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UNITED
NATIONS
A

        General Assembly
A/45/13 (SUPP)
21 September 1990

Original: Arabic/English/French

REPORT
OF THE COMMISSIONER-GENERAL
OF THE UNITED NATIONS
RELIEF AND WORKS AGENCY
FOR PALESTINE REFUGEES
IN THE NEAR EAST

______________


1 July 1989 - 30 June 1990




GENERAL ASSEMBLY


OFFICIAL RECORDS: FORTY-FIFTH SESSION

SUPPLEMENT No. 13 (A/45/13)



UNITED NATIONS

New York, 1990





NOTE


Symbols of United Nations documents are composed of capital letters combined with figures. Mention of such a symbol indicates a reference to a United Nations document.






[Original: Arabic/English/French]

[21 September 1990]


CONTENTS
ChapterParagraphs Page
LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL .................................................

LETTER DATED 30 AUGUST 1990 FROM THE CHAIRMAN OF THE ADVISORY
COMMISSION OF THE UNITED NATIONS RELIEF AND WORKS AGENCY FOR
PALESTINE REFUGEES IN THE NEAR EAST ADDRESSED TO THE
COMMISSIONER-GENERAL ..................................................
v




vii
I.

II.
INTRODUCTION ...............................................

GENERAL DEVELOPMENTS IN AGENCY PROGRAMMES ..................
1 - 19

20 - 44
1

6
A.

B.

C.
Education ..............................................

Health .................................................

Relief and social services .............................
20 - 27

28 - 37

38 - 44
6

7

10
III.JORDAN ..................................................... 45 - 5513
A.

B.

C.
Education ..............................................

Health .................................................

Relief and social services .............................
45 - 47

48 - 51

52 - 55
13

13

14
IV.LEBANON .................................................... 56 - 6916
A.

B.

C.

D.
Education ..............................................

Health .................................................

Relief and social services .............................

Emergency operations and reconstruction ................
56 - 57

58 - 61

62 - 65

66 - 69
16

16

17

17
V.SYRIAN ARAB REPUBLIC ....................................... 70 - 7919
A.

B.

C.
Education ..............................................

Health .................................................

Relief and social services .............................
70 - 72

73 - 75

76 - 79
19

19

20
VI.OCCUPIED TERRITORY ......................................... 80 - 10621
A.

B.

C.
Education ..............................................

Health .................................................

Relief and social services .............................
80 - 85

86 - 92

93 - 98
21

22

24
D.


E.
Extraordinary measures of general assistance and
protection .............................................

Expanded programme of assistance .......................
99 - 101

102 - 106
26

26
VII.LEGAL MATTERS ..............................................107 - 12128
A.

B.

C.
Agency staff ...........................................

Agency services and premises ...........................

Claims against Governments .............................
107 - 112

113 - 120

121
28

29

31
Annexes
I.

II.
Statistical and financial information .................................

Pertinent records of the General Assembly and other United Nations
bodies ................................................................
32


50





LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

11 September 1990


Sir,

I have the honor to submit to the General Assembly my annual report on the work of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East for the period 1 July 1989 to 30 June 1990, in compliance with the request in paragraph 21 of resolution 302 (IV) of 8 December 1949 and with paragraph 8 of resolution 1315 (XIII) of 12 December 1958.

In the introduction (chap. I), I have concentrated largely upon the impact on the lives of the Palestine refugees of the situations prevailing in Lebanon and in the occupied territory of the West Bank and Gaza Strip. As a consequence of these situations, the Agency was functioning under difficult circumstances and running emergency operations in three of its five fields throughout the period covered by this report.

Chapter II provides an overview of major developments in the Agency's three main programmes of education, health and relief and social services, while summaries of activities in each of the five fields is contained in chapters III to VI. The emergency operations and reconstruction programme in Lebanon are set out in chapter IV. The Agency's programme of extraordinary measures in the occupied territory to meet humanitarian needs created by the intifadah and countermeasures taken by the Israeli authorities is dealt with in chapter VI, as is the expanded programme of assistance which aims principally to improve the miserable conditions under which refugees live in the camps of the West Bank and Gaza. Those additional programmes have been funded by contributions from UNRWA's regular donors and other countries. However, as I point out in the introduction, in 1989 it was necessary to use some $US 3 million from the regular budget to finance these activities. At the time of writing, some $US 12 million was still required in order for the Agency to continue emergency programmes at the current level until the end of 1990, while no specific commitment had been received for 1991. As a subsidiary body of the General Assembly, UNRWA hopes that the Assembly, with your personal support, will make a special effort to ensure that the Agency's emergency humanitarian assistance will be maintained as long as the need for it remains, in adherence with the recommendations of the Advisory Commission.

Legal matters are dealt with in chapter VII, while the two annexes contain statistical tables and charts illustrating the composition of the Palestine refugee population in the area of operations and the Agency's main programmes, and references to documents of the General Assembly and other United Nations bodies related to UNRWA. In order to provide the General Assembly with the most up-to-date information in conformity with previous practice, budget estimates for 1991 and other financial data will be presented in an addendum to the present report in early October.

This report was examined in draft form by the members of UNRWA's Advisory Commission, and their comments have been given careful attention in the preparation of the final text. The Advisory Commission's views are set out in the Chairman's letter of 30 August, a copy of which appears hereafter.

Once again, I have deemed it appropriate to maintain the practice of showing my report in draft form to representatives of the Government of Israel and to give consideration to their comments in view of the fact that a major part of the Agency's operations takes place in the territory occupied by Israel since 1967.

Accept, Sir, the assurances of my highest consideration.

(Signed) Giorgio GIACOMELLI
Commissioner-General

The President of the General Assembly
United Nations
New York





LETTER DATED 30 AUGUST 1990 FROM THE CHAIRMAN OF THE ADVISORY COMMISSION
OF THE UNITED NATIONS RELIEF AND WORKS AGENCY FOR PALESTINE REFUGEES
IN THE NEAR EAST ADDRESSED TO THE COMMISSIONER-GENERAL


Dear Mr. Giacomelli,

During its regular meeting on 30 August 1990, UNRWA's Advisory Commission considered your draft report on the Agency's activities during the period 1 July 1989 to 30 June 1990, which is to be submitted to the General Assembly at its forty-fifth session. The Commission examined a draft version of UNRWA's budget for 1991.

The Advisory Commission is convinced that the provision of extensive services in the area of health education and relief and social welfare, as well as the emergency assistance extended in the occupied West Bank and Gaza Strip and in Lebanon, where the population is confronted with extremely precarious living conditions, are tasks of the utmost importance, which the Agency is fulfilling in conformity with appropriate General Assembly resolutions.

The Advisory Commission believes that the activities of the Agency are an indispensable contribution in preventing the situation from deteriorating to an extent where efforts in favor of a just and lasting solution of the Palestinian question would be jeopardized. Aware of the increasingly difficult situation in which UNRWA is operating, the Advisory Commission is of the opinion that the Agency's emergency services must continue to be provided as long as they are needed. It urges member Governments and others to contribute generously to the financing of UNRWA activities both under the regular budget and for emergency programmes.

The Advisory Commission notes with appreciation the efforts of the Governments of host countries to facilitate the operations of UNRWA, as well as the activities, contributions and assistance of these Governments on behalf of the Palestine refugees.

The Advisory Commission commends UNRWA for the measure of protection its general assistance is providing the Palestine refugees in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip and requests the Agency to continue on a flexible and emergency basis general assistance to the population in need.

The Advisory Commission remains concerned that despite calls for an end to interferences with UNRWA operations by the government authorities described in your report, these difficulties have increased during the period. This can only add to the suffering of the population concerned and lessen the ability of Agency operations to alleviate them. The Commission therefore urges the authorities mentioned above, to respect fully the Agency's status, including the inviolability of its premises and the security and the freedom of movement of its personnel, and to extend to it all necessary assistance, both regarding its regular and emergency activities.

The Advisory Commission notes that, at the request of the Government of Jordan and upon the Advisory Commission's recommendations the Agency intends, while taking into account the financial implications, to incorporate a tenth year into its education programme to fit in with the ten-year compulsory education cycle now in force in that country. It also notes that the same measure will be extended to the West Bank by the occupying Power, thus adding to the financial burden carried by UNRWA. The Commission therefore appeals to Governments to assist UNRWA in meeting these requirements.

The Advisory Commission commends the role played by UNRWA, in co-ordination with the Government of Jordan and other governmental and non-governmental organizations, in providing humanitarian assistance to Palestine refugees and other displaced persons from the Gulf region.

The Advisory Commission notes with interest UNRWA's intention to work out a biennial planning and budgeting cycle, and its provision of budget estimates for 1991.

The members of the Advisory Commission thank the Secretary-General for his continued personal support of the Agency and the interest he consistently shows in UNRWA's activities. They also wish to express once again their appreciation, Mr. Commissioner- General, for the unwavering commitment shown by you and your staff, and for UNRWA's vigorous response to the many challenges it faces in carrying out its mandate.

Yours sincerely,

(Signed) Georges VILAIN XIIII
Chairman of the Advisory Commission
Mr. Giorgio Giacomelli
Commissioner-General of the
United Nations Relief and
Works Agency for Palestine
Refugees in the Near East




I. INTRODUCTION


1. In the introduction to last year’s report, I noted how events in the area of operations had created additional needs among Palestine refugees and, at the same time, raised new expectations of the Agency on the part of the international community. The spectrum of requirements had never been so wide: traditional programmes, emergency assistance, protection in the form of general assistance, social and developmental functions all had come to be seen as different but equally necessary elements in the performance of the mandate.

2. Those trends were confirmed and reinforced over the past year. The Agency responded by strengthening its traditional programmes, elaborating new approaches and activities that would better satisfy the requirements of the beneficiaries, while striving to overcome a variety of difficulties, financial and otherwise. In so doing, it became essential to ensure a steady flow of information to Member States as well as to the beneficiaries to secure their understanding and support. I see my annual report as an important means to that end. Detailed information about the activities of UNRWA is provided later in the report; in keeping with past practice, this introduction highlights some general concerns.

3. In Lebanon, the reporting period began with the sea blockade of east Beirut and heavy shelling and fighting, particularly in the central area of the country. Subsequent developments involving a variety of political and, military forces were often accompanied by violence and led to a roller-coaster of hopes and delusions. Palestinians, along with the least privileged sectors of Lebanese society, bore the heavy consequences of the violence, lack of security and continuing economic difficulties. Some 23,000 Palestinians were displaced by the turmoil and it is estimated that 43 registered refugees were killed as a direct consequence of it.

4. For many months, however, refugee camps were not physically affected and, in spite of occasional disruptions, the repair and rehabilitation of shelters continued, particularly in Shatila and Burj el-Barajneh camps. A major exception occurred in February 1990 when more than 20 per cent of shelters were damaged or destroyed by heavy shelling in the refugee camp of Dbayeh near Jounieh. In the latter part of the reporting period, active involvement of Palestinians in the fighting led to an increase in the casualties and caused some damage in camps such as Rashidieh and Ein el-Hilweh. Israeli air raids over southern Lebanon also caused causalities and destruction.

