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Président Abbas annonce à la 67e session de l’AG une candidature modifiée de la Palestine comme État non Membre des Nations Unies – Communiqué de presse Français
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Source: Department of Public Information (DPI)
General Assembly
27 September 2012

General Assembly
GA/11295

        Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Sixty-seventh General Assembly
Plenary
12th, 13th & 14th Meetings (AM, PM & Night)


SHARED GOAL OF MIDDLE EAST PEACE AT CENTRE OF GENERAL ASSEMBLY DEBATE,

BUT LEADERS CHART DIVERGENT PATHS TO ITS ACHIEVEMENT

Palestinian Authority to Modify Bid for Upgraded Status at UN; Israel Says
Time to Halt Iran’s Nuclear Weapon Programme by Drawing ‘Red Line’ through It


In a move intended to bolster the chances forpeace, Mahmoud Abbas, President of the Palestinian Authority, announced in the General Assembly today that his Government would seek status for Palestine as a non-Member State of the United Nations, following what he described as “aborted” efforts last year to have the Security Council allow the State of Palestine to “assume its rightful place in the United Nations”, despite widespread support for the initiative.

Mr. Abbas told world leaders gathered on day three of the Assembly’s annual general debate that the Palestinian Authority had begun intensive consultations with regional organizations and Member States aimed at having the 193-member body adopt, during this session, a resolution on that bid. He was confident of its broad support by the vast majority of countries.

In those efforts, he issued a clarion call to the international community to uphold its responsibility in the Security Council by adopting a resolution that outlined the foundation for a solution to the Palestinian-Israeli conflict. Such a text would serve as a “binding reference” and guide for the survival of the two-State solution — as envisioned by the historic Oslo Accords 19 years ago. The independence and freedom of a Palestinian State was, above all, a sacred right that must be realized, he said.

To further that aim, the Palestinian Authority had created a model for an effective, modern State, he said. It had held exploratory talks with Israel at the start of the year and created conditions favourable for resuming negotiations. But Israel’s actions in his homeland and its position on permanent status issues had led him to conclude that Israel rejected a two-State solution. Moreover, its campaign of “ethnic cleansing” through settlement building was increasingly altering the character of Jerusalem and the West Bank, while its blockade and movement restrictions in Gaza had punished Palestinians for years.

He called for a new approach that would realize an independent State of Palestine with East Jerusalem as its capital, over all territory occupied by Israel since 1967. “There is no homeland for us except Palestine,” he declared. Peaceful resistance against the occupation would continue. “Let peace be victorious before it is too late.”

Israel, too, sought a lasting peace with the Palestinian people, said the country’s Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu. But the conflict would not be solved with “libellous speeches at the United Nations” or unilateral declarations of statehood. The parties must negotiate a solution in which a demilitarized Palestine recognized a single Jewish State.

Complicating the broader picture, however, were the forces of radical Islam, he said, which sought to “end the modern world”. It had many branches — from the rulers of Iran, to Al-Qaida terrorists to radical cells lurking in every part of the globe — rooted in the same “bitter soil of ignorance”. Iran had turned Lebanon and Gaza into terrorist strongholds and continued to deny the Holocaust. With that track record, “who among you would feel safe in the Middle East?” he asked.

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Background

The General Assembly met today to continue the general debate of its sixty-seventh session.

Statements

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BAKIR IZETBEGOVIĆ, Chairman of the Presidency of Bosnia and Herzegovina, ...

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“Who could have predicted such an explosion of freedom in the Middle East?” he asked. As a Security Council member, he had strongly supported those aspirations for greater freedom and democracy. At the same time, turning to the “deeply troubling” Israeli-Palestinian stalemate, which continued unabated, he stressed that the peace process was not moving forward. “The chain of violence is not broken,” he said. A new impetus to negotiations was urgently needed, because there was no alternative to a negotiated solution. The Palestinians had every right — historic, moral and legal — to a State of their own, and Israel had every right to its security. The occupation must end, but so must the terror and violence. All attempts to create new realities on the ground in the hope that those would become accepted as a starting point must be rejected, he said, adding that Israel should immediately end all settlement activities in the Palestinian territories — the “most serious obstacle to peace”. Moreover, he said, “the state of affairs of 60 or 6,000 years ago is not the right point of reference”. Instead, it should be the principle of peaceful coexistence between two sovereign States that guided a just resolution to the conflict.

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MONCEF MARZOUKI, President of Tunisia, ...

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... More broadly, he supported Palestinians on their quest for peace and an independent State with Al-Quds as its capital. Denouncing Islamophobia, he urged reducing the chasm between rich and poor. ...


