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UNITED
NATIONS
A

        General Assembly
A/41/13/Add.1
31 October 1986

UNITED NATIONS
GENERAL
ASSEMBLY
Forty-first Session

Official Records
ADDENDUM
Supplement No. 13
(A/41/13)
October 1986

NEW YORK


REPORT OF THE COMMISSIONER-GENERAL OF THE UNITED NATIONS RELIEF
AND WORKS AGENCY FOR PALESTINE REFUGEES IN THE NEAR EAST

Addendum


1. This addendum to the Commissioner-General's report to the General Assembly 1/ contains information on the financial results in 1985, the financial performance to date in 1986 and on the Agency's proposed budget for 1987.

2. Direct government assistance to Palestine refugees is provided by the governments in the area of operations. Information on this assistance, shown as reported by the Governments concerned, is given in annex II.

I. FINANCIAL RESULTS IN 1985

3. With the exception of 1984 when the Agency received a special one-time grant of $8.9 million following the closure of the United Nations Special Emergency Operations Trust Fund, regular contributions to the Agency showed a decline each year from 1980 to 1985. At the beginning of 1985, total regular contributions to the Agency were only $164 million, some $26 million less than in 1980. The reduction in income was such that the Commissioner-General had no recourse but to severely reduce the budget for i985 and to make a special appeal to Governments for additional contributions. A number of Governments responded to the special appeal and by the close of 1985 the Agency's income for the year totaled $182 million. The Agency was able, therefore, to close the gap between income and expenditure in its General Fund substantially, ending the year with an excess of expenditure over income of only $1.2 million, which was met from its working capital.

II. FINANCIAL PERFORMANCE IN 1986

4. The Agency's consolidated budget estimates for 1986 were $191.2 million, of which $170.5 million was for the General Fund, $13.1 million for Project Funds and $7.6 million for the Capital Construction Fund. 2/ This budget, adjusted to reflect the exchange rates prevailing in December 1985, was authorized for expenditure by the Commissioner-General.

5. As at the date of this report, the gap between income and 1986 estimated expenditure is $9 million, of which $2 million relates to the General Fund and $7 million to the Capital Construction Fund. The Agency has informed its major donors of the level of 1986 income to date (see annex I) and is hopeful that the additional contributions required for 1986, in particular for the General Fund, will be pledged.

III. MEDIUM-TERM PLAN

6. The Agency embarked in 1986 on its first multi-year planning exercise. In order to provide for the orderly development of the three substantive programmes of the Agency - education, health and relief services - and to provide donors with a forecast of the level of financing, that will be required over the planning period, the Agency has prepared a three-year medium-term plan. This plan will be a rolling plan, that is, it will be revised annually by adding a year and dropping the current year. The plan contains a description of the objectives of each programme and sub-programme, the strategies that will be followed to meet the objectives and the methods of evaluating the achievement of the objectives. The plan will thus form the basis for the policies that will govern the preparation of the Agency's annual budgets.

IV. PROPOSED BUDGET FOR 1987

7. Following the practice adopted in 1985, UNRWA's proposed 1987 budget estimates are being submitted during the forty-first session of the General Assembly as an addendum to the Commissioner-General's report. These estimates are subdivided into three sections: the General Fund, Project Fund and Capital Construction Fund requirements.
A. Consolidated budget estimates

8. The consolidated budget estimates for 1987, as shown in table 1 (General Fund, Project Fund and Capital Construction Fund), are $200.3 million, an increase of $9.1 million or 4.8 Per cent over the 1986 approved budget. Table 2 contains a comparison of the 1987 budget estimates with the 1986 approved budget by type of expenditure.