5. The Agency managed to carry on its regular programmes and to provide a degree of emergency assistance. Schools in the central Lebanon area made up for the time lost in the previous school year and four emergency food distributions to about 230,000 beneficiaries were successfully completed. Following the decision taken last year to relocate part of the operations from Beirut to Siblin, in March 1990 major operational difficulties and an increasingly complex-security situation led to a further readjustment with the transfer of administrative units and supply and transport facilities from Siblin to Bar Elias in the Beqa'a valley, which is closer to the alternative supply route now reaching Lebanon via Latakia and Damascus. The Agency was, however, following developments closely and looked forward to returning its entire Lebanon headquarters operations to Beirut as soon as circumstances permitted.

6. Meanwhile, I must draw attention again to the Agency's constant preoccupation, caused by the need to manage and control a large programme of activities while trying to ensure staff safety. Threats, physical violence and the danger of kidnapping were most worrying. Palestinians were affected by the high state of tension and uncertainty throughout most of the country, and this was occasionally reflected in the aggressive behavior of some individuals or groups in their dealings with the Agency and its staff.

7. Given the prevailing circumstances in Lebanon, UNRWA continued to extend emergency assistance as well as most of its regular programmes, including education, to the entire Palestinian community and not merely to registered refugees. It also actively participated with other United Nations agencies and international relief organizations in activities to provide assistance to the Lebanese population in general. Thus, for instance, from January 1990 onwards UNRWA made available water tankers to help the Government in its efforts to supply water to west Beirut, and it provided relief in the form of food and other basic necessities to Lebanese families in Dbayeh.

8. In the occupied territory of the West Bank and Gaza Strip, the intifadah continued throughout the reporting period. Its intensity varied in a highly charged atmosphere where diverse developments, including those on the political scene, could unleash extremely violent confrontations and high casualties. The Israeli authorities continued to apply harsh repressive measures, and violations of human rights were widespread. Between 1 July 1989 and 30 June 1990, 85 Palestinians were killed in Gaza and 164 in the West Bank. More than 20,000 sought emergency medical attention in local hospitals and the Agency's clinics, suffering from beatings, tear-gas inhalation and rubber bullet or live ammunition wounds; 24 children under 15 years of age were killed and some 1,640 were treated for beatings.

9. Other severe measures were applied in the occupied territory. They ranged from deliberate damage to property, demolition and sealing of individual shelters and houses to incarcerations on a large scale. In some cases, representations by UNRWA staff were sufficient to prevent the arrest of young children or to bring about their early release. The temporary detention of young people was used at times as a form of economic pressure since parents had to pay in order to secure their release. Innocent parties were made to suffer for suspected individuals, such as when relatives or neighbours were detained until the person sought after would turn himself or herself in.

10. The frequency of strikes and curfews varied. The latter increased in the West Bank, while in Gaza they dropped from 1,178 camp/area days between July 1988 and June 1989 to 399 camp/area days during the reporting period. In the West Bank, schools reopened in late July 1989. The Agency's vocational training centres were also allowed to open in stages between March and May 1990. Owing to selective closure orders by the authorities as well as strikes, however, school life was severely disrupted. In Tulkarm in the West Bank, for instance, Agency schools were open for only 41 out of 141 school days scheduled for the 1989/90 school year. Universities remained closed throughout the reporting period. Therefore, while the reopening of certain facilities was welcome, the situation remained unsatisfactory and the problems faced in trying to provide adequate education to 135,000 young Palestinians in the occupied territory continued to be among the major concerns of the Agency.

11. Beyond the tragic toll of lives and the physical repression, the prolongation of the conflict in the occupied territory was, in itself, causing progressive damage. The income of Palestinian families was increasingly affected by the slow-down and occasional paralysis of economic life and the detention or unemployment of breadwinners. The young people's traditional perception of education as a redeeming value in refugee life was seriously threatened. The very fabric of society showed increasing strains in an uncertain and at times contradictory political and social context. The killing of alleged collaborators and of community members who deviated from the prevailing ethical standards was a phenomenon that assumed major proportions from early 1989. During the reporting period, it is estimated that 132 such individuals were killed in the occupied territory; four of them were staff members of the Agency.

12. The situation in the West Bank and Gaza Strip led to repeated calls for the protection of Palestinians. 1/ What the Agency did in extending a measure of protection through the provision of general assistance is detailed elsewhere in this report. It should be recalled here, however, that the emergency activities of the Agency reached out to the Palestinian community in general. Indeed, the Advisory Commission of the Agency, after a special session held in March 1988, urged me to provide, as far as practicable, humanitarian assistance on an emergency basis and as a temporary measure to non-refugees in the occupied territory who were in serious need because of the present situation. 2/ This is not a new feature of Agency operations, as UNRWA has on various occasions provided emergency assistance to Palestinians in some of its fields, regardless of their status. This happened, for instance, in Jordan after the 1967 hostilities; as mentioned earlier, it is the case at the moment in Lebanon. Resources permitting, the Agency will continue to pursue its emergency programme in the occupied territory, an undertaking which is intended to respond to obvious needs of the beneficiaries as well as to repeated requests from the international community.

13. Contacts with the Israeli authorities were frequent at the working and policy-making levels. In spite of the ongoing efforts to explain the circumstances and concerns of the beneficiaries and the programme requirements of the Agency, relations on the ground remained difficult. Privileges and immunities of UNRWA were increasingly disregarded. Violations of premises, such as the assault on the Rimal Health Centre in Gaza Town on 12 June 1990 in which many innocent infants and young children were injured, were strongly protested to the authorities and were condemned by the international community. Beyond those specific incidents, there were attempts by the occupying authorities to attempt gradually to assert control over Agency operations. This took the form of increasing administrative red tape, limiting the freedom of movement of staff members and interrogating them about work-related matters, enforcing new and time-consuming clearance procedures for activities that used to be carried out within the Agency's own authority and dictating the terms and duration of the school year. For the sake of its fundamental obligations to the beneficiaries, UNRWA tried pragmatically to carry on with its work while protesting specific incidents. There are, however, limits to the extent of interference that the Agency can withstand if it is to preserve its independence and international character.

14. In a constantly tense and confrontational environment, difficulties arose in ensuring that Agency premises, which given their functions are generally open to the public, were not at times also placed in jeopardy by individuals or groups from the local community. This was particularly so of Agency schools which, like government schools, were at the centre of student unrest. Measures were taken by the Agency with a view to reducing the impact and frequency of such situations.

15. Elsewhere in the area of operations, the difficulties confronted by the largest number of refugees related to the economic situation prevailing in the host countries as well as in most other countries in the region. Skilled and semi-skilled Palestinians who had found employment outside Jordan and the Syrian Arab Republic, particularly in the Gulf States, returned in increasing numbers to their families with resulting loss of income and likelihood of continued unemployment. It is probable that the growing demands on the Agency's health and welfare services in both fields were related to this economic hardship. Against this background the Agency hoped that ongoing discussions with the authorities in the Syrian Arab Republic over the implementation of its social welfare programmes there would soon lead to a mutually acceptable solution.

16. In early December 1989, demonstrations in support of the intifadah took place in some refugee camps in Jordan. Following the killing of seven Palestinian laborers in Israel on 20 May 1990 and the subsequent incidents in Israel and in the occupied territory, solidarity strikes and protests were called in Jordan, particularly in Baqa'a and Marka camps. In the ensuing clashes with security forces, four refugees were shot dead and about 400 were wounded or treated for tear-gas inhalation.

17. During the reporting period the Agency continued to operate simultaneously regular programmes and emergency activities in three of its five fields. This required complex managerial and administrative arrangements to balance the need for proper control with that of ensuring rapid and effective delivery of services. A major decrease in the contribution of the largest donor announced in November 1989 led to a last-minute review of the programmes and priorities of the 1990 budget. While most of the cuts could be re-absorbed owing to a subsequent additional contribution by the same donor, which compensated for much of the earlier reduction this was but one further reminder of the fragility of the financial basis of UNRWA and its dependence on a limited number of donors, particularly for its regular budget. A degree of donor fatigue was also manifest in the ad hoc funding of the emergency programmes in Lebanon and the occupied territory. In 1989, it was necessary to use some $3 million from the regular budget to finance these activities. At the time of writing, some $12 million was still required in order to continue emergency programmes at the current level until the end of 1990. Furthermore, no specific expression of support or commitment had been received for the funding of any emergency activity for 1991. While this may be due in part to the very nature of an emergency programme, I was profoundly concerned by a situation which, in a matter of weeks, could result in the curtailment or discontinuance of indispensable assistance in Lebanon and in the occupied territory.

18. During the reporting period, the Secretary-General provided his unwavering support to the Agency at a time when it was particularly needed. I personally appreciated his understanding of the concerns and priorities of UNRWA and his willingness to help it in the pursuit of its mandate. The initiative undertaken by UNRWA in March 1989 to ensure greater co-operation for an effective response to the economic and social needs of Palestinians in the occupied territory continued with a second inter-agency meeting and other initiatives such as the publication of a periodic bulletin outlining the ongoing and projected activities of the organizations in the United Nations common system. I am convinced that more can be achieved in this undertaking provided all organizations strengthen their commitment to it. Co-operation with other international organizations, particularly the International Committee of the Red Cross, was also intensified during the reporting period.

19. Until a just and lasting solution to the Palestine question is reached, UNRWA is likely to remain an important presence in the Middle East. With its 18,000 staff, it is one of the largest single employers in the region. Its well established quasi-governmental education, health and social welfare programmes benefit over 2 million people, two thirds of whom no longer live in refugee camps. Emergency activities in Lebanon and in the occupied territory confirm the capacity, within obvious financial and political constraints, to provide swift, practical responses in emergencies. At a time of continuing political stalemate, the knowledge and skills acquired in over forty years of operations are, I believe, a most useful instrument available to the international community in expressing its commitment to the Palestinian people. Support to the Agency will help it exploit to the maximum extent possible its remarkable potential.

II. GENERAL DEVELOPMENTS IN AGENCY PROGRAMMES

A. Education

20. The education programme of UNRWA, which is run with the technical assistance of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), provides general education, vocational and technical training, pre-service and in-service teacher training and university scholarships for higher education (see annex I, tables 5 to 7). The programme, even in relatively normal times, is beset with many difficulties, notably a lack of adequate financial resources leading to problems such as dilapidated buildings and crowded classrooms. Such difficulties were compounded during the reporting period by even more serious problems in three fields of operation.

21. After a lengthy closure ordered by the occupation authorities, schools in the West Bank were permitted to reopen in July 1989, but teaching was seriously affected by curfews, strikes and individual closure orders and the school year itself was shortened by 69 days. In addition, pupils witnessed scenes of violence, a pervasive presence of security forces, intrusion of soldiers into school compounds and classrooms involving at times the firing of ammunition, rubber bullets and tear-gas, the detention of students and teachers, the imposition of curfews keeping large families confined to miserable dwellings for indefinite periods, the wounding and killing of school friends, relatives or neighbours and the demolition of houses and other property. While the Agency strived to provide an element of stability and normality in the lives of students, it is easy to appreciate that this could have only a limited effect in ensuring that they not only develop their intellectual and social skills, but also that there is no psychological damage over the longer term.

22. The situation of the education programme in Lebanon was also difficult. Schools continued to operate in the context of chronic instability, which caused frequent forced movements of population and prolonged local school closures. Damaged schools, transfers of pupils and outbreaks of fighting provided a poor background for learning, and again parents were left with uncertainty as to what the long-term effects would be on their children.

