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UNITED
NATIONS
A

        General Assembly
A/57/PV.28
14 October 2002

Official Records
General Assembly
Fifty-seventh session
28th plenary meeting
Monday, 14 October 2002, 3 p.m.
New York

President:Mr. Kavan ......................................................................... (Czech Republic)

In the absence of the President, Mr. Aguilar Zinser (Mexico), Vice-President, took the Chair.

The meeting was called to order at 3.05 p.m.

Agenda items 11 and 40 ( continued)

Report of the Security Council (A/57/2 andA/57/2/Corr.1)

Question of equitable representation on and increase in the membership of the Security Council and related matters

/...

Mr. Andjaba (Namibia): ...

/...

Namibia firmly believes that all Security Council resolutions must be implemented by the relevant parties, failing which the Council and, indeed, the entire Organization loses credibility. But when the Security Council unanimously adopts four resolutions on the Middle East during the period under review and none of them see implementation, what message does this send to the parties, and especially to the Palestinian people, whose only hope rests in the implementation of the Council resolutions? The Council must do all it can to help bring about peace in the Middle East.

On Iraq, the report of the Security Council states, inter alia, that the Secretary-General’s dialogue with Iraq was renewed and that members of the Council were supportive of that process. My delegation sees merit in that process and urges its continuation.

/...

Mr. Atta (Egypt) (spoke in Arabic) : ...

/...

Fifthly, all Security Council resolutions should be implemented with equal rigour. Some are implemented immediately and to the letter, while others seem to be ignored by the Council or by any State that may be involved in their implementation. We in the Middle East have many examples to invoke in this regard.

Sixthly, with respect to the Council’s working methods and the follow-up to its recommendations, the Council took a commendable step in establishing a Panel of Experts last July to submit an independent report on the violations of the arms embargo against Somalia. A similar step should be taken with regard to the grave violations of international humanitarian law committed in the occupied Palestinian territories.

/...

Mr. Yuchengco (Philippines): ...

/...

The Security Council has a crucial role to play in finding an effective solution to the Middle East conflict, and we believe it must continue to do so. My delegation views the recently adopted declaration of the Quartet, specifying its three-phase solution to realize the vision of two States living side by side in secure borders, as a positive development. We would, however, emphasize that the international community cannot impose peace. The success of the Quartet formula rests on the parties concerned. We reiterate that there is no military solution to the Middle East conflict. The way forward is through political negotiations.

/...

Mr. Sun (Republic of Korea): ...

/...

In the Middle East, there seems to be no respite in violence and strife. The loss of civilian lives and the deterioration in the humanitarian situation in the region are of profound concern. There have been both achievements and setbacks in the Council’s work to address these challenges. However, what is important is that the Security Council has laid down crucial groundwork for peace in the Middle East by setting out in its resolution 1397 (2001) a vision of two States living side by side within secure and recognized borders. We truly hope that the efforts of the international community, particularly those of the “Quartet”, to bring lasting peace to the region will succeed in achieving a positive outcome within the framework of the relevant Security Council resolutions.

/...

Mr. Ngo Duc Thang (Viet Nam): ...

/...

However, while applauding the encouraging results of the Council’s work, we cannot fail but mention the protracted Middle East crisis. Despite the attention paid by the Council to the ongoing crisis during the past year, it is regrettable that the continued aggressive policy of the Israeli Government on one hand and the lack of consistent measures by the Security Council on the other did not allow for the implementation of several Security Council resolutions on the issue. As a result, the situation in the region remains volatile, and the prospect of lasting peace is ever more remote. In this connection, my delegation believes that it is necessary for every State Member of the United Nations to abide by the Council’s resolutions, thereby leaving no impression of double standard in the Council’s work.

/...

Mr. Akram (Pakistan): ...

/...

The Middle East crisis and the prolonged tragedy of the Palestinian people have continued to challenge the credibility of the Security Council. The Council achieved a high point when it adopted resolution 1397 (2002), creating the framework for a just, lasting and comprehensive solution of the Arab-Israeli conflict on the basis of the principle of land for peace. Since then, however, confronted by repeated Israeli military incursions, punitive measures, the economic strangulation of the Palestinian people and spiralling violence in the occupied territories, the Security Council’s deliberations have become almost a parody of the role which the Charter had perceived for it.

/...

The meeting rose at 6.15 p.m.

This record contains the text of speeches delivered in English and of the interpretation of speeches delivered in the other languages. Corrections should be submitted to the original languages only. They should be incorporated in a copy of the record and sent under the signature of a member of the delegation concerned to the Chief of the Verbatim Reporting Service, room C-154A. Corrections will be issued after the end of the session in a consolidated corrigendum.



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