UNISPAL Home

French.pdf
Press Release
UNITED NATIONS
Department of Public Information · News Coverage Service · New York


Fifty-eighth General Assembly
Plenary
13th & 14th Meetings (AM & PM)
GA/10161
26 September 2003


CONCERNS OF DEVELOPING COUNTRIES HIGHLIGHTED, AS GENERAL ASSEMBLY CONCLUDES FIRST WEEK OF HIGH-LEVEL DEBATE

Debt, Trade Barriers, HIV/AIDS, Concerns of Landlocked and Small
Island Nations Stressed by 27 Speakers, Including Presidents, Top Ministers


/...

Background

The General Assembly met to continue its general debate.

Statements

/...

Shaikh MOHAMMED BIN MUBARAK AL-KHALIFA, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Foreign Affairs of Bahrain, ...

/...

While Bahrain’s success and stability made it attractive to investors within and beyond its region, he said that achieving economic integration and regional cooperation between the Gulf and Middle East regions and other major trading blocks depended on the strong foundation of a peaceful and cooperative political and strategic environment.  With that in mind, he said that the achievement of a just and comprehensive peace in the Middle East could only be brought about through the recognition of the inherent rights of the Palestinian people to self-determination and the establishment of an independent state.  Bahrain would call on the diplomatic Quartet and the international community to pressure Israel not to implement its recent “dangerous” decision to remove Palestinian Authority President Yasser Arafat.

/...

ABUBAKR AL-QIRBI, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Yemen, said the United Nations must face the tragic events occurring on the world stage with collective action.  During its fifty-seventh session, the General Assembly had unanimously condemned terrorism, welcomed the “Road Map” and committed itself to avoiding war in Iraq.  And yet, one must ask how well those goals had been accomplished.  Had the removal of Saddam Hussein’s regime brought democratic self-governance to Iraq?  That war had served only to fan the flames of terrorism.  As for the Arab-Israeli conflict, its settlement must be accomplished within the context of the principles laid down by the Quartet.  The settlement would only be achieved if Israel ceased its delaying tactics and acted to implement the relevant international resolutions.

/...

The Security Council had been paralysed in the last year, he noted, with the emergence of a global order in which policies of hegemony were pursued.  However, the need to proclaim adherence to the ideals of democracy, devotion to freedom and human rights and the elimination of poverty remained.  The rich and powerful States must heed the cries of the poor and fight against injustice.  That would prove to be the true guarantee of international peace and security, and an end to international terrorism.  Without such a concerted fight against the ills of the world, there would be a “revolution of the poor, a rebellion of the oppressed”.

Much needed to be done, he continued, to avoid a clash of civilizations.  The occupation of Iraqi territory must be brought immediately to a halt, its sovereignty, territorial integrity and the democratic self-governance of the Iraqi people assured.  Moreover, the United Nations must implement its resolutions with regard to the Arab-Israeli conflict.  Israel must be prevented from killing or expelling Palestinian President Arafat, and it must withdraw from occupied Syrian and Lebanese territory.  As one of the Arab countries that had accepted Israel as a State and agreed to deal with it in terms of achieving peace, Yemen subscribed to the belief that the Middle East must be a nuclear weapons-free zone.  Israeli nuclear installations must be subjected to international inspection.

/...

M.S. MERAHFE, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Botswana, ...

/...

Turning to the Middle East, he said the decision by Israel and others to insist on determining which Palestinian leader they would do business with was unacceptable, and condemned Israel’s threat to expel Yasser Arafat.  In Iraq, the situation clearly called for an intervention by the Security Council to ensure the Iraqi people were given the mandate to govern themselves, and to expand the role of the United Nations in the reconstruction of the country.

/...

ABDULLAH GÜL, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Foreign Affairs of Turkey, ...

/...

Describing the situation in the Middle East as crucial for the evolution of the international environment, he called on the entire international community to rally behind Iraq’s rebuilding efforts.  On the Arab-Israeli conflict, he said that sending the President of the Palestinian National Authority into exile would be counterproductive and urged the Israeli Government to review its position.  At the same time, he urged the Palestinian side to exert every effort to prevent further terrorist attacks.

/...

HAMA BIN JASSIN BIN JABR AL-THANI, First Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Foreign Affairs of Qatar, ...

/...

His country also had a special programme for rebuilding Afghanistan that had so far received $62 million.  He said the Arab-Israeli conflict and the question of Palestine were at the forefront of those conflicts, and it was necessary for the international community to work together to achieve a just, final and comprehensive solution.  Qatar had embraced and supported the Quartet’s Road Map as a basis for a final solution to the establishment of two States existing side by side.

/...

JAAP DE HOOP SCHEFFER, Minister for Foreign Affairs of the Netherlands, ...

/...

Emphasizing the European Union’s support for the United Nations, he called for increased cooperation between the United Nations and the other regional organizations.  He also urged the General Assembly to try and find a more focused message in response to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict.  He also called attention to the Greentree report, which aims to restore the United Nations General Assembly to the centre stage of world deliberations.

RASHID ABDULLAH AL-NOAIMI, Minister for Foreign Affairs of the United Arab Emirates, ...

/...

The United Arab Emirates condemned Israel’s policy of targeted killings and extrajudiciary executions in the occupied Palestinian territories, in violation of international and humanitarian laws.  He called on the Quartet to revitalize the peace process and compel Israel to implement the Road Map, which stipulated an end to the Israeli occupation and the establishment of a Palestinian State by 2005.  The United Arab Emirates demanded that Israel stop placing obstacles in the way of implementing the Road Map and urged Israel to lift the siege of President Yasser Arafat and the Palestinian people, to dismantle the separation fence, and release the prisoners in Israeli prisons.  A fair settlement of the Palestinian question required Israel’s commitment to adhere to international resolutions and called on Israel to join the Nuclear Non–Proliferation Treaty.

/...

HABIB BEN YAHIA, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Tunisia, ...

/...

In the context of international peace and security, he deplored Israel’s continued imposition of occupation and continuous military campaigns against the Palestinian people, including the decision to expel President Arafat, in spite of the Palestinian Authority’s readiness to fulfil its commitments within the framework of the Road Map.  The need to respect the legitimacy of the freely chosen Palestinian leadership, as well as the independence and territorial integrity of Iraq, were stressed.  ...

/...

FIORENZO STOLFI, Minister for Foreign and Political Affairs of San Marino, ...

/...

On the Middle East, he was convinced that both the Israeli and Palestinian peoples must be guaranteed the “undisputable right to live freely on a territory of their own”.  Efforts to restore favourable conditions for dialogue must not be jeopardized by obstacles to the Middle East Road Map.

/...

ROY CHADERTON MATOS, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Venezuela, ...

/...

Peace and reconciliation were desired by the Venezuelan Government for its own people, as well as for those of Colombia, Northern Ireland, the Balkans, Israel and Palestine, he said.  Yet, the painful repercussions of the war in Iraq, the tension in the Middle East, and the alarming rate of poverty worldwide made for profound reflection and must oblige Member States to strengthen the United Nations, for unilateralism was sluggish and oppressive, while multilateralism was animated and democratic.

/...

* *** *
______________________________________________________________________
For information media - not an official record