23. As to the education programme itself, the Agency's tight budgetary situation continued to leave little room for major new initiatives. This resulted in the programme being essentially of an ongoing nature, catering to an increasing school population, with new undertakings being in the nature of necessary reactions to external factors or ad hoc improvements facilitated by extra-budgetary donations. One such external factor was the high level of disruption of school operations in the West Bank and Gaza Strip. To reduce the impact of this situation, UNRWA developed - and hopes to develop further if funding is obtained – alternative approaches to education, including written self-learning materials and video programmes. Such self-learning materials covered the basic subject areas of the school curriculum.

24. Another external factor affecting the education programme was the introduction of significant reforms in Jordan, namely, the extension of the general education cycle from 9 to 10 years and the requirement that all teachers in elementary and preparatory cycles possess a first university degree in order to obtain the education profession license. As mentioned in last year's report, UNRWA welcomes these but remains most concerned at the substantial increase in expenditure that would be required to adapt to the new system. The potential financial implications, ranging from the employment of new staff and construction of additional classrooms to the upgrading of the qualifications of existing teachers, became more serious during the reporting period with the decision of the Israeli education authorities to introduce the tenth year to the West Bank.

25. Funds for the construction required to prevent triple shifting in some schools, the replacement of unsuitable rented premises and dilapidated schools and sanitary facilities were not included in the Agency's regular budget. During the reporting period, virtually all such construction was therefore dependent on ad hoc contributions from Governments, regional agencies, non-governmental organizations and private individuals. While UNRWA was grateful for the assistance received, it did not suffice to meet the most urgent requirements within a reasonable period of time.

26. The Agency's eight vocational, technical and teacher-training centres train 5,000 refugee students in 45 courses. The programmes have produced more than 52,000 graduates over the years and have an annual output-capacity of 2,500 graduates. Many of these graduates, in addition to becoming self-sufficient and helping their families, have contributed their skills to various countries in the region. In the case of vocational and technical training, a survey is carried out every two to three years to assess the demand for skills in the host and neighbouring countries and to adjust courses accordingly. At the end of the reporting period, UNRWA was in the process of introducing new courses, particularly for skills at the semi-professional level, and upgrading and re-equipping existing courses. The university scholarship programme received a boost during the year when two Governments provided contributions to be spread over five years for the provision of about 100 additional scholarships.

27. The Agency follows the curricula of host countries. Specialist staff, however, are continually engaged in devising enrichment material to supplement them. During the year, the Department of Education carried out a programme of in-service training for more than 840 teachers and education staff of various categories, including 111 vocational training instructors whose qualifications were upgraded. The syllabuses for more than 40 courses operating at the training centres were updated while new teachers' guides were produced.

B. Health

28. The Agency's health programme, which is essentially community-based, provides primary health care in the form of medical care services, health protection and promotion services, environmental health services in camps, and nutrition and supplementary feeding to vulnerable population groups. Its prime objective is to meet the basic health needs of the refugee population in accordance with the humanitarian policies of the United Nations and the basic principles of the World Health Organization (WHO).

29. During the reporting period, morbidity from infectious diseases continued to decrease despite the unsatisfactory environmental conditions prevailing in most refugee camps (see annex I, table 10). With the exception of limited outbreaks of measles among susceptible children, which are not unexpected among highly immunized populations, no epidemics of communicable diseases preventable by immunization occurred in the area of operations. Studies on infant mortality in camps revealed rates ranging between 25 and 35 per 1,000 live births. The main causes of infant deaths continued to be respiratory infections, low birth weight and prematurity, congenital malformations and gastro-enteritis. The prevalence of malnutrition among refugee children remained low despite deteriorating economic and social circumstances in most fields. Children showing growth failure were assisted individually with a view to identifying underlying causes and providing appropriate case management.

30. Events in the occupied territory created a high demand for emergency and casualty care. In April and May 1989, a team of WHO consultants carried out an assessment of needs in respect of emergency medical care in the UNRWA clinics and non-governmental hospitals in the West Bank and Gaza. Based on their recommendations, UNRWA took steps, described in paragraphs 87 and 100 of this report, to upgrade the emergency capacity of its health care system at the primary level. The implementation of these measures was assessed by another consultant who visited all health centres, emergency and night duty clinics in Gaza and West Bank in April 1990. The findings testified to improvements in the quality and magnitude of the management of casualties in health centres and stabilization of conditions requiring referral to hospital for urgent surgical intervention and resuscitation, thus providing life saving services to a large number of injured persons.

31. During 1989, there was a 9 per cent increase over 1988 in the number of medical consultations Agency-wide (annex I, table 9). This was due to the deterioration of economic conditions and the ever-increasing cost of medical care, especially that provided at government and private hospitals, and required additional resources beyond the capability of the Agency. This increase could have been greater had not access to UNRWA clinics been limited by restrictions on the movement of people in the occupied territory.

32. During the reporting period, several key problems and issues were addressed at workshops organized by the Agency. The psychological health problems among groups at risk received greater recognition and attention at a workshop on mental health, organized by UNRWA and WHO, held at the Amman Training Centre in July 1989. Subsequently, a plan for a multidisciplinary programme for the prevention and management of mental health problems among children was developed as a basis for further consultations. The problems of overcrowded health centres and quality of patient care were discussed at two workshops on patient flow analysis which were attended by senior health staff. The objective was to reduce patients' waiting time and provide more efficient service in the health centres. Transfer of the technology and methodology of this operational research activity to all fields was due to be completed in 1990, and the appropriate adjustments and reforms to the clinic service will be introduced in 1991.

33. The coverage and quality of maternal health services, particularly to women at high risk, continued to be a priority and in September 1989 a project formulation workshop was arranged in Jerusalem, co-sponsored by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) and UNRWA, in order to develop an expanded maternal health programme for Gaza and the West Bank. Finally, the changing pattern of morbidity among refugees and the need to introduce programmes for the control of non-communicable diseases were the focus of new planning efforts. A workshop held in Jordan in February 1990, in collaboration with experts from the University of Zagreb in Yugoslavia, developed an appropriate strategy for the control of diabetes mellitus. At the time of writing this report, recommendations for action were being implemented to upgrade the level of service in the, 53 diabetic clinics run by UNRWA, as well as to expand such special care clinics where needed.

34. During the reporting period there was no material evidence that human immunodeficiency (HIV) virus and acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) infections represented a major problem among the refugee population. Nevertheless, UNRWA had to keep pace with the global strategy for prevention of this pandemic. A short-term plan of action for HIV/AIDS prevention and control in all fields was prepared in collaboration with WHO. Over $200,000 was contributed by WHO to implement this plan, giving priority to epidemiological surveillance, staff training and blood safety measures.

35. In May 1990, the Agency conducted a nutrition survey in collaboration with a team of consultants from WHO and the Centers for Disease Control of Atlanta, United States, to assess the nutritional status of defined groups of mothers and children and to compare results with those of a similar survey conducted in 1984. The preliminary analysis of survey data revealed that there was very little difference in weight between the refugee children and the reference child population and that the prevalence of under height children - so called "stunting" - had decreased by as much as a half between 1984 and 1990 in the three fields where comparison of the results of the 1984 and 1990 surveys was possible, namely Jordan, Gaza and West Bank. There remained however one substantial nutritional problem. The survey, which was carried out on large samples of children and non-pregnant and pregnant women, confirmed what previous studies had shown, that there was a high prevalence of iron-deficiency anemia in children under three years of age, that the degree of anemia could be characterized as mild or moderate but not severe and immediately life-threatening, and that there was no sign that this iron-deficiency anemia prevalence was declining.

36. On the basis of the nutritional survey and the regular surveillance system maintained by the Agency at its clinics, the following policy decisions were made. The cost- ineffective midday meal programme would be terminated in January 1991. A food supplement, in the form of dry rations for children who were regular attenders of the programme, will be issued for a transitional period of three years in Jordan and the Syrian Arab Republic and as long as the emergency continues in Gaza, West Bank and Lebanon. Coupled with these measures, an appropriate strategy for prophylaxis and treatment of anemia among at-risk groups will be introduced and a programme of thorough medical investigation and treatment of children showing signs of growth retardation will be simultaneously implemented. Other components of the supplementary feeding programmes, namely, milk to children aged 6 to 36 months and dry rations to pregnant and nursing mothers, will be maintained.

37. The environmental health conditions in many refugee camps leave much to be desired in terms of basic infrastructure. In the West Bank and Lebanon, only 22 per cent of the camp population is served by underground sewerage systems; in Gaza the figure is as low as 6 per cent. UNRWA is attempting to integrate camp water supply and waste disposal networks within the municipal or regional systems. Some progress was achieved in improving liquid waste disposal and general sanitation, particularly in Gaza, West Bank and Lebanon.

C. Relief and social services

38. Heavy demands were placed upon the Agency's relief and social services during the period under review. In addition to the regular programmes of assistance, the situations prevailing in Lebanon, the West Bank and Gaza demanded emergency relief measures described in paragraphs 67, 68, 69 and 101 of this report. Even in Jordan and the Syrian Arab Republic, the economic support network of extended families was weakened by rising unemployment and the declining purchasing power of incomes. Applications from households that could no longer count on contributions from relatives continued to grow for admission to the Agency's special hardship programme. Over and above this provision of much-needed direct relief, however, the Agency was also looking to a longer-term approach through which the Palestinian community would gradually strengthen its own capabilities.

39. The special hardship programme is extended to, households in which there is no male adult present who is medically fit to earn a living and which have no other identified source of finances adequate to meet basic needs. The Agency's financial means, however, necessitate a budgetary ceiling on the foodstuffs and other material aid supplied each year. Applications are therefore processed conservatively within rates based on available resources. By the end of June 1990, the number of refugees registered as special hardship cases had reached 151,860 or 7.8 per cent of the refugees eligible for services. This percentage varied from 3.7 per cent in Jordan to 13.8 per cent in Lebanon. This situation compared with 141,840 cases at the end of June 1989, or 7.2 per cent of the refugee population at that time. A quarter of the cases were elderly persons without support from children, who would almost certainly need assistance for the remainder of their lives. In many of the other families, however, there were frequently members through whom a longer-term solution could be achieved, and it was to them that the Agency's more developmental social services were principally directed.

40. Income-generation and related training were among the main components of the social services. Those receiving special hardship assistance were targeted together with others from poorer families and small entrepreneurs who did not have access to commercial credit facilities. Demands to facilitate economic self-reliance have grown in recent years, especially in the occupied territory and Lebanon where many jobs have been lost. During the reporting period, the demand considerably exceeded the funding which the Agency land its principal non-governmental partner in this endeavor were able to raise. By the summer of 1990, the joint programme had made loans averaging $7,700 to 167 enterprises in the West Bank and Gaza, carefully selected for potential economic viability in sectors shown by feasibility studies to have good markets - a total investment of almost $1.3 million. Other enterprises in the occupied territory would receive funding when capital became available, as they would in Jordan where the programme was initiated in the summer of 1989. On average, each project directly employed three persons. In 14 projects, the recipient of the loan was a woman, and women accounted for a quarter of the persons employed. Additionally, grants for smaller-scale enterprises were made to the families of the most needy to help bring them out of the welfare net, where appropriate potential could be identified. By the end of June 1990, 327 such projects had received grants and were in business Agency-wide.

