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Source: Department of Public Information (DPI)
7 October 1947
UNITED NATIONS
Department of Public Information
Press and Publication Bureau
Lake Success, New York
Ad Hoc Committee on Palestine
Seventh Meeting
Summary
Press Release GA/PAL/7
7 October 1947
PALESTINE COMMITTEE HEARS STATEMENT
BY PAKISTAN REPRESENTATIVE

The Committee continued general discussion of the Palestine question, and this morning heard Sir Zafrullah Khan (Pakistan).

The Representative of Pakistan recapitulated the history of the Palestine problem, which, he said, bears out the Arab claims. He stressed that the Balfour Declaration in favor of a Jewish National Home could not be considered as paving the way for a Jewish State in Palestine. He asked that independence be granted to Palestine and a democratic government established in accordance with the wishes of the majority of its people.

Regarding the proposal to partition Palestine, he said, that while the majority report considered it an inequity for 600,000 Jews to be dominated by 1,300,000 Arabs and Bedouins it did not consider it an inequity for 500,000 Arabs and Bedouins to be dominated by 498,000 Jews.

The Committee will reconvene tomorrow Wednesday at 11 a.m.

(A chronological account of the meeting is given in Takes #1 through #4 which follow this summary)



UNITED NATIONS
Department of Public Information
Press and Publications Bureau
Lake Success New York

Ad Hoc Committee
Seventh Meeting
(AM) TAKE #1
Press Release GA/PAL/7
7 October 1947

(AM) TAKE NUMBER 1
Palestine


The Chairman, Dr. H.V. Evatt (Australia) called the meeting to order at 11:15 a.m., and gave the floor to Sir Mohammed Zafrullah Khan (Pakistan).

Sir Zafrullah began by stating that although a recapitulation if the history of the Palestine problem would appear unnecessary at this point, nevertheless it appeared useful in view of some errors made by previous speakers. Sir Zafrullah said he wished in particular to correct a statement made yesterday in which it was declared that while Jewish immigration into Palestine had been severely curtailed during the last 30 years, the Arabs had been allowed free entry.

The Pakistan Delegate said that practically the opposite was true. He pointed out that whereas present Palestine quota allows the entry of 1,500 Jews per month, the entry quota for all other peoples, including Arabs, is only 100 per month.

Sir Zafrullah then proceeded with a detailed history of the early part of the Palestine problem. He recapitulated the proposals for Arab assistance in World War One by Great Britain to the then Shareef of Mecca, the late King Hussein. King Hussein, he declared, insisted that as a quid pro quo for Arab assistance, Great Britain should promise to recognize the complete independence of the Arab countries. Sir Zafrullah continued by saying that later the Arabs felt some doubts when Britain wished to exclude certain territories because they were either not mainly Arab territories or because they were under control of he Ally - France.

No mention, he said, was made in the proposed exclusions, however, of that area now known as modern Palestine, since, he declared, it was incontrovertibly Arab in make-up.

Sir Zafrullah then touched upon the Hogarth Mission to King Hussein and Memorial to the Seven in order to reassure the Arabs after the Sykes-Picot secret agreement was made known.


(END OF TAKE #1)


UNITED NATIONS
Department of Public Information
Press and Publications Bureau
Lake Success New York


Ad Hoc Committee
Seventh Meeting
(AM) TAKE #2
Press Release GA/PAL/7
7 October 1947


(AM) TAKE #2
Palestine

Sir Zafrullah also referred to the sending to Palestine by the late President Wilson of the King Crane commission, and the latter’s subsequent recommendation that Jewish immigration into Palestine be restricted.

Continuing, Sir Zafrullah said that trouble was bound to arise from the divergent interpretations by the Arabs and the British Government of the Balfour Declaration.

He then described the successive missions to Palestine during the period between the two world wars, and the British White Paper of 1939.

Sir Zafrullah stressed that the Balfour Declaration could not be construed as going beyond the creation of a Jewish National Home, and as paving the way for the creation of a Jewish State. Sir Zafrullah also insisted that the question of assistance to European Jewish refugees was the concern of all countries and that Palestine should not be called upon alone to solve the problem. This, he said, also applied to the Uruguay proposal for the immediate admission into Palestine of 30,000 Jewish orphans.


(End of Take #2)


UNITED NATIONS
Department of Public Information
Press in Publications Bureau
Lake Success, New York


Ad Hoc Committee
Seventh Meeting
(AM) TAKE #3
Press Release GA/PAL/7
7 October 1947


(AM) TAKE #3
Palestine


Sir Zafrullah asked that independence be granted to Palestine, and a democratic government be established in that country in accordance with the wishes of the majority of the people of Palestine.

He declared that the wish of Jewish displaced persons to go to Palestine could not be allowed to prevail against the immigration laws of the country, no more, he said, than the wishes of other displaced persons to go to the United States could be allowed to prevail against American immigration laws.

Sir Zafrullah did not deny the economic benefits derived by the Arabs from Jewish colonization but said that such benefits could not constitute a claim for the setting up of a Jewish State in Palestine.


(END OF (AM) TAKE #3)


UNITED NATIONS
Department of Public information
Press and Publications Bureau
Lake Success, New York


Ad Hoc Committee
Seventh Meeting
(AM) TAKE #4
Press Release GA/PAL/7
7 October 1947

(AM) TAKE NUMBER 4
Palestine


Dr. Chaim Weizman, said the Representative of Pakistan, had cited the division of India into Moslem and non-Moslem areas as a precedent for the partition of Palestine. In India, he said, the partition was not artificial and furthermore had the consent of both the Moslems and non Moslems.

Typically and geographically, the partition of Palestine proposed by the City majoriry would be a monstrosity, he declared.

Sir Zafrullah Kahn stated that while the majority report apparently considered it would be an inequity for six hundred thousand Jews to be under domination of a State containing 1,300,000 Arabs and Bedouins, it did not consider it an inequity for a total of 407,000 Arabs, plus 91,000 Bedouins so far unmentioned, to live in the proposed Jewish State containing an equal number — 498,000 Jews.

The Port of Jaffa, he pointed out, while an all Arab town, had been included in the proposed Jewish State.

Under the majority proposal, he said, half a million Arabs and Bedouins living in the Jewish State shortly would become landless and destitute because of the Jewish land laws and the Jews’ failure to employ Arab workmen except in case of dire necessity. Actually, he said, a compulsory exchange of population would be necessitated. But, he pointed out, the Arabs who would thus be forced from the Jewish State in Palestine, would have no place to go, insofar as the Arab State by that time be filled to capacity.

The Pakistan Representative concluded by saying that it is the duty of the United Nations to see if there is still any possibility of the Jews and Arabs in settling the problem themselves.

Barring this, he said, the United Nations must work out a solution under the principles of the Charter.

The meeting adjourned at and will reconvene tomorrow at 11 a.m.

(END OF TAKE #4 AND OF PRESS RELEASE GA/PAL/7)


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