DONALD RABINDRANAUTH RAMOTAR, President of Guyana, ...

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... He said the United Nations must persevere in finding a peaceful end to conflict in Syria, and concerning Israel and Palestine. ...

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IKILILOU DHOININE, President of Comoros, ... Equally important was the Palestinian cause, he added, which had long awaited a just solution. Comoros reiterated its full support to the Palestinian people, and associated itself with the solution of a Palestinian State living side by side in peace with Israel. ...

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HAJI AL-MUHTADEE BILLAH, Crown Prince of Brunei Darussalam, ...

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... He said that the weakness of the Organization’s structure was personified by the Palestinian peoples’ six decades of suffering and by “all other desperate situations in which the root causes of conflict and confrontation are still buried in the last century”. Simply put, that must change; in a globalized world, all nations were interdependent and equally responsible.

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MAHMOUD ABBAS, Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Palestinian Liberation Organization and President of the Palestinian National Authority, said attacks by the “terrorist militias” of Israeli settlers had become a daily reality, with at least 535 attacks perpetrated since the start of 2012. Palestinians faced relentless waves of attacks against their mosques, churches, homes and schools. Increased attacks should not surprise anyone; they stemmed from a policy that prioritized settlements and a racist climate fuelled by a “culture of incitement” in the Israeli curriculum and extremist declarations.

Since the Assembly’s last session, Israel had continued its settlement campaign in Jerusalem and its environs, he said, aiming at altering the city’s historic character. It was a campaign of “ethnic cleansing” against Palestinians by demolishing homes, revoking residency rights, denying basic services, closing institutions and impoverishing people through a “siege” of walls and checkpoints. Settlement building continued throughout the West Bank, while attacks persisted against the Gaza Strip. He urged that Israel be compelled to respect the Geneva Conventions, lift the blockade of Gaza and investigate the detention of Palestinian prisoners and detainees in Israeli jails.

He said Israel continued to impose severe restrictions on movement, preventing the Palestinian National Authority from implementing infrastructure projects and providing services to its citizens. Its overall policy was undermining the Authority’s ability to carry out its functions and implement its obligations. Such actions were taking place amid an Israeli political discourse that brandished extremist positions, which incited religious conflict. “This is something we firmly reject,” he said, stressing that such discourse only fuelled those trying to use tolerant monotheistic religions as ideological justification for terrorism.

To surmount that impasse, Palestinians had held exploratory talks with Israel at the start of the year, upon Jordan’s initiative, he said, and had made efforts to create favourable conditions to resume negotiations. But Israel’s actions in his homeland and position on permanent status issues had led him to conclude that Israel rejected the two-State solution. A State of Palestine coexisting alongside Israel represented the “historic compromise” of the Oslo Declaration of Principles adopted 19 years ago under United States auspices, by which Palestinians had accepted to establish their State on only 22 per cent of the territory of historic Palestine. Israeli measures aimed to empty the Oslo Accords of their meaning, making their implementation extremely difficult if not impossible.

Further, Israel refused to seriously discuss the issue of Palestinian refugees, he said, and continued its occupation of Palestinian water basins, agricultural land, air, skies and borders. It refused to allow Palestinians to attain their rights and rejected the independence of a State of Palestine. “I speak on behalf of an angry people,” he said, calling Israel’s evasion of accountability a license for it to continue its policy of dispossession and ethnic cleansing.

Despite the complexity of the reality and all the frustration, “there is still a chance — maybe the last — to save the two-State solution and to salvage peace,” he said, urging a new approach based on an understanding that a racist “settler colonization” must be condemned, punished and boycotted. It also required reaffirmation of and adherence to the terms of reference endorsed by the United Nations. Marathon talks were not needed, but rather the sincere intention to reach peace. The approach must include realization of an independent Palestinian State, with East Jerusalem as its capital, over all territory occupied by Israel since 1967, as well as an agreed solution to the Palestinian refugee issue, in line with resolution 194 (III), as prescribed in the Arab Peace Initiative.

The international community must now uphold its responsibilities, he said. He called on the Security Council to adopt a resolution on the foundations for a solution to the Palestinian-Israeli conflict, which would be the basis and foundation and serve as a “binding reference” if the two-State solution was to survive. The independence and freedom of a State of Palestine was a sacred right that must be realized. The Palestinian National Authority had affirmed its ability to create an advanced model for a modern State, achievements recognized by the Ad Hoc Liaison Committee and the World Bank, among others. A year ago, he had submitted the application for consideration by the Security Council to allow the State of Palestine to assume its rightful place in the United Nations, efforts that were aborted despite the fact that the overwhelming majority of countries supported them. A year later, “ Palestine” was playing its role in the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) with high professionalism.