41. Women refugees headed almost half of the households receiving special hardship assistance and carried heavy responsibilities in those where husbands were invalid, disabled or imprisoned. A triple objective was identified by the Agency to enable more women to acquire the skills and opportunity to earn a living; to help them cope better with family and social problems; and to facilitate their role in the development of their community. The focal points for this endeavor were the multipurpose women's programme centres that the Agency had established or was setting up in refugee camps and other centres of refugee population. During the reporting period, funds were received for three new centres, a fourth was completed, another was well underway and a sixth had made good progress when work was halted by the Israeli authorities for alleged security reasons. Additionally, in all five fields buildings no longer required for their original purpose or which were inadequate were renovated, extended and better equipped. The range of activities in the centres increased, with the women themselves often identifying their own training requirements and paying small fees for teachers and equipment.

42. At the end of the reporting period, a major donor announced its intention to establish a grant for a Palestinian women's initiative fund and for the training of staff and beneficiaries to develop projects to be financed from it. These projects would move away from the traditional embroidery and sewing schemes, which, while still very popular, have a limited market. The women's programme centres were also used for health education, literacy classes and learning in early childhood development and as places where women could be freely consulted on community needs and involved in initiatives to improve community facilities. Several centres adjoined kindergartens run by non-governmental organizations in association with UNRWA, an arrangement the Agency was keen to develop.

43. The third major component of the social services was support for the physically and mentally disabled and their families, in association with local communities and non- governmental organizations. The underlying objective was community-based rehabilitation, from childhood through adulthood. In addition to the 1.3 per cent or more of the refugees who were born with disabilities, some of those injured in Lebanon or in the occupied territory had serious or residual handicaps that demanded not only medical intervention but also vocational rehabilitation and socio-economic support. UNRWA pioneered community centres for the disabled in the refugee camps in Jordan, where they number five, and over the reporting period initiated the extension of that programme to the other fields. At the time of writing, surveys were being conducted in selected communities using local volunteers and Agency staff.

44. Ideally, the refugee community itself - which provided the volunteer workers for the centres and undertook some fund-raising - should take over the full responsibility for the centres. While this was encouraged, in the economic and political circumstances of the region it was clear that outside contributions would continue to be required for a long time. The Agency's role was essentially to mobilize, to facilitate and to give technical and administrative support, frequently in old premises that were renovated and adapted. It was also to link the camp centre with local institutes that could provide more specialized facilities and expertise. These were developing in several areas, and for the forthcoming school year the Agency will be able to reduce significantly the numbers of young children who in the past would have been sent to institutes away from their families. Where a disability was not severe, perhaps the most valuable help UNRWA could give was to enable handicapped refugees to take advantage of mainstream education and training facilities. Ways of accomplishing this were being studied by programme staff as well as technical personnel who would design or modify health, education and social service installations so as to facilitate access to them by the disabled.

III. JORDAN

A. Education

45. In Jordan, the operation of the 197 UNRWA schools with a total of 133,810 pupils was normal throughout the 1989/90 school year. During the reporting period an elementary girls school that included 22 classrooms and specialized rooms was constructed at Baqa'a to replace dilapidated prefabricated premises that were housing 2,080 pupils. Four other school premises were under construction: at Wadi Seer, Baqa'a and Waqqas in the north Jordan valley to replace unsatisfactory rented premises, and at Jarash to replace prefabricated premises.

46. As indicated in the last report, Jordan increased the preparatory cycle by one year starting from the 1989/90 school year, thus extending compulsory education to 10 years. This extension has considerable implications for UNRWA, as it has been the Agency's practice to provide equivalent education services to those of the host country. The Government kindly offered to accommodate in its schools the ninth-grade leavers from UNRWA schools for the initial three years of operating the new system. At its meeting in August 1989, the Advisory Commission urged UNRWA to take the necessary steps to ensure that, after the expiration of the transitional period, those refugee children provided for by UNRWA in Jordan would continue their studies for a tenth year. The Agency was seeking the substantial additional financial resources necessary to do so and to satisfy a related requirement that all teachers must possess a first university degree.

47. The Amman and Wadi Seer Training Centres, which operated successfully during the year, trained a total of 1,168 students in 27 vocational and technical courses. The Amman Centre, in addition to teacher training, provided courses in the paramedical and commercial areas. The Wadi Seer Centre provided courses in the mechanical, electrical and building trades as well as a range of technician courses. In the general comprehensive examination held in the summer of 1989 for community colleges in Jordan, the students of the two Centres achieved outstanding results, with success rates of 98 and 92 per cent respectively. At the Amman Training Centre, 300 training places were provided for teacher-trainees who also achieved very good results in the 1989 State examinations.

B. Health

48. The health facilities in Jordan, serving about 850,000 Palestine refugees, ran uninterruptedly during the period covered by this report. They included 18 health centres and points, 14 dental clinics, 10 laboratories, 8 specialist clinics, 12 diabetes clinics and 5 hypertension clinics.

49. In-patient care was provided by subsidizing 40 beds in private hospitals, equivalent to a rate of 0.05 beds per 1,000 population. This modest measure was complemented by a scheme for reimbursement of expenses incurred on treatment of emergency medical conditions. To improve this situation the Agency was considering increasing the rates of reimbursement according to the socio-economic status of different categories of beneficiaries, giving priority and a higher level of reimbursement to special hardship cases.

50. The newly constructed health centre in Jarash camp, funded by a special contribution, began operating in August 1989. The construction of a mother and child health sub-centre in Amman New Camp was expected to be completed in August 1990. Building of a similar sub-centre at Jabal Nuzha in Amman would start as soon as a building permit was issued by the municipality. The Agency allocated funds for the construction of new health centres at Amman New Camp and Suf camp and for the extension of Jabal el-Hussein and Husn health centres. Tenders were opened in April 1990 for the construction of a health training centre in Amman, which will serve as a focal training centre Agency-wide.

51. A total of 66,000 square meters of pathways were paved in Baqa'a, Zarqa, Marka, Husn and Suf camps under self-help camp improvement projects. Underground sewerage networks with sewage treatment facilities were completed by the Government at Zarqa and Baqa'a camps and the sewerage scheme in Irbid camp was progressing. UNRWA installations and shelters, of special hardship cases were connected to these networks. Thus far more than 77 per cent of the camp population in Jordan has had its shelters connected to the sewerage schemes.

C. Relief and social services

52. The socio-economic circumstances of refugees in Jordan were relatively stable and on average more comfortable than elsewhere. Nevertheless, the demand for material aid from those living in poverty continued to grow and was affected over the past year by a rise in unemployment and by the Agency's initiative in surveying the needs of refugees living in the Aqaba area for whom few services were available. At the end of June 1990, the number of persons in families registered as special hardship cases had reached 30,687, or 3.7 per cent of the eligible population. Many of them lived in shelters that did not meet minimal health standards, and 109 families received assistance with repair or reconstruction.

53. By the end of June 1990, 109 previously destitute families were running small income-generating enterprises from their homes with the help of self-support grants and technical follow-up. In June 1989, project development officers were appointed for a revolving loan programme, and studies were subsequently carried out of business sectors offering opportunities, concessional credit schemes and the feasibility of specific projects. Several proposals were fully developed, including a toy-making workshop that would employ women in Jabal el-Hussein and two enterprises that would primarily provide work for physically handicapped refugees.

54. The women's programmes expanded over the year and were run from 10 women's programme centres, with an eleventh in the planning stages. Four centres moved into new or renovated premises and equipment was upgraded. Courses were conducted in dressmaking, machine- knitting, artificial flower-making, hairdressing and typing. A wool spinning project was initiated in the spring of 1990, with UNRWA providing the premises and co-ordination and a non-governmental organization the training and equipment.

55. The programme of community-based rehabilitation of the disabled also developed further in Jordan at the four established centres at Suf, Baqa'a, Husn and Jarash. A new unit for the deaf was opened at Husn and an activities centre was opened at Baqa'a. Among the achievements of the programme over the year, especially satisfying was the success of seven cerebrally-palsied children who became able to walk without support. Six disabled young women who had undergone rehabilitation were enrolled in skill-training courses alongside other women at the women's programme centres. Important to this process is change in the attitude of the community towards the disabled, from one of fear and shame to one of acceptance and pride. There was considerable progress here, and it will be assisted by the far-reaching law on behalf of the disabled adopted by the Jordanian Government at the beginning of 1990.

IV. LEBANON

A. Education

56. During the 1989/90 school year, the 76 UNRWA schools in Lebanon had 33,300 pupils. The 20 schools in the central Lebanon area, which had been closed for security reasons since mid-March 1989, were unable to reopen before the summer vacation and in fact did not commence operation again until October. The two following months were spent on completing the 1988/89 school year before beginning the 1989/90 year. The remaining schools commenced the 1989/90 school year as scheduled on 18 September. Apart from occasional interruptions due to strikes, schools in Lebanon generally operated normally except during February 1990 when the schools in central Lebanon were again closed for security reasons. At reporting time, it was hoped to complete the 1989/90 school year in those schools in August 1990. One new school for 3,000 pupils, containing 33 classrooms as well as specialized rooms, was under construction at Ein el-Hilweh to replace old dilapidated premises.

57. The Siblin Training Centre provided a total of 640 training places in the 1989/90 academic year, covering a total of 18 vocational and technical courses. The actual number of students at the start of the year was 607 of whom 382 were boarders. The Centre continued to operate throughout the reporting period with only relatively minor interruptions related to the commemoration of anniversaries and local strikes. Although the Centre was given considerable financial support in 1987 for re-equipping courses following a three-year closure, there remained a need for a considerable amount of equipment, renovation and construction. A sum of $250,000 was allocated for equipment for the instrument mechanic, electronics and business and office practice courses.

B. Health

58. Despite the prevailing conditions in Lebanon, some of the Agency's health programmes were improved. Services were disrupted, however, in certain areas when heavy rounds of fighting or shelling prevented access of staff and refugees to health centres.

59. Four additional diabetes clinics and two hypertension clinics were established, bringing the total number of specialized clinics to 11. In addition, a cardiac clinic, run by a specialist contracted to UNRWA, was also established. The health centre at Shatila camp was reconstructed, major renovation of Rashidieh health centre completed and a clinical laboratory was operated at Ein el-Hilweh health centre. Three additional dental units were installed at Wavel, Saida Town and Rashidieh health centres and maternal and child health services were extended to three villages served by a mobile team.

60. Although the cost of hospital services continued to increase, it was nevertheless possible to keep expenditure within the budget ceiling by applying strict control on referrals, re-deploying beds according to need and reducing a corresponding number of contracted beds in private hospitals.

61. Daily operation of refuse collection and disposal in refugee camps was carried out and safe water supply was ensured through installation of chlorinators in co-ordination with the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF). In Ein el-Hilweh camp, 1,500 meters of dilapidated sewers were replaced and the sewers in the north-east part of the camp were connected to the nearby municipal sewerage scheme. Sanitation infrastructures in Shatila and Burj el-Barajneh camps, which were destroyed during the "camps war" in 1986-1987, were reconstructed and the water network in one sector of Beddawi camp was renovated.

C. Relief and social services

62. The need for material assistance for the destitute continued to be higher in Lebanon than in any other field. By the end of June 1990, 35,350 persons were registered as special hardship cases, amounting to 13.8 per cent of the refugees eligible for services, compared with 31,720 at the same time last year. Delivery of assistance was frequently disrupted by localized fighting. In east Beirut, heavy fighting not only necessitated emergency aid described later in this report, but for several months during the reporting period it meant that many special hardship families were unable to collect their food rations. Of special concern were the families displaced often on several occasions over the past 15 years and who were living in unacceptable conditions. In June 1990, a gathering of representatives of UNRWA, UNICEF and a number of concerned local and international non-governmental organizations drew up proposals for a co-ordinated programme of assistance.