9. The preparation of the 1987 budget has been guided by the policies and strategies developed in the Agency's 1987-1989 medium-term plan which also sets out the projected income needs of the Agency over the period. These projections reflect a realistic view of the income the Agency considers it would be possible raise from contributing Governments and others. The meeting of major donors in May 1986 endorsed these projections of income and it is on this basis that the proposed budget for 1987 has been prepared. The policy assumptions on which UNRWA's 1987 budget estimates have been based are that all administrative and support services would be held at the same level as 1986 and that growth in the three substantive programmes would be limited to projections of population increases as set out in the medium-term plan.

B. General Fund

10. The General Fund budget represents the resources needed to operate the continuing major programmes of the Agency. It includes the staff and other costs necessary to maintain the education, health and welfare services that the Agency provides to serve two million Palestine refugees. Each of these programmes is described in greater detail in the sections that follow.

11. The 1987 General Fund budget estimates amount to $178.3 million, of which $163.0 million represents cash expenditure and $15.5 million expenditure of donated food commodities and services. These figures show an increase of $7.9 million or 4.6 per cent over the approved General Fund budget for 1986.

Table 1. 1986 APPROVED BUDGET AND 1987 PROPOSED BUDGET ESTIMATES

(Thousands of United States dollars)

1986
APPROVED BUDGET a/
1987
PROPOSED ESTIMATES
Cash
In kind
Total
Cash
In kind
Total
A.General Fund
I.Education services

Elementary education
Preparatory education
Vocational and professional training
Other activities
52 057
35 541
7 951
4 538
21
7
838
797
52 078
34 548
8 789
5 335
53 659
35 175
8 240
4 082
12
14
791
762
53 676
35 189
9 031
4 844
Total I 99 087 1 663 100 750 101 156 1 584 102 740
II.Health services

Medical services
Environmental sanitation
17 924
6 308
398
476
18 322
6 784
18 211
6 219
381
533
18 592
6 752
Total II 24 232 874 25 106 24 430 914 25 344
III.Relief services

Special hardship assistance
Relief and welfare services
Shelter
2 384
3 728
629
10 119
1
152
12 503
3 729
781
2 818
3 552
638
12 390
1
270
15 208
3 553
908
Total III 6 741 10 272 17 013 7 008 12 661 19 669
IV.Operational services

Supply and transport services
Architectural and engineering
services
7 142

1 064
270

-
7 412

1 064
7 223

1 258
290

-
7 513

1 258
Total IV 8 206 270 8 476 8 481 290 8 771
V.Common services

General management
Administration
5 828
13 316
-
-
5 828
13 316
8 317
13 598
-
-
8 317
13 598
Total V 19 144 - 19 144 21 915 - 21 915
General Fund, Total157 410 13 079 170 489 162 990 15 447 178 439
B.Project Fund

Education services
Health services
Relief services
2 862
4 858
271
-
5 101
-
2 862
9 959
271
3 031
4 037
327
77
6 158
3
3 108
10 195
330
Project Fund, Total 7 991 5 101 13 092 7 395 6 238 13 633
C.Capital Construction Fund

Education services
Health services
Relief services
Operational services
6 463
760
359
50
-
-
-
-
6 463
760
359
50
5 902
1 919
325
126
-
-
-
-
5 902
1 919
325
126
Capital Construction Fund, Total 7 632 - 7 632 8 272 - 8 272
GRAND TOTAL173 023 18 180 191 213 178 657 21 687 200 344

a/ The 1986 budget figures have been reclassified to conform with the current presentation.


C. Project Fund

12. UNRWA continues to implement two types of projects: ongoing projects that are fully funded by special contributions such as those shown in annex III and construction projects that provide new or expanded facilities for the Agency's programmes. Funding for ongoing projects is estimated at $13.6 million in 19817 an increase of $500,000 over 1986 due to an increase in the valuation of donated food commodities and a small expansion in the number of refugees benefiting from the supplementary feeding programme.

