without giving them the right to appeal beforehand and without prior warning. Four hundred and fifteen men were deported: 163 from the Gaza district and 252 from the West Bank. Among the deportees were Dr. Abdel Aziz Rantisi, a founder of Hamas from the Khan Younis camp, Dr. Mahmoud a-Zaher, a lecturer at the Islamic University of Gaza, and Ahmed Nimr Hamdan and Atia Mahjaz, both of whom were on the list of 11 persons whose deportation was cancelled by Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin in August 1992. The Lebanese Government refused to grant the deportees entry on its territory and, as a result, a tent camp was established near Marj Al-Zohour. (For press references, see para. 405)

384. On 21 December 1992, three deportees were reportedly injured by the shelling of the South Lebanon Army while attempting to reach the "security zone". On 22 December 1992, the High Court of Justice rejected two appeals requesting it to order the Government to allow the 415 deportees back into Israel. The first petition had been filed on 18 December 1992, by lawyers Avidgor Feldman and Andre Rosenthal, upon request by a number of families of deportees. They were later joined by Imad Dakwar, representing the Arab Democratic Party and MK Abdul Wahab Darawshe. The military tribunals formed to hear individual appeals by the Hamas and Islamic Jihad deportees reportedly started their work on 28 December. Each panel was headed by a military judge and had the authority to shorten or cancel the deportation order for any of the 415 deportees. On 30 December a list was published with the names of 10 deportees whom the IDF acknowledged having deported by mistake: Jawad a-Din; Iad a-Din; Bassem Sayuri; Sa'id Amer; Az Bashir; Mahmud Akilan; Ali Tayem; Hassan Mabhuh; Haled Tzalibi and Akron Tla. On 31 December, Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin reiterated that Israel would not accede to any new requests by the ICRC to unilaterally grant medical assistance to the deportees and evacuate the sick to a hospital in Marjayoun, in the "security zone". (Ibid.)

385. On 7 January 1993, Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin acceded to a request made by the Red Cross to carry out a single visit to the camp in order to appraise the humanitarian needs of the deportees. Lebanon agreed to allow two officials from the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC) to be flown to the security zone and visit the deportees' tent camp. (Ibid.)

386. On 7 January 1993, the GSS, the Shabak, was reported to have recommended the expulsion of only six to seven Hamas activists. They were said to have been surprised when over 400 Palestinians were deported. (Ibid.)

387. On 9 January 1993, two representatives of ICRC were airlifted to the site of the camp in a helicopter chartered for that purpose and flown by a UNIFIL crew. They returned to UNIFIL headquarters at Nakoura, inside the "security zone", with Bassem Sayuri (or Siyuri), 16, who had been deported by mistake and with Zuhar Lubada, 31, who was suffering from a kidney ailment. Sayuri was subsequently taken to his house in Hebron by the IDF, while Lubada was admitted to the UNIFIL hospital at Nakoura. Lubada was later turned over to an IDF unit, examined by an IDF physician and transferred to a hospital in Marjayoun. (For press reference, see para. 405)

388. On 14 January 1993, it was reported that 6 additional men had been deported by mistake, amounting to a total of 16. So far only one, Bassem Sayuri, had returned. The six men were: Abd al-Rahman Ibrahim al-Aruri; Mustafa Mohammed Said Abu Ara; Yasser Suleiman Daud Mansua; Naim Mohammed Ibrahim al-Rul; Mahar Sadaq Mustafa Haryam and Mohammed Suleiman Nimar. It was also reported that 78 additional activists who had been slated for deportation had their deportation orders cancelled at the last moment. No reasons were given why they were taken off the list. (Ibid.)

389. On 15 January 1993, Israel announced that it would allow ICRC to transport medical supplies to the deportees. (Ibid.)

390. On 117 January 1993, a special bench composed of seven judges began hearings at the High Court of Justice concerning a petition challenging the legality of the expulsion. Numerous lawyers represented the deportees, among whom were Avigdor Feldman, Leah Tsemel and Andre Rosenthal. The Association for Civil Rights in Israel and the Organization for Defending Rights in the Territories were also parties to the petition. A military tribunal in Ramallah began hearing on the first appeal lodged by one of the deportees, Rifat Sali Yaish, from Nablus. (Ibid.)

391. On 22 January 1993, it was reported that 10 additional persons had been deported by mistake, in addition to the previous 16. (Ibid.)

392. On 23 January 1993, Red Cross officials evacuated 17 deportees from their tent camp in Lebanon with three British helicopters. Four of the deportees were sick or injured were brought to Marjayoun Hospital, in the "security zone", while 13 were taken back to Israel. A deportee who had been evacuated from the tent camp two weeks earlier was already receiving treatment for a kidney malfunction in Marjayoun Hospital. The 13 deportees were among the 15 who had been expelled by mistake and whom the Government informed that they could return. Two from the 15 had chosen to remain at the tent camp. The 13 men were brought to Haifa where they were handed over to the army. Army sources indicated that seven men would return to jail, four to detention camps and two to their homes. The 13 men were: Jawad Issa Mahommed A-din; Iyad Mufdi Hussein A-Din; Said Ibrahim Mohammed Amar; Mustafa Mohammed Said Abu Ara; Abd el-Rahman Ibrahim Yussuf Aruri; Yasser Daud Suleiman Mansour; Az a-din Nimr Ali Bashir; Ali Mohammed Mohammed Tayam; Hassan Abd al-Rauf Mohammed Mabhuh; Khaled Mahmud Mustafa Salibi; Akram Ahmed Mohammed Tala'; Mahar Sadaq Mustafa Karim and Mohammed Salim Nimr Abu Alam'aza. The two deportees who had refused to return were: Mohamed Abdallah Hussein Akilan and Naim Mohammed Ibrahim al-Ajul. (Ibid.)

393. On 26 January 1993, it was reported that the deportees had rejected the Government's decision to allow family members and lawyers to meet with them in order to determine whether they wanted to appeal their expulsion orders. In a written declaration presented to the High Court of Justice on 25 January 1993, Attorney-General Yosef Harish stated that "every deportee will be able to meet his representative (attorney or family members) once for consultations about filing the appeal". (Ibid.)

394. On 28 January 1993, the High Court of Justice ruled that the expulsion order was invalid but indicated that Israel was not obliged to return the deportees. The High Court also rejected 13 appeals which had been filed by representatives of deportees and several organizations. In its opinion on the deportations, the High Court cautioned that only "concrete, exceptional circumstances" could provide a justification for waiving a person's right to due process. The Court thought however that these circumstances were not described in the deportation order. It did not order the Government to repatriate the deportees. The Court allowed the deportation orders to remain in force because of an emergency mandatory regulation that provided for individual deportations. The judges concluded that the deportations amounted to 415 individual expulsions, with each man deported on the basis of evidence brought against him individually. The High Court had previously ruled that the Fourth Geneva Convention prohibited mass deportations but not the deportations of individuals. However, the seven-judge panel ruled that the legal instrument employed to carry out the mass deportation, the General Temporary Deportation Order, was not valid. The deportees' lawyers argued that the order, which limited the deportation to a period of two years, was merely a way to carry it out without first having to accord the deportees the right of appeal. The Court did maintain, however, that there were cases when security considerations outweighed the individual's right to a hearing. However, the Court continued, deportation before appeal ought to be an exception, owing to exceptional circumstances, and not the rule. The Court also ruled that each deportee had the right to appear before an Advisory Council and appeal his deportation. If the Advisory Councils determined that an appeal was justified, the deportee would then be able to appeal the whole deportation procedure before the High Court. If not, the deportation order would remain in force. The Court indicated that the authorities were obliged to make arrangements for the deportees to be able to appear before the Committees, although it did not specify where the hearings should take place. The Temporary Deportation Order which was invalidated stipulated that the deportees would be represented by their lawyers or a family member before a Military Appeals Tribunal but did not allow them to appear before the tribunals themselves. The Court also noted the Attorney-General's announcement that the Security Services would evaluate "within a reasonable time" information relating to each deportee who did not appeal his deportation order and draw the "necessary conclusion" when required. The ruling was unanimous. (Ibid.)

