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Source: Division for Palestinian Rights (DPR)
Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People (CEIRPP)
Special Unit on Palestinian Rights (SUPR)(See also > CEIRPP > DPR)
30 January 1980

SPECIAL UNIT ON
PALESTINIAN RIGHTS


Office of the Under-Secretary-General
for Political and General Assembly Affairs


January 1980


Contents

1. Action taken by the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People

2. Representation of the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People at the World Conference in Solidarity with the Arab people, held at Lisbon, Portugal, from 2 to 6 November 1979

3. Consideration of the question of Palestine in the 34th session of the General Assembly

4. Resolutions regarding Palestine adopted by the 34th session of the General Assembly


1. Action taken by the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People

The 45th meeting of the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People was held on 13 November 1979. At this meeting the Committee heard statements by the delegation of the World Peace Council which was headed by its President.

At this meeting the arrest and probable future deportation of the Mayor of Nablus in the Israeli-occupied Arab territories was also considered. The Committee authorized the Chairman to address a letter to the Secretary-General and to the President of the Security Council expressing the Committee's concern over the new violation of the rights of the people of Palestine by the Israeli authorities. The Committee also authorized the Chairman to issue a press communique on the subject. Text of the letter dated 13 November 1979 from the Chairman of the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People addressed to the Secretary-General and the President of the Security Council is as follows: (A/34/680-S/13624)

I have the honour, in my capacity as Chairman of the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People, to draw your attention to the recent press reports relating to the arrest of Mayor Bassam Shaka of Nablus. The reason for this arrest, according to the information given in the press, appears to be the favourable disposition of the Mayor towards the Palestinians, whom the Israeli authorities describe as terrorists, an expression which the same authorities apply to the Palestine Liberation Organization, recognized by the United Nations General Assembly as the sole representative of the Palestinian people.

This arrest of an elected official, as well as the impending measure of deportation with which he is threatened, constitutes one more example in the efforts of the Israeli authorities in their repression of Palestinian opinion and their suppression of freedom of expression in the Arab territories under illegal occupation by Israel since 1967. Such a measure of deportation would, moreover, be a direct violation of article 49 of the fourth Geneva Convention of 1949, which prohibits deportation.

The Committee of which I have the honour to be Chairman has authorized me to express its deep concern in the light of this recent case of violation of international law, which, moreover, clearly indicates Israel's intention of consolidating its hold on the territories which that State illegally occupies. Such actions, which represent a threat to the security and peace of the region, can only aggravate the situation and would make it necessary for the Security Council to take appropriate steps as soon as possible in order to dissuade the Israeli authorities from their intention of arresting and deporting Mayor Bassam Shaka.

I should be grateful if you would have the text of this letter circulated as a document of the General Assembly, under agenda item 24, and of the Security Council.


(Signed) M├ędoune FALL
Chairman of the Committee on the
Exercise of the Inalienable Rights
of the Palestinian People

2. Representation of the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People at the World Conference in Solidarity with the Arab People held in Lisbon, Portugal from 2 to 6 November 1979

The Committee was represented at the Conference by its rapporteur Mr. Gauci, the Permanent Representative of Malta to the United Nations. The rapporteur made a statement on behalf of the Committee at this Conference. (Full text below).

The World Conference in Solidarity with the Arab People and their central issue: Palestine, adopted a declaration (A/34/734-S/13656) (full text below).

Statement made by the Rapporteur of the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People at the World Conference in Solidarity with the Arab People and their Central Issue; The Palestinian Question, held in Lisbon, Portugal from 2 to 6 November 1979

Chairman Arafat of the Palestine Liberation Organization, in his memorable address to the United Nations, symbolically brought with him an olive branch, and asked the members not to allow it to fall from his hand.

The large majority in the United Nations heeded that call, and gave their contribution, mainly through the creation of, and support for, the United Nations Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People, established four years ago. Even before it was established, pressure was exercised by Israel on countries not to participate in its work, and not to accept membership. However, 20 countries - representing all the continents in the world - accepted, and the following year the membership was increased to 23.

Subsequently, many Western newspapers had been confidently predicting that the report of the Committee would be so one-sided as to make it easily disposed of and put aside. They were grossly mistaken. The members of the Committee deliberately went out of their way to invite all interested countries to state their views before the Committee, and carefully analysed statements made at the United Nations. Most of the Arab Frontline States participated as observers; Israel refused.

The Committee carefully analysed all the resolutions of the United Nations on the Palestine question and on the more comprehensive Middle East crisis. We worked on a basis of consensus, free from any pressure, open to all who cared to make a contribution.

We prepared a report and submitted a plan of action to enable the Palestinian people to exercise their inalienable rights.

In presenting, as Rapporteur, my report on the work of the Committee in its first year, both before the Security Council and before the General Assembly, I stressed the importance of the question being discussed, both from the political and human rights view, and asked all countries carefully to consider the report and the recommendations before delivering a verdict. I said we, i.e., members of the Committee, claimed no monopoly of wisdom - the recommendations could be supplemented, or even changed, in accordance with views expressed, provided such views were well-founded. The only partiality to which the Committee would admit was that of legality and morality, and the search for peace within the United Nations.

No suggestions or amendments were made. The recommendations were endorsed by the General Assembly with over 90 votes in favour on the first occasion, and over 100 the second time, when more explanations had been given to those countries which initially had entertained certain doubts. Our recommendations were also endorsed by the Palestine National Council as a positive contribution to the solution of the question of Palestine. The General Assembly endorsed them as "a basis for the solution of the question of Palestine."

This favourable international reaction greatly encouraged us in our work.

During the subsequent years of our existence, in addition to pressing for action on our recommendations, and keeping a watchful eye on events in the Middle East, we prepared and completed several studies on the Palestine question, which we feel will help public opinion to be better informed on the evolution of this question in an objective manner - because in the past a great deal of misinformation had been propagated.

Copies of these studies will be made available to this Conference.

A film too has been prepared, which will be released shortly, in time for the celebration of the International Day of Solidarity with the Palestinian People on the 29th of this month.

Both the Committee and the Special Unit on Palestinian Rights at the United Nations attach importance to the objectivity of these studies and the film in helping to educate world public opinion.

Because of Israel's persistent intransigence in the occupied territories the Committee has on innumerable occasions found it necessary to issue letters of protest at actions illegally taken by the Israeli Government.

Now the Committee is in the process of submitting its fourth report to the General Assembly. In it, while giving an account of our activities, we will again stress what the aims of the international community are, and how we feel they should be activated.

We will stress that the Security Council has not yet taken action. We will point out our considered opinion on the deficiencies in agreements purporting to advance the cause of the Palestinian people. We will insist that this cannot be done without the participation of the PLO, the recognized leaders of the Palestinian people. And we will stress that the inalienable rights of the Palestinian people have not been implemented, despite the quasi-unanimous international consensus that has emerged.

A minority of countries in the United Nations remains so far uncertain, hesitant. Most of the Western European countries fall in this category. But apparently there has been an awakened interest in European countries, particularly those of the Economic Community, in assuming a more balanced position on the essential parameters of a comprehensive solution, judging by recent individual initiatives and collective policy statements.

That European countries have policies, interests and commitments which are not exactly identical to those of the United States, even less to those of Israel, is self-evident. That European economic prosperity is heavily dependent on Arab oil, which comprises 60 per cent of the world's known reserves, and presently accounts for two thirds of the world oil traffic, is equally self-evident.

On the basis of justice and morality, in defence of fundamental human rights, and even on the more narrow basis of self-interest, it seems to me that the countries of Europe need to assume a much more active role in helping to climax an international consensus for a peaceful and comprehensive solution, which the recently-signed Egyptian-Israeli peace treaty shows no sign of providing at this stage. Partial peace has already become very expensive; if progress continues to elude us, the prospects of economic chaos and political war loom dangerously nearer every day.

