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About the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People
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UNITED
NATIONS
A

        General Assembly
A/AC.183/SR.188
22 June 1992

COMMITTEE ON THE EXERCISE OF THE INALIENABLE RIGHTS
OF THE PALESTINIAN PEOPLE
SUMMARY RECORD OF THE 188th MEETING
Held at Headquarters, New York,
on Wednesday, 17 June 1992, at 10.30 a.m.


Chairman: Mr. CISSE (Senegal)
CONTENTS

Observance of the twenty-fifth anniversary of the occupation by Israel of the Palestinian territory, including Jerusalem, and other Arab territories




This record is subject to correction.

Corrections should be submitted in one of the working languages. They should be set forth in a memorandum and also incorporated in a copy of the record. They should be sent within one week of the date of this document to the Chief, Official Records Editing Section, Office of Conference Services, room DC2-750, 2 United Nations Plaza.

Any corrections to the record of this meeting and of other meetings will be issued in a corrigendum.


The meeting was called to order at 10.45 a.m.

OBSERVANCE OF THE TWENTY-FIFTH ANNIVERSARY OF THE OCCUPATION BY ISRAEL OF THE
PALESTINIAN TERRITORY, INCLUDING JERUSALEM, AND OTHER ARAB TERRITORIES

1. The CHAIRMAN said that since its inception, the Committee had clearly
understood that the withdrawal of Israeli forces from the occupied territories
was a sine qua non for the exercise of Palestinian rights and the attainment
of a just and lasting settlement in accordance with United Nations
resolutions. For that reason, the Committee had given priority in its
original recommendations to the Security Council to the development of a plan
to ensure such withdrawal. Those recommendations had been endorsed every year
by the General Assembly, but the Security Council had been unable to act upon
them because of the veto of a permanent member. In the absence of action by
the Security Council, the military occupation had continued and even been
consolidated. The devastation it had caused not only to the Palestinian
territories, but also to neighbouring countries, was well known; the
twenty-fifth anniversary of the Six Day War coincided with the tenth
anniversary of the invasion of Lebanon and the massacre at Sabra and Shatila.
In a letter addressed to the Secretary-General on 5 June 1992, he had given a
brief account of the increasingly grave situation in the occupied Palestinian
territory during the 25 years of military occupation. The occupation could
only be maintained through increasingly ruthless measures, which the current
Israeli Government seemed determined to pursue in defiance of the Fourth
Geneva Convention and other human rights instruments, and also in disregard of
a sizeable sector of its own public.

2. Despite the valiant efforts of UNRWA and other international and
non-governmental organizations, the situation had continued to deteriorate,
particularly since the beginning of the intifadah nearly five years earlier.
The number of casualties had increased steadily, at least one quarter being
children under 16, and Israel had responded not with efforts to work out a
political solution, but rather with violent repression. The Israeli
leadership did not yet seem to have realized that security and peace could not
be brought about purely by military action, but must result from mutual
accommodation. It was imperative that appropriate measures should be taken at
the international level to ensure that Israel respected the provisions of the
Fourth Geneva Convention and that adequate protection was provided to
Palestinians in the occupied territories.

3. Of even greater concern was the Israeli policy of de facto annexation of
the Palestinian and other Arab territories: Israel had relentlessly
appropriated ever more land for its own use, established settlements and
expanded existing ones, and moved its own citizens to the occupied land.
Land-use plans and other economic development measures had been geared to
further fragmenting Palestinian land and integrating large portions of the
occupied territories into the Israeli economy. The process had accelerated
even more since the beginning of the Madrid peace process, in an obvious and
avowed effort to create irreversible facts on the ground. Israel was telling
the world that in a few years, hundreds of thousands of Jews would be living
in the occupied territories and that the notion of territorial compromise
would fade away like a bad dream.

4. However, no such statements could turn the occupation into an
irreversible fact or make it any more acceptable to the international
community. The Security Council and the General Assembly had affirmed that
the measures taken by Israel to change the demographic composition and the
status of occupied Palestinian territory, including Jerusalem, and other Arab
territories, were null and void, and had called for an end to the settlement
policy and for the withdrawal of Israeli forces.

5. The international consensus that completely rejected the occupation and
the policy of faits accomplis pursued by Israel must be reaffirmed, and the
relevant resolutions of the Security Council and the General Assembly must be
implemented, in order for a peaceful, but also just, settlement of the
question of Palestine to be achieved.