395. In accordance with the decision of the High Court, Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin ordered the IDF to make the necessary preparations in order to enable Palestinians to appeal their deportation orders in person. A spokesman for the office of the Prime Minister indicated that starting at 10 a.m. on 29 January 1993, the representatives of the deportees would be allowed to come to the Zumriya crossing and present their appeals to an IDF officer. The spokesman added that a team of security officials and legal advisers would check the file of each deportee who did not lodge an appeal, in compliance with the information provided by Attorney-General Yosef Harish to the Court. The IDF also asked the Red Cross to help the deportees deliver their appeals to their lawyers and to the Committees of Appeal that had been established for that purpose. Fourteen committees were set in order to accelerate the appeals procedure. Each committee would be headed by a military judge who would be assisted by two IDF officers. (Ibid.)

396. On 29 and 30 January 1993, the deportees remained in their tent camp while IDF officers waited at the Zumriya crossing on the northern border of the "security zone" for those wishing to lodge appeals. A spokesman for the nearly 400 deportees affirmed that they would not appeal their expulsion orders because they did not wish to legitimize the decision of the High Court. (Ibid.)

397. On 31 January 1993, a representative of the ICRC visited five ill and wounded deportees at Marjayoun Hospital, inside the "security zone". (Ibid.)

398. On 1 February 1993, in a partial reversal of its December deportation decision, the cabinet voted unanimously to allow "about 100 selected Hamas activists" to return from southern Lebanon. Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin announced that the decision allowing the return had been reached after an extraordinary Cabinet meeting and was part of a "package deal". The other decision reduced the duration of the expulsion of the remaining deportees half. Israel would help to transport supplies to the deportees by helicopter, while the appeals and the procedures to review the cases would continue, in keeping with the Government's commitment to the High Court. (Ibid.)

399. On 2 February 1993, the deportees rejected unanimously Israel's compromise decision to allow approximately 100 men to return and to reduce deportation of the rest by half. The deportees insisted on a solution that would allow either all or none to return. Their spokesman stated that there would be no solution as long as a single deportee tent remained standing. spokesman for the deportees noted, however, that deportees who were ill would be able to leave for treatment and hospitalization in Israel or in the security zone, under the auspices of the ICRC, since there were no health facilities at the tent camp where they could receive treatment. (Ibid.)

400. On 4 February 1993, the security authorities gave the ICRC the list of the 101 deportees that would be allowed to return. Sixty-six were from the West Bank and 35 from the Gaza Strip. (Ibid.)

401. On 7 February 1993, five deportees, Amjad Zamal, 29 (or Ahmed Zamal, 23); Zuheir Labadah, 31; Wa'el Hiludiyeh, 32; Hussein Abu Kawiji (or Kweit) 37; Zubdi Tubbaileh, 24, who had been hospitalized in Marjayoun, inside the security zone, returned to Israel. The five were on the list of 101 deportees who the Government had allowed to return. They were flown back to Israel and four were taken to a detention camp in Meggido, in northern Israel, where they underwent a medical examination to determine whether they required further hospitalization. (They were reported to be in administrative detention. A fifth deportee, Amjad Zanal, was transferred to an undisclosed location.) (Ibid.)

402. On 8 February 1993, a spokesman for the deportees announced that sick deportees would remain at the tent camp in southern Lebanon rather than be evacuated for medical treatment to the security zone, even if this meant death. They charged that the five sick deportees who were returned to Israel from Marjayoun Hospital had been given no choice and were forced to go back. (Ibid.)

403. On 9 February 1993, attorney Avigdor Feldman launched an appeal with the High Court of Justice against Prime Minister and Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin, seeking to allow the deportees to appeal against their expulsion from within Israeli borders. (Ibid.)

404. On 4 March 1993, two Palestinians who had returned from Lebanon a month earlier went back to their homes. Zuhdi Tbaileh had been in the Ketsiot prison camp since his return on 7 February 1993 while Zuher Lubadeh was in hospital since he suffered from kidney problems. The two men were among the five sick Palestinian deportees who were taken back to Israel from a hospital in the security zone as part of a group of 101 deportees that Israel had approved to return. (Ibid.)

405. The preceding information was reported as follows: Ha'aretz, 15-18, 20-25, 27-29 and 31 December 1992; 1, 3, 4, 6-8, 10, 11, 14, 15, 17, 18, 21, 22, 24, 26, 28, 29 and 31 January 1993; 2, 7, 8 and 10 February 1993; 16-18, 20-24, 27-29, 30 and 31 December 1992; 1, 3, 4, 7, 8, 10-13, 17, 18, 20-22, 24-29 and 31 January 1993; 1, 2, 4, 8 and 9 February 1993; 5 March 1993; Al-Tali'ah, 17, 24 and 31 December 1992; 7 and 21 January 1993; 4 and 25 February 1993; Al-Fajr, 21 and 28 December 1992; 11, 18 and 25 January 1993; 1 and 22 February 1993; 8 March 1993)


(ii) Other information concerning expulsions


406. On 26 December 1992, an IDF spokesman announced that Majed Mohammed Said Salame, 52, of Deir Razale (West Bank), who was deported to Jordan in 1970, would be allowed to return. Salame was deported on charges of membership in the Fatah movement. The appeal of another deportee, Or. Alfred Michael Tubassi, who was deported in 1974, was rejected. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 27 December 1992)

407. On 14 February 1993, Majad (or Zakarreh, 50) Salameh, who was deported in 1970 because of membership in the Fatah, returned home to his village, Deir Ghazala, east of Jenin. The 55-year-old construction worker was allowed to return at the first Military Court hearing of its kind, following a petition which had been filed with the High Court of Justice in 1987 by his attorney, Leah Tsemel, requesting that such a hearing be held (this information has also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 22 February 1993). An appeal made by Dr. Alfred Toubasi, 65, a dentist from Ramallah, who was deported in 1974, was rejected. Prior to the mass expulsions of Hamas members in December 1992, more than 1,000 men had been deported since 1967. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 15 February 1993)

408. On 17 February 1993, it was reported that Imad Radid Sabinh, from Ra'i village, an activist of the Popular Front, had agreed to "voluntary" exile, and was deported on 16 February to Jordan. According to Palestinian sources, the exile would cover a period of at least three years. A week earlier, "Black Panthers" activist Imad Zakzuk, from Idida village, was also "voluntarily" expelled to Jordan. (Ha'aretz, 17 February 1993)

409. On 2 March 1993, Majed Karzan (or Karazan) 24, from Birkin, near Nablus, reportedly left for Jordan after reaching an agreement with the Israeli authorities to voluntarily go to Jordan for five years rather than several to prison. The man had been wanted for "hostile activities" for three years. (Ha'aretz, 4 March 1993; Jerusalem Post, 5 March 1993)

410. On 10 March 1993, OC Central Command Major-General Danny Yatom stated that in 1992, 21 fugitives had been deported to Jordan for a fixed period instead of serving jail sentences. He also indicated that the IDF had rejected offers of surrender by a number of gunmen who had demanded the right to leave for Jordan as a condition for giving themselves up. (Jerusalem Post, 11 March 1993)