His Government would continue its efforts to obtain full membership for Palestine at the United Nations, he said, and had begun consultations with regional organizations and Member States aimed at having the General Assembly adopt, during this session, a resolution considering the State of Palestine as a non-Member State of the United Nations. Today, 77 per cent of Palestinians were younger than 35 years old and they would not allow a new Nakba to occur. All Palestinians would continue to survive on their beloved land, every inch of which carried evidence of their roots. “There is no homeland for us except Palestine,” he said. Palestinians would continue peaceful resistance, in line with international humanitarian law, against the occupation for the sake of freedom, independence and peace. “Let peace be victorious before it is too late,” he said.

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BENJAMIN NETANYAHU, Prime Minister of Israel, told the Assembly that, three thousand years ago, King David had reigned over the Jewish State in its eternal capital, Jerusalem. In saying that, he addressed, in particular, those who proclaimed that the Jewish State had no roots in the region, and that it would soon disappear. The Jewish people had lived on, and “the Jewish State will live forever”, he said. Even after it was exiled from Israel, the Jewish people never gave up the dream of returning to their ancient homeland; over time, they had restored independence and rebuilt their national life. “The Jewish people have come home, and we will never be uprooted again,” he stressed.

Yesterday, on the holiest day of the Jewish year, Yom Kippur, Jews had taken stock of the past, prayed for the future, and remembered the sorrows of persecution, including the extermination of a third of its people — 6 million — during the Holocaust. But, at the end of the day, they had celebrated the heroism of their people and the marvel of the “flourishing, modern” Jewish State. “We walk the same paths tread by our patriarchs”, but “we blaze new trails in science, technology, medicine and agriculture”, he said, adding that the past and the future found common ground in his nation. Unfortunately, that was not the case in many other countries, as a great battle was being waged between the modern and the medieval. Modernity sought a bright future in which the rights of all were protected and life was precious. The forces of medievalism sought a world in which women were subjugated, and in which rights were suppressed and death, not life, was glorified. Nowhere was that more stark than in the Middle East, he said.

Israel stood firmly with the forces of modernity. Its exceptional creativity was matched by its remarkable compassion, he said, describing Israeli humanitarian efforts during recent crises in Haiti, Japan, Tunisia and elsewhere. Israel treated thousands of Palestinian Arabs in its hospitals. Indeed, it was because Israel so cherished life that it also cherished and sought peace. It sought to preserve historic ties with Egypt and Jordan, and to forge a lasting peace with the Palestinian People. However, he emphasized, “we won’t solve our conflict with libellous speeches at the United Nations” or with “unilateral declarations of statehood”. Instead, the parties must sit together to negotiate a solution in which a demilitarized Palestinian State recognized the one and only Jewish State.

Israel wanted to see the three great religions that had sprung from its region coexist in peace and mutual respect, he went on. But, the forces of radical Islam, which sought supremacy over all of Islam, wanted to extinguish freedom and “end the modern world”. It had many branches, from the rulers of Iran to Al-Qaida terrorists to the radical cells lurking in every part of the world. They were all rooted in the same “bitter soil of intolerance”, he said, and they were directed at their fellow Muslims, at Christians, and Jews, at secular people and at anyone who did not submit to their creed. However, he stressed that “ultimately, they will fail… ultimately light will penetrate the darkness”. Ignorance had given way to enlightenment in the past, and so, too, would the Middle East once again be guided not by fanaticism and conspiracy, but by reason and curiosity. The question was not whether fanaticism would be defeated, but how many lives would be lost before it was defeated.

In the past, those who opposed fanaticism had waited too long to act, at a “horrific cost”. That could not happen again. “Nothing could imperil the world more than the arming of Iran with nuclear weapons.” Likening a nuclear-armed Iran to a nuclear-armed Al-Qaida, he said that both were fired “by the same hatred, and driven by the same lust for violence”. He pointed to the actions of Iran to date, even without nuclear weapons: it had brutally put down protests for democracy in its own country in 2009, and abetted the killing of American soldiers in Iraq. It had turned Lebanon and Gaza into terrorist strongholds, embedding thousands of rockets and missiles. Thousands of those had been fired at Israel by their terrorist proxies. It had even plotted to blow up a restaurant a few blocks from the White House, and continued to deny the Holocaust, as it had done again this week at the United Nations. Given that record of Iranian aggression, he asked the Assembly to imagine its actions with nuclear weapons. In that context, “who among you would feel safe in the Middle East?” Who would feel safe in Europe, in America or anywhere?

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THOMAS MOTSOAHAE THABANE, Prime Minister of Lesotho, ...