6. Mr. JONAH (Under-Secretary-General for Political Affairs) said that the
convening of the current meeting of the Committee reflected the international
community's great concern with the continuation of the occupation, and for a
just and lasting settlement of the Middle East problem and its core, the
question of Palestine. The United Nations had always attached the utmost
importance to the endeavour to achieve such a settlement in accordance with
Security Council resolutions 242 (1967) and 338 (1973) and taking fully into
account the legitimate political rights of the Palestinian people.

7. The current Arab-Israeli negotiations had proved that dialogue was
possible; the framework for such negotiations had been provided by the
Security Council in its relevant resolutions. The General Assembly had
welcomed the convening of the Peace Conference on the Middle East in Madrid on
30 October 1991 as a significant step towards peace. It was hoped that the
Conference would result in agreements that would satisfy all parties concerned
and allow the Palestinian people to realize its inalienable rights. While
that process took place, however, the immediate protection of Palestinians in
the occupied territory must be ensured. The intifadah had made it clear that
the Palestinian people would continue to reject Israeli occupation and to
struggle for the exercise of its rights. Since December 1987, hundreds had
been killed and thousands wounded, including many children. Palestinians had
been expelled and other measures had been instituted despite many resolutions
of the Security Council, the General Assembly, the Commission on Human Rights
and other United Nations bodies.

8. The international community unanimously considered that Israel must
respect its obligations under the 1949 Geneva Convention relative to the
Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War, whose signatories, in
particular, had an obligation to ensure respect for its provisions in the
occupied territories.

9. The Committee was a valuable forum for helping to advance the peace
process and the prospect of a just peace in the Middle East and a lasting
settlement of the question of Palestine.

10. Mr. AL-KIDWA (Observer for Palestine) noted that it had been 25 years
since Israel had occupied the Palestinian territory, including Jerusalem, and
other Arab territories. That was the core of the Middle East problem and the
source of all related problems: 25 years of occupation was not a normal event
in the life of a people. The Palestinian people had suffered in many ways
because of Israel's ongoing attacks and violations of the Charter and of
Security Council resolutions.

11. The Security Council had adopted more than 20 resolutions on the
situation in the Arab territories; none had been respected by Israel. The
General Assembly, too, as well as other agencies, had enacted resolutions;
none had been complied with. Moreover, Israeli violations of international
law had been compounded by its transgressions against natural law. The
phenomenon of the intifadah was too well known to need any elaboration.

12. The approach taken by Israel could be called settlement colonialism.
Israel's plan was to occupy land, empty if possible, and to nip in the bud any
desire to establish a Palestinian State. If that situation was allowed to
continue, the Palestinian people was in danger of experiencing a new tragedy
no less serious than that of 1948. It was regrettable that the time available
to prevent such a tragedy was so short.

13. It was true that a peace process had been initiated, but absolutely no
progress whatsoever had been made. The reason for its failure was clear:
Israeli leaders refused openly and every day to leave the occupied
territories. What was more, they denied the very existence of the Palestinian
people and refused to deal with the sole legitimate representative of the
Palestinian people, the Palestine Liberation Organization. Time was running
out, and the world must react rapidly if any results were to be expected from
the peace process and if the current situation was not to deteriorate. The
United Nations and its associated agencies must act, each according to its
mandate but interdependently. The Committee had special responsibilities in
that regard, and a special political role. The role of the Division for
Palestinian Rights in the United Nations Secretariat should also be
strengthened.

14. The United Nations must respond to the urgent needs of the Palestinian
people, taking into account the situation in the occupied Arab territories and
the serious violations of international law, particularly the Fourth Geneva
Convention. The responsibility of the Security Council was fundamental in
that regard. Unfortunately, the failure of the Council to take effective
steps had raised many doubts about its impartiality. Nevertheless, he hoped
that it would be able to respond to the urgent needs of the Palestinian people
and that the Secretary-General would take concrete measures to implement
Security Council resolution 681 (1990) to ensure compliance with the Fourth
Geneva Convention.

15. He stressed the need for increased and more effective participation by
the United Nations, and supported the position of the Secretary-General in
that respect. At a time when the role of the Organization was expanding in
many parts of the world, its failure to participate in efforts to uphold the
rights of the Palestinian people seemed to run counter to United Nations
positions in other areas.

16. His delegation supported the draft statement by the Committee on the
twenty-fifth anniversary of the Israeli occupation of the Palestinian
territory, including Jerusalem, and other Arab territories, and hoped that it
would be adopted by the Committee.