It is in the common interest of European and Arab countries that there should be an equitable solution. And there cannot be an equitable solution to the Middle East problem unless, as a fundamental prerequisite, the legitimate interests of the Palestinian people are taken into account, and unless their representatives have a say in the unfolding of their own destiny. No one can doubt that the Palestinians recognize the PLO as their political spokesman and leaders. I have had this confirmed time and time again at the United Nations. It is not for outsiders to tell the Palestinians who their leaders are.

The Arab countries, despite differences in approach, are united in their objectives. Even the policies advocated by the so-called "rejectionist" States, defined in their bare essentials, aim to achieve:


These objectives cannot be faulted. On the contrary, they provide a basis for mutually beneficial short- and long-term policies of co-operation between European and Arab countries. My own country, Malta, has pointed this out on numerous occasions in the past; permit me in my official capacity to do so once again, at a critical period, before hostile division becomes an even more pronounced feature of the turbulent Middle East. The time for objective involvement is fast running out.

There are now two major plans for the Middle East. One is the partial accord, recently signed, between two of the countries on the spot, with United States backing; this agreement was recently strongly condemned by the non-aligned countries, in so far as it neglected the rights of the Palestinian people. The second is that proposed by the United Nations, already endorsed by 100 countries. Despite conflicting interpretations, these two approaches should not be mutually exclusive, and Europe has an important role - and a suitable opportunity - if the Middle East is to be rescued from the clear danger of more acute confrontation, and instead drawn towards the potential of a genuinely peaceful solution.

It is therefore essential that European countries no longer remain largely indifferent to the evolving situation at the forthcoming General Assembly session, and thereafter. The opportunities are ahead; most of the spadework has already been done. The question now is at an important cross-roads, and the desire within the region itself for positive change and peaceful initiatives is probably at its most acute.

It is my firm conviction, as Rapporteur of the United Nations-Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People, that the United Nations has proposed an objective solution - a comprehensive solution. There is a significance in this advocated solution which is often overlooked in the heat of the debate at the United Nations. In the acrimonious atmosphere that unfortunately still prevails, as accusations and counter-accusations are hurled at each other by the protagonists. I wish to stress this point.

It is of particular significance that, for the first time, the third world has reconfirmed and given legal endorsement to a decision taken in the past, when the membership was only 50 countries, and when there was then an automatic (Western) majority. Now international opinion is much more widely represented, and a former decision of far-reaching significance, which was objected to previously, has now been endorsed.

In other words:

1. The right of Israel to exist in secure borders has been repeatedly confirmed by the present United Nations membership.

2. Indirectly, through their support of the Committee's recommendations, Israel's right to an independent existence has also been accepted by the PLO and its supporters, as a proposition coming from the prevailing international consensus on this issue. What they could not accept in the past as a Western inspired imposition, they can accept from a more broadly-based international consensus in which their friends were represented. But the present uncertainty about the future of the Palestinian people must be clarified first.

Public opinion throughout the world, including Israel itself and in the United States, is clamouring for change. But it is eliciting no governmental action, and the United Nations can only function if a truly international consensus emerges. This is the year when a major step forward is needed. But who will provide the impetus?

The United States, in the nature of present realities, is one of the most important countries with decisive influence in the Middle East equation. For the present and foreseeable future, however, as it enters the pre-Presidential election phase, it simply cannot provide the required leadership. In the best of times it is caught between the pressures of the Presidency, the Congress, the National Security Council, the State Department, the Press, the lobbies and the special envoys to the Middle East. The normal confusion becomes accentuated during the Presidential campaign and nothing in the nature of mature wisdom is likely to be forthcoming from that source for some more time.

The role of European countries at this delicate phase therefore assumes critical importance in shaping a future course based on justice, designed to produce genuine prospects for an enduring and peaceful solution, so long overdue on account of opportunities overlooked in the past. The international community cannot afford indifference; neither can it condone erroneous policies.

The recent pronouncements by the nine countries of the European Economic Community rightly laid stress on important elements which still have to be considered if an equitable solution is to be attained.

Among the European countries, those bordering the Mediterranean have a special responsibility in this regard, for they are the first to suffer as a result of the division in the region, which will prevail until an equitable solution is arrived at. No solution can be considered democratic and rational if it fails to provide the elements necessary for Palestinian self-determination. This factor has been recognized by Mediterranean countries. Some European Mediterranean countries are in fact members of the Palestine Committee; Portugal this year headed a special commission of the Security Council which investigated Israel's settlements policies; the other non-European Mediterranean countries have consistently followed the Committee's work and have contributed to its deliberations. Israel was and remains the only exception.

The non-aligned countries have endorsed Malta's proposal for a meeting between non-aligned countries of the Mediterranean and Mediterranean countries parties to the Conference on Security and Co-operation in Europe so as to exchange views and to prepare for the forthcoming CSCE meeting in Madrid. Here lies a unique opportunity for Mediterranean and other interested countries to provide a regional perspective to a possible solution, which would really stand the chance of healing the present alarming division, would promote justice, and advance the prospects of economic progress and peace.

This gathering today, representing so many European leaders, could provide a new impetus, a new insight, in the diligent search for enduring peace, in the most sensitive and holy region in the world of today.

We are now past the time of declarations. What we need are concrete recommendations, backed by determination to translate words into deeds. It is, as you all know, high time for the peaceful aspirations of the Palestinian people to be realized - 30 years of oppression must be alleviated.

The United Nations has provided a comprehensive formula for peace which does not overlook the interests and preoccupations of any country or people in the Middle East. It remains, however, to be acted on. This is Europe's opportunity. Mediterranean countries can provide the lead.

The World Conference in Solidarity with the Palestinian People adopted a Declaration, the text of which follows:

"The struggle for freedom, justice and peace constitutes an indivisible international responsibility. On the one hand, there is world-wide support for the cause of the Palestinian and Arab people in their struggle for the attainment of their inalienable national rights and the total withdrawal of Israel from the occupied territories. On the other hand, an explosive situation has been created as a result of Israel's persistent policy of continued occupation, annexation of territories, suppression and expulsion of Arabs from their homelands and the conspiracies of American imperialism violating the sovereignty of the Arab states. This has created a situation that threatens not only the security of the Arab region but also international peace and security. This situation is further aggravated by escalating brutal Israeli aggression against Southern Lebanon and the provocation of Syria and the exercise of a war of attrition against her, thus creating the most critical situation in this region.

This World Conference, in which more than 750 delegates representing 325 international popular bodies, parties and organizations in more than 100 countries have come to participate in Lisbon, Portugal from 2 to 6 November firmly and solemnly:

1. Condemns all imperialist and Zionist schemes, especially the Camp David accords and the Egyptian-Israeli Treaty. These accords have no validity because they violate and deny the inalienable national rights of the Palestinian Arab people and condone continued Israeli occupation of Palestinian and Arab territories.

2. Reaffirms its support to the struggle of the Arab people, especially the Palestinian Arab people, under the leadership of the P.L.O. which has achieved significant political gains in international and national forums.

3. Records its appreciation of the heroic struggle of the Palestinian Arab people in the occupied territories against Israeli occupation and against the so-called self-rule that denies their right to sovereignty and independence.

And calls for:

A. The unconditional, total and immediate Israeli withdrawal from all the occupied Arab and Palestinian territories, including Jerusalem, as affirmed by United Nations General Assembly resolutions and particularly resolution No. 33/29.

B. The restoration of the national inalienable rights of the Arab Palestinian people including their right to return to their homeland, self-determination, and the establishment of their national independent state as affirmed by the resolutions of the United Nations General Assembly, particularly resolution 3236.

C. The reaffirmation of the right of the Arab Palestinian people to conduct all forms of struggle, including armed struggle, to regain their national inalienable rights, as endorsed by the United Nations resolutions, and the principles of international law applicable to all national liberation movements.

D. Full support to the resolutions of the United Nations and other organizations condemning Israel for:


E. Full support to the United Nations General Assembly resolution No. 3379, which declares that zionism is a form of racism and racial discrimination, and for dissemination of relevant information in this regard.

