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Source: Division for Palestinian Rights (DPR)
1 March 1993
APPROACHES TOWARDS
THE SETTLEMENT
OF THE ARAB-ISRAELI CONFLICT
AND THE QUESTION OF PALESTINE

Issue 21 - February 1993

Note . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . ii

The issue of Palestinian deportees and the Arab-Israeli peace negotiations

Excerpts from opening statement by the United States Secretary
of State at a news conference at the Permanent Mission of the
United States to the United Nations, New York, 1 February 1993. . . . . . . 1

Text of a statement by President Clinton,
Washington, D.C., 3 February 1993 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

Extracts from an address by Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin before the Knesset,
Jerusalem, 3 February 1993. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3

Remarks by the official spokesperson of the Palestinian delegation to the
Arab-Israeli peace negotiations, Jerusalem, 9 February 1993 . . . . . . . . 6

Joint remarks by the Minister for Foreign Affairs of Israel and
the United States Secretary of State, Jerusalem, 22 February 1993 . . . . . 6

Excerpts from opening statements at a joint news conference by the
Prime Minister of Israel and the United States Secretary of State,
Jerusalem, 24 February 1993 . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8

Text of a joint United States-Russian Federation statement
on the Middle East, Geneva, 25 February 1993. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

Remarks by the United States Secretary of State and the Minister for
Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation concerning the ninth round
of the Arab-Israeli peace negotiations, Geneva, 25 January 1993 . . . . . . 10







United Nations
New York, March 1993


- ii -


















NOTE


Since April 1991, at the request of the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People, the Division for Palestinian Rights of the United Nations Secretariat has prepared on a monthly basis a compilation of relevant statements, declarations, documents or other material regarding the settlement of the Arab-Israeli conflict, including the question of Palestine and the convening of an international peace conference on the Middle East for the use of the Committee members and observers. The present issue covers the month of February 1993.

Reproduced herein are only those parts of the statements, declarations, documents or other material, quoted or summarized, which relate to the Arab-Israeli conflict and the question of Palestine.
The issue of Palestinian deportees and the Arab-Israeli peace negotiations


Excerpts from opening statement by the United States Secretary of State
at a news conference at the Permanent Mission of the United States
to the United Nations, New York, 1 February 1993


On 1 February 1993, in New York, the United States Secretary of State Mr. Warren Christopher, at a news conference held at the Permanent Mission of the United States to the United Nations, explained the position of the United States Administration on the issue of Palestinian deportees. He said, inter alia:

Text of a statement by President Clinton,
Washington, D.C., 3 February 1993


On 3 February 1993, at Washington, D.C., the following statement by President Clinton was released by the Office of the Press Secretary at the White House:

Extracts from an address by Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin
before the Knesset,
Jerusalem, 3 February 1993


On 3 February 1993, speaking before the Knesset, Prime Minister of Israel Yitzhak Rabin explained his Government's position concerning the deportation, in December 1992, of Palestinian civilians and the subsequent discussion of the issue with the United States Administration. Mr. Rabin stated the following, inter alia:

Remarks by the official spokesperson of the Palestinian delegation
to the Arab-Israeli peace negotiations,
Jerusalem, 9 February 1993


In an interview with a Kol Yisrael correspondent, broadcast in Jerusalem, on 9 February 1993, Mrs. Hanan Ashrawi, official spokesperson of the Palestinian delegation to the Arab-Israeli peace negotiations, said the following regarding the attendance by the delegation of the ninth round of the negotiations:

In response to a question on the delegation's view of the bilateral and the multilateral negotiations following its contacts with US Administration officials, Mrs. Ashrawi stated:

Joint remarks by the Minister for Foreign Affairs of Israel
and the United States Secretary of State,
Jerusalem, 22 February 1993


On 22 February 1993, at Jerusalem, the following remarks were made by the Minister for Foreign Affairs of Israel Mr. Shimon Peres and the United States Secretary of State Mr. Warren Christopher, upon Mr. Christopher's arrival in Israel, as released by the United States Information Service:

Minister Peres


"Secretary Christopher, I would like to welcome you here in our country as a cherished guest, representing a mission of the utmost importance for us, for the region, for peace. We know that you are representing an Administration that has raised the hopes of the whole of the free world, that has started anew the process of peace, and we do hope that is the first step in the renewal of the peace negotiations - something that we are awaiting anxiously, with great expectation. We welcome you here with great respect, hope, and friendship. You know how dear the relations between the United States and Israel are to all of us, and I am sure that you will represent it with great devotion and talent. Welcome to Israel."5/

Secretary Christopher


"Thank you, Mr. Foreign Minister. It is a great honour to be welcomed by the distinguished Foreign Minister who has a worldwide reputation as a person who has sought peace for most of his adult life and someone who has great respect in my country. Thank you ever so much for the honour you have served me by being out to welcome me.