17. Mr. TLILI (Department of Public Information) said that the Department's
special information programme on the question of Palestine was designed to
enhance understanding of the various aspects of the question and promote the
right of the Palestinian people to self-determination. The Department pursued
those objectives through a combination of multimedia activities, including the
production of posters. In observing the twenty-fifth anniversary of the
occupation of the Palestinian territory, including Jerusalem, and other Arab
territories, he was pleased to announce that the Department had released the
English and French versions of a poster aimed at promoting self-determination
as an inalienable right of the Palestinian people. On behalf of the
Under-Secretary-General for Public Information, he had the honour to present
the Chairman with copies of the poster in English and French, as a symbol of
the Department's close and constructive cooperation with the Committee.

18. The CHAIRMAN thanked the representative of the Department of Public
Information for the poster and expressed the hope that the Secretary-General
would continue to provide the Department with the resources needed to continue
its activities concerning the rights of the Palestinian people.

19. Mr. KHOUINI (Tunisia), speaking on behalf of the Arab Group, said that in
the past 25 years the Palestinian people had made inestimable sacrifices and
had been the victim of horrendous practices never before visited on any other
people. The Israeli occupation authorities had been doing their best to
efface the identity of the Palestinian people and change the demographic
composition of the occupied territories through an expansionist policy. In
spite of numerous United Nations resolutions and international agreements,
including the Fourth Geneva Convention, those authorities continued to use
lies and delaying tactics in order to avoid having to carry out their
international responsibilities.

20. The stepped-up Israeli occupation policy had resulted in the
expropriation of approximately 60 per cent of the land in the West Bank and
Gaza Strip. The Israeli authorities had expelled Palestinians, demolished
houses and expropriated sources of water. International organizations such as
UNHCR, ICRC and UNRWA were unable to carry out their mandates in the occupied
territories because of the obstacles placed in their way by Israel. In spite
of those practices, which were an aspect of daily life in the occupied
territories, the Palestinian people continued to struggle for its legitimate
rights and seek a just and lasting peace in the Middle East in accordance with
Security Council resolutions 242 (1967) and 338 (1973) and the Charter of the
United Nations.

21. The current peace process would succeed only if it was based on
principles rooted in respect for international law and the relevant United
Nations resolutions. If Israel really wanted just and lasting peace in the
region, it must demonstrate that by recognizing the principle of land for
peace, refraining from building further settlements, and discontinuing its
repressive practices, which only further aggravated the situation.

22. He expressed satisfaction at the efforts by all the international and
non-governmental organizations that had provided assistance to the Palestinian
people, and hoped that the draft statement by the Committee would be adopted.

23. Mr. WISNUMURTI (Indonesia) said that just and lasting peace in the Middle
East could not be achieved until the Palestinian people was allowed to
exercise its inalienable national rights. A comprehensive and equitable
settlement of the conflict in the region could not be brought about without
the total withdrawal of Israel from all Palestinian and other Arab territories
occupied since 1967, including Jerusalem. For more than four decades,
Israel's policies of expansionist aggression and creeping annexation and its
systematic but vain attempts to obliterate the identity of the Palestinian
people had continued in defiance of the will of the international community
and in violation of international law. Indonesia urged Israel to carry out
its obligations under the Fourth Geneva Convention and comply with the
relevant United Nations resolutions.

24. The Ministerial Meeting of the Coordinating Bureau of the Non-Aligned
Movement, recently held in Bali, had adopted a communiqué welcoming the
current peace efforts aimed at bringing about a comprehensive and lasting
solution to the Middle East problem and calling for the speedy implementation
of the relevant United Nations resolutions. The communiqué stressed that the
attainment of a just, comprehensive and lasting solution to the question of
Palestine should remain a priority objective of the Movement, and reiterated
the view that a comprehensive negotiated settlement could be achieved through
the International Peace Conference on the Middle East, under the auspices of
the United Nations, with the participation of all parties concerned on an
equal footing, including the Palestine Liberation Organization and the
permanent members of the Security Council.

25. His delegation called upon Israel to adopt a positive approach to the
peace process by observing international treaties and implementing the
relevant United Nations resolutions and decisions. It urged the Security
Council, particularly its permanent members, to show the same determination in
dealing with the question of Palestine that it had demonstrated during the
crisis in the Gulf, and to seize the opportunity resulting from the cessation
of East-West tension. Lastly, it expressed satisfaction at the laudable
record of the Committee, which over the years had mobilized international
support for the valiant struggle of the Palestinian people.