F. The peoples of the world to work for wider recognition of the P.L.O. by governments all over the world.

The Conference expresses its solidarity with and appreciation for the struggle of the national, patriotic and progressive forces in Lebanon in defence of unity and territorial integrity, and independence of Arab Lebanon and its democratic development. The Conference further expresses its support to the presence of the Palestinian resistance in Lebanon for fulfilling its militant responsibility. It condemns the continuous and barbaric Israeli attacks on Lebanon, particularly in South Lebanon. It also condemns the fascist, isolationist proposals which have inherent dangers as they seek to give legitimacy to Israeli occupation of a part of South Lebanon. The Conference calls for the immediate and strict implementation of Security Council resolutions 425, 426, 444 and 450 as well as the decisions of the Beiteddin Conference and relevant decisions of the Baghdad Summit, especially the provisions dealing with Israel and the removal of obstacles that prevent the role of the Arab deterrent forces in helping the legal authorities to restore the sovereignty of Lebanon.

The Conference declares its full solidarity with the Egyptian national and progressive movement in its struggle for democracy and to nullify the Camp David Agreements and Washington Treaty that usurped the national sovereignty of Egypt over its territory.

The Conference declares its full solidarity with the struggle of the Syrian Arab Republic in its frontline confrontation against zionism and imperialism, the struggle of the Arab Front of Steadfastness and Confrontation, (Syria, Algeria, Libya, Democratic Yemen and the PLO), as well as the Arab Peoples Conference in opposing the Camp David Accords. The Conference also expresses its support for the decisions arrived at in the Ninth Arab Summit Conference held in Baghdad.

The Conference expresses support to the national movements of the Arab peninsula and the Gulf, in their struggle against pacts and military bases. The Conference also calls for vigilance against alliances formed by the United States of America, Israel and Sadat, aimed against the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya, Algeria and Democratic Yemen.

The Conference also condemns the United States policy of obstructing the work of the United Nations, particularly in adopting resolutions recognizing the inalienable right of the Palestinian people and the use of the veto to achieve its aims.

"The Conference finally calls upon all patriotic organizations and all peace-loving forces to support the PLO with all concrete and tangible means in order to achieve its objectives and fight all conspiracies and aggression.

The Conference records its satisfaction with the close co-ordination of the democratic and progressive forces in the Arab homeland in the struggle against reactionary, zionist and United States imperialist schemes.

The Conference also appreciates the significant role of the socialist countries, particularly the Soviet Union, the non-aligned countries, the Organization of African Unity, the Islamic Conference Organization, friendly States, and all forces of liberation, democracy and peace in support of the just struggle of the Arab people. This has led to the convening of the International Conference of Solidarity with the Arab People and their Central Issue: Palestine.

In order to further its objective and in support of the struggle of the Arab nation and the Arab people of Palestine, the Conference decides that the International Secretariat for Solidarity should continue its work."

3. Consideration of the Question of Palestine in the 34th Session of the General Assembly

The question of Palestine was considered by the 34th session of the General Assembly between 26 and 30 November 1979. Sixty-nine countries spoke in the general debate in the plenary. The debate started with the statement made by the Chairman of the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People, Ambassador Medoune Fall, of Senegal. (Full text below).

One would have thought that by inscribing the question of Palestine as a separate item on the agenda of its twenty-ninth session, and by adopting resolution 3236 (XXIX), which clearly defined the inalienable rights of the Palestinian people, the General Assembly had at last found a solution that could put an end to the difficulties that characterize the question of Palestine. Unfortunately, such was not the case, and the question of Palestine continues to figure among the major concerns of the international community. However, although it cannot be said that our Organization has always devoted to this question all the attention it requires, or that it has at all times made the necessary efforts to find a just and lasting solution to it, it is nevertheless true that over the years a positive trend has been established that has as its principal aim to find and to promote a definitive solution of this question. In the process, the General Assembly, in resolution 3236 (XXIX), defined the inalienable rights of the Palestinian people and recognized the right of the Palestine Liberation Organization to participate on an equal footing in all efforts and in all deliberations and conferences held under United Nations auspices to find a solution to the problem of the Middle East, at the very heart of which is the question of Palestine.

With this in view, the General Assembly established a special committee entrusted, inter alia, with preparing recommendations on the implementation of the inalienable rights of the Palestinian people. This Committee prepared recommendations that were approved by the United Nations General Assembly, the Movement of Non-Aligned Countries, the Organization of African Unity and the Islamic Conference. The National Palestinian Council, the sole representative body of the whole of the Palestinian people, likewise gave its support to the Committee's recommendations.

It seems to me useful to recall these facts, because those who have always been opposed to the rights of the Palestinian people to self-determination try to pass over the existence of this international consensus in silence and to ignore the recommendations of the General Assembly on the solution to the Palestinian problem. These recommendations continue to be valid and important, especially in view of present circumstances. Unfortunately, a major obstacle has always prevented their being put into effect: in this case, it is the obstructionist policy of a permanent member of the Security Council that opposes the approval by that body of the aforesaid recommendations. It is thus the Committee's duty to bring to the attention of the General Assembly, this trying situation that contravenes its will and its resolutions.'

Our Assembly, in resolution 31/20 of 24 November 1976, endorsed the recommendations contained in the report of the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People.

In that same resolution, the General Assembly urged the Security Council to consider the recommendations contained in the Committee's report and to take the necessary measures to implement those recommendations in order to achieve early progress towards a solution of the problem of Palestine and the establishment of a just and lasting peace in the Middle East.

Further in that same resolution, the General Assembly authorized the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People:


It was on the basis of that mandate of the General Assembly, therefore, a mandate that was renewed in resolutions 32/40 of 2 December 1977 and resolution 33/28 of 7 December 1978, that the Committee several times approached both the President and the permanent members of the Security Council to induce that United Nations body to act on the recommendations of the General Assembly.

On 27 October 1977, the Security Council resumed consideration of the General Assembly recommendations relating to the implementation of the inalienable rights of the Palestinian people, and since that time, it has remained seized of the question.

In fact, at the request of certain influential members of the Security Council, the Committee agreed that the consideration of the recommendations be suspended for a time. At that juncture, the Committee was attempting to demonstrate its good will and to enable certain initiatives to prove their effectiveness. The Committee nevertheless clearly made it known that it would under no circumstances be willing to subscribe to a postponement sine die of the Security Council's consideration of its recommendations.

At its thirty-third session, the General Assembly, in resolution 33/28 A of 7 December 1978, authorized the Committee,


In accordance with its mandate, the Committee sent several letters to the Security Council, drawing its attention to the stipulations contained in that General Assembly resolution, recalling to it the fundamental principles upon which the Assembly's recommendations were based, and, finally, asking it to adopt concrete measures based on those recommendations to promote the realization of tangible progress towards the solution of the question of Palestine.

Nevertheless, the Committee has been obliged to note that since its session of October 1977, the Security Council has not shown the slightest intention of resuming the consideration of the General Assembly's recommendations on the question of Palestine, despite numerous reminders from both the Assembly and the Committee. Thus the latter, which regarded this situation as the consequence of the obstructionist policy of one of the permanent members, entered into consultations designed to bring the Security Council to reopen its consideration of the question. This inaction on the part of the Security Council was all the less comprehensible in that all members of the Council were, at one point or another, led to speak in favour of the rights of the Palestinian people.

Finally, the Security Council decided to meet during the period from 20 June to 24 August 1979. During this series of meetings, a draft resolution was proposed by Senegal on behalf of the Committee. Nevertheless, owing to the special circumstances prevailing within the Council at that time, the Committee, after consultations with the delegations concerned, did not deem it appropriate to insist that the draft resolution be put to an immediate vote. It remains nevertheless understood that debate on this question will have to resume shortly, because the Security Council has still not adopted any decision on the subject of the recommendations of the General Assembly. And, in this connexion we must deplore the fact that a permanent member of the Security Council has seen fit by means of public pronouncements, to try to intimidate the Council in order to dissuade it from fulfilling the mandate which was conferred upon it by the General Assembly.