63. In view of the damage done to the economic infrastructure of Lebanon and the frequent exclusion of Palestinians from employment opportunities, efforts to establish income- generating schemes became important. Among the special hardship cases, the Agency supported 93 small enterprises, 5 of which, in the Tyre area, reached a level of sustained income, during the year sufficient for the family to be taken off the welfare rolls. UNRWA programmes that could offer work to refugee enterprises did so, as with the production of doors and windows for the rehabilitation of refugee shelters in Shatila camp.

64. Many of those seeking paid work were women, who became increasingly responsible for the support of their families. Women trained at the women's programme centres were directed to organizations running small workshops or co-ordinating cottage industries. Courses in dressmaking, artificial flower-making and hairdressing were offered at five women's programme centres, and funds were made available for a sixth centre which it was hoped would be constructed later in 1990 in Burj el-Shemali. Married women were encouraged to participate by the provision of crèches and the siting of centres close to pre-school facilities run by non-governmental organizations in association with UNRWA.

65. Another problematic legacy of 15 years of conflict was the large number of disabled children and adults. Nahr el-Bared camp was provisionally the location of the first community-based rehabilitation centre to be established by the Agency in Lebanon, provided that non-governmental partners and the local community could be mobilized.

D. Emergency operations and reconstruction

66. While for most of the reporting period the Palestinian community was not directly involved in the conflicts in Lebanon, the refugees were inevitably affected by the turmoil and the continuing economic difficulties. As the locus of the violence shifted, many refugees fled from one place to another. The Agency's emergency operation was directed especially to alleviating the plight of these displaced refugees and to others who had been most affected by the violence. Once again, the Agency extended assistance to non-registered Palestinians and occasionally to Lebanese who had been displaced by the hostilities. In addition, emergency health assistance and supplementary feeding, at estimated annual costs o $80,000 and $90,000 respectively, were extended to refugees not normally eligible for such services.

67. The 1990 budget for emergency operations in Lebanon amounted to $10 million, of which around $2 million was being spent on food aid. Four emergency general ration distributions of food, sugar and rice to approximately 230,000 beneficiaries were carried out during the reporting period. Emergency funds also went into the distribution of relief supplies, water, clothing, mattresses, blankets and kitchen kits as well as medical treatment and hospitalization. Cash grants were given to refugees to help them repair their shelters and a cash assistance programme was introduced.

68. The shelter repair programme to assist refugees whose shelters had been damaged or destroyed continued. By the end of the reporting period, 1,265 shelters had been repaired or reconstructed in Burj el-Barajneh. In Shatila, the programme slowed along with the pace of the return of the refugees to the camp but by the end of June 1990, 463 shelters had been repaired or reconstructed and a total of 1,766 windows and doors had been installed.

69. In February, Dbayeh camp near Jounieh, which had been virtually unscathed in 15 years of civil war, was caught in shell cross-fire and around 20 per cent of shelters were damaged or destroyed. Within three days, UNRWA carried out an initial inspection and took in 16-tons of flour. Additional supplies, including blankets, clothing, food and cash, were quickly made available. At around the same time, potable water became scarce in west Beirut. All five of the Agency's available water tankers supplied water to UNRWA installations as well as to the Lebanese populations adjoining the refugee camps.

V. SYRIAN ARAB REPUBLIC

A. Education

70. In the Syrian Arab Republic, 111 UNRWA schools with a student population of 55,550 were open without interruption in 1989/96. Although 90 per cent of the schools had the disadvantage of operating on a double-shift basis, the pupils had once again a much higher success rate in the State examinations than pupils of other schools.

71. The problem of inadequate and insufficient school premises remained chronic. Many schools were housed in dilapidated rented premises and the available sanitary facilities presented health hazards in many cases. The Agency continued to experience difficulty in securing sufficient funds to carry out a sustained programme of construction at the desired speed. Owing to an improved exchange rate available to UNRWA and the savings resulting there from, however, $2 million were allocated to a number of projects, including construction of a school to replace rented accommodation, renovation of sanitary facilities at 15 schools and construction of nine classrooms to avoid triple-shifting. During the reporting period one new school building for 910 pupils, containing 10 classrooms and specialized rooms, was completed. This building, in the Yarmouk refugee quarter of Damascus, made it possible to avoid triple-shifting.

72. In the 1989/90 academic year, the Damascus Training Centre operated without interruption. In July 1989, 404 trainees graduated from the Centre, which provided a total of 768 training places covering a total of 19 vocational and technical courses. Some badly needed renovation was completed at the Centre but considerable funding was still required to carry out further essential updating and replacement of equipment.

B. Health

73. The construction of a health and feeding centre at Hama and the extension of the Yarmouk health centre to accommodate the central laboratory were completed during the reporting period. Work started for construction of a health centre in Latakia and a maternal and child health sub-centre in Yarmouk. To meet the increasing demand on out-patient services in the south area following construction of a new health centre there, an additional medical team was established to operate Dera'a and Mazereeb health centres on a full-time rather than part-time basis.

74. Private hospitals, where UNRWA reserved 55 beds for in-patient care to eligible refugees, requested substantial increases in subsidy rates far exceeding the allotted budget. The Agency was forced to exercise closer control on hospitalization services in order to maintain the expenditure within the budget ceiling, without affecting essential services to refugees.

75. UNICEF completed the water augmentation project in Qabr Essit camp and handed it over to the concerned government establishment to operate. It also drilled a water well in Khan Dannoun camp and started a project for replacement of the internal sewerage network in that camp as well as in Jaramana camp. UNRWA funded and implemented a water supply project for its installations in Homs camp and continued to provide water to Damascus camps through its water tankers because of the low ground-water level in camp wells. Garbage collection and disposal was mechanized in Khan Dannoun and Khan Eshieh camps in the Damascus area, by provision of a compactor truck and matching containers.

C. Relief and social services

76. As in the other fields, the number of refugee families applying for admission to the programme of special hardship assistance grew, primarily because of the increase in unemployment in the Syrian Arab Republic itself and the fall in job opportunities for Palestinians elsewhere in the Arab world. Unfortunately, the dialogue between the Agency and the Government of the Syrian Arab Republic on arrangements for UNRWA social workers to visit refugees in their homes still failed to result in a mutually satisfactory agreement. It was hoped that a modus operandi could soon be reached, at which time the material assistance to the special hardship cases could be increased above the level at which it was frozen in July 1989. Lists were compiled of those families requesting help with the rehabilitation of their shelters, and this programme could also resume as soon as the shelters could be inspected and technical decisions taken on the work needed. At the end of the reporting period, persons in the families receiving assistance numbered 14,454, representing 6 per cent of the refugee population eligible for services.

77. On home visits hinges much of the Agency's ability to deliver social services of improved quality and enlarged scope. A number of families, for instance, applied for help in starting up small enterprises from their homes, a programme suspended at the Government's request in February 1989. To be successful this programme requires, inter alia, a joint study by the social worker and the family of the feasibility of the proposed enterprise and determination of the input needed from the Agency.

78. At the time of writing this report UNRWA supported 32 disabled youngsters in institutionalized programmes, but such support was minimal compared with the level of need. Two workshops were held over the year to train social workers in the nature and objectives of a community-based approach and in the techniques of conducting house-to-house studies to identify the disabled, who are typically confined to their homes. It was hoped shortly to open a community centre for the disabled in Neirab camp.

79. One of the most heartening developments over the period under review was the approach to the Agency by a group of women in Neirab camp seeking help to enable six disabled young women to learn a skill that would allow them to contribute to family income. This was only one of several refugee initiatives in this camp, where another group of women developed a proposal for an income-generating project to produce garments for local retail outlets. They will be helped with a grant to start up the business. Elsewhere, courses in dressmaking, machine-knitting and hairdressing were offered at the women's programme centres, and plans were developed to expand the programme and improve facilities.

VI. OCCUPIED TERRITORY

A. Education

80. Of the 98 UNRWA schools in the West Bank with a total pupil population of 39,460, 90 schools with 36,700 pupils suffered severe disruption during the reporting period. The 90 schools, which had been closed by Israeli military order since January 1989, were allowed to reopen on 22 July in the case of elementary schools and 2 August in the case of preparatory schools. Attempts to complete the 1988/89 academic year were hampered by curfews, strikes and individual military closure orders until 13 November when schools were again ordered closed until 10 January 1990. This brought the school year to an end with the prescribed education curriculum uncompleted. Following reopening in January for the school year 1989/90, the schools, operated for the remainder of the reporting period subject again to various disruptions. They were scheduled to complete the year on 2 July 1990 with a reduction of 33 per cent from the normal duration of the school year and an average lost time of 15 to 20 per cent. Some schools lost more than 50 per cent of the already reduced school year. The remaining eight schools in the West Bank, located within the Jerusalem city limits with a total population of 2,760 pupils, were more fortunate. They reopened in September 1989 after the summer vacation and functioned with little interruption during the reporting period. Two new school premises, one containing 13 classrooms and the other 9 classrooms plus specialized rooms, were under construction. The schools, at Sur Baher for 610 pupils and at Arrabeh for 320 pupils, will replace unsuitable rented premises.

81. The Agency, conscious of how seriously its school programme in the West Bank had been affected and of the danger of long-term effects on the education of Palestinian children, continued to develop further the alternative approaches to education that had been initiated in the previous year. The emphasis was on the production of self-learning written materials for distribution to individual pupils. Such materials, apart from their obvious usefulness when schools were closed, also provided useful supplementary assistance to pupils who were back at school but had missed so much schooling in the recent past. Another alternative method being pursued during the reporting period was the development of audio-visual materials. This approach was necessarily more long term, requiring specialized equipment and the development of a wide range of expertise. The primary aim was to produce video cassettes for the various school levels and for vocational and technical training.

82. The three training centres in the West Bank, two of which are in Ramallah and the other in Kalandia, provided 944 vocational and technical training places and 550 teacher training places. These centres were seriously affected, as they were closed by military order for more than two years from the beginning of 1988 until the spring of 1990. Eventually permitted to reopen in stages between 10 March and 1 May 1990, the centres operated thereafter until the end of the reporting period with occasional disruption caused by strikes, curfews and disturbances. Attendance at all three centres suffered when compared to enrolment before the lengthy period of enforced closure. At the Kalandia Training Centre, for example, 212 trainees were in attendance, while 217 of their colleagues did not re-enroll. Some were known to be in detention, some studying abroad, some had found jobs and there were others about whom the Agency had no information. Efforts were being made to recruit new trainees to fill the vacant places. Construction at the three training centres during the reporting period included a gymnasium at the Ramallah Men's Training Centre, expansion of the library and the installation of central heating at Ramallah Women's Training Centre and the renovation of some workshops and dormitories at Kalandia Training Centre.

83. During the 1989/90 school year, the 149 UNRWA schools in Gaza had 95,600 pupils. When they reopened after the summer vacation in September 1989, a short initial period saw the implementation of a contingency plan intended to cover essential topics of the 1988/89 curriculum that had not been completed prior to the vacation owing to the loss of teaching time.