"It is a great pleasure to visit Israel on my first trip abroad as Secretary of State. I have much to learn about this ancient land and this modern State. I hope to use this opportunity to begin to know and see Israel and its people. I want to gain a better understanding of the challenges and opportunities that you face. As I arrive in Israel this evening, there are several things about which President Clinton and I are very certain.

"First, the relationship between the United States and Israel is a special relationship for special reasons. It is based upon shared interests, shared values, and a shared commitment to democracy, pluralism, and respect for the individual. The ties between our two countries have proved strong and resilient, and President Clinton is determined to make them even stronger and more resilient.

"Second, I know that to understand Israel - Israel's present and its future - it is essential to understand Israel's past. History has cast a long shadow over the people of this Jewish State. The Israeli people have had to fight war and terrorism to defend the State. I understand this struggle for survival. That's why the United States is unalterably committed to Israel's security. That commitment will not change.

"Third, real security can only be brought about by real peace. But we also know that peace won't be possible unless Israel is fully secure. The Israeli people want peace - not just peace meaning the absence of war, but peace reflected in lasting treaties, normalized relationships, and real reconciliation.

"It is with this in mind that President Clinton has sent me to this region to assess, to consult, and to focus the parties - all the parties -on the importance of resuming negotiations at the very earliest date. So I am very much looking forward to my meetings with Prime Minister Rabin, with Foreign Minister Peres, and later with the Palestinians.

"As in the period before Madrid, and now with the help of the United States as a full partner, the parties can build on the substance of structure of real peace through direct negotiations. Working together, the United States, Israel, and the Arab and the Palestinian negotiating parties can turn this process into one of real breakthroughs and achievements rather than missed opportunities."5/


Excerpts from opening statements at a joint news conference by the
Prime Minister of Israel and the United States Secretary of State,
Jerusalem, 24 February 1993


On 24 February 1993, at Jerusalem, during a joint news conference, the Prime Minister of Israel Mr. Yitzhak Rabin and the United States Secretary of State Mr. Warren Christopher made the following statements, as released by the United States Information Service:

Prime Minister Rabin


"The Secretary of State of the United States, his colleagues, ladies and gentlemen of the media. We more than appreciate the decision of President Clinton and the Secretary of State to have the first visit of the Secretary of State after President Clinton took the office of the President of the United States to come to the Middle East with the purpose to bring about the resumption of the peace negotiations.

"I believe that the visit of the Secretary of State, the discussions, the talks that were held now in Israel, no doubt will serve as a landmark in the relationship between our two countries, in the efforts to invigorate the peace negotiations and to bring their resumption. I believe that during the visit of the Secretary of State here in Israel, I had the opportunity and the pleasure to have talks, deep to the issues, and I hope that ... we succeeded to establish special relations - relations of friendship, understanding, and [candor].

"I believe that in the talks that were held here, we discussed a variety of issues: first and foremost, what has to be done to bring about the resumption of the peace negotiations, how to make sure that once they will be resumed, they lead in 1993 to results - results that I believe all the peoples, all the countries of this region expect them to achieve. It is to say to have a breakthrough that will lead to peace between Israel and its neighbouring countries and the Palestinians.

"I hope and I believe that the visit of the Secretary of State, not only to Israel but also to the other capitals of the Arab countries that are directly involved in the peace negotiations ... will create a new atmosphere that will be conducive to bring about more meaningful peace negotiations. We have discussed at length the special relations between the United States and Israel, and there's no doubt in my mind that these relations will be developed and strengthened in the interest of the two countries. And no doubt, this development will bring about and will facilitate many things that we, together, try to achieve in this region.