These manoeuvres of obstruction and intimidation appear all the more surprising to us as the draft resolution submitted before the Security Council, on behalf of the Committee, takes duly into consideration resolutions 242 (1967) and 338 (1973) which some consider - though wrongly as a matter of fact - to be the letters patent of the existence of the State of Israel. It is true that the draft resolution also indicates the inalienable rights of the Palestinian people - those rights that are recognized by all, but whose realization is being prevented by so many obstacles which have been artificially placed in the way.

In this respect, the Sixth Summit Conference of Heads of State or Government of Non-Aligned Countries, which was held in Havana in September 1979, reaffirmed its support for the decisions and proposals of the Committee. It was also:


The Conference of Non-Aligned Countries likewise advocated the convening of a special session of the General Assembly, "should the Security Council not succeed in coming to a decision through a lack of unanimity among its permanent members". The Conference-finally instructed the Co-ordinating Bureau of the Non-Aligned Countries in New York to co-ordinate its action with that of the Committee with a view to calling for the convening of such a special session when the time came.

The General Assembly of the United Nations has already adopted a resolution dividing a country - Palestine - in contempt for the sovereign will of its people. The General Assembly has adopted resolutions authorizing the use, in armed conflicts, of troops operating under the flag of the United Nations. That same General Assembly, with the same rights and privileges it has always had, may also make up for the short-comings of the Security Council by adopting in this present instance a decision to impose the terms of a peaceful and just settlement in a dispute that it was largely responsible for creating. The resolutions of the United Nations are the most authentic expression of the collective conscience of the whole of mankind, and the faithful implementation of those resolutions is a duty which is incumbent upon every Member of our Organization. The United Nations Charter, the foundation for these resolutions, is a multilateral treaty which is binding on all its signatories, which have solemnly committed themselves to respecting the spirit and the letter of that instrument.

Pursuant to its mandate, the Committee was required to follow the developments of the situation in the occupied Palestinian territories. To our great regret, we must state that the Israeli occupying Power has in no way renounced its methods of repression of the indigenous populations or its occupation of their lands. . .

Thus, the Committee has on a number of occasions been informed by Arab inhabitants of violations of human rights constantly being committed by the Israeli authorities. The Committee has, for its part, relied upon information in several articles appearing in the press and in official documents of the State Department of the United States of America referring to cases of torture and of inhuman treatment of the Arab populations in reporting to the Secretary-General and informing him of its concern in that regard.

Another source of concern which the Committee shares with the international community is the pursuit by the Israeli Government of its policy of establishing settlements in the occupied Arab territories. The Committee, in this connexion, has called to the attention of the Secretary-General of the United Nations and of the Security Council this policy which the entire international community concurs in considering to be in violation of basic principles of universally accepted international law and a serious additional hindrance to any further steps to promote peace in the Middle East.

The Security Council was obliged to examine this serious problem and to establish a Commission whose responsibility it was to examine the situation relating to settlements in the Arab territories occupied since 1967, including the Holy City of Jerusalem. The Commission, with which the Israeli Government completely refused to co-operate, issued a report (S/13450), the recommendations of which have been endorsed by the Security Council.

The Commission established, first of all, that the Government of Israel was engaged in a wilful, systematic and large-scale process of establishing settlements in the occupied Arab territories; that, secondly, in the implementation of that policy it had shown disregard for basic human rights, including in particular the right of the refugees to return to their homeland and thirdly, that that policy was causing profound and irreversible changes of a geographical and demographic nature in those territories, including the Holy City of Jerusalem.

The Commission further reaffirmed that:


These recommendations of the Commission were supported by the Security Council, which adopted resolution 452 (1979) on the subject. Unfortunately, Israel continues to defy the international community and to extend its settlements in the occupied Arab and Palestinian territories. There is no doubt that this policy will increase the agitation in those territories and unleash a new cycle of violence and oppression there.

On 27 October 1977, in presenting the recommendations of the Committee to the Security Council, I emphasized the danger represented by the explosive situation prevailing in southern Lebanon, which I had visited earlier as part of my duties as Chairman of the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People, and I said that Lebanon might well become the theatre of the unleashing of the fifth Middle Eastern war. Unfortunately, events proved me correct, and several months later the Israeli armed forces invaded southern Lebanon, from which they have not yet totally withdrawn.

The Security Council, as a result of these actions, sent a peace-keeping force to Lebanon. That force has, unfortunately, thus far not been able to carry out its mandate fully, as a result of the pursuit by Israel of its policy of occupation through the intermediary of bands of mercenaries. The personnel of the United Nations Force is being harassed and provoked in numerous ways. The behaviour of Israel in southern Lebanon has met with the uniform disapprobation of the entire international community. It has greatly increased the threats to peace and international security.

As regards the general development of the situation in the Middle East and specifically the peace efforts which have been deployed there from time to time, our Committee has intervened on a number of occasions in order to recall either to the parties involved or to the pertinent bodies of the United Nations the principles established by the General Assembly upon which any settlement of the question of Palestine should be based.

On 29 March 1979 the Committee, through its Chairman, sent to the Secretary-General and to the President of the Security Council a letter in which it recalled the principles upon which its recommendations were founded, and regretted, by the same token, that they had been ignored in the course of the recent negotiations on the Middle East. The Committee likewise expressed its concern on the subject of the recent decisions adopted by certain parties to the conflict in the Middle East. Those decisions, in the view of the committee, could hardly serve the principle of the inalienable rights of the people of Palestine and did not in a sufficiently specific manner attempt to solve the problem of Palestine, which the United Nations considers to be at the very heart of the conflict in the Middle East.

These fragmentary and ambiguous actions appear to us to be all the more inappropriate as numerous countries have now recognized the need for the United Nations to continue to deal with the question of the Middle East and to play a paramount role in it. The General Assembly has expressed this will in operative paragraph 4 of its resolution 33/28 A, where it states:


If the prospects for a just and lasting peace in the Middle East do not appear to us to be part of some immediate future, it remains true that the question of the inalienable rights of the Palestinian people has developed positively, and its importance is evidence of the dynamism which is also associated with the development of the Palestinian problem throughout the world.

Thus, in Europe and North America the Palestinian cause has met with constantly growing understanding, whereas in the recent past the populations of those regions, influenced by carefully stage-managed propaganda, had appeared insensitive if not hostile to that cause.

We are convinced that the visits to Vienna, Madrid and Lisbon by the President of the Palestine Liberation Organization, Mr. Yasser Arafat, will help the peoples of Europe to understand and to adopt a more appropriate view of the importance of the Palestinian problem. It was with this in mind that we welcomed the declaration published on 18 June last by the Ministers of Foreign Affairs of the European Economic Community, which affirms:


When speaking on 29 June 1979 on behalf of the Committee in the Security Council, I stated that we were ready to support any decision based upon the terms of that communique from the Nine. That statement is still valid: the ball is still in Europe's court.

In doing so I wish once again to express to the members of the Committee and to its officers my appreciation of their patient and constant contribution to the difficult tasks assigned to us by the Assembly.

In particular, the indefatigable Chairman of the Committee, Mr. Pall of Senegal, who has set his stamp of dedication, fairness and eloquence in the way he has guided the Committee, deserves our unanimous commendation. His departure from the United Nations, and in particular from the Committee, on a new assignment fills us with regret, for we shall truly miss him in the future.

Today he has again rendered us sterling service in his account of the work of the Committee over the period since we last met to discuss the human drama of the Palestinian people.

The report of the Committee is brief and factual. Essentially, the message it conveys is that, despite the endorsement of the recommendations of the Committee by this Assembly for three consecutive years and on each occasion more strongly than on the previous one, the recommendations have not yet been acted upon by the Security Council still less has a start been made in their implementation.