26. Mr. MAKKAWI (Observer for Lebanon) said that the international community
must clearly recognize that only one country had been allowed to defy its will
for the past 25 years. Israel's occupation of Palestinian territory,
including Jerusalem, and of the Golan Heights and parts of southern Lebanon
had elicited scores of United Nations resolutions. Israel increasingly
resorted to armed repression and the violation of fundamental human rights in
the Palestinian territories and Syria and Lebanon, in order to perpetuate its
occupation, exploit the resources of those lands and settle many of the recent
Soviet immigrants on Arab soil. It had no intention of exchanging the Arab
land for peace, and had stepped up the building of settlements in the
Palestinian territories and the Syrian Golan through the use of force against
the indigenous inhabitants, in violation of the Fourth Geneva Convention.

27. Lebanon had hoped that the peace talks would result in the implementation
of Security Council resolution 425 (1978) and the long-awaited withdrawal of
Israel from Lebanon. Instead, Israel had subjected the Lebanese civilian
population to regular bombardment since the beginning of the International
Peace Conference on the Middle East in Madrid, and had expanded the area of
Lebanese territory under its occupation.

28. The people living under occupation in the Palestinian territories, the
Golan Heights and southern Lebanon were demonstrating to the world that they
would never accept the continuation of that situation. They cherished the
hope that in the end Israel would acquiesce to the will of the international
community in order to ensure justice through the implementation of all the
relevant United Nations resolutions.

29. He commended the Committee for the excellent work that it had carried out
in support of the people in the occupied Arab territories.

30. Mr. BATIOUK (Ukraine) said that the continued illegal occupation by
Israel of the Palestinian territory, including Jerusalem, and other Arab
territories was of grave concern to his Government and people. There was
broad international agreement that the question of Palestine, which was at the
core of the Arab-Israeli conflict, could be resolved on a just and lasting
basis only if Israeli forces withdrew from Arab territories occupied since
June 1967, and when there was an acknowledgment of and respect for the
sovereignty and territorial integrity and political independence of all the
States of the region, as well as their right to live in peace within secure
and internationally recognized boundaries. A viable peace had to be based on
the recognition of the legitimate political rights of the Palestinian people,
including the right to self-determination. One of the most important issues
was the protection of Palestinian civilians under occupation, and the Security
Council, the General Assembly and all other relevant organs of the United
Nations, including the Committee, should do their best to discharge their
responsibilities in order to ensure respect for the human rights and
fundamental freedoms of Palestinians in the occupied territories.

31. Israel must be persuaded to stop deportation of Palestinian civilians,
and accept the de jure applicability of the Fourth Geneva Convention to all
the territories occupied since 1967. The Secretary-General should continue
his efforts to convene a meeting of the High Contracting Parties to the
Convention to discuss measures that might be taken to ensure that Israel
respected its obligations. The situation of Palestinian civilians under
Israeli occupation must be closely monitored by the Secretary-General in order
that the Security Council might be kept regularly informed.

32. The implementation of such measures alone would not bring an end to the
conflict between Israel and the Palestinians, which was essentially political
and called for a political, negotiated solution. It was to be hoped,
therefore, that future negotiations within the peace process initiated in
Madrid on 30 October 1991 would produce tangible results based on Security
Council resolutions 242 (1967) and 338 (1973), and that hope had recently been
encouraged by the decision of the Palestine National Council to continue its
participation in the process. The twenty-fifth anniversary of the Israeli
occupation of the Palestinian territory, including Jerusalem, and other Arab
territories was an appropriate occasion to call on all concerned to grasp the
historic opportunity, display wisdom and goodwill, and refrain from any
actions that might jeopardize or in any way complicate the search for lasting
peace in the Middle East. One of the most pressing issues that caused almost
universal concern was the Israeli policy of confiscating land and building new
settlements, including those for newly arrived Jewish immigrants. His
Government shared that concern, since a number of those settlers had come from
Ukraine, and called upon Israel to reconsider and abandon its policy, thereby
removing one of the major obstacles to the successful conclusion of the peace
talks.

33. Twenty-five years of occupation had not weakened the resolve of the
Palestinian people to achieve its inalienable rights, including the right to
self-determination, or the determination of the international community to
continue its support and assistance to the Palestinians in their just cause.
The Committee and the various activities undertaken under its guidance had
contributed significantly to greater understanding of the question of
Palestine throughout the world, and it was to be hoped that it would continue
to receive the necessary resources to fulfil the mandate entrusted to it by
the General Assembly. Ukraine would continue to give its full support to the
work of the Committee, and to the draft statement before it.