(d) Economic and social situation


411. On 6 December 1992, it was reported that Israelis would be able to request employment permits for Gazans aged 18 to 20 who were married or were their families' sole breadwinners. This age group had been banned from working in Israel since the 24 May stabbing of Helena Rapp in Bat Yam. (Jerusalem Post, 6 December 1992)

412. On 23 December 1992, it was reported that Amos Baram, the Contractors Association, had demanded that foreign construction workers be brought into Israel in order to minimize the damage caused by the absence of Palestinian workers during the curfews in the Gaza Strip. According to the Association, some 60,000 Arabs from the territories were usually employed on construction sites; in recent weeks, however, their numbers had dropped to between 8,000 and 10,000, owing to the uprising, curfews and the weather. (Jerusalem Post, 23 December 1992)

413. On 5 January 1993, the Cabinet Sub-Committee on Economics decided that Israeli companies in the territories that did not enjoy "approved enterprise" status would no longer be able to obtain loan guarantees from the Government. In addition, companies in the territories, whether approved or not, would no longer be eligible for loan guarantees once the original loan had been repaid. This decision cancelled regulations introduced by the Likud Government in February 1992 which rendered non-approved companies in the territories eligible for government loan guarantees of up to 30 per cent of was their fixed property. The guarantees were renewable, both for companies approved and non-approved the guarantees. (Ha'aretz, 6 January 1993)

414. On 5 January 1993, the Israeli authorities issued new orders to Gaza fishermen whereby they were confined to fishing daily between 7 a.m. and 4 p.m. Fishermen complained about the new restrictions which did not allow them to cover their costs. The area which Gaza fishermen are allowed to use for fishing is already limited to a depth of 10 miles with very restricted boundaries. (Al-Fajr, 11 January 1993)

415. On 8 January 1993, it was reported that a group claiming to have over 3,000 Arab merchants and homeowners from eastern Jerusalem as members had decided to petition the High Court of Justice concerning alleged discrimination in the area of property tax (arnona) rates. (Jerusalem Post, 8 January 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 7 January 1993)

416. On 25 January 1993, a five-man committee of World Bank representatives met with the heads of the Palestinian Chamber of Commerce to discuss the economic infrastructure of the territories. The purpose of the committee's two-week visit was to conduct research about economic issues in the territories for use in the multinational talks on economic and regional development. (Jerusalem Post, 26 January 1993)

417. On 4 February 1993, it was reported that the Jerusalem municipality had begun to work on a plan to redevelop the business district in eastern Jerusalem as a centre for the Arab population both in the capital and the administered territories. More than $36,500 allotted for the initial planning of the project were approved without discussion at the City Council meeting on 31 January 1993. (Jerusalem Post, 4 February 1993)

418. On 7 March 1993, it was reported that leaders of trade unions in the territories were accusing the Histadrut (Federation of Labour in Israel) of abandoning them and of helping the Israeli authorities discriminate against Palestinian workers. The union leaders stated that they worked in fear and that their offices were constantly raided and all their contents confiscated by the military authorities. (Jerusalem Post, 7 March 1993)

419. On 10 March 1993, an alliance of Arab business and home-owners from Jerusalem petitioned the High Court of Justice, requesting that the city abolish the collecting of the "arnona" (property) tax fees which they claimed Wore based on an unfair assessment. According to the petition, the city obliged Arab property owners to pay rates comparable to those applied in western Jerusalem, without taking into consideration the fact that the standard of living in the Arab sector of the capital was far lower. The petition stated that the uprising had also affected adversely businessmen in eastern Jerusalem, making it impossible for numerous businessmen to pay high property tax rates. The petitioners charged that the municipality provided fewer services and invested far less in the infrastructure of Arab neighbourhoods than in the Jewish neighbourhoods. (Jerusalem Post, 11 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 22 March 1993)

420. On 14 March 1993, the head of the Omer Local Council, MK Pini Badash, called upon Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin to immediately cancel the permits issued by the Civil Administration to a number of residents of the territories to work as drivers on "Egged" company's regular routes. He stated that he was shocked to learn that the six such drivers were employed by the "Egged" company. (Jerusalem Post, 15 March 1993)

421. On 18 March 1993, it was reported that the crackdown on residents of the territories working in the north without permits was continuing. Dozens of people were detained and questioned and files concerning them were opened. This was also the case with several employers who allegedly arranged for sleeping accommodation for workers who did not have permits to stay over night in Israel. (Jerusalem Post, 18 March 1993)

422. On 21 March 1993, following the ban concerning Arab labour imposed by settlers in the Gush Katif area, some 270 to 280 Israelis went to work in the area in order to help with the flower and tomato crops. Farmers had met with Ora Namir of the Ministry of Labour and Social Affairs on 16 March 1993 and asked her to approve bringing workers from Thailand. She turned the request down flatly and entrusted the Employment Service with finding workers. (Ha'aretz, 17, 19 and 22 March 1993; Jerusalem Post, 17 and 22 March 1993)

423. On 28 March 1993, it was reported that the majority of settlers in the Gush Katif area were once again employing Arabs despite their earlier decision to stop using Arab labour. Sixteen settlements had decided not to hire Arab workers after two Israelis were murdered in the area. Approximately 350 of the 1,500 Arabs who were working in Gush Katif three weeks earlier were still working there, strenghtened by 350 Israeli workers and 200 volunteers who, according to the farmers, were more expensive to hire and less efficient than the dismissed Arab workers. The Jewish workers received a salary of approximately $26 a day while Arabs received the minimum wage of about $15; the difference was reimbursed by the Government. Three settlements: Ganei Tal, Bedula, and Gadid refused to fire their Arab workers, claiming that It was economically unfeasible. (Jerusalem Post, 28 March 1993)

424. On 29 March 1993, soldiers raided the "7-Up" soft drink factory in Gaza City during the night because it did not repay its bank loans. They cut the plant's electricity and phone lines after casting away its manufacturing equipment on the company's own forklifts. The owners claimed that the army ignored their pleas to wait one day so they could find the money to pay approximately $109,500 in debts to the Hapoalim Bank. (Jerusalem Post, 31 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 5 April 1993


(e) Other developments


425. On 8 February 1993, it was reported that the environmental problems of Gaza were receiving special attention from UNRWA resulting in a major initiative to combat the problems of water supply, sewage, drainage and other infrastructure needs. According to UNRWA statistics, approximately 20 per cent of homes in refugee camps and about 40 per cent of houses in towns and villages were connected to sewers. The rest of the population disposed of waste through sewage pits that often flowed into surface drainage systems, threatened groundwater supplies and attracted rodents and insects. (Jerusalem Post, 8 February 1993)

2. Measures affecting certain fundamental freedoms


(a) Freedom of movement


426. On 1 December 1992, Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin inaugurated the new Allenby Bridge terminal which was designed to increase the speed and facilitate the crossing of the bridge by Palestinians in peak seasons. (Jerusalem Post, 2 December 1992)

427. On 20 December 1992, Dr. Amin Talji, head of the "Mokassed" hospital in East Jerusalem, claimed that IDF soldiers did not allow a large number of members of the medical teams of the hospital to pass through checkpoints recently. According to Dr. Talji, doctors were allowed to cross but some 400 members of medical teams were barred from crossing and had to go back home. (Ha'aretz, 21 December 1992)

428. On 5 January 1993, an Israeli army spokesman declared that Palestinians from the occupied territories who transit through the bridges to Jordan or Egypt via Rafah still have to pay the $90 travel tax which was cancelled for Israelis at the beginning of 1993. A decision of the Defence Ministry stipulates that only Palestinians travelling from the Lod airport would be exempted from paying the travel tax. (Al-Fajr, 11 January 1993)

429. On 18 January 1993, 25 workers from the territories without permits to stay in Israel were arrested in the Kafr Qassim, Rosh Ha'ayn and Petakh Tikva industrial areas. (Ha'aretz, 19 January 1993)