This in turn means that once more we cannot but admit to disappointment and concern, for nothing tangible has been done to alleviate the plight of the Palestinian people. On the contrary, as recent events have shown and as the Special Committee appointed by the Security Council has determined, the action on the spot taken by the occupying Power is increasing tension in the area and, unfortunately, retarding the prospects of a peaceful solution.

It is indeed difficult to imagine that real efforts at peace are contemplated when the Prime Minister of Israel proclaims, as he did as recently as June of this year:


That these are not mere words has been amply demonstrated in the last few days with the arrest and threatened deportation of the elected Arab Mayor of Nablus.

These and other official pronouncements, accompanied by long-term plans for further expansion of existing settlements or the establishment of additional ones in the occupied territories, are hardly consistent with the accepted concept of self-determination for the Palestinian people on which the international consensus is becoming more pronounced with every passing year.

Even The New York Times, not particularly noted for being sympathetic to the aspirations of the Palestinian people, in an editorial under the title "The West Bank Folly", had the following comment:


How the Israelis expect to negotiate with people they seem determined to humiliate is almost beyond understanding." (The New York Times, 16 November 1979, p. A 30)

The article concluded:


With their past and present historical experience, it is therefore not surprising that the leaders of the Palestinian people are sceptical of the real intentions of Israel, and yet they continue to favour the peaceful approach recommended by the Committee. I believe that this is an important element which all should recognize.

It is equally not surprising that the Committee, while continuing to derive encouragement from the consistently favourable response to its recommendations obtained from a growing number of governmental and non-governmental organizations has had perforce to limit its role over the past three years to three main functions: first, retaining its openness and objectivity; secondly, exercising vigilance over events on the spot; and, thirdly, spreading new information on the various aspects of the question of Palestine.

We have from the beginning been open to all sectors of opinion, and we jealously maintain that openness. On the very first day that the Committee meets after receiving its mandate from the General Assembly it invites all sectors of opinion that wish to make themselves heard before the Committee to do so. We have repeated this invitation each year of the Committee's existence, and every important statement made by any of the protagonists or by others with a potential influence on the question is carefully studied by the Committee.

We have also made efforts to give additional explanations on the Committee's recommendations whenever we have sensed that their exact purport may have been misunderstood. In particular, we have stressed that the paramount importance of this question and the fundamental elements of justice and human rights inherent in the Committee's recommendations should not be obscured under procedural pretexts. We remain ready at all times to provide any additional explanation that may be requested.

Therefore we wish once more to remind all who care to listen that the Committee's recommendations constitute a prescription for peace, three times endorsed after very careful consideration by the international community; recommendations that safeguard the interests and assuage the genuine preoccupations of all States and peoples in the Middle East. The solid foundation of the recommendations springs from their legality.

The second aspect of our work was to exercise vigilance concerning the events taking place on the spot. Here, unfortunately, we have had to raise our collective voices in protest all too often because of several repressive measures taken by the occupying Power that clearly went against the pronouncements, past and present, both of the General Assembly and of the Security Council.

These illegal measures adopted by the Israeli authorities are too numerous to mention individually. They have been recounted by the Chairman of the Committee, in his statement just before mine, and they have been the subject of several letters that we have had to address to the President of the Security Council and to the Secretary-General. They are clearly mentioned in the report.

The Committee also felt the need periodically to remind the Security Council of the urgency of the action that was expected of it by the Committee in its recommendations. In addition, the Committee co-operated fully with the Commission set up by the Security Council to investigate the situation relating to the Arab territories occupied since 1967 and was gratified to note that the views expressed by that Commission coincided largely with those of the Committee.

The Committee also expressed its serious preoccupation with the attempts to change the status of Jerusalem. Finally, the Committee felt the necessity to point out serious omissions in certain bilateral agreements, in so far as they related to the rights of the Palestinian people, which were negotiated without the participation of the Palestinians' recognized representatives and outside the framework of the United Nations on a question concerning which the responsibility of this Organization is particularly heavy.

The third element of the Committee's work involved the dissemination of objective information on the evolution of the Palestine question. In this, the Committee, aided by the Special Unit within the Secretariat, was assiduously active throughout the period under review. Ten major studies have been produced, entitled: "Origins and evolution of the Palestine problem" - covering in the first part the League of Nations period and in the second part the United Nations period from 1947 to 1977 and issued in November 1978; "The right of return of the Palestinian people" - issued in December 1978; "The right of self-determination of the Palestinian people" - issued in January 1979; "An international law analysis of the major United Nations resolutions concerning the Palestine question" - issued in July 1979; "The question of Palestine" - issued in November 1979; "The status of Jerusalem" - issued in November 1979; "The international status of the Palestinian people" - issued in November 1979; "The question of the observance of the Fourth Geneva Convention of 1949 in the territories of Gaza and the West Bank, including Jerusalem, occupied by Israel in June 1967" - at present being printed; "Acquisition of land in Palestine" - still to be issued; and "The status of fundamental rights of the Palestinian partition resolution" - also still to be issued.

A film has also been produced and will be shown for the first time on 29 November. And today, at 2.45 p.m., there will be a formal opening in the General Assembly public lobby of an exhibit entitled: "Palestinian children against occupation", presented by the Committee.

The delay in the reproduction of some of these studies is regretted, but it is hoped nevertheless that they will be found useful even for this year's debate.

During our debate last year, the local papers condescended to give prominence once to the fact that the item on Palestine was being discussed at the United Nations, and then proceeded to set out the main points in the statements of two delegations. The other 54 nations that participated in that debate received no mention; their views went completely unrecorded. This was a typical example of the way in which the popular local news media have portrayed the question of Palestine, time and time again in the past and to this day. This is the kind of distortion that the Committee has had to rectify.

Against the background of this habitual indifference and distortion, the Committee does not find it surprising that an orchestrated attempt is being made to characterize as biased the studies produced by the Unit. When indifference and distortion are the norm, productivity and objectivity become the exception. But the Committee has always insisted, and will continue to insist, on strict objectivity in whatever it produces.

As I have mentioned on a previous occasion, the only biases to which the Committee readily admits are those towards morality, legality and a peaceful approach. As an indication of this, it is sufficient for me to mention that, despite the numerical disparity of the opposing points of view in the Middle East controversy, there is in these studies more frequent reference given to scholarly and official Israeli sources than to Arab ones.

These studies make no sensational headlines, no instant news; they contain no arbitrary bias on the question of what is considered fit to print. They simply contain an objective, chronological presentation of the evolution of various aspects of the question of Palestine, so as to enable delegations and the public to form their own enlightened views on the events of the past. The actual experience of the Committee, in its attendance at conferences, has been that the talks that have been given and the studies that have been produced have helped to enhance understanding of the question of Palestine.

As we debate this item, let us not forget that, if to us here these reports form an informative source of study, to the people on the spot, to two generations of Palestinians, the events portrayed in them represent an anthology of destitution, of persecution, of strife, of dispossession, of upheaval and uprooting, of death and destruction, and of lingering frustration over hopes unfulfilled.

This, then, is the poignant question that still remains before us, incessantly demanding our attention and taxing our resources.

We know now - as we knew last year - that an important crossroads has been reached in the situation. We know that the desire for peace and positive change in the region is probably at its most acute. We know only too well that the erroneous policies of the past have not advanced the prospects of peace. We have found that the unrelieved tension in the region has already become very expensive, causing economic upheavals with world-wide impact. And we sense that if progress continues to elude us, if division becomes even more pronounced, the prospects of economic chaos and outright conflict will loom dangerously nearer every day. The subject-matter, therefore, is well documented. We are not taking a leap in the dark. On the contrary, the growing international consensus on the parameters of an equitable solution to the question of Palestine is now sufficiently well identified. Public opinion in individual countries without exception, as well as international opinion here at the United Nations, is clamouring for a change, for concerned action, for a peaceful, democratic solution. There is no longer any doubt in anyone's mind that the legitimate rights of the Palestinian people are now squarely in the forefront of public opinion; no longer can they be arbitrarily frustrated. There must therefore be a corresponding governmental response. And it must come, in the first place, through a unanimous vote here in this Assembly in favour of positive action. This is the year when a major new impetus is needed. The international community can no longer afford indifference, neither can it condone persistently erroneous policies.