D. Capital Construction Fund

13. The Capital Construction Fund consists of requirements for the replacement of unsatisfactory facilities and for new facilities to meet the needs brought about by the growth in the refugee population. Funds will be used to build new schools, health clinics, health sub-centres, mother-and child health care-units, sewing centres, distribution centres and warehousing facilities, as well as for additional classrooms to avoid triple-shifting of classes and the replacement and renovation of toilet units in existing schools. In 1986 this requirement was $7.6 million, but only $1.5 million of the proposed projects have been funded as at the date of this report. Accordingly a number of the proposed projects are included in the 1987 budget estimate, which has been increased marginally over the 1986 level. If sufficient funds are not found to enable the Agency to build these much-needed facilities, buildings will have to continue to be rented, which will increase the overall operating costs of the Agency.

E. Programmes

14. In 1987 the education programme will account for about 58 per cent of the total General Fund budget. Health services represent 14.0 per cent of the budget, relief services equal 11 per cent, operational services 4.8 per cent and common services 12.2 per cent. Each of these programmes is described below.

1. Education

15. The Agency's education programme includes elementary and preparatory schooling, vocational and professional training in Agency-operated vocational training centres, and a scholarship grants programme to help in the financing of refugee students seeking higher education in or near the Agency’s areas of operation. The general education programme for elementary and preparatory age group students provides schooling for 352,800 pupils enrolled in 638 Agency schools serviced by a teaching staff of 10,200. In addition 8,540 refugee pupils are enrolled in government and private schools. It is projected that the number of pupils serviced by the Agency will increase by 2,840 in the 1987/88 school year, requiring the hiring of about 78 additional teachers in the autumn of 1987.

16. In UNRWA's 8 training centres, 3,660 training places are available to Palestine refugees for vocational and technical training and 850 for teacher training. The type and content of the courses are continually revised by the Agency to enable graduates from the centres to obtain employment so as to be able to contribute economically to the continuing development of the region. During the 1985/86 academic year, UNRWA awarded 360 scholarships for refugees to study at universities.

17. In planning the general education programme for the 1987/88 school year, the Agency has concentrated on lowering the occupancy level of the most congested classrooms so that no class section will have more than 50 pupils. This will require the employment of a further 67 teachers in addition to those required to accommodate normal growth in the school population (see para. 14). An additional 66 teaching staff will be employed in Gaza to eliminate the work-load difference that currently exists between Gaza and the West Bank. The aim of these policies to overcome the effects of the freeze in the number of teaching positions in the 1985/86 school year made necessary by the severe financial constraints that faced the Agency in 1985.

18. The goal of the Agency’s construction programme for education is to provide standard schools to replace rented schools and unsatisfactory or unsuitable Agency schools as well as to provide for the growth in school population. The Agency is able to recover the cost of new standard schools in full in six years through reductions in the number of teachers required. The programme to provide improved sanitation facilities in-current Agency schools that was started in 1986'is being continued in 1987.

19. Expenditure for the education programme is estimated at $102.7 million for 1987, as compared to $100.8 million in 1986.

2. Health

20. Primary health care is provided through curative and preventive medical care services and maternal and child health programmes. These programmes are operated through a network of 98 health centres/health points, polyclinics, hospitals, laboratories and rehabilitation centres, run either by UNRWA or Governments which provide services to about 1,878 million eligible Palestine refugees.

21. Basic community sanitation services are provided by UNRWA in 61 camp locations housing Palestine refugees and displaced persons. These services cover the provision of potable water, sanitary disposal of solid and liquid wastes, drainage of storm water and the control of disease-carving insects and rodents.

22. Three general policy objectives have been incorporated in the 1987 budget estimates. They are to improve specialist medical services by employing a limited number of additional doctors and nurses, to expand clinical laboratory services to areas where they do not currently exist, and to improve dental health services. In the occupied territories, the thrust of the policy decisions is to make available additional hospital beds to refugees in Gaza and to improve sanitary conditions through major capital equipment programmes for garbage collection and for the reconstruction of sewer systems.