430. On 28 January 1993, it was reported-that the Civil Administration was studying the possibility of abolishing the exit fees paid by the residents of the territories at the Allenby and Adam Bridges on the border with Jordan. (Ha'aretz, 28 January 1993)

431. On 14 February 1993, the Cabinet announced that it in tended to abolish $91 of the approximately $128 tax that all Palestinians had to pay in order to Cross the Allenby Bridge to Jordan. Cabinet-level officials explained that the tax was supposed to be reduced by 1 March (this information has also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 22 February 1993). Officials in the Prime Minister's Office insisted that reducing the tax was not a confidence-building measure, but rather a parallel step to the lifting on 1 January 1993 of the travel tax that Israelis were obliged to pay since the early 1980s. (Jerusalem Post, 15 February 1993)

432. On 17 February 1993, officials of the Jerusalem municipality and police announced that they had agreed to build a fence in order to divide a section of Jebel Mukaber from East Talpiot, near the site of the "terror" attack of 15 February 1993. The fence would probably be some 300 metres long and would be parallel-to the street where the attack occurred. According to the statement, it was a measure which had already been taken in other parts of Jerusalem, such as the A-Tur road, Naomi road and the road between Dehiyal al Barid and Neveh Ya'acov. (Jerusalem Post, 18 February 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 22 February 1993)

433. On 25 February, a police spokesman announced that roadblocks would be set up at all entrances from the administered territories into Jerusalem but that there were to be no restrictions as to who would be allowed in, since tens of thousands of Muslim worshippers were expected to converge on the capital on 26 February for the service, marking the first Friday of the holy month of Ramadan. (Jerusalem Post, 26 February 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 1 March 1993)

434. On 9 March 1993, the Deputy Chief of General Staff, Major-General Shahak, reportedly told the Knesset Foreign Affairs and Defence Committee that the Erez checkpoint at the northern entrance to the Gaza district was not functioning efficiently, and that the army planned to invest some $3,7 million to improve security measures such as the installation of metal detectors and the improvement of road markings and signs. (Jerusalem Post, 10 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 15 March 1993)

435. On 15 March 1993, it was reported that following the recent spate of "terrorist" attacks, roadblocks had been erected at the entrances and exits to cities as well as on the roads leading from the territories, and that the number of police patrols had been increased. Roadblocks were set at all hours of the day and their locations were changed frequently. (Jerusalem Post, 15 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 18 March 1993)

436. On 16 March 1993, it was reported that following several "terrorist" attacks, orders had been issued to strictly enforce the law prohibiting Jewish employers from allowing workers from the territories to spend the night within the Green Line without a special permit. (Jerusalem Post, 16 March 1993)

437. On 16 March 1993, it was reported that four magnetic gates were to be installed at checkpoints in the Gaza Strip in order to detect knives, axes and other arms carried by the residents of Gaza going to work in Israel. An additional "bar code" device would also be installed to help read the magnetic card of each worker from Gaza. (Ha'aretz, 16 March 1993)

438. On 28 March 1993, it was reported that 180 residents of the territories who were caught staying overnight illegally in Arab villages in the region were arrested since the beginning of the year in the Galilee district. (Jerusalem Post, 28 March 1993)

439. On 31 March 1993, it was reported that, in addition to extending the closure of the territories from Gaza to the West Bank, the Knesset Foreign Affairs and Defence Committee had also decided to deny to all Palestinian-owned vehicles from the territories the right of entry into Israel, and to bar Palestinians from staying overnight inside Israel, including eastern Jerusalem. (Jerusalem Post, 31 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 5 April 1993)

440. On 31 March 1993, Police Ministry officials stated that Palestinians from the administered territories would be barred from entering Israel in private vehicles even after their closure ended. The officials indicated that if the wave of "terrorist" activity were to continue, residents of the territories would be barred completely from using private vehicles. Palestinians working inside the Green Line or those who otherwise needed to enter Israel would have to use public transportation. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 1 April 1993)


(b) Freedom of education


441. On 17 December 1992, it was reported that the Salem Saadiya Secondary School in Kalkilia had remained closed, after disturbances took place in the school on 10 December. (Ha'aretz, 17 December 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 14 December 1992)

442. On 24 December 1992, it was reported that studies at the Gaza Islamic University and at the Al Najah University in Nablus were suspended, until further notice. Bethlehem University was also ordered closed until 28 December 1992. Seventeen employees of the Islamic University and 20 of the Al Najah University were among the 415 Palestinian Islamic activists who were expelled on 17 December 1992. (Al-Tali'ah, 24 December 1992)

443. On 4 January 1993, the Israeli authorities allowed the Islamic University of Gaza to reopen. Classes had been suspended after the expulsion order affecting 415 Palestinians had been issued last December. Several staff Members of the university were among the deportees. (Al-Fajr, 11 January 1993)

444. On 7 January 1993, it was reported that the University of New Haven had suspended indefinitely plans to open a Middle East campus in El Kana, in the northern West Bank. Classes were supposed to begin in February. (Jerusalem Post, 7 January 1993)

445. On 10 January 1993, the High Court of Justice rejected a petition filed by the residents of the Kfar Darom settlement in the Gaza Strip, aimed at preventing the IDF from reopening an UNRWA school near the settlement. (Ha'aretz, 11 January 1993)

446. On 11 January 1993, UNRWA statistics regarding curfews and school closures in the Gaza Strip revealed that 12 per cent of the 1991/92 school year was lost in comparison with 61 per cent the previous year. As for the current school year which began in September, the UNRWA schools in Gaza were mostly closed during October and December. The city of Rafah and its refugee camp suffered the longest periods under curfew last year. (Al-Fajr, 18 January 1993)

447. On 28 January 1993, the military authorities ordered two schools in Bethlehem closed for two weeks. Students of these schools allegedly took part in activities against the occupation. (Al-Fajr, 1 February 1993)

448. On 23 February 1993, the IDF closed a school in the Tulkarm refugee camp, for two weeks after a stone-throwing incident. The incident occurred after the IDF had gunned down the youth, Mahmud Abdullah Huweiti. (Al-Fajr, 1 March 1993)

449. On 24 February 1993, the IDF closed the Islamic University and al-Azhar College and High School in Gaza for one week, after toy guns, subversive literature and protest transparencies were found on the premises. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 25 February 1993; Jerusalem Post, 26 February 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 1 March 1993)

450. On 26 February 1993, the administrators of the al-Azhar University claimed that soldiers had caused approximately $20,000 worth of damage when they broke into the University premises on 24 February 1993. (Ha'aretz, 26 February 1993)

451. On 3 March 1993, the Issawiya High School in East Jerusalem was closed because students had participated in the stoning of border policemen. The school was to reopen on 5 March 1993. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 4 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 4 March 1993). Also on 3 March 1993, the Bethlehem Secondary School was closed following clashes in the city. (Al-Tali'ah, 4 March 1993)

452. On 4 March 1993, the army ordered closed for two weeks two schools in Bethlehem, including the High School because students had participated in numerous stone-throwing incidents. (Jerusalem Post, 5 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 8 March 1993)

453. On 26 March 1993, Tel Aviv Mayor Shlomo Lahat announced that Arabs from the territories would not be allowed to work in schools and kindergartens in the Tel Aviv area. (Jerusalem Post, 29 March 1993)


(c) Freedom of expression


454. On 16 December 1992, several major news organizations asked prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin to explain the detention of Gaza journalist Taher Shriteh, who worked for them as a stringer. Shriteh was one of the 1,200 Palestinians who were detained during the IDF operation following the abduction of border policeman Nissim Toledano. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 16 December 1992)