4. Resolutions regarding Palestine adopted by the 34th session of the General Assembly

The following resolutions concerning the question of Palestine was adopted by the thirty-fourth session of the General Assembly:


Question of Palestine (A/RES/34/65)

A


The General Assembly,

Recalling and reaffirming its resolutions 3236 (XXIX) of 22 November 1974, 3375 (XXX) and 3376 (XXX) of 10 November 1975, 31/20 of 24 November 1976, 32/40 A and B of 2 December 1977 and 33/28 A to C of 7 December 1978,

Having considered the report of the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People,

Having heard the statement of the Palestine Liberation Organization, the representative of the Palestinian people,

1. Expresses its grave concern that no just solution to the problem of Palestine has been achieved and that this problem therefore continues to aggravate the Middle East conflict, of which it is the core, and to endanger international peace and security;

2. Reaffirms that a just and lasting peace in the Middle East cannot be established without the achievement, inter alia, of a just solution of the problem of Palestine on the basis of the attainment of the inalienable rights of the Palestinian people, including the right of return and the right to national independence and sovereignty in Palestine, in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations;

3. Calls once more for the invitation of the Palestine Liberation Organization, the representative of the Palestinian people, to participate, on the basis of General Assembly resolution 3236 (XXIX), in all efforts, deliberations and conferences on the Middle East which are held under the auspices of the United Nations, on an equal footing with other parties;

4. Endorses the recommendations of the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People as contained in paragraphs 52 to 55 of its report;

5. Expresses its regret and concern that the recommendations of the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People endorsed by the General Assembly in its resolutions 31/20, 32/40 A and 33/28 A have not been implemented;

6. Notes with regret that the Security Council has not taken the action it was urged to take by the General Assembly in paragraph 4 of its resolution 32/40 A,

7. Once again urges the Security Council to consider and take as soon as possible a decision on the recommendations endorsed by the General Assembly in its resolutions 31/20, 32/40 A and 33/28 A and in the present resolution;

8. Authorizes and requests the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People, in the event of the Security Council failing to consider or to take a decision on those recommendations by 31 March 1980, to consider that situation and to make the suggestions it deems appropriate;

9. Decides to include the item entitled "Question of Palestine" in the provisional agenda of its thirty-fifth session.


83rd plenary meeting
29 November 1979

This resolution was adopted by 117 votes in favour, 14 against with 16 abstentions.


B

The General Assembly,

Recalling and reaffirming the declaration, contained in paragraph 4 of its resolution 33/28 A of 7 December 1978, that the validity of agreements purporting to solve the problem of Palestine requires that they be within the framework of the United Nations and its Charter and its resolutions on the basis of the full attainment and exercise of the inalienable rights of the Palestinian people, including the right of return and the right to national independence and sovereignty in Palestine, and with the participation of the Palestine Liberation Organization.

Taking note of paragraphs 33 to 35 of the report of the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People,

1. Notes with concern that the Camp David accords have been concluded outside the framework of the United Nations and without the participation of the Palestine Liberation Organization, the representative of the Palestinian people;

2. Rejects those provisions of the accords which ignore, infringe upon, violate or deny the inalienable rights of the Palestinian people, including the right of return, the right of self-determination and the right to national independence and sovereignty in Palestine, in accordance with the Charter of the United Nations, and which envisage and condone continued Israeli occupation of the Palestinian territories occupied by Israel since 1967;

3. Strongly condemns all partial agreements and separate treaties which constitute a flagrant violation of the rights of the Palestinian people, the principles of the Charter and the resolutions adopted in the various international forums on the Palestinian issue;

4. Declares that the Camp David accords and other agreements have no validity in so far as they purport to determine the future of the Palestinian people and of the Palestinian territories occupied by Israel since 1967.


83rd plenary meeting
29 November 1979

This resolution was adopted by 75 votes in favour, 33 against with 37 abstentions.


C

The General Assembly,

Recalling its resolutions 3376 (XXX) of 10 November 1975, 31/20 of 24 November 1976, 32/40 A and B of 2 December 1977 and 33/28 A to C of 7 December 1978,

Having considered the report of the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People,

1. Expresses its appreciation to the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian. People for its efforts in performing the tasks assigned to it by the General Assembly;

2. Requests the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People to keep the situation relating to the question of Palestine under review and to report and make suggestions to the General Assembly or the Security Council, as appropriate;

3. Authorizes the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People to continue to exert all efforts to promote the implementation of its recommendations, to send delegations or representatives to international conferences where such representation would be considered by it to be appropriate, and to report thereon to the General Assembly at its thirty-fifth session and thereafter;

4. Requests the United Nations Conciliation Commission for Palestine, established under General Assembly resolution 194 (III) of 11 December 1948, as well as other United Nations bodies associated with the question of Palestine, to co-operate fully with the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People and to make available to the Committee, at its request, the relevant information and documentation which the Commission has at its disposal;

5. Decides to circulate the report of the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People to all the competent bodies of the United Nations and urges them to take necessary action, as appropriate, in accordance with the Committee's programme of implementation;

6. Requests the Secretary-General to continue to provide the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People with all the necessary facilities for the performance of its tasks.


100th plenary meeting
12 December 1979

This resolution was adopted by 118 votes in favour, 10 against with 12 abstentions.


D

The General Assembly,

Having considered the report of the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People,

Noting, in particular, the information contained in paragraphs 45 to 51 of that report,

Recalling its resolutions 32/40 B of 2 December 1977 and 33/28 C of 7 December 1978,

1. Requests the Secretary-General, in the light of the consultations held in accordance with paragraph 3 of General Assembly resolution 33/28 C, to redesignate the Special Unit on Palestinian Rights as the Division for Palestinian Rights and to provide it with the resources necessary to discharge the increased responsibilities assigned to it by the Assembly;

2. Also requests the Secretary-General to ensure that the Division for Palestinian Rights, in consultation with the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People and under its guidance:

(a) Shall continue to discharge the tasks detailed in paragraph 1 of General Assembly resolution 32/40 B;

(b) Shall undertake an expanded programme of work, including, inter alia, the following:

(i) Establishment of closer co-operation within the United Nations framework and with non-governmental organizations;

(ii) Organization of four seminars during the biennium 1980-1981, sponsoring of annual internship programmes and arrangements for lecture tours;

(iii) Monitoring of political and other relevant developments affecting the inalienable rights of the Palestinian people;

(iv) Assistance in the preparation of visual material, such as posters;

(v) Expansion of the scope of the bulletin issued by the Division for Palestinian Rights to include all items relevant to the question of Palestinian rights;

3. Further requests the Secretary-General to ensure the full co-operation of the Department of Public Information and other units of the Secretariat in enabling the Division for Palestinian Rights to perform its tasks;

4. Invites all Governments and organizations to lend their co-operation to the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People and the Division for Palestinian Rights in the performance of their tasks;

5. Requests the Secretary-General to direct the United Nations Postal Administration to issue a series of United Nations commemorative postage stamps to publicize as widely as possible the grave situation and the inalienable rights of the Palestinian people;

6. Requests Member States to observe annually on 29 November the International Day of Solidarity with the Palestinian People and to issue special postage stamps for the occasion;

7. Requests the Secretary-General to direct the Department of Public Information to set up, in consultation with the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian- People, a photographic display in the public areas of United Nations Headquarters with a view to keeping visitors informed of the grave situation and the inalienable rights of the Palestinian people.


100th plenary meeting
12 December 1979

This resolution was adopted by 117 votes in favour, 15 against with 9 abstentions.