84. There was no prolonged general closure of schools in Gaza during the academic year 1989/90. Nevertheless, curfews, disturbances, strikes and, in the case of some schools, individual closure orders that varied from one week to three months, caused frequent interruptions. By mid-May 1990, 40 per cent of teaching time had been lost. The occupation authorities refused to allow the Agency to extend the school year, and contingency plans, including the distribution of self-learning materials to the pupils, had to be put into effect. As the occupation authorities also refused to allow UNRWA to reopen schools one month early after a shortened summer vacation to compensate for time lost in 1989/90, it was proposed to use the first few weeks of the 1990/91 school year for this purpose. During the reporting period, construction of a total of 22 classrooms to avoid triple-shift operations and an additional 26 classrooms to replace existing dilapidated structures were completed.

85. The Gaza Training Centre in 1989/90 had 650 training places and offered a total of 15 vocational and technical courses. The Centre's opening after the summer vacation was delayed by the occupation authorities until 2 October 1989. From that time onwards, it operated with general regularity throughout the academic year although, inevitably, it was affected by strikes, curfews and closure orders. The opening ceremony for two new semi-professional courses in physiotherapy and business and office practice took place on 15 February. When fully operative, the courses would provide training for 88 male and female trainees. This marked the introduction of semi-professional training at the Centre and provided opportunities for female trainees to enroll for the first time.

B. Health

86. The continuation of the intifadah and the countermeasures employed by the Israeli security forces continued to have serious effects upon UNRWA health services in the occupied territory during the period under review. The Agency had to give priority to emergency and casualty care, while at the same time maintaining its regular health activities in all areas, in spite of interruptions caused by curfews, strikes and disturbances.

87. In health centres, emergency medical kits and surgical equipment were provided and staff members received special training. The value of these improvements was clearly illustrated on many occasions, most notably on 20 May 1990 when fierce confrontations erupted throughout the occupied territory following the killing of Palestinian workers at Rishon Lezion in Israel. On this occasion, UNRWA medical staff treated literally hundreds of people and resuscitated the most severely injured prior to their evacuation to hospitals.

88. The joint UNRWA-UNICEF physiotherapy programme, continued to function in five health centres in the Gaza Strip and was extended to the West bank where clinics were opened in Jenin and Doura in April 1990. In addition, physiotherapy clinics were in operation in Qalqiliya hospital and Balata and Tulkarm health centres. UNRWA doctors and nurses received practical training in casualty care and first aid at Makassed hospital in East Jerusalem and all practical nurses attended a two-month training course in physiotherapy at the Princess Basma Crippled Children Rehabilitation Centre.

89. The Agency continued to provide assistance to hospitals run by non-governmental organizations. In order to cope with the increased number of referred patients and casualties, UNRWA contributed towards the expansion of Al Ahli hospital in Gaza, where it already subsidized 40 beds. Improvements included a children's ward, an additional operating theatre and provision of equipment for an intensive care unit. Progress was also made towards the construction and equipment of a 20-bed orthopedic ward. In West Bank, equipment was provided to Augusta Victoria hospital for the newly established neonatal ward and to five other establishments to which refugee patients were referred.

90. The new surgical ward at the hospital operated by UNRWA in Qalqiliya was put into use following the appointment of a surgeon, a gynecologist, an anesthesiologist and 11 practical nurses. Renovation and upgrading was completed at Arrub, Kalandia and Jenin health centres and the establishment of X-ray and laboratory services at Balata, Hebron and Far'a health centres was underway, as were projects for the construction of new health centres in Fawwar, Deir Ammar and Doura and a central pharmacy in Jerusalem. In Gaza, where most health centre buildings require replacement or major renovation, the new Gaza Town health centre, serving a population of 40,000, was inaugurated in November 1989. Designs were prepared for the construction of three new health centres at Beach camp, Beit Hanoun and Tel el-Sultan, two maternal and child health sub-centres at Khuza'a and Nuseirat, reconstruction of Deir el-Balah health centre and the installation of radiological units at Nuseirat and Rafah health centres. The award of contracts, however, awaited the issue of building permits by the Civil Administration. Funds were also allotted and designs completed for construction of a new field pharmacy to replace the existing premises, which were beyond repair. Finally, UNRWA carried out, in collaboration with WHO, a feasibility study with a design brief and development plan to construct, equip and commission a 200-bed general hospital in Gaza. The project was estimated to cost $35 million, of which $20 million represented capital costs and $15 million running costs for three years. Subsequently, a detailed project proposal was developed and fund-raising activities started, which led to some encouraging preliminary responses.

91. In the area of environmental health, work on the internal sewerage scheme at Amari camp was completed. The first phase of a similar scheme at Dheisheh Camp, however, proceeded slowly owing to obstacles created by the Israeli security forces. The ultimate objective was to connect the internal sewerage scheme to the regional scheme of Bethlehem municipality, comprising Dheisheh, Aida and Beit Jibrin camps. Funds were also allocated to implement internal sewerage systems at Askar, Tulkarm, Nur Shams and Jenin camps, and ground profile drawings along proposed routes were prepared as part of the contract documents. Refuse collection and disposal at Tulkarm and Nur Shams camps were improved by the use of a new UNRWA skip-lift vehicle and matching containers. Two other garbage compactor trucks for Arrub, Fawwar and Far'a camps were put into operation. Nevertheless, refuse collection and disposal in the camps throughout the, occupied territory continued to suffer, operational difficulties, especially during curfews and strikes.

92. In Gaza, emphasis was placed upon upgrading water and liquid waste disposal in the eight congested camps of the Strip. In Jabalia, a feasibility study was conducted for unification of water supply sources and the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) finalized all arrangements for implementing the construction of a sewerage scheme. Two water augmentation projects were underway in Bureij and Maghazi camps, which experienced severe water shortages in each of the past two summers. The project for replacement of the Bureij camp sewage pumping station did not begin, pending final approval by the occupation authorities. The approval of WHO was obtained to use a governmental contribution towards environmental health projects in Beach camp, comprising replacement of the main pumping station, construction of a high pressure line and replacement of two old municipal pumping stations. Also in Beach camp, an agreement was reached with Gaza municipality regarding the placement of a storm drain to the sea to eliminate a localized flooding problem.

C. Relief and social services

93. The intifadah and the Israeli response to it, on the one hand, greatly increased the number of families unable to satisfy their own basic needs and, on the other, stimulated a remarkable determination to produce both goods and employment. Fewer refugees were able to find full-time work within the territory or in Israel and the number searching for jobs was augmented by students whose schools and universities were closed. Remittances from abroad fell and many families were left without a breadwinner because of death, injuries or detention. Refugees thus turned to UNRWA in larger numbers for material assistance and for support in setting up small enterprises of their own.

94. The Agency's emergency relief programmes are described in paragraph 101 of this report. They complemented the special hardship assistance, which, by June 1990, was being given to almost 71,400 refugees in the West Bank and Gaza under the normal programme and another 4,400 as a supplementary measure. By the end of the reporting period 13.4 per cent of the refugees eligible for services in Gaza were registered as special hardship cases. In the West Bank too, at 9.1 per cent of the refugees, the special hardship cases were significantly more than the Agency-wide average of 7.8 per cent. These percentages were higher than the previous year.

95. In the belief that direct relief must be accompanied by the search for ways of helping the refugees meet their own needs, particular attention was paid to promoting self-support projects and identifying and nurturing small enterprises. Among the special hardship cases, Agency social workers succeeded in establishing 45 small businesses in the West Bank and 25 in Gaza with grants in aid. In Gaza a $25,000 loan was made in May 1990 to a garment factory that was able to employ 60 workers, including 20 women, three of whom were disabled. This was the largest credit yet advanced under the loan programme, which by June 1990 was supporting 105 projects in Gaza and 62 in the West Bank. The bulk of the projects were industrial workshops and animal husbandry, but others were in the service sector, horticulture, and medical technology. In spite of difficulties caused by various Israeli measures to control the intifadah and the detention of several of the loan recipients, business was sufficiently good to sustain a 75 per cent rate of repayment of loans. The 167 projects provided work directly to 462 persons, and, if each of these represented the typical five-person household, this meant well over 2,000 people were supported through the scheme.

96. The women's programme centres played an important role in the occupied territory as a facility for skill-training and a secure meeting place where women could support one another and discuss issues of common concern. Over the past two years, the number of women participating in activities at the centres doubled in 10 locations each in the West Bank and Gaza. Courses were conducted in dressmaking, machine-knitting, cooking and home economics, and hairdressing, skills which are demanded today not only to assist in the conservation of household income but to augment it. The opportunities for women to earn money from their homes or in small enterprises grew perceptibly if slowly. In July 1989, 505 young women graduated from an 11-month combined course in dressmaking, home economics and health education, and a similar number were enrolled in the 1989/90 course due to be completed in August. At three centres in the West Bank classes were conducted in literacy for women who requested them.

97. The number of Palestine refugees in the occupied territory disabled through permanent injury increased during the intifadah. In the West Bank and in Gaza, UNRWA played its part along with local organizations in. promoting and developing outreach through community- based rehabilitation programmes. In the West Bank, the Agency made available premises to non-governmental organizations working with the disabled in Dheisheh and Kalandia camps. In Fawwar camp, a project proposal was prepared for a community-based rehabilitation centre on the lines of those pioneered in Jordan. In Gaza, the Training Centre for the Blind opened the extension to its premises in May 1990 and was able to receive a larger number of children and young people in both its schooling and vocational training sections; production workshops were also being expanded. The Centre supported projects for knitted goods, brooms, brushes and cane work at the Centre itself and through home service units in the refugee camps. Over the past year those projects enabled 35 blind adults to supplement family income. In Gaza, too, arrangements were in hand for the first community-based rehabilitation centre in Jabalia camp where a house-to-house survey identified no less than 1,100 disabled refugees.

98. An additional concern in Gaza was the future of the Palestine refugees stranded on the Egyptian side of the border, in Canada camp, who, under an agreement between Israel and Egypt, were to return to the Gaza Strip where they would be reunited with their families. In August 1989, a group of 20 families were accommodated in Rafah, Gaza. The Agency assisted them for a six-month settling in period with the rations on which they had relied in the Sinai. The agreement between the Israeli and Egyptian authorities for the other families, who numbered over 800, was that they should return to the Tel el-Sultan housing project in a phased transfer. The compensation provided by the Egyptian Government to each family for the housing they would leave behind was a mere fraction of the cost of a simple house of sufficient size to accommodate the household and very few families were able to accumulate any savings with which to supplement the compensation. Local efforts to raise additional funds have not so far been successful. By the end of the reporting period, over 35 heads of family had begun to build their new homes, which must be completed before families are permitted to return. Consequently, plans have been postponed under which UNDP was to construct a centre in Tel el-Sultan to provide shops and workshops for the returnees to rent. Meanwhile, UNRWA continued to provide food rations to some 4,000 refugees in the Canada camp who were mostly unemployed and living in poverty.

D. Extraordinary measures of general assistance and protection

99. The programme of extraordinary measures in the occupied territory comprised measures to cope with the effects of the intifadah and the countermeasures of the authorities. It included health services, relief and social services and general assistance. The budget for the extraordinary measures in both West Bank and Gaza for 1990 was approximately $29 million.

100. The Agency instituted training programmes and provided equipment for its clinics to deal with large numbers of wounded and to evacuate casualties to hospital. Most Agency clinics operated an additional shift for emergencies and five in Gaza remained open 24 hours a day. These measures were expected to cost $1.8 million in 1990. More patients were referred to hospital and many required extensive care for which additional funds amounting to $590,000 were provided. Approximately $1.2 million worth of additional medical supplies and equipment were provided for clinics and for use of refugee patients in hospitals. The provision of supplementary food to children and to pregnant and nursing women was extended to the benefit of more registered refugees and to the benefit of non-registered refugees at a cost of $1.8 million.