34. Mr. INSANALLY (Guyana) said that in the past 25 years, attitudes had
hardened and hostility deepened as the division between Israel as the
occupying Power and the Palestinian people had increased to the point where
the situation had become a serious threat to peace not only in the Middle
East, but also beyond. It was therefore incumbent upon all, particularly the
parties involved, to make a determined effort to reach agreement on those
issues which were crucial to a final, definitive and durable settlement.
Other conflicts had shown that the willingness of disputants to use all
available techniques of diplomacy was an important ingredient of success; the
spirit which had brought about the remarkable rapprochement between East and
West must be allowed to pervade the current dialogue aimed at bringing an end
to the conflict in the Middle East.

35. The United Nations could be an important catalyst for diplomacy at the
present, crucial time, and with the assistance of the Division for Palestinian
Rights, the Committee must continue to keep the Palestinian issue at the
forefront of international attention and work vigorously to promote an
environment in which fruitful negotiations might be held. He expressed the
hope that the current meeting and the draft statement before the Committee
would serve to provide renewed impetus towards cutting the Gordian knot which
the situation in the Middle East had become. In essence, the question of
which the Committee was seized was one of respect for the human rights of all
peoples of the area, particularly the Palestinians, and in the light of the
third preambular paragraph of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the
international community, and the United Nations in particular, had an
obligation to defend the welfare of the Palestinian people. It was his
sincere hope that by the time the World Conference on Human Rights was held in
1993, the plight of the Palestinian people would have been resolved, and it
would have been restored to its rightful place in the international community.

36. Mr. MARKER (Pakistan) said that it was a matter of extreme regret and
concern that the situation with regard to the Palestinian civilian population
in the territory occupied by Israel for the past 25 years had deteriorated
following the start of the intifadah in December 1987. Any settlement of the
Middle East crisis which bypassed the core issue of the fundamental right of
the people of Palestine to self-determination and a State of its own would be
inherently flawed and would not bring peace to the area. A solution based on
Security Council resolutions 242 (1967) and 338 (1973) would be both just and
lasting. However, in the meantime, Israel must be prevailed upon to abide by
its obligations under the Geneva Convention relative to the Protection of
Civilian Persons in Time of War, and must discontinue its policy of annexing
land and building settlements.

37. It was his sincere hope that the profound changes which had occurred in
the world would have a positive bearing on the situation in the Middle East.
His Government was following with keen interest the negotiations co-sponsored
by the United States of America and the Russian Federation, but until such
time as a comprehensive, just and lasting solution of the Arab-Israeli
conflict was brought about, it was imperative that the United Nations should
remain actively involved in the search for peace. The work of the Committee
remained as relevant to the cause of the Palestinian people as it had been at
the time of its establishment, and it was important for it to enhance its role
in the quest for a peaceful and just solution of the Arab-Israeli conflict.

38. The Government and people of Pakistan remained unflinching in their
support for the just cause of the people of Palestine and for the important
work of the Committee. They fully supported its efforts on behalf of the
Palestinian people and the draft statement that was before it.

39. Mr. KASOULIDES (Cyprus) said that the world community was commemorating
the anniversary amid general disappointment and concern over recent
developments which were adversely affecting the situation of the Palestinian
people in the occupied territories. It was the view of his Government that
the question of Palestine should be solved through implementation of the
relevant United Nations resolutions, especially Security Council resolutions
242 (1967) and 338 (1973), but that such implementation could be achieved only
through the complete and unconditional withdrawal of all Israeli armed forces
from the Palestinian and other Arab territories which had been occupied since
1967. Repeated incidents in the occupied territories, causing a large number
of casualties among Palestinian civilians, were a source of grave concern to
the people of Cyprus.

40. The Security Council had a responsibility to ensure full implementation
of its relevant resolutions and guarantee the safety of the Palestinian
people. The enhanced role of the United Nations and the decisive approach of
the Security Council in its efforts to impose a political climate of
conciliation upon world affairs gave grounds for hope for the Palestinian
people. All parties to the Middle East peace process should be encouraged to
demonstrate goodwill and a spirit of conciliation in order to achieve a
permanent solution to the tragic Arab-Israeli conflict. Such a solution was
long overdue.