A

United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees
in the near East (A/RES/34/52)

Assistance to Palestine refugees


The General Assembly,

Recalling its resolution 33/112 A of 18 December 1978 and all previous resolutions on the question, including resolution 194 (III) of 11 December 1948,

Taking note of the report of the Commissioner-General of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East, covering the period from 1 July 1978 to 30 June 1979,

1. Notes with deep regret that repatriation or compensation of the refugees as provided for in paragraph 11 of General Assembly resolution 194 (III) has not been effected, that no substantial progress has been made in the programme endorsed by the Assembly in paragraph 2 of its resolution 513 (VI) of 26 January 1952 for the reintegration of refugees either by repatriation or resettlement and that, therefore, the situation of the refugees continues to be a matter of serious concern;

2. Expresses its thanks to the Commissioner-General and to all the staff of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East, recognizing that the Agency is doing all it can within the limits of available resources, and also expresses its thanks to the specialized agencies and private organizations for their valuable work in assisting the refugees;

3. Expresses its deep appreciation to the former Commissioner-General, Mr. Thomas W. McElhiney, for his many years of effective service to the Agency and his dedication to the welfare of the refugees;

4. Reiterates its request that the headquarters of the Agency should be relocated within the area of its operations as soon as practicable;

5. Notes with regret that the United Nations Conciliation Commission for Palestine has been unable to find a means of achieving progress in the implementation of paragraph 11 of General Assembly resolution 194 (III) and requests the Commission to exert continued efforts towards the implementation of that paragraph and to report as appropriate, but no later than 1 October 1980;

6. Directs attention to the continuing seriousness of the financial position of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East, as outlined in the report of the Commissioner-General;

7. Notes with profound concern that, despite the commendable and successful efforts of the Commissioner-General to collect additional contributions, this increased level of income to the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East is still insufficient to cover essential budget requirements in the present year and that, at currently foreseen levels of giving, deficits will recur each year;

8. Calls upon all Governments as a matter of urgency to make the most generous efforts possible to meet the anticipated needs of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East, particularly in the light of the budgetary deficit projected in the report of the Commissioner-General, and therefore urges non-contributing Governments to contribute regularly and contributing Governments to consider increasing their regular contributions.


76th plenary meeting
23 November 1979

This resolution was adopted by 140 votes in favour with 1 abstention.


B

Assistance to persons displaced as a result of the June 1967 hostilities


The General Assembly,

Recalling its resolution 33/112 B of 18 December 1978 and all previous resolutions on the question,

Taking note of the report of the Commissioner-General of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East, covering the period from 1 July 1978 to 30 June 1979,

Concerned about the continued human suffering resulting from the June 1967 hostilities in the Middle East;

1. Reaffirms its resolution 33/112 B and all previous resolutions on the question;

2. Endorses, bearing in mind the objectives of those resolutions, the efforts of the Commissioner-General of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East to continue to provide humanitarian assistance as far as practicable, on an emergency basis and as a temporary measure, to other persons in the area who are at present displaced and in serious need of continued assistance as a result of the June 1967 hostilities;

3. Strongly appeals to all Governments and to organizations and individuals to contribute generously for the above purposes to the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East and to the other intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations concerned.


76th plenary meeting
23 November 1979

This resolution was adopted without a vote.


C

Offers by Member States of grants and scholarships for higher
education, including vocational training, for the Palestinian refugees


The General Assembly,

Recalling its resolution 212 (III) of 19 November 1948 on assistance to Palestinian refugees,

Recalling also its resolution 33/112 C of 18 December 1978,

Cognizant of the fact that the Palestinian refugees have, for the last three decades, lost their lands and means of livelihood,

Having considered the report of the Secretary-General on the implementation of resolution 32/90 F,

Having examined with appreciation the report of the Secretary-General on offers of scholarships and grants for higher education for Palestinian refugees and the scope of the implementation of resolution 32/90 F,

Having also examined with appreciation the parts of the report of the Commissioner-General of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East, covering the period from 1 July 1978 to 30 June 1979, dealing with this subject,

Noting that less than one per thousand of the Palestinian refugee students have the chance to continue higher education, including vocational training,

Noting also that over the past several years the number of scholarships offered by the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East has dwindled to half of what it was because of the Agency's recurring budgetary difficulties,

1. Expresses its appreciation to all Governments, specialized agencies and non-governmental organizations which responded favourably to General Assembly resolution 33/112 C;

2. Appeals to all States, specialized agencies and non-governmental organizations to augment the special allocations for scholarships and grants to Palestinian refugees in addition to their contributions to the regular budget of the United Nations relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East;

3. Invites the relevant United Nations agencies to continue to expand the inclusion within their respective spheres of competence of assistance for higher education for the Palestinian refugee students;

4. Appeals to all States, specialized agencies and the United Nations University to contribute generously to the Palestinian universities in the territories occupied by Israel since 1967;

5. Also appeals to all States, specialized agencies and other international bodies to contribute towards the establishment of vocational training centres for Palestinian refugees;

6. Requests the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East to act as recipient and trustee for such special allocations and scholarships and to award them to qualified Palestinian refugee candidates;

7. Requests the Secretary-General to report to the General Assembly at its thirty-fifth session on the implementation of the present resolution.


76th plenary meeting
23 November 1979

This resolution was adopted by 138 votes in favour with 2 abstentions.


D

Working Group on the Financing of the United Nations Relief
and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East


The General Assembly,

Recalling its resolutions 2656 (XXV) of 7 December 1970, 2728 (XXV) of 15 December 1970, 2791 (XXVI) of 6 December 1971, 2964 (XXVII) of 13 December 1972, 3090 (XXVIII) of 7 December 1973, 3330 (XXIX) of 17 December 1974, 3419 D (XXX) of 8 December 1975, 31/15 C of 23 November 1976, 32/90 D of 13 December 1977 and 33/112 D of 18 December 1978,

Having considered the report of the Working Group on the Financing of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East,

Taking into account the report of the Commissioner-General of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East, covering the period from 1 July 1978 to 30 June 1979,

Gravely concerned at the critical financial situation of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East, which has already reduced the essential minimum services being provided to the Palestinian refugees and which threatens even greater reductions in the future,

Emphasizing the urgent need for extraordinary efforts in order to maintain, at least at their present minimum level, the activities of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East,

1. Commends the Working Group on the Financing of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East for its efforts to assist in ensuring the Agency's financial security;

2. Takes note with approval of the report of the Working Group;

3. Requests the Working Group to continue its efforts, in co-operation with the Secretary-General and the Commissioner-General, for the financing of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East for a further period of one year;

4. Requests the Secretary-General to provide the necessary services and assistance to the Working Group for the conduct of its work.


76th plenary meeting
23 November 1979
This resolution was adopted without a vote


E

Population and refugees displaced since 1967


The General Assembly,

Recalling Security Council resolution 237 (1967) of 14 June 1967,

Recalling also its resolutions 2252 (ES-V) of 4 July 1967, 2452 A (XXIII) of 19 December 1968, 2535 B (XXIV) of 10 December 1969, 2672 D (XXV) of 8 December 1970, 2792 E (XXVI) of 6 December 1971, 2963 C and D (XXVII) of 13 December 1972, 3089 C (XXVIII) of 7 December 1973, 3331 D (XXIX) of 17 December 1974, 3419 C (XXX) of 8 December 1975, 31/15 D of 23 November 1976, 32/90 E of 13 December 1977 and 33/112 F of 18 December 1978,

Having considered the report of the Commissioner-General of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East, covering the period from 1 July 1978 to 30 June 1979, and the report of the Secretary-General of 16 October 1979,

1. Reaffirms the inalienable right of all the displaced inhabitants to,. return to their homes or former places of residence in the territories occupied by Israel since 1967 and declares once more that any attempt to restrict, or to attach conditions to, the free exercise of the right of return by any displaced persons is inconsistent with that inalienable right and inadmissible;

2. Considers any and all agreements embodying any restriction on or condition for the return of the displaced inhabitants as null and void;

3. Deplores the continued refusal of the Israeli authorities to take steps for the return of the displaced inhabitants;

4. Calls once more upon Israel:

(a) To take immediate steps for the return of all the displaced inhabitants;

(b) To desist from all measures that obstruct the return of the displaced inhabitants, including measures affecting the physical and demographic structure of the occupied territories;

5. Requests the Secretary-General, after consulting with the Commissioner-General of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East, to report to the General Assembly by the opening of the thirty-fifth session on Israel's compliance with paragraph 4 above.