455. On 26 December 1992, Awad Awad, a Palestinian photo-journalist, was severely beaten by a group of border policemen in East Jerusalem while he was photographing confrontations between Palestinians and soldiers. He suffered bruises all over his body and was subsequently treated at the Makassed Hospital. The policemen also smashed his camera. (Al-Fajr, 4 January 1993)

456. On 9 February 1993, it was reported that the army had released three Palestinian journalists who were arrested on 7 February when they refused to leave a closed military area in Gaza according to the IDF. Taher Shriteh, Marwan Ghoul, and his brother Ashraf, were released on a $182 bail. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 8 and 9 February 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 15 February 1993)

457. On 2 March 1993, IDF soldiers searched a press office in Hebron for two hours on suspicion that it was linked to hostile Islamic organizations. They also took letters from local families that were to be sent to the deportee camp in Lebanon. According to its owner, Khaled Suleiman, the soldiers took news articles, a fax machine and a list of telephone numbers from the "A-Zahra" press office. Suleiman stated the search was thorough but conducted in a polite manner. (Jerusalem Post, 3 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 4 March 1993)

458. On 14 March 1993, IDF soldiers searched the premises of the Jerusalem weekly Al Sada. They confiscated material owned by the publishers which was later brought back. (Al-Fajr, 22 March 1993)

459. On 27 March 1993, three Palestinian journalists were arrested in Gaza City while covering confrontations between the residents and Israeli troops. Taher Shriteh, a Reuters correspondent, Marwan Ghoul, a cameraman for Reuters and Ashraf Ghoul, a Visnews correspondent, were transferred to the Ansar II detention centre in Gaza. (Al-Fajr, 5 April 1993)

460. On 31 March 1993, the Israeli authorities ordered closed for six months the Hebron-based All Zahra Press Service on charges that seditious material had been found on its premises. (Al-Fajr, 5 April 1993)


(d) Freedom of religion


461. On 27 January 1993, the Israeli authorities ordered the closure of three mosques in the Nablus area allegedly because controversial material was found inside. (Al-Fajr, 1 February 1993)

462. On 3 February 1993, the Israeli authorities are reported to have turned down a request by Muslim notables to reopen seven mosques (four in the West Bank and three in the Gaza Strip) that were closed recently under the pretext that anti-occupation materials were found inside. (Al-Fajr, 8 February 1993)

463. On 12 February 1993, it was reported that the security forces had closed a mosque in Bir Habalah (West Bank), three weeks earlier, after finding anti-Israeli Hamas literature on the premises. (Ha'aretz, 14 February 1993; Jerusalem Post, 12 February 1993)

464. On 22 February 1993, the Israeli authorities decided to reopen the Akhdar mosque in Bethlehem after a two-week closure. The authorities claimed that seditious material had been hidden in the mosque. In the el-Bureij refugee, camp, the Nur mosque was reopened following a three-year closure. (Al-Fajr, 1 March 1993)

3. Information on settlers' activities affecting the civilian population


465. On 1 December 1992, settlers in Hebron began patrolling the Tel-Rumeida neighbourbood after three petrol bombs were thrown at a settler's home several days earlier. Arab residents have complained that the windows of a number of homes were smashed and several people beaten during such patrols. This was not confirmed by the police or the IDF. (Jerusalem Post, 2 December 1992; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 3 December 1992; Al-Fajr, 7 December 1992)

466. On 3 December 1992, it was reported that the Arab residents of Tel Al Rumeida in Hebron had complained of continuous attacks by settlers. They stated that the settlers had formed armed patrols in the area. A military spokesman denied the existence of such patrols but added that the army had allowed settlers in the area to carry arms. (Al-Tali'ah, 3 December 1992)

467. On 31 December 1992, it was reported that the extremist "Kahana" movement had organized military training camps for American Jews on a site near New York. The training course would be completed in the Tafuh settlement near Hebron next summer. Youths between 16 and 24 years of age were reportedly recruited for such training. Mike Gasowski, the coordinator of the "Kahana" movement in the United States, stated that dozens of settlers had received training to fight in the occupied territories. (Al-Tali'ah, 31 December 1992)

468. On 1 and 2 January 1993, the residents of Kiryat Arba are alleged to have gone on a rampage through downtown Hebron, beating several Arab residents, smashing the windows of 20 to 30 vehicles, puncturing car tires and throwing stones to break the windows of houses and shops. The attack was led by "Kach" activists, apparently in response to the stoning a week earlier of Israeli vehicles in the city. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 3 January 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 7 January 1993; Al-Fajr, 11 January 1993)

469. On 5 January 1993, Israeli settlers in Hebron threw a stone weighing ,approximately 5 kg at a Palestinian car, injuring the driver, Dr. Sadr, in the head. Dr. Sadr was admitted to Makassed Hospital to be treated for skull fractures. (Al-Fajr, 11 January 1993)

470. On 14 January 1993, settlers from the Hajai settlement south of Hebron blocked the only road leading to an Arab-owned house located near the settlement for over a week. The owner of the house, Abdel Salam Sahlab, stated that the settlers had been threatening to blow up his house and he complained of continuous harassment by them. (Al-Tali'ah, 14 January 1993)

471. On 28 January 1993, the head of the Gush Katif Settlement Council in Gaza reportedly announced that trained dogs would be used by settlers to pursue stone-throwers. Also on 28 January 1993, it was reported that the settlers from the Hadar Bitar settlement near the village of Nahalin (Bethlehem area) were waiting in ambush on a nearby road in order to throw stones at passing Arab cars. (Al-Tali'ah, 28 January 1993)

472. On 7 February 1993, settlers planted tens of thousands of trees, within and outside 70 settlements despite an IDF ban on planting trees without authorization on unappropriated State land. In Kiryat Arba, hundreds of settlers planted trees in four areas of State-owned land. In Adam, north-east of Jerusalem, several Members of the Knesset from the right-wing opposition political parties attended the "Tu Bishvat" ceremony. Letters stated that the massive tree-planting campaign was aimed at protesting against the fact that the Government did not use the State-owned land in the territories for the settlements. It is estimated that between 38 per cent and 65 per cent of land in the territories is State-owned. (Ha'aretz, 5 February 1993; Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 8 February 1993)

473. On 8 February 1993, it was reported that settlers continued to plant trees within and outside the settlements, especially in the northern West Bank. Some 50.000 trees were planted in two days. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 9 February 1993)

474. On 10 February 1993, Health Minister Haim Ramon, the Government's liaison with the Knesset, stated that the current Government, unlike its predecessors, would not be lenient towards Jewish settlers who broke the law in the administered territories. Meanwhile, a dozen settlers planted saplings on State-owned land near the settlement of Kochar Hashahar, east of Ramallah. (Jerusalem Post, 11 February 1993)

475. On 14 February 1993, several cars in Hebron were reportedly damaged by settlers despite the deployment of the army, following the shooting attack on a Jewish couple by gunmen on the road linking Kiryat Arba to Jerusalem. (Jerusalem Post, 15 February 1993)

476. On 15 February 1993, following the murder of an Israeli in East Talpiot, about 150 residents of the neighbourhood, joined by several busloads of people from Kiryat Arba, many of whom were carrying torches and chanting "death to Arabs", tried to break through police barricades that were placed around Jebel Mukaber. (Jerusalem Post, 16 February 1993)

477. On 18 February 1993, youths from East Talpiot threw stones at houses in nearby Jebel Mukaber. Police were called in and arrested 10 or 11 of the youths, who were subsequently released after questioning. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 21 February 1993)