101. Emergency relief measures included extended provision of cash assistance to those in immediate distress, for which $1.2 million was budgeted, extension of special hardship benefits to those with longer term needs at an expected cost of $410,000, and provision of food commodities, primarily flour, to needy families at an expected cost of $12 million. A further aspect of the Agency's emergency measures was the programme of general assistance and protection. The major component of this programme was the assignment of 13 international staff members in the West Bank and 10 in the Gaza Strip as refugee affairs officers. They facilitated Agency operations and assisted the refugee population in their day-to-day life. The refugee affairs officers also helped, by their presence, to lower tensions and to prevent maltreatment of the refugees, especially vulnerable groups such as women and children. They helped to evacuate the wounded, to reduce interference with ambulances and to obtain the release of refugee children. They assisted the population as occasion arose, for example, to obtain permits for funerals. They also helped to obtain curfew permits to carry on essential services during curfew periods and to facilitate the movement of essential food and medical supplies to camps and other locations where needed. In performing these functions the refugee affairs officers sometimes succeeded in establishing a dialogue with Civil Administration officials and were able to assist on the spot in numerous matters affecting the welfare of the population. Refugee affairs officers continued to be of particular assistance to UNRWA local staff members who found it especially difficult to carry out their functions in the prevailing situation.

E. Expanded programme of assistance

102. In the report submitted to the Security Council in accordance with its resolution 605 (1987) of 22 December 1987, the Secretary-General noted that he had requested the Commissioner-General, inter alia, to prepare proposals for improving the infrastructure of the refugee camps and to seek the necessary funds (S/119443, para. 48). In early 1988, the Commissioner-General presented a broad plan of action to a meeting of representatives of major donor and host countries. This expanded programme of assistance to the occupied territory had a target figure of $65 million, and was intended to improve the living conditions in the West Bank and Gaza Strip. Against this target, $30 million had been received or pledged by mid-1990.

103. The expanded programme was further developed during 1988 and 1989 and covered shelter rehabilitation; improvement and expansion of health services, including construction, supplies, equipment and training; environmental sanitation, improved water supply; employment; income-generating and self-support projects; logistics; improvement of Agency installations through which services are delivered; and some education projects such as scholarships.

104. During the reporting period, priority was given to the rehabilitation of shelters belonging to special hardship cases in the camps. Satisfactory progress was achieved in this programme, which included reconstruction, upgrading, repair and maintenance. The Agency made major interventions in environmental sanitation projects in the camps to deal with health hazards stemming from lack of adequate sewage and refuse disposal systems by planning, surveying and designing large sewage projects, including one major system in Beach camp in the Gaza Strip and eight in the West Bank. Implementation began on those projects for which funds had been received, notably in Beach camp in Gaza, and in Aida, Amari, Beit Jibrin and Dheisheh camps in the West Bank. Equipment such as compactor trucks and containers was provided to those camps where strikes or curfews often prevented municipal trucks from carting away the refuse. The supply of potable water in the occupied territory continued to be a serious problem, in particular in Gaza. As an interim measure, the Agency tendered for the installation of two reverse osmosis plants in Rafah and Khan Younis camps and commissioned a study of road and storm water design and an integrated water network in Jabalia camp.

105. Plans were proceeding for the construction of nine additional health centres, sub-centres and health points in West Bank and Gaza, with existing health centres being renovated, expanded and upgraded through improved and new equipment. Installation of nine pre-fabricated physiotherapy units was begun as part of a larger physiotherapy programme. Mobile dental units, additional health buses and afternoon shifts and outreach nursing programmes continued to provide much needed and speedy care and coverage.

106. At reporting time, approximately 100 projects and sub-projects were at various stages between negotiation and completion; about 35 were completed and another 50 were under implementation. The Agency began to experience delays in implementation, with the Israeli authorities imposing new conditions on allowing construction projects inside refugee camps to proceed. As a result, some projects were rejected outright by the authorities, others which had started were prevented from continuing, while still others were delayed pending clearance.

VII. LEGAL MATTERS

A. Agency staff

107. The annual reports of the past two years referred to increases in the number of staff members arrested and detained without charge or trial in the occupied territory. This trend continued in the present, reporting period. In Lebanon the total number of staff kidnapped or detained decreased. Two staff members from Canada Camp in the Sinai were deported from Egypt. One of them was arrested during the reporting period (see annex I, table 11).

108. UNRWA remained unable to obtain adequate and timely information on the reasons for the arrest and detention of its staff members. In the absence of such information the Agency was unable to ascertain whether the staff members' official functions were involved. It was also unable to ensure that their rights and duties flowing from the Charter of the United Nations, the Convention on the Privileges and Immunities of the United Nations of 1946 and the pertinent Staff Regulations and Rules of UNRWA were duly respected.

109. The treatment of staff in detention caused considerable concern. There were instances of Agency staff (both area and international) who, while performing their official duties, were intimidated and subjected to physical abuse by. Israeli soldiers in the West Bank and Gaza Strip. Staff members complained of beatings and other forms of brutality during their detention. In the Gaza Strip alone, the Agency registered more than 170 incidents in which staff alleged mistreatment. Four area staff members in the Gaza Strip were killed as alleged collaborators.

110. The Agency experienced more difficulties than in the previous year in visiting detained staff members, but had access to 13 staff members from the West Bank who were held in prisons and detention centres, including nine held in detention centres in Israel. While the authorities promised to make the necessary arrangements, obstacles to making these arrangements persisted. The Agency had access to 47 staff members from the Gaza Strip who were held in the Kitziot detention camp in the Negev. It had access for the first time to two staff members held in the Beach detention camp, Gaza Town. It had no access to staff from the Gaza Strip detained elsewhere by the Israeli occupation authorities. The Agency had access to one of the two staff members prior to deportation by the Egyptian authorities (see para. 107 above). The Agency had no success in visiting staff in detention in Jordan, the Syrian Arab Republic and Lebanon.

111. The Agency continued to meet difficulties in the travel of staff into and out of the West Bank and the Gaza Strip. There were substantial delays in the clearance of staff for travel, which was refused in some cases. A staff member was required to report on five occasions to the Israeli authorities in connection with duty travel to Canada Camp but received no explanation for the refusal of travel facilities. The movement of both international and area staff within the West Bank and the Gaza Strip was affected by the frequent imposition of curfews and the designation of areas as closed military zones. In the Gaza Strip the Israeli authorities continued to insist that area staff move during curfews only if in possession of permits issued by the Israeli Civil Administration. The Israeli authorities failed to renew a substantial number of permits issued at the beginning of 1990, as a result of which Agency operations were impeded and even stopped in many areas during three periods of general curfew. As from August 1989 the Israeli authorities also insisted on area staff members obtaining “magnetic card" if they wished to travel through Israel, even on official duty.

112. The Agency continued to take up with the Israeli authorities the practice of summoning area staff for interrogation during office hours. In particular in October 1989, despite protest, a number of senior area staff members in the Gaza Strip were questioned on various aspects of Agency operations. In the West Bank, the questioning of staff members during official hours decreased during the reporting period.

B. Agency services and premises

113. In the increasingly complex and tense environment that persisted in the occupied territory during the reporting period, the Agency continued its efforts to support the upholding of the, safety and security and the legal and human rights of the refugees. Some of the measures of passive protection which the Agency extended in the territory are detailed at paragraph 101 of this report. The Agency also found it necessary to reflect the concerns of the international community about the situation on the ground. The heavy toll of the casualties in the reporting period over 23,000 cases of injuries recorded by the Agency, including a substantial proportion of women and children of which nearly 18,000 were refugees was protested to the authorities as an excessive use of force by the Israeli security forces, especially beatings and the use of live-ammunition in situations which could not be regarded as life threatening (see annex I, table 12). Other measures, such as collective punishments, punitive demolitions, sealing of shelters, arrest and detention without charge or trial, physical and moral coercion, interference with medical services, were also protested as a failure on the part of the Israeli military authorities to uphold standards required under international humanitarian law. Those measures which related to the population in the occupied territory were of direct concern to the Agency in its efforts to provide the refugees with essential humanitarian services.

114. Unauthorized entry by the Israeli authorities into Agency premises increased. During the reporting period 555 intrusions into Agency premises were recorded in the Gaza Strip and 191 in the West Bank. In several cases such intrusions into Agency premises resulted in injury to staff or damage to property or both. The Commissioner-General, in his statement to the Special Political Committee on 19 October 1989, referred to what appeared to have been co-ordinated raids on 18 October 1989 when Israeli soldiers, accompanied by Civil Administration officers, entered the Deir el-Balah Distribution Centre in the Gaza Strip and the Agency's camp services offices in Jalazone, Dheisheh and Fawwar camps in the West Bank and ransacked a number of files and other official documents. In this incident, two UNRWA international staff members and one area staff member were arrested and force used against them. On 6 February 1990, Israeli authorities entered Rafah health centre in the Gaza Strip and, despite objections by staff on duty, ransacked Agency records and stores and questioned staff on matters relating to the Agency's health services. The Agency noted with concern an increasing number of intrusions into health centres in the Gaza Strip. In the month of June 1990 alone, 22 incursions into health centres were registered. By way of example, on 12 June 1990, Israeli soldiers pursuing stone throwers threw two tear gas grenades into the Rimal health centre in Gaza Town affecting patients including 66 registered infants awaiting treatment. The Agency protested these actions as violations of the Agency's privileges and immunities. The Israeli authorities invoked consideration of military security and in some cases, claimed that Agency installations had been misused. The Agency was pursuing the legal and other aspects of this matter.

115. The Agency also protested as violations of its privileges and immunities other actions of the Israeli security forces. For example, ambulances carrying injured persons for medical attention were interfered with, and staff performing their duties were ill-treated. In October 1989 an ambulance carrying injured persons from Khan Younis camp in the Gaza Strip was stopped, searched and the driver beaten. In another instance, in April 1990 a doctor at the Jabalia health centre was beaten when he refused to order his staff to stop working and to leave the clinic. The Agency was particularly concerned with interference with these services which were all the more required in the prevailing situation in the occupied territory.

116. The Agency viewed with concern recent incidents in which Israeli soldiers occupied Agency installations, in some cases for lengthy periods. The establishment of a military observation post on the roof of a school in Aqbat Jabr camp in the West Bank, which was referred to in the 1987-1988 annual report, was virtually continuous from mid-November 1989, despite frequent protests by the Agency. The authorities also issued a military order purporting to seize a part of this installation for the use of the Israel Defense Forces. Again, despite protests by the Agency, a military observation post was established on the roof of the head teacher's office of Kalandia Girls' School in the West Bank for the period 26-30 April 1990. In Jabalia camp in the Gaza Strip, the Israeli authorities erected a six-meter high barbed-wire fence around the UNRWA women's activities centre, construction of which had been prevented by the authorities in the last reporting period. As a result, there was no access to the site of the centre and to a home service unit attached to the Training Centre for the Blind. The reason given was in effect security, as the Israeli authorities established a military installation adjacent to the women's activities centre. The Agency-repeatedly protested and called upon the authorities to refrain from such actions in conformity with their international legal obligations. The barricading of entrances to camps and the erection of fences, reported in the past two years' reports, continued to pose problems. Several new barricades were erected and many barricades constructed earlier remained in place.

117. Despite the Agency's protest, the Government of Jordan used some Agency installations, including the Wadi Seer Training Centre, as polling stations in the national elections held on 8 November 1989.