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... As for the Middle East, he said it was time for individual interests to give way to compassion and reason, so that the Palestinian people could enjoy their inalienable right to self determination “in our lifetime”. The two-State solution had long been held as the only plausible way forward, and the international community must prevail upon Israel to support it. ...

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MOHAMED WAHEED, President of the Maldives, ... He expressed hope that Palestine would join the United Nations as a full member, and called on all Member State to support the Palestinian people’s aspirations and their right to self-determination.

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MOHAMED YOUSEF EL-MAGARIAF, President of the General National Congress of Libya, ...

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It called for urgent action to end Israeli aggression against the Palestinians, for Israel’s withdrawal from the Occupied Palestinian Territory, and for an independent State of Palestine. ...

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KHUDIER ALKHUZAE, Vice-President of Iraq, ...

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... Expressing support for a Palestinian State with Jerusalem as its capital and United Nations membership, he “unequivocally” rejected Israel’s policies of repression, Judaization and usurpation of land, its disregard for international calls to end its unjust practices, and its refusal to place its nuclear installations and arsenal under IAEA monitoring. ...

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NAJIB MIKATI, Prime Minister of Lebanon, said that at a time of legitimate Arab demands for reform and change, their goals would only be met through dialogue rather than violence and foreign interference, he said. Regarding the Syrian crisis, Lebanon could not alone handle the increasing number of refugees displaced by the conflict, he said, calling for international assistance and efforts to ensure a political consensus on ending the violence, which claimed hundreds of lives each day. As for the question of Palestine, Lebanon supported the people’s right to return to their homeland and to have an independent State, he said adding that recognition and acceptance of such a State as a full United Nations member should pave the way for a just political settlement of the Palestinian cause and end the historical injustice the Palestinian people had suffered since 1948.

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GORDON DARCY LILO, Prime Minister of the Solomon Islands, ...

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... The Solomon Islands supported a major United Nations role in resolving all situations of conflict in the Middle East, including advancing a two-State solution to the Israeli-Palestinian dispute. ...

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YANG JIECHI, Minister for Foreign Affairs of China, ... Expressing deep concern about the stalled Israeli-Palestinian peace process and the economic and humanitarian difficulties facing the Palestinian people, he reiterated China’s support for the creation of an independent Palestinian State, enjoying full sovereignty and with East Jerusalem as its capital. China also supported Palestine’s membership in the United Nations and other international organizations.

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ESPEN BARTH EIDE, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Norway, ...

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While welcoming some positive developments concerning conflicts in Myanmar, Sudan-South Sudan and Colombia, he expressed concern about the Israeli-Palestinian situation. Noting that he was Chair of the Ad Hoc Liaison Committee for Support to the Palestinian Authority, he recalled that exactly one year ago, it had been agreed in New York that the Palestinian State-building process had reached “a level where the institutions of State are in place”. However, “great expectations were created, only to be frustrated”, he said, adding: “Time is running short, shorter than many seem to understand.” A two-State solution was the only path to sustainable peace, he emphasized, adding that negotiations remained the key. A strong United Nations was needed to international goals, he said, pointing out that intergovernmental micromanagement of what would be the Chief Executive’s prerogative in any modern organization was the opposite of making the Organization work. “Leaders have real choices,” he noted.

KHALID BIN AHMED BIN MOHAMMED AL KHALIFA, Foreign Minister of Bahrain, ...

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Even though the Syrian crisis was currently the international community’s main concern, the Palestinian question remained the core issue in the Middle East, he said. It was imperative to redouble efforts for a just, durable and comprehensive solution, notably through the creation of an independent Palestinian State with East Jerusalem as its capital, in conformity with the relevant resolutions of the United Nations, the Arab Peace Initiative and the decisions of the Middle East Quartet. The international community should, therefore, demand that Israel halt its settlement-construction which was jeopardizing the chances for peace. He also stressed the necessity of implementing General Assembly and Security Council resolutions by taking practical action to halt Israeli violations and aggression and ensure its observance of the principles of international legitimacy.

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EDOUARD NIANKOYE LAMA, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Guinea, ...

... Concerning the Middle East, he said the restoration of lasting peace in the region required an independent Palestinian State living in peace and security alongside Israel. The situation in Syria was more alarming than ever before, and Guinea urged stakeholders to exert all efforts to halt the violence, protect civilians and restore peace.

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RAFAEL RONCAGLIOLO ORBEGOSO, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Peru, ...

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Reaffirming his country’s recognition of a Palestinian State, he said Peru had established diplomatic relations with it and supported its admission as a Member State of the United Nations. ...

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