41. He expressed his country's full support for the draft statement before
the Committee.

42. Mr. REDZUAN (Malaysia) said that the Government and people of his country
paid tribute to the people and the leaders of Palestine in their brave and
just struggle to exercise their inalienable rights and to reject the illegal
and brutal Israeli occupation of their territory. He associated himself with
the statement made by the observer for Palestine, and had been encouraged by
the statement made by the Under-Secretary-General for Political Affairs. His
delegation fully supported the draft statement before the Committee.

43. Malaysia recognized that priority should be given to the achievement of
the legitimate national and political rights of the Palestinian people, and in
that regard supported the Middle East peace process, which should allow for a
rightful United Nations role. Meanwhile, it was of the utmost importance that
the Security Council should be actively and continuously seized of the
question of Palestine, especially with regard to compliance by Israel with the
provisions of the Fourth Geneva Convention and with regard to the safety and
protection of Palestinians in the occupied territories.

44. Malaysia had been a sponsor of Security Council resolution 681 (1990),
and had been involved in negotiations over a period of 51 days to avoid a veto
by a permanent member. Accordingly, Malaysia believed that the provisions of
the resolution provided a workable machinery that would enable the Security
Council to monitor, on a regular basis, the situation affecting the safety and
protection of Palestinians in the occupied territories, as well as Israel's
full compliance with all the provisions of the Fourth Geneva Convention,
including the issue of Israel's confiscation of Palestinian land and
establishment of illegal settlements. Malaysia would like to see an earnest
effort on the part of the Security Council to implement its resolution
681 (1990), and looked forward to the next report from the Secretary-General,
as provided for in that resolution. The time had come for the Palestinian
people to benefit from the new spirit of cooperation that prevailed in the
Security Council, which had a special responsibility towards the people of
Palestine, whom it must not fail. The Palestinians had suffered and been
denied their rights for too long.

45. The CHAIRMAN read out the following draft statement by the Committee on
the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Israeli occupation of the Palestinian
territory, including Jerusalem, and other Arab territories:

"On the twenty-fifth anniversary of the Israeli occupation of the
Palestinian territory, including Jerusalem, and other Arab territories,
the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the
Palestinian People wishes to draw the most urgent attention of the
international community to the fact that the occupation still continues,
in defiance of the United Nations Charter, its resolutions and
international efforts to bring about a just and peaceful settlement of
the Palestine question, the core of the Arab-Israeli conflict, the latest
of which is the Peace Conference on the Middle East convened in Madrid in
October 1991.

The Palestinian people has consistently manifested its determination
to resist the occupation and to regain and exercise its inalienable
rights, in particular its right to self-determination. It has also
expressed its readiness to live in peace in a State of its own, alongside
Israel, and has presented peace proposals to this effect. However,
Israel has increasingly resorted to armed repression and violations of
fundamental human rights in order to maintain the occupation. Through
confiscation of land, establishment of settlements, appropriation of
natural resources, and efforts to integrate the Palestinian economy into
its own, Israel has pursued a policy of de facto annexation of the
occupied Palestinian territory. Its illegal annexation of Jerusalem
since 1980 and its persistence in changing the physical character and
demographic composition of the Holy City remain matters of the greatest
concern. These policies and practices of Israel, the occupying Power,
which are in violation of its obligations under the Geneva Convention
relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War, have been
universally condemned.

The continued suffering of the Palestinian people after 25 years of
occupation poses an urgent imperative to the international community to
take all necessary measures to ensure the protection of the Palestinian
people and the attainment of a just and lasting settlement based on
Security Council resolutions 242 (1967) and 338 (1973), and the
fundamental principle of the inadmissibility of the acquisition of
territory by war.

On this twenty-fifth anniversary of the occupation by Israel of the
Palestinian territory, including Jerusalem, and other Arab territories,
the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the
Palestinian People wishes to draw once again the attention of the
Security Council and the General Assembly to the fact that their
resolutions on the question of Palestine remain unimplemented. The
perpetuation of the occupation causes persistent tension and conflict in
the region, and threatens the credibility of the United Nations at a time
of historic importance for its efforts to create a better and more just
and peaceful world for all. The international community has a duty and a
responsibility to ensure that this unacceptable situation is brought to
an end."

46. The draft statement was adopted.

47. The CHAIRMAN said that the statement would be published in the monthly
bulletin of the Division for Palestinian Rights.

The meeting rose at 12.30 p.m.




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