76th plenary meeting
23 November 1979

This resolution was adopted by 121 votes in favour, 3 against with 16 abstentions.


F

Palestinian refugees in the Gaza Strip


The General Assembly,

Recalling Security Council resolution 237 (1967) of 14 June 1967,

Recalling also its resolutions 2792 C (XXVI) of 6 December 1971, 2963 C (XXVII) of 13 December 1972, 3089 C (XXVIII) of 7 December 1973, 3331 D (XXIX) of 17 December 1974, 3419 C (XXX) of 8 December 1975, 31/15 E of 23 November 1976, 32/90 C of 13 December 1977 and 33/112 E of 18 December 1978,

Having considered the report of the Commissioner-General of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East, covering the period from 1 July 1978 to 30 June 1979, and the report of the Secretary-General of 16 October 1979,

Recalling the provisions of paragraph 11 of its resolution 194 (III) of 11 December 1948 and considering that measures to resettle Palestinian refugees in the Gaza Strip away from the homes and property from which they were displaced constitute a violation of their inalienable right of return,

1. Calls once more upon Israel to desist from removal and resettlement of Palestinian refugees in the Gaza Strip and from destruction of their shelters;

2. Requests the Secretary-General, after consulting with the Commissioner-General of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East, to report to the General Assembly by the opening of its thirty-fifth session on Israel's compliance with paragraph 1 above.


76th plenary meeting
23 November 1979

This resolution was adopted by 136 votes, 1 against with 5 abstentions.

Situation in the Occupied Territories (A/RES/34/29)


The General Assembly,

Noting with concern the decision of the Israeli authorities to deport the Mayor of Nablus outside the occupied Palestinian territory,

Gravely concerned at the resignation of the mayors of cities and towns in the occupied Palestinian territory as a result of the deportation decision,

Expressing grave anxiety and concern about the present serious situation in the occupied Palestinian territory as a result of the deportation decision,

1. Calls upon the Israeli authorities to rescind the deportation order;

2. Requests the Secretary-General to report to the General Assembly as soon as possible on the implementation of the present resolution.


71st plenary meeting
16 November 1979

This resolution was adopted by 132 votes in favour, 1 against with 1 abstention.


Living Conditions of the Palestinian People (A/RES/34/113)

The General Assembly,

Recalling the Vancouver Declaration on Human Settlements, 1976, and the relevant recommendations for national action adopted by Habitat: United Nations Conference on Human Settlements,

Recalling also resolution 3, entitled "Living conditions of the Palestinians

on occupied territories", contained in the recommendations for international co-operation adopted by the Conference, and Economic and Social Council resolutions 2026 (LXI) of 4 August 1976 and 2100 (LXIII) of 3 August 1977,

Recalling its resolutions 31/110 of 16 December 1976, 32/171 of 19 December 1977 and 33/110 of 18 December 1978,

1. Takes note of the report of the Secretary-General on the living conditions of the Palestinian people in the occupied Arab territories and notes that, although it contains many relevant facts, it has not been sufficiently analytical;

2. Requests, therefore, the Secretary-General, in collaboration with the relevant United Nations organs and specialized agencies, particularly the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East, the Economic Commission for Western Asia and the Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices Affecting the Human Rights of the Population of the Occupied Territories, to prepare and submit to the General Assembly at its thirty-fifth session a comprehensive and analytical report on the social and economic impact of the Israeli occupation on the living conditions of the Palestinian people in the occupied Arab territories;

3. Also requests the Secretary-General, in preparing the above-mentioned report, to consult and co-operate with the Palestine Liberation Organization, the representative of the Palestinian people;

4- Urges all States to co-operate with the Secretary-General in the preparation of the report.


104th plenary meeting
14 December 1979

This resolution was adopted by 120 votes in favour, 2 against, with 21 abstentions.


Assistance to the Palestinian People (A/RES/34/133)

The General Assembly,

Recalling its resolutions 3236 (XXIX) and 3237 (XXIX) of 22 November 1974 and 33/147 of 20 December 1978,

Recalling also Economic and Social Council resolutions 1978 (LIX) of 31 July 1975, 2026 (LXI) of 4 August 1976 and 2100 (LXIII) of 3 August 1977,

Taking into consideration the report of the Secretary-General on assistance to the Palestinian people,

Taking note of the report of the Governing Council of the United Nations Development Programme on its twenty-sixth session, and of the response of the Administrator of the Programme,

1. Notes with satisfaction the action taken by the Administrator and the Governing Council of the United Nations Development Programme in response to General Assembly resolution 33/147;

2. Endorses decision 79/18 of 26 June 1979 of the Governing Council of the United Nations Development Programme on the implementation of General Assembly resolution 33/147;

3. Urges the relevant agencies, organizations, organs and programmes of the United Nations system to take the necessary steps for the full implementation of Economic and Social Council resolutions 2026 (LXI) and 2100 (LXIII);

4. Requests the Secretary-General to report to the Economic and Social Council and to the General Assembly at its thirty-fifth session on the progress made in the implementation of the present resolution.


104th plenary meeting
14 December 1979

This resolution was adopted by 112 votes in favour, 3 against with 21 abstentions.

Permanent Sovereignty over National Resources in the Occupied Arab Territories (A/RES/34/136)


The General Assembly,

Bearing in mind the relevant principles of international law and the provisions of the international conventions and regulations, in particular the Hague Convention IV of 1907 and the fourth Geneva Convention of 12 August 1949, concerning the obligations and responsibilities of the occupying Power,

Recalling its previous resolutions on permanent sovereignty over natural resources, particularly their provisions supporting resolutely the efforts of the developing countries and the peoples of territories under colonial and racial domination and foreign occupation in their struggle to regain effective control over their natural and all other resources, wealth and economic activities,

Bearing in mind the pertinent provisions of its resolutions 3201 (S-VI) and 3202 (S-VI) of 1 May 1974 containing the Declaration and the Programme of Action on the Establishment of a New International Economic Order and 3281 (XXIX) of 12 December 1974 containing the Charter of Economic Rights and Duties of States,

Recalling further its resolutions 3175 (XXVIII) of 17 December 1973, 3336 (XXIX) of 17 December 1974, 3516 (XXX) of 15 December 1975, 31/186 of 21 December 1976 and 32/161 of 19 December 1977 on permanent sovereignty over national resources in the occupied Arab territories,

1. Emphasizes the right of the Arab States and peoples whose territories are under Israeli occupation to full and effective permanent sovereignty and control over their natural and all other resources, wealth and economic activities;

2. Reaffirms that all measures undertaken by Israel to exploit the human, natural and all other resources, wealth and economic activities in the occupied Arab territories are illegal and calls upon Israel immediately to desist forthwith from all such measures;

3. Further reaffirms the right of the Arab States and peoples subjected to Israel aggression and occupation to the restitution of, and full compensation for the exploitation, depletion and loss of and damages to, their natural, human and all other resources, wealth and economic activities, and calls upon Israel to meet their just claims;

4. Calls upon all states to support and assist the Arab States and peoples in the exercise of their above-mentioned rights;

5. Calls upon all States, international organizations, specialized agencies, investment corporations and all other institutions not to recognize, or co-operate with or assist in any manner in, any measures undertaken by Israel to exploit the resources of the occupied territories or to effect any changes in the demographic composition or geographic character or institutional structure of those territories?

6. Requests the Secretary-General to prepare and submit to the General Assembly at its thirty-fifth session a report which takes into consideration the provisions of paragraph 2 of its resolution 32/161.


104th plenary meeting
14 December 1979

This resolution was adopted by 118 votes in favour, 2 against with 21 abstentions.


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