23. Estimated costs for the health programme have not increased, although there is a planned expansion in certain areas of operation. Maintaining the budget at the 1986 level of about $25.3 million has been made possible by exchange rate changes in several currencies in the areas of operation.

24. The major goal of the Agency’s relief programme is to assist destitute refugee families through a Special Hardship Case programme which provides basic food needs, blankets, clothing for children, and shelter repair and reconstruction services. Currently this programme services 118,000 beneficiaries. Limited cash grants are given to Special Hardship Cases and adult training programmes are also carried out. Because of increased economic difficulties in the Agency’s areas of operation, the number of Special Hardship Case applications is expected to increase in 1987 by 11,200. Food and clothing are distributed to the eligible refugees through a network of distribution centres and distribution points located throughout the camps, with food distribution being made either monthly or bimonthly, while clothing is distributed twice annually. With the expansion in the number of beneficiaries in 1987, cash costs will increase.

25. Further development of sewing and women’s activity centres are planned in 1987 with the objective of giving participants skills that can be used to augment their family income. Additional funding will be required to construct and equip planned new centres and to employ trained teaching staff.

26. The 1987 budget estimate for this programme is $19.7 million, which is an increase of about $2.6 million over 1986, brought about principally by the anticipated increase in Special Hardship Cases.

4. Operational services

27. The three substantive programmes of the Agency are supported by a supply and transport operation and an architectural and civil engineering services group. The supply and transport operation provides procurement, freight transport and passenger transport services in all the areas of operation. In 1986, 23,650 tons of basic commodities and 5,000 tons of general cargo were handled through a network of central and satellite warehouses for final distribution to the beneficiaries of the services provided by the Agency's programmes. The logistics operations of the Agency are carried out by a fleet of vehicles that are used to transport commodities and general stores, for garbage collection, water distribution and sewage clearance services, and for education and health programmes. In total the Agency has a fleet of 462 vehicles. All of these vehicles are maintained by the Agency’s vehicle maintenance staff. The proposed budget for this operation in 1987 is $7.5 million, compared to $7.2 million in 1986.

28. The architectural and civil engineering group is responsible for the design of all new Agency facilities and for the maintenance of existing Agency premises. In 1986 the staff have worked on the design of buildings to the value of $6.6 million, supervised construction worth about $2.8 million and implemented a maintenance programme of about $1.4 million. The budget estimate for architectural and civil engineering services in 1987 is $1.3 million, an increase of $200,000 over 1986. The costs associated with the construction of new facilities is, in most cases, recovered as a direct charge to the Construction Fund.

5. Common services

29. Common services support all programmes run by the Agency and cover two distinct areas: general management and administrative services. General management consists of the offices of the Commissioner-General and Deputy Commissioner-General the directors in each field, and the functions of legal services, external relations, public information, internal audit and management services. Administrative services include financial, personnel, data processing and related functions.

30. The increase in common service costs is due to two major factors. Firstly, although there have been reductions in programme costs due to more favorable exchange rates in two of the areas of UNRWA operations, there have been increases in costs resulting from less favorable exchange rates in the locations where the majority of the Agency's administrative personnel are stationed (Vienna and Amman). Secondly, the proposed budget for administrative services includes the costs associated with the move of the Agency's headquarters unit in Amman from rented space to space recently made available in Agency- owned premises, saving rent. The one-time cost of approximately $600,000 in 1987 will be recovered through rental savings over the next five years.

F. Staff costs

31. Staff costs make up a large part of UNRWA's operating budget, as is illustrated in table, 2, and are carefully controlled and monitored throughout the operating year. In preparing the 1987 budget, administrative staff have been held to the 1986 level while staff in the substantive programmes have been increased to a limited extent to provide for the growth in the refugee population and eliminate work-load anomalies. Table 2 shows the estimated expenditure for staff funded by the regular budget and by extra-budgetary funds, while table 3 contains the staffing table of the Agency, also subdivided by source of funding (regular budget and extra-budgetary funds), and shows the total number of staff employed. Efforts are continually being made to improve the productivity of staff by providing additional training and through the introduction of automated equipment. As posts become vacant, their functions are carefully analyzed to ensure that they are still required before action is taken to fill them.

