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Press Release
UNITED NATIONS
Department of Public Information · News Coverage Service · New York


Security Council
4753rd Meeting (AM & PM)
SC/7756
13 May 2003


SECURITY COUNCIL COMMITS TO WIDER, EFFECTIVE USE OF CHARTER PROVISIONS

AIMED AT PEACEFUL SETTLEMENT OF DISPUTES

In Presidential Statement, Cites Framework of Chapter VI;
Secretary-General Says Council Should Use Influence to Pre-empt Volatile Issues


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Background

The Security Council met this morning to discuss its role in the pacific settlement of disputes.  Before entering into an interactive dialogue, the Council was scheduled to first hear from the Secretary-General and three eminent persons: Sir Brian Urquhart, former Under-Secretary-General for Special Political Affairs; Jamsheed Marker, former Personal Representative of the Secretary-General for East Timor; and Nabil Elaraby, Judge of the International Court of Justice.

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Statements by Council Members

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JEAN MARC DE LA SABLIÈRE (France) ...

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Continuing, he said that much hope existing for implementing the “Road Map” established by the Quartet for the Middle East.  There was no point in changing the delicate balance defined by the Charter, but within the scheme established under Chapter VI, the Council could make a major contribution in various ways, including lending political support to the Secretary-General and to regional organizations, by establishing peacekeeping and observer missions and, in broader terms, by facilitating implementation of agreements reached between the parties, by sending messages that they had to find a negotiated solution.  His country was deeply committed to the pacific settlement of disputes, for which the Council could be a catalyst towards a meeting of minds and wills.

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MIKHAIL WEHBE (Syria) ...

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He said that, for more than 50 years the United Nations, in general, and specifically the Security Council, had prevented many conflicts through diplomacy and dialogue.  It had also built peace in many regions.  Some problems remained, however, particularly the Middle East question, which was among the oldest conflicts before the Council.  All resolutions relating to the Arab-Israeli conflict had been adopted under Chapter VI of the Charter.  The Council had not taken the appropriate measures to achieve the peaceful settlement of that conflict, which was still raging today.  The Council’s role was not confined to the use of peaceful means, but extended to the use of all possible means to prevent a situation from raging out of control. 

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For information media - not an official record