"Mr. Secretary, thank you very much for your patience, your readiness to listen, to travel, to see. I believe that we put on you quite a burden of work during the two days that you stay[ed] in Israel. Allow me through you to send my thanks and congratulations to President Clinton about his decision to give such a high priority to solve the difficulties that prevent[ed] until now the achievement of the peace negotiations. Thank you very much, Mr. Secretary."6/


Secretary Christopher


"Mr. Prime Minister, thank you for those very warm words. I've just concluded the last of my meetings here in Jerusalem, and let me say I've tremendously enjoyed my stay here. The detailed discussions that I've had with the Prime Minister, the Foreign Minister, and their colleagues were serious and productive and very helpful to me. I've had three separate meetings with the Prime Minister, and he and his wife were gracious enough to host me and my delegation last night for dinner. And all in all, it was a splendid time for me.

"Over these last 3 days, we have strengthened and deepened the special relationship between our two nations. On a personal note, as the Prime Minister so generously said, I am pleased that we've developed a close and personal relationship. I know that President Clinton is looking forward to greeting Prime Minister Rabin in Washington in the very near future and looking forward to that development of a similar relationship. The relationship that the Prime Minister and I have established is symbolic of the friendship between our two nations - a friendship that's based upon deep and enduring interest, shared values, and common interests. My stay here was all too short, but it did give me an opportunity to learn just a little bit about the rich history of this ancient land and to feel a sense of the dynamism of the modern, vibrant democracy.

"In my visit to Yad Vashem, I was reminded again of the extraordinary uniqueness of the Jewish State. And this morning in my visit to northern Israel, I was again reminded that the Jewish State continues to face very substantial security challenges. It's high time for Israel to be able to enjoy the acceptance of its neighbours in the security that comes from having a just and lasting peace. I know that the people of Israel yearn for that day, and I know that the Israeli Government is doing all that [it] can to achieve it.

"After visiting with the leaders of the significant parties to the negotiations, I have a very real sense that all the parties want the negotiations to succeed. They want them to resume and succeed at an early date, and they agree that they should redouble their efforts to that end. I've also had in the last 2 days serious and thoughtful discussions with the Palestinians. The Palestinian representatives with whom I spoke emphasized their commitment to seek peace with Israel, and they expressed their understanding of the stake that they have in seeking that peace. I leave the Middle East hopeful but cognizant that there still are obstacles - obstacles that will have to be overcome. But I sense among all the parties that they want to seek and make peace. If that translates into an early resumption of the peace talks, as I hope it will be, the United States stands ready to be a full partner. Before I left Washington, I said that I was coming to the region to learn, to find the facts, to get to know the leaders in this area. I have accomplished far more in that sense than I'd expected, and I've had substantive discussions far deeper than I'd anticipated.

"This is a region that has known too much war and too much violence in its past. The parties are at a historic crossroad. This is an opportunity which I hope all the parties will embrace, and we'll do our part to help them in that regard. Thank you very much."6/


Text of a joint United States-Russian Federation
statement on the Middle East,
Geneva, 25 February 1993


The following is the text of a joint United States-Russian Federation statement on the Middle East, as released by the Office of the Assistant Secretary/Spokesman:

Remarks by the United States Secretary of State and
the Minister for Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation
concerning the ninth round of the Arab-Israeli peace negotiations,
Geneva, 25 February 1993


On 25 February 1993, at Geneva, during a joint press conference, the following remarks concerning the resumption of the bilateral Arab-Israeli negotiations were made by the United States Secretary of State Mr. Warren Christopher and the Minister for Foreign Affairs of the Russian Federation Mr. Andrei Kozyrev:

Secretary Christopher


"...
Minister Kozyrev


* * *



Notes


1. United States Department of State Dispatch, February 15, 1993, Vol. 4, No. 7, p. 83.

2. Ibid., February 8, 1993, Vol. 4, No. 6, p. 74.

3. Foreign Broadcast Information Service, Daily Report: Near East & South Asia, No. FBIS-NES-93-023, 5 February 1993, pp. 21-23.

4. Ibid., FBIS-NES-93-026, 10 February 1993, p. 3.

5. United States Department of State Dispatch, March 1, 1993, Vol. 4, No. 9, p. 123.

6. Ibid., pp. 122-123.

7. Ibid., p. 122.

8. United States Department of State, Office of the Assistant Secretary/Spokesman, press release, 25 February 1993, Geneva, Switzerland.

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