32. In 1987, 270 additional staff will be required in the education, health and relief programmes. Also a small number of reclassifications are included in the budget estimates to allow for the correction of some post classifications and the redistribution of duties and responsibilities where this will result in improved efficiency and effectiveness.

33. Estimated staff costs in 1987 are $137 million compared to $134.9 million in 1986.

Table 2. Summary of the 1987 regular and extra-budgetary cost estimates
classified by expenditure groups
(Thousands of United States dollars)
1986
appropriations
1987
estimates
Classification of types of expenditure
I.




II.





III.












IV.
Regular budget

Established posts
International

Extrabudgetary staff costs

Established posts
International
Locally recruited

Extrabudgetary other costs

Contract services
Operational expenses
Supplies
Building and equipment
Premises
Grants and subsidies
Reimbursements and transfers
from production units

Subtotal

Supplies and services in kind

Grand total
5 510




750
128 734



5 806
615
10 262
10 897
4 816
6 721

(1 078)

173 033

18 180

191 213
=======
6 176




578
130 285



6 103
944
10 877
12 900
4 566
7 322

(1 094)

178 657

21 687

200 344
=======


Table 3. Staffing table
Established
posts
Regular budget
Established
posts
Extrabudgetary
Posts
provided by
UNESCO and WHO
Grand total
1986
1987
1986
1987
1986
1987
1986
1987
Professional
and above
USG
ASG
D-2
D-1
P-5
P-4
P-3
P-2/1
1
1
1
10
16
36
15
2
1
1
1
10
16
36
15
2
-
-
-
-
3
2
-
1
-
-
-
-
3
2
-
1
-
-
2
-
5
19
1
-
-
-
2
-
5
19
-
-
1
1
3
10
24
57
16
3
1
1
3
10
24
57
15
3
Subtotal8282
6
6
27
26
115 114
General Service
Other
services
1010
1
1
- 1 11 11
Subtotal1010
1
1
- 1 11 11
Area staff
G-18
17
16
15
14
13
12
11
10
9
8
7
6
5
4
3
2
1
____
16
9
75
87
172
69
284
236
2 229
2 087
4 430
1 859
948
798
377
203
444
2 969
17
9
86
83
184
75
251
219
2 526
2 247
4 313
1 746
1 065
842
352
199
479
2 865
16
9
75
87
172
69
284
236
2 229
2 087
4 430
1 859
948
798
377
203
444
2 969
17
9
86
83
184
75
251
219
2 526
2 247
4 313
1 746
1 065
842
352
199
479
2 865
Subtotal - -
17 292
17 558
- -17 292 17 558
Grand total92
==
92
==
17 299
======
17 565
======
27
==

26
==
17 418
======
17 683
======

G. Non-staff costs

34. Expenditures in 1987 will increase for the maintenance of buildings and facilities, supplies, replacement of unserviceable equipment and for subsidized hospital services in Gaza and other fields. Estimated expenditure in 1987 for goods and services is $41.6 million compared to $38 million in 1986.

V. FINANCING THE 1987 BUDGET

35. The cash and in-kind income that will be required to finance the 1987 UNRWA budget is shown in the following table:
1987
(Millions of United States dollars)
Cash
In kind
Total
A.
B.
C.
General Fund
Project Fund
Capital Construction Fund

Total
163.0
7.4
8.3

178.7
15.4
6.2
-

21.6
178.4
13.6
8.3

200.3


36. UNWRA has no reserves on which to draw to finance the 1987 budget. Funds for the operations of the Agency's programmes will be totally dependent, therefore, on the contributions received from donors. Contributions to UNRWA are made in two forms: cash and in-kind donations of basic commodities (principally food) and services.