478. On 23 February 1993, it was reported that Jewish youths from East Talpiot had stoned the homes and vehicles in nearby Jebel Mukaber almost on a nightly basis since the 15 February killing in the Jewish neighbourhood. According to the village Mukhtar, dozens of vehicles and homes have been damaged. He also complained that the police was doing little to protect the residents (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 1 March 1993). Police reports confirmed the allegation although, according to the police spokesman, no formal complaints had been lodged by the residents of Jebel Mukaber. (Jerusalem Post, 22 February 1993; Ha'aretz, 23 February 1993)

479. On 26 or 28 February 1993, it was reported that windows of several Arab-owned cars were smashed in Hebron following the death of a girl from Kiryat Arbain in a car accident, apparently following a stoning attack. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 28 February 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 1 March 1993)

480. On 1 March 1993, Mohammed Hussein Hassan Tanah, a resident of Freides village in the Bethlehem area, complained of constant harassment by settlers from the neighbouring El David settlement. Tanah stated that the settlers had threatened to kill him if he continued living in his house. Settlers have been building a factory only a few hundred yards away from Tanah's house. (Al-Fajr, 8 March 1993)

481. On 2 March 1993, settler leaders called upon the Jewish residents of the Gaza district to "open fire in order to hit (Palestinian) troublemakers" and Gaza stone-throwers. Zvi Hendel, the Chairman of the Gaza Coast Settlements Regional Council, instructed settlers to use firearms "even if one's life was not in danger". However, the IDF warned that civilians would be arrested if they ignored standing regulations for opening fire only in life-threatening situations. (Ha'aretz, 3 March 1993; Jerusalem Post, 4 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 4 March 1993; Al-Fajr, 8 March 1993)

482. On 2 March 1993, settlers from Beit Eyl reportedly threw stones at passing Arab-owned vehicles on the Nablus-Ramallah road. (Al-Tali'ah, 4 March 1993)

483. On 7 March 1993, settlers reportedly attacked Muslim worshippers at the Ibrahimi mosque in Hebron. Palestinian youths smashed the windshields of Israeli settlers' cars in retaliation. In a separate development, Jerusalem Police Chief Rafi Peled was reported to have declared his sympathy for the demands of settlers to retrieve two Arab houses in the Muslim Quarter which the Israeli Government had confiscated for alleged security reasons. (Al-Tali'ah, 11 March 1993; Al-Fajr, 15 March 1993)

484. On 8 March 1993, a Palestinian was shot dead in a clash between settlers and Arab workers near the Erez checkpoint. Settlers attending the funeral of an Israeli who had been stabbed threw stones and opened fire. Another Palestinian was reportedly injured by settler fire. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 9 and 10 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 15 March 1993)

485. On 8 March 1993, several members of a Palestinian family were injured when settlers attacked their car with stones near Khan Younis. (Al-Fajr, 15 March 1993)

486. On 11 March 1993, an UNRWA spokesman stated that settlers had entered into the UNRWA-run al-Mazaraa School in Gaza and had forced the children to leave (according to Al-Fajr, the settlers from the neighbouring Kfar Drom settlement claimed that the school had been built on land belonging to the State of Israel). (Al-Fajr, 22 March 1993) They then shouted at the teachers and pushed the principal around until soldiers and police intervened. The settlers left the school and then blocked the two-lane highway near the Deir el-Balah refugee camp for two hours. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 12 March 1993)

487. On 11 March 1993, settlers erected roadblocks and stoned Arab-owned cars in Hebron. An Israeli soldier was injured when he was stoned in the same area two days earlier. (Al-Fajr, 15 March 1993)

488. On 14 March 1993, it was reported that settler leaders in Gaza had declared a ban on employing Arab workers following the murder of Simha Levy on 12 March 1993. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 14 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 22 March 1993)

489. On 15 March 1993, it was reported that on the first day after the settlers had proclaimed the ban on Arab laborers in Gush Katif (Gaza Strip), 200 Israeli schoolchildren came as volunteers to replace the 1,000 to 2,000 Gazans who normally worked there. Ganei Tal, where two soldiers were gunned down on 30 January 1993, was one of the three settlements which had not accepted the ban on Arab labour. In the northern West Bank, the Karnei Shomron Local Council, which included Ginot Shomron, announced that it had also decided to fire its Arab workers. Also on 15 March, a settler from Ma'aleh Levona, near the Eli settlement, threw a stone which smashed the windshield of an Arab taxi in which Leah Tsemel, an Israeli lawyer, was sitting. Tsemel stated that she had reported the incident to the IDF and to the Ramallah police. Later in the afternoon, more than 100 angry settlers carrying flags and burning tires blocked the Nablus road near Beit El. They then marched to the el-Bireh municipal building and threw stones at cars and balconies, breaking several windows. In the morning, two Israeli hitchhikers had been killed near Eli by an Arab who ran them over with a van at a bus stop. The IDF announced that it had arrested several settlers after the disturbances. Also on 15 March, troops lodged a complaint with the police against six settlers who broke through two roadblocks and entered the villages of Bidiya and Hawara where they threw stones at cars and smashed windows. (Ha'aretz, 16 March 1993; Jerusalem Post, 15, 16 and 17 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 18 March 1993)

490. On 15 March 1993, Israeli settlers were reported to have attacked Arab property in el-Bireh under the protection of IDF patrols. (Al-Tali'ah, 18 March 1993)

491. On 16 March 1993, settlers attacked the residents of Bidya, in the Nablus area, and smashed the windows of their cars. In a separate development, a group of settlers stormed the premises of the University Graduates' Association in Hebron, firing their guns and destroying the main gate with bullets. (Al-Fajr, 22 March 1993)

492. On 17 March 1993, the Nablus police was investigating an attack by settlers on a gas station near the village of Luban a-Sharkiye near the Eli settlement in which several windows were smashed. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 18 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 18 March 1993; Al-Fajr, 22 March 1993)

493. On 17 March 1993, settlers set up barricades on the Ramallah road in order to prevent Palestinian workers from crossing the Green Line. (Al-Fajr, 22 March 1993)

494. On 18 March 1993, settlers punctured the tyres of dozens of Palestinian-owned cars with knives at the Ram junction on the road between Ramallah and Jerusalem. (Al-Fajr, 22 March 1993)

495. On 24 March 1993, an Arab who stabbed a resident of Sussya was shot dead by settlers after he was captured. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 24 and the 25 March 1993; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 29 March 1993)

496. On 25 March 1993, hundreds of settlers from the West Bank and the Gaza district blocked roads in the territories to demonstrate against what they claimed was the Government's weakness in the face of terrorism. A number of Arab-owned vehicles were stoned (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 29 March 1993). At least 10 settlers were detained for questioning during the demonstrations. (Jerusalem Post, 26 March 1993)

497. On 28 March 1993, hundreds of settlers blocked roads in the Gaza district following the murder of an Israeli man there. Arab vehicles were stoned. One Arab resident was reportedly injured by a stone while five cars were damaged. (Ha'aretz, 29 March 1993)

498. On 31 March 1993, it was reported that settlers damaged the Akad mosque in southern Khan Younis, in the Gaza district, when they set fire to it shortly after an Israeli man was murdered in Kfar Yam on 29 March 1993. The IDF announced that they were searching for the arsonists. Palestinians reported that settlers had also stoned up to eight small houses near the sea front on the road leading to Khan Younis. Two or more Israelis entered a house and struck Michbal Shorab, 48 and his son Yusef, 16, who were subsequently taken to Nasser Hospital for treatment of light injuries. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 31 March 1993

D. Treatment of detainees


499. On 7 December 1992, approximately 30 Palestinian security prisoners detained at the Megiddo jail were taken ill because of suspected food poisoning. They were treated at the prison infirmary, and 26 were later taken under guard to the Emek Hospital in Afula for further examination. Showing no further signs of illness, they were subsequently brought back to the prison. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 8 December 1992)

