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UNITED
NATIONS
A

      General Assembly
Distr.
GENERAL
A/C.3/54/SR.42
11 November 1999

English
Original: French

General Assembly
Fifty-fourth session
Official Records



Third Committee

Summary record of the 42nd meeting
Held at Headquarters, New York, on Thursday, 11 November 1999, at 10 a.m.

Chairman: Mr. Galuška.....................................................(Czech Republic)



Contents

Agenda item 116: Human rights questions (continued)

(b) Human rights questions, including alternative approaches for improving the effective enjoyment of human rights and fundamental freedoms (continued)

(c) Human rights situations and reports of special rapporteurs and representatives (continued)

(d) Comprehensive implementation of and follow-up to the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action (continued)

(e) Report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (continued)

The meeting was called to order at 10.15 a.m.


Agenda item 116: Human rights questions (continued)


(b) Human rights questions, including alternative approaches for improving the effective enjoyment of human rights and fundamental freedoms (continued) (A/54/93, A/54/137, A/54/216, A/54/222 and Add.1, A/54/303, A/54/319, A/54/336, A/54/353, A/54/360, A/54/386, A/54/399 and Add.1, A/54/401, A/54/439 and A/54/491)


(c) Human rights situations and reports of special rapporteurs and representatives (continued) (A/54/188, A/54/302, A/54/330-S/1999/958, A/54/331-S/1999/959, A/54/359, A/54/361, A/54/365, A/54/366, A/54/387, A/54/396-S/1999/1000, A/54/409, A/54/422, A/54/440, A/54/465-S/1999/1060, A/54/466, A/54/467, A/54/482, A/54/493, A/54/499 and A/54/527-S/1999/1125; A/C.3/54/3 and A/C.3/54/4)


(d) Comprehensive implementation of and follow-up to the Vienna Declaration and Programme of Action (continued)


(e) Report of the United Nations High Commissioner for Human Rights (continued) (A/54/36)

/...

19. Ms. Barghouti (Observer for Palestine) said that the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and all the declarations, conventions and instruments which had followed constituted the political and legal basis for the international community’s activities in the field of human rights. Nonetheless, much remained to be done to ensure that those rights were universally respected. In particular, since all human rights were indivisible and interdependent, more attention should be given to the promotion of civil, political, social and cultural rights.

20. The World Conference on Human Rights, which had called, inter alia, for action to assist peoples subjected to foreign domination, constituted a major step forward. Yet, as had been noted in the reports of the Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices Affecting the Human Rights of the Palestinian People and Other Arabs of the Occupied Territories, and as her delegation had stated before the Special Political and Decolonization Committee, Israel’s ill-treatment of the Palestinian people continued.

21. The occupation automatically produced a situation of oppression and violation of the collective and individual rights of the Palestinians: deprivation of the right to self-determination, confiscation of land, seizure of natural resources, the building of illegal settlements, detention and denial of freedom of movement and obstruction of the Palestinians’ means of livelihood. The international community must not tolerate a situation in which 7 million persons were still deprived of their fundamental rights at the end of the twentieth century. The United Nations had a responsibility to defend the human rights enshrined in the Charter, including the rights of peoples living under foreign occupation, and to ensure universal respect for international law, the Fourth Geneva Convention and other instruments of humanitarian law.

22. The signing of the Sharm-el-Sheikh Memorandum and the resumption of the peace process were encouraging, but there could be no lasting peace as long as the living conditions of the Palestinians did not improve and as long as Israel did not respect the Palestinians’ fundamental rights. It was imperative that the Israeli Government should go beyond rhetoric, recognize the de jure applicability of the Fourth Geneva Convention and fully respect the Convention’s provisions.

/...

The meeting rose at 12 noon.


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