A. Cash requirements

37. To continue to provide basic education, health and relief services to refugees, UNRWA will require $163 million to finance its General Fund. This compares with estimated income for 1986 of $154.6 million. In addition to the cash resources required for General Fund operations, UNRWA has unmet Capital Construction Fund deeds in 1987 of $8.3 million. Donors will be sought for these projects. Continuing support of about $7.14 million is anticipated from current donors for the funding of the remaining ongoing projects.

B. In-kind requirements

38. In-kind requirements for 1987 are estimated to be $21.7 million. Several donors have customarily made in-kind contributions of basic commodities and services to UNRWA. It is expected that they will be in a position to continue their support in 1987. In 1984 and 1985, the quantities of food products donated to the Agency had fallen off. Last year the Agency issued a special appeal for flour in order to rebuild stock reserves for emergency purposes, such as in Lebanon, and received a positive response from a number of Governments. This flour has been delivered and reasonable stock balances are now held by the Agency.

Notes

1/ Official Records of the General Assembly, Forty-first Session, Supplement No. 13 (A/41/13).

2/ Ibid., Fortieth Session, Supplement No. 13 (A/40/13/Add.1), para. 9.




ANNEX I

Contributions pledged to 30 September 1986

(United States dollars)

Contributor
Cash
In kind
Total
I. Contributions from Governments

Argentina
Australia
Austria
Bahrain
Belgium
Burma
Cameroon
Canada
Chile
China
Cyprus
Denmark
Egypt
Finland
France
Germany, Federal Republic of
Greece
Holy See
Iceland
India
Indonesia
Iran (Islamic Republic of)
Ireland
Israel
Italy
Japan
Jordan
Kuwait
Lebanon
Luxembourg
Malaysia
Maldives
Mexico
Monaco
Netherlands
Norway
Oman
Pakistan
Philippines
Portugal
Qatar
San Marino
Saudi Arabia
Senegal
Seychelles
Spain
Sri Lanka
Sweden
Switzerland
Syrian Arab Republic
Thailand
Tunisia
Turkey
United Kingdom of Great Britain
and Northern Ireland
United States of America
Venezuela
Yugoslavia
Zimbabwe
15 000
977 620
145 000
15 000
428 304
1 000
6 000
6 127 247
5 000
50 000
1 983
2 463 394
7 407
958 252
1 043 952
4 368 666
60 000
14 500
9 500
17 000
8 000
30 000
448 470
-
4 874 431
9 500 000
-
1 100 000
-
7 851
5 000
1 000
3 000
1 708
2 028 875
8 580 905
25 000
21 065
2 000
15 000
100 000
3 170
1 000 000
5 000
300
1 382 271
-
9 516 668
1 534 558
-
13 532
11 000
30 000

7 147 754
67 000 000
10 000
-
3 689
-
346 154
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
741 714
353 320
-
-
-
7 642
-
-
-
289 300
847 000
2 444 706
544 236
-
12 497
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2 000
-
3 453 327
132 102
-
-
-

-
-
-
25 000
-
15 000
1 323 774
145 000
15 000
428 304
1 000
6 000
6 127 247
5 000
50 000
1 983
2 463 394
7 407
958 252
1 785 666
4 721 986
60 000
14 500
9 500
24 642
8 000
30 000
448 470
289 300
5 721 431
11 944 706
544 236
1 100 000
12 497
7 851
5 000
1 000
3 000
1 708
2 028 875
8 580 905
25 000
21 065
2 000
15 000
100 000
3 170
1 000 000
5 000
300
1 382 271
2 000
9 516 668
4 987 885
132 102
13 532
11 000
30 000

7 147 754
67 000 000
10 000
25 000
3 689
Subtotal 131 125 072 9 198 998 140 324 070
II.Contributions from intergovernmental
organizations