500. On 9 December 1992, Palestinians detained at the Hebron Central Prison went on a one-day strike and were considering other protest measures because the prison authorities had not taken their demands seriously and because of deteriorating conditions of detention. (Al-Fajr, 21 December 1992)

501. On 11 December 1992, the Chief Military Prosecutor, Col. Menahem Finkelstein, speaking to the students of the Zeitlin High School in Tel Aviv, stated that there had been a tremendous decrease in the number of administrative detainees since 1989. He indicated that as at 1 November 1989, there were 1,366 administrative detainees. By 1 November 1990, this number had decreased to 715. A year later, the number stood at 449 and in 1992, at 223. Col. Finkelstein indicated that at the beginning of the uprising, 20 per cent of the prisoners were administrative detainees, as opposed to only 3 per cent today. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 13 December 1992)

502. On 14 December 1992, a security prisoner stabbed a military policeman at the Ketziot detention camp in the Negev, wounding him lightly. A guard then shot the assailant, wounding him in the groin. Following the stabbing, there were disturbances in the cell block where the assailant was being held. Guards dispersed the rioters with smoke grenades and rubber bullets. There were no injuries. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 15 December 1992)

503. On 20 December 1992, it was reported that following the last hunger strike staged by security prisoners, prison authorities had started to renovate the cells of some 30 security prisoners, most of whom are Hamas activists, in wing 8 of Nitzan prison in Ramallah. So far, only a tenth of the 1,700 existing cells have been renovated. The prison authorities planned to renovate most of the cells (for judicial and security prisoners) in Israel and in the territories, over the two coming years. (Ha'aretz, 20 December 1992)

504. On 8 January 1993, it was reported that as of the following week, the IDF would set up courtrooms inside detention facilities in the territories. According to the plan, the IDF would also allow the families of detainees to attend the proceedings. So far, families were not allowed to attend trials. The new regulations would currently apply only to the Dahariya, Far'a and "the Beach" detention centres. in the Gaza Strip. (Ha'aretz, 8 January 1993)

505. On 21 January 1993, it was reported that the Israeli Prison Authority at the Dhahiriya Prison near Hebron had refused to meet a number of demands contained in a list submitted by the Palestinian detainees at the prison. The detainees went on a one-day hunger strike on 17 January 1993 in order to protest the deteriorating conditions at Dhahiriya. (Al-Fajr, 25 January 1993)

506. On 25 January 1993, Palestinian prisoners detained in Ashkelon Prison went on a three-day hunger strike to protest against the prison administration's inhumane treatment and the delay in fulfilling their demands. (Al-Fajr, 1 February 1993)

507. On 28 January 1993, it was reported that Dr. Fathi Subah from the al-Azhar University in Gaza had claimed that he was severely beaten by men from the GSS, after he was arrested on 9 January and imprisoned in a Gaza jail. His representative, Attorney Tamar Peleg-Sarik of the Association for Civil Rights in Israel, lodged a complaint against the State Attorney-General Yosef Harish. (Ha'aretz, 28 January 1993)

508. On 4 February 1993, the Ministry of Justice denied reports alleging that new regulations were being established concerning the General Security Service (GSS) interrogation of security detainees which would bar GSS agents from using "moderate physical pressure", but would not make them liable to prosecution if a prisoner died during interrogation. According to reports on Israeli radio and in the "Davar" newspaper, a ministerial committee and the GSS were reviewing interrogation regulations with a view to replacing the Landau Report guidelines which were issued in 1987, allowing the use of "moderate physical pressure" during questioning. The extent of "moderate physical pressure" was specified in a secret report presented to the then Prime Minister Yitzhak Shamir, details of which have never been released. News reports indicated that changes in the guidelines were reviewed on 3 February 1993. (Ha'aretz, 5 February 1993; Jerusalem Post, 5 February 1993; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 11 February 1993)

509. On 10 February 1993, security prisoners in the Hebron central prison lodged a complaint with the High Court against the administrators of the prison protesting the insufficient amount of water they were given. (Ha'aretz, 11 February 1993)

510. On 12 February 1993, it was reported that the Association for Civil Rights in Israel (ACRI), had appealed to the Government to investigate the condition of Jihad Abu Omar, a detainee from Hebron. Abu Omar has been under Shabak interrogation for the past 40 days, and has had no access to medical treatment. ACRI stated that the Shabak had used the illegal practice of psychological and physical torture on the detainee. (Al-Fajr, 22 February 1993)

511. On 17 February 1993, it was reported that the Association of Israeli-Palestinian Physicians had demanded that Police Minister Moshe Shahal examine the circumstances of the death of a security prisoner who was found hanging in his cell on 15 February 1993 in the Beersheba jail. Thirty-four-year-old Samir Karim (or Mohammed Sulameh) had served nearly eight years of an 18-year prison sentence for attempted murder, illegal possesion of firearms and for belonging to a hostile organization. (Jerusalem Post, 17 February 1993; Al-Fajr, 22 February 1993)

512. On 17 February 1993, it was reported that the ICRC was urging the Government to take concrete measures to improve the treatment of Palestinians under interrogation. The appeal was made in a statement issued by a spokesman for the organization after a confidential report on the matter was submitted on 14 February 1993 to Police Minister Moshe Shahal, Justice Minister David Liba'i, with copies to Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and Foreign Minister Shimon Peres. (Jerusalem Post, 17 February 1993)

513. On 25 February 1993, it was reported that in a letter to Member of the Knesset Tewfik Ziad, security prisoners detained at the Kfar Yuna prison had complained that the prison authorities did not implement the recommendations of the Levi Commission. Palestinian security prisoners in Gaza prison also complained that only minor improvements had been made in detention conditions since the end of their hunger strike. (Al-Tali'ah, 25 February 1993)

514. On 6 March 1993, it was reported that Ziad Silmi, 19, who killed two Israelis and injured nine others in Tel Aviv, had been transferred to Ayalon Prison in Ramle. Silmi's legs and arms were broken when Israelis attacked him with metal bars and beat him severely during the attack. Israeli sources reported that the youth had also been severely beaten during his 15-day interrogation, in the course of which he was rendered unconscious several times. (Al-Fajr, 15 March 1993)

E. Annexation and settlement


515. On 1 December 1992, it was reported in the Jerusalem Post that official Israeli estimates were that 61 per cent of the land in the territories was owned by Arabs and 8 per cent by Israelis, while the rest was State land or land that had been unclaimed. The proportion of land confiscated by Israel had been placed as high as 60 to 70 per cent by many Palestinians who quoted studies on the subject. (Jerusalem Post, 1 December 1992)

516. On 2 December 1992, it was reported that the Government had approved a special allocation of some $3,817,000 for the development of Arab neighbourhoods in eastern Jerusalem, after Mayor Teddy Kollek had personally lobbied Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin for funds. The allocation was approved as an addition to the 1992 State budget. The bulk of the money was to be used to improve roads and about $305,350 was to be funnelled through the Arab Community councils and committees for use in improving street lighting, garbage collection, and smaller development projects. Moshe Amirav, who holds the municipality's transport portfolio, stated that plans were already being finalized for badly needed work in Beit Hanina, Beit Safafa, and Sur Bahir. (Jerusalem Post, 2 December 1992, Ha'aretz, 3 December 1992)

517. On 31 December 1992, it was reported that, according to the new lists published on 30 December 1992, the Government would continue to provide Special area loans for settlements in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, and special area grants would continue to be accorded in Gush Etzion. (Jerusalem Post, 31 December 1992)

518. On 7 January 1993, it was reported that the Israeli Government would continue granting loans to settlers in the amount of up to 49,500 shekels, and that part of the loan would be considered as a donation. (Al-Tali'ah, 7 January 1993)

519. On 17 January 1993, the "Peace Now" movement reported that a survey it had recently conducted in the territories showed that new building had started since the Rabin Government took office, in addition to the 11,000 housing units the Government had pledged to complete. The report estimated that the new construction amounted to only several dozen units, but demanded that the Government "honour its commitment not to build any new settlements". (Jerusalem Post, 18 January 1993)

520. On 19 January 1993, it was reported that the Jerusalem municipality had proposed to the Housing Ministry the establishment of a new Jewish neighbourhood to be located between Pisgat Zeev and the French Hill neighbourhoods in Jerusalem, in an area of 800 dunams, most of which was not cultivated and was owned by Arabs. The land would be requisitioned for the purpose of this project. (Ha'aretz, 19 January 1993)

521. On 19 January 1993, eyewitnesses from the village of Silwad near Ramallah reported that the Israeli authorities had begun expanding the nearby Ofra settlement on land belonging to the village. (Al-Fajr, 25 January 1993)

522. On 21 January 1993, intensive settlement activity took place in the occupied territories, following the approval two weeks before by the Knesset of the 1993 budget which allocated 99 million shekels for "small" settlements. This new definition seems to include both "political" and "security'' settlements. (Al-Tali'ah, 21 January 1993)

523. On 31 January 1993, a spokesman for the Gaza Coast Regional Council announced that Moshav Ganai Tal, in the Gaza district, where two soldiers were killed on 30 January 1993, would be extended in response to the attack by moving its fence further south, thus giving the settlement an additional 100 dunams of land near the hothouses. Since the additional dunams were already included in the settlement's master plan, there was no need for additional permits from the Government. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 31 January 1993)

524. On 2 February 1993, it was reported that settlers in the West Bank and Gaza were finding it difficult to pay the rent for some 2,000 caravans which currently stood empty, and have asked the Housing Minister to redraft their rental agreements. It was also reported that a month earlier Housing Minister Binyamin Ben-Eliezer had ordered that connecting new caravans to the infrastructure be stopped and had also ordered that no more immigrants be moved into the caravans. (Jerusalem Post, 2 February 1993)

525. On 4 February 1993, it was reported that there were currently empty 7,000 housing units in the occupied territories which were apparently located in areas where no Israelis wished to live. According to the report published by the Israeli daily Ha'aretz last November, the number of Israelis who want to live in the occupied territories is constantly declining. (Al-Fajr, February 1993)

526. On 11 February 1993, it was reported that OC Central Command Major-General Danny Yatom and OC Southern Command Major-General Matan Vilnai had lately issued an order prohibiting the settlers from building and planting in the territories. (Ha'aretz, 11 February 1993)

527. On 25 February 1993, it was reported that the Jerusalem municipality had received a permission to complete the Minoniya school, one of the most controversial projects in eastern Jerusalem in recent years, which was fought over by ministers, the police and local leaders. The school has stood half-completed for two years, in the area where Wadi Joz meets Mount Scopus. The National Planning Board authorized on 23 February 1993 the completion of the school, for up to 200 handicapped and special education pupils. Mayor Teddy Kollek stated that it was the obligation of the State and the Jerusalem authorities' aim to meet the educational needs of all segments of the city's population, including the Arabs. (Jerusalem Post, 25 February 1993)

528. On 8 March 1993, the Jerusalem Post reported that a strict government quota on Arab housing construction in Jerusalem had been in force for two decades and was aimed at keeping the Arab population in the capital in check. "Labour" and "Likud" Governments both enforced the quota which attempted to ensure that the Arab population did not rise significantly above its 26 per cent share it constituted when Jerusalem was reunited in 1967. (Jerusalem Post, 8 March 1993)

529. On 11 March 1993, Jamal Talab, the head of the Land Affairs Committee of the Arab Studies Society in Jerusalem, stated that 53,000 dunums of the occupied territories, including Jerusalem, had been confiscated in 1992. Talab explained that this relatively low figure in comparison with the previous year could be explained by the fact that there was less land left to be confiscated. For example, 67 per cent of West Bank land had either been confiscated already or was in the process of being confiscated. The last figure included land which was sealed off as well as land cases which remained to be examined by objection committees. A total of 277,000 dunums were confiscated during the first five years of the intifadah. Talab noted an increase in land that was seized by settlers and Israeli authorities directly from its owners, without the taking of any legal steps, particularly last Year. Five new settlements were built in 1992 while 43 were expanded. During 1992, settlement activities were particularly intensive in the district of Bethlehem, followed by the districts of Nablus and Tulkarm. Talab also Pointed out that settlement activities were less intensive in the so-called "security settlements" such as those in the Valley area, in Jenin and in Hebron. The figures released by the Committee also showed that 64,000 trees were uprooted in 1992, representing 31 per cent of all trees that were Uprooted during the five years of the intifadah. (Al-Tali'ah, 11 March 1993)

F. Information concerning the occupied Syrian Arab Golan


530. On 17 February 1993, it was reported that Deputy Housing Minister Aryeh Gamliel had denied that the Government has stopped construction in the Golan Heights but confirmed that it had suspended work on the housing infrastructure in the area. Gamliel explained that the Government was completing the work on infrastructure according to priorities, attending to heavily populated areas first. (Jerusalem Post, 17 February 1993)

531. On 22 February 1993, thousands of demonstrators marched through Jerusalem demanding that Israel not return the Golan Heights to the Syrian Arab Republic. Police estimated the crowd at 7,000. Jerusalem police chief, Commander Rafi Peled, described the demonstration as one of the largest to have taken place in the capital in years. (Jerusalem Post, 24 February 1993)

532. On 15 March 1993, angry settlers from the Golan Heights tried to enter the Syrian Arab Republic at the Quneitra border crossing in an attempt to deliver a personal message to President Hafez Assad. A number of demonstrators were detained but were subsequently released. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 16 March 1993)

533. On 15 March 1993, a resident of Katzrin was remanded for 15 days after shooting and seriously wounding a young Druze from the Golan Heights whom he apparently mistook for a "terrorist". (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 16 March 1993)

534. On 16 March 1993, hundreds of Druzes staged from the Golan a general strike and mass rally in the village of Buka'ata in order to protest the shooting of a young Druze by a resident of Katzrin. The rally soon turned into a pro-Syrian and anti-Israeli demonstration. The protesters sang pro-Syrian songs, raised Syrian flags and shouted slogans that the Golan was and always has been a part of the Syrian Arab Republic. (Jerusalem Post, 17 March 1993)

535. On 16 March 1993, residents of the southern Golan Heights blocked part of the road around Lake Kinneret with vehicles and burning tyres. (Jerusalem Post, 17 March 1993)

536. On 28 March 1993, it was reported that the Israeli and Syrian authorities, under the auspices of the ICRC, had allowed an 85-year-old woman and her daughter from a Druze village on the Golan Heights to cross into the Syrian Arab Republic to attend the funeral of a son she had seen only once during the past 26 years. (Jerusalem Post, 28 March 1993)

537. On 30 March 1993, it was reported that the renovated Kibbutz Meitzar on the southern reaches of the Golan was continuing to attract settlers from the kibbutzim in other parts of the country despite uncertainty surrounding the future of the Golan Heights. Kibbutz Meitzar had been founded 10 years earlier near the Syrian border, but was virtually abandoned six years later when all the original members had left it. A group of eight families from other kibbutzim had settled in Meitzar in 1992 after the opening of the Madrid peace talks and additional families had also moved there since that time. (Jerusalem Post, 30 March 1993)

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Nahalin Nahhalin




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