European Community
OPEC Fund
AGFUND
20 138 000
726 000
920 000
11 584 263
-
-
31 722 263
726 000
920 000
Subtotal 21 784 000 11 584 263 33 368 263
III.Contributions from United Nations
and United Nations agencies

United Nations (from regular budget)
UNICEF
UNESCO
WHO
533 700
510 890
-
-
-
-
1 470 020
465 890
5 510 890
33 700
1 470 020
465 890
Subtotal 5 544 590 1 935 910 7 480 500
IV.Income from non-governmental sources

American Friends Service Committee
American Near East Refugee Aid
Arabian American Oil Company
(ARAMCO) - Saudi Arabia
Calouste Gulbenkian
Foundation - Portugal
Co-operation for Development
Gaza Authorities
Holy Land Christian Mission
Indonesian National Committee for
the Commemoration of the Fortieth
Anniversary of the United Nations
Near East Council of Churches
Norwegian People's Aid
Norwegian Refugee Council
OXFAM - UK
Pontifical Mission for Palestine
Statens Serum Institute
SURVIVE MIVA - UK
Swedish Save the Children Fund
(Radda Barnen)
Sundry contributors
131 000
2 000

220 000

12 258
58 623
-
120 000


6 000
-
823
118 074
41 654
99 714
-
18 837

32 000
816 011
-
21 239

-

-
-
71 618
-


-
40,000
-
-
-
-
3,451
-

-
65 847
131 000
23 239

220 000

12 258
58 623
71 618
120 000


6 000
40 000
823
118 074
41 654
99 714
3 451
18 837

32 000
881 858
Subtotal 1 676 994 202 155 1 879 149
V.Income from others

Capen, Ms. Anna
Turkish Cypriot People
Sundry contributors
8 000
2 000
207 110
-
-
7 657
8 000
2 000
214 767
Subtotal 217 110 7 657 224 767
Total 160 347 766
===========
22 928 983
==========
183 276 749
===========



ANNEX II

Direct government assistance to Palestine refugees a/

(1 July 1985-30 June 1986)


Note. All data in the table below are shown as reported by the Governments concerned and are expressed in United States dollars computed by applying United Nations operational rates of exchange.

Egypt
Israel
Jordan
Lebanon b/
Syrian Arab
Republic
Education services

Social welfare
services

Medical services

Housing

Security services

Miscellaneous services

Administrative costs

Total
82 224 000


3 925 000

c/

d/

-

d/

184 111 000

270 260 000
===========
12 460 000


1 680 000

7 500 000

1 500 000

-

4 000 000

-

27 140 000
==========
74 780 495


3 610 871

22 944 076

19 075 286

e/

e/

5 319 587

125 730 315
===========
__________


==========
56 177 496


2 721 686

2 185 810

8 271 464

6 148 472

9 181 471

6 345 900

91 032 299
==========
____________________________________________________________________________________

a/ This assistance was rendered direct to the refugees, in addition to contributions to UNRWA (see annex 1).

b/ Figures not received.

c/ Health services are included in social welfare services.

d/ Housing and miscellaneous services are included in administrative costs.

e/ Security and miscellaneous services are included in administrative costs.



ANNEX III

Ongoing Projects that are fully funded by donors for 1987
Title
Thousands of United States
dollars
1.

2.


3.


4.


5.


6.

7.


8.


9.
Supplementary feeding programme, funded by EEC

Income-generating project in Gaza, funded by Co-operation for Development, United Kingdom

Gaza Centre for the Blind, funded by the
Pontifical Mission and other donors

Husn Camp Centre for the Disabled, funded by the Mennonite Central Committee

Ramallah Men's and Women's Training Centre,
funded by the Government of Denmark

ARAMCO-University scholarships, funded by ARAMCO

Jarash community project for the disabled,
funded by OXFAM

Suf community project for the disabled,
funded by OXFAM

Income-generating project in Lebanon,
funded by Norwegian People's Aid
10 194


24


213


15


3 040

68


24


15


40

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