118. In the Gaza Strip 173 rooms were demolished, affecting 540 persons and reflecting a marked increase in punitive demolitions. In contrast, the number of shelters demolished for punitive reasons in the West Bank fell considerably during the reporting period. In the West Bank two shelters were demolished on punitive grounds, affecting 16 persons. In addition nine shelters were sealed, affecting 66 persons in the West Bank, and 34 rooms affecting 149 persons in the Gaza Strip. The number of demolitions carried out on grounds of illegal construction increased. The Agency continued to press the Israeli authorities for compensation for families affected by the demolition of adjacent shelters during the previous year. The Agency protested the punitive demolitions and sealings of shelters as being incompatible with articles 33 and 53 of the Geneva Convention relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War of 12 August 1949. The Agency also continued to take up with the Israeli authorities the status of the sites of shelters demolished on punitive grounds. The Israeli Civil Administration continued to object to the reconstruction of shelters demolished on punitive grounds. The Agency pointed to assurances formally given by the Israeli Ministry of Foreign Affairs as far back as May 1971 that there was no objection to such reconstruction.

119. The Agency had difficulties in carrying out urgently needed construction for its operations in the occupied territory. Notwithstanding past practice, the Israeli authorities in effect required that the Agency should obtain permits from the Civil Administration before embarking on new construction. Many projects were delayed and the authorities stopped the work on others. The Agency was pursuing the matter with the authorities.

120. The Government of Israel did not yet reimburse the Agency for clearance, warehousing and transport charges, payable to the Agency under the Comaxy-Michelmore provisional agreement of 14 June 1967. 3/ As described in last year's report, the Agency continued to advance the sums required, while maintaining that this was a temporary measure, it being understood that the sums so advanced, would be reimbursed. At the end of the reporting period, the Government of Israel had still given no indication that it was willing to agree to reimburse the Agency these advances, which stood at $3,452,895 at the end of the reporting period.

C. Claims against Governments

121. The Agency regrets that no progress was made with regard to its various claims against Governments.

Notes

1/ As concerns refugees, the General Assembly in its resolution 44/47 I of 8 December 1989, inter alia, urged the Secretary-General, in consultation with the Commissioner-General of UNRWA, "to continue to work for the upholding of the safety and security and the legal and human rights of the Palestine refugees in all the territories under Israeli occupation in 1967 and thereafter".

2/ Official Records of the General Assembly, Forty-third Session, Supplement No. 13 (A/43/13).

3/ Exchange of letters constituting a provisional agreement between UNRWA and Israel concerning assistance to Palestine refugees (United Nations, Treaty Series, vol. 620, No. 8955, p. 183).




ANNEX I

Statistical and financial information
TablePage
1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.

12.

13.
Number of registered persons ........................................

Distribution of registered population ...............................

Number and distribution of special hardship cases ...................

Social services programme ...........................................

Distribution of refugee pupils in UNRWA schools .....................

Training places in UNRWA training Centres ...........................

University scholarship-holders by faculty and country of study ......

Medical care services ...............................................

Trends in utilization of out-patient clinics ........................

Incidence trends of selected communicable diseases ..................

Staff members arrested and detained .................................

Casualties in the occupied territories ..............................

Contributions in cash and in kind by Governments and
by the European Community* .........................................
33

34

35

36

37

38

39

40

41

42

43

44


46
____________

* For more detailed information on the financing of the Agency's programme see the audited financial statements for the year ended 31 December 1989 and the report of the Board of Auditors (Official Records of the General Assembly, Forty-fifth Session, Supplement No. 5C (A/45/5/Add.3)).





Table 1. Number of registered persons a/

(As at 30 June each year)

Field
1950
1960
1965
1970
1975
1980
1985
1989
1990
Lebanon

Syrian Arab
Republic

Jordan

West Bank

Gaza Strip
127 600


82 194

506 200

-

198 227
136 561


115 043

613 743

-

255 542
159 810


135 971

688 089

-

296 953
175 958


158 717

506 038

272 692

311 814
196 855


184 042

625 857

292 922

333 031
226 554


209 362

716 372

324 035

367 995
263 599


244 626

799 724

357 704

427 892
294 272


272 778

899 811

398 391

469 385
302 049


280 731

929 097

414 298

496 339
Total
914 221b/
1 120 889
1 280 823
1 425 219
1 623 707
1 844 318
2 093 545
2 334 637
2 422 514

a/ These statistics are based on UNRWA registration records, which are updated continually. The number of registered refugees present in the Agency's area of operations, however, is almost certainly less than the population recorded. The Agency's budgeted expenditure is based not on the registration records but on the projected numbers of beneficiaries of its services. In 1989-1990, 362,730 refugees enrolled in education or training programmes, approximately 2.1 million were eligible for health care and 151,862 persons received special hardship assistance.

b/ This total excludes 45,800 persons receiving relief in Israel, who were the responsibility of UNRWA until June 1952.




Table 2. Distribution of registered population

(As at 30 June 1990)
Field
Population
Number of
camps
Total camp
population a/
Registered persons not in camps
Percentage of
population
not in camps
Lebanon

Syrian Arab
Republic

Jordan

West Bank

Gaza Strip
302 049


280 731

929 097

414 298

496 339
13


10

10

20

8
154 533


82 047

222 972

110 010

271 938
147 516


198 324

706 125

304 288

224 401
48.84


70.65

76.00

73.45

45.21
Total2 422 514
61
841 860
1 580 654
65.25

a/ It is estimated that a further 52,000 persons, who are not registered refugees, live in camps. About 37,000 of these are persons displaced as a result of the June 1967 hostilities.




Table 3. Number and distribution of special hardship cases

(As at 30 June 1990)
Number of persons
Field
Number of families
Receiving rations
Not
receiving
rations a/
Total
Percentage of refugee population
Lebanon

Syrian Arab
Republic

Jordan

West Bank

Gaza Strip
8 709


4 023

6 508

6 440

9 537
34 836


13 188

28 179

23 986

42 760
513


1 266

2 508

2 783

1 843
35 349


14 454

30 687

26 769

44 603
13.36


5.21

3.31

7.39

12.24
Total
35 217
142 949
8 913
151 862
7.01

a/ Includes children under one year of age, imprisoned individuals, students studying away from home etc.





Table 4. Social services programme

(1 July 1989-30 June 1990)
Support for disabled
Income-generation
Youth
activities
Women's
programme
Craft training
Community- based rehabilitation
Referrals to rehabil- itation facilities
Self-support grants
Loan-based projects
Field
Cen- tres
Parti- cipants
Cen-
tres
Parti- cipants
Sewing
& Em- broidery
Graduates
Car-
pentry
Gra-
duates
Centres
Par- tici- pants
Up to 7/89

No. Grants
$
7/89 to 6/90

No. Grants
$
7/89 to 6/90

No. Loans
$
Up to 6/90
Total
No. loans
$
Jordan

West
Bank

Gaza

Lebanon

Syrian
Arab
Republic
-


17

8

-



-
-


2 201

a/

-



-
11


5

10

2



7
800


456

940

100



207
130


187

418

90



198
-


43

-

-



-
4


1

-

-



-
160


22

-

-



-
42


18

27

50



19
86


32

25

54



47
47 820


187 626

102 636

91 640



95 442
21


13

-

49



b/
29 007


112 515

-

131 047



-
-


18

19

-



-
-


124 000

170 350

-



-
-


62 )
)
105 )

-



-
-



1.3
million

-



-
TOTAL
25
2 201
35
2 503
1 023
43
5
182
156
244
525 164
83
272 569
37
294 350
-
-

a/ Centres are temporarily closed by authorities.

b/ Programme suspended February 1989 at the request of the Government, pending outcome of discussions with the Agency on home visits.





Table 5. Distribution of refugee pupils in UNRWA schools a/

(As at 15 October 1989)
Field
Number of UNRWA schools
Number of teachers
Number of
pupils in elementary classes c/
Number of
pupils in preparatory classes c/
Total number
of refugee
pupils
Boys
Girls
Total
Boys
Girls
Total
Lebanon

Syrian Arab
Republic

Jordan

West Bank b/

Gaza Strip
76


111

197

98

149
1 173


1 581

3 728

1 339

2 682
11 829


19 873

47 910

12 616

35 591
11 357


18 531

45 999

15 408

33 280
23 186


38 404

93 909

28 024

68 871
5 055


8 942

20 496

5 284

14 225
5 108


8 200

19 403

6 148

12 501
10 113


17 142

39 899

11 432

26 726
33 299


55 546

133 808

39 456

95 597
Total
631
10 503
127 819
124 575
252 394
53 952
51 360
105 312
357 706

a/ Excluding an estimated total of 115,300 refugee pupils attending elementary, preparatory and secondary government and private schools.

b/ Because of the closure of the schools in the West Bank by Israeli military order for most of 1989, the 1989/90 school year began on 10 January 1990.

c/ Including non-eligible children attending UNRWA schools, who now number 56,569.










Table 7. University scholarship-holders by faculty and country of study

(Academic year 1989/90)
Lebanon
Syrian Arab
Republic
Jordan
West
Bank a/ b/
Egypt
Others b/
Total
Grand
Total
M
F
M
F
M
F
M
F
M
F
M
F
M
F
Engineering

Medicine

Science

Pharmacy

Arts

Dentistry

Nursing

Business Ad-
ministration

Commerce

Education and
teacher training

Law
24

2

18

4

1

-

-


-

-



-

-
3

1

8

8

3

-

-


-

-



-

-
30

50

1

8

-

19

-


-

-



-

-
16

26

2

8

-

10

-


-

-



-

1
61

32

5

15

5

-

-


-

-



-

-
15

9

8

10

5

-

1


-

1



-

-
30

-

2

-

2

-

-


-

-



-

-
3

-

2

-

9

-

2


-

-



-

-
5

4

7

4

2

-

-


-

2



3

-
1

-

2

-

-

1

-


1

1



6

-
22

7

3

1

-

1

-


1

-



-

-
-

5

2

2

-

-

-


-

-



-

-
172

95

36

32

7

20

-


1

2



3

-
38

41

24

28

17

11

3


1

2



6

1
210

136

60

60

24

31

3


2

4



9

-
Total
49
23
108
63
115
49
34
16
27
12
35
9
368
172
539

a/ Owing to the closure of institutions of higher learning by Israeli military order, the 50 scholars (34 male and 16 female) scheduled to study at West Bank universities were unable to do so.

b/ Excluding 48 scholarships whose award to deserving students is not yet finalized owing to late receipt
of registration documents from universities outside the West Bank.

c/ other countries were: Turkey (22 male students and 1 female student), Yemen (1 male and 1 female student) and the Libyan Arab Jamahiriya (12 male and 7 female students).







Table 8. Medical care services

(1 July 1989-30 June 1990)
Type of service
Lebanon
Syrian
Arab
Rep.
Jordan
West
Bank
Gaza
Strip
Total
A.Curative medical care
1.Out-patient care
2.
Number of patients
Number of patient visits:
Medical treatments a/
Dental treatment

In-patient care b/
Hospital beds available
Beds/1,000 population ratio
Number of patients admitted
Annual patient days per
1,000 population
126 129
.
789 488
42 090
.
.
144
0.50
12 052
.
208
172 996
.
946 837
56 045
.
.
55
0.62
4 423
.
56
324 760
.
1 300 529
105 200
.
.
40
0.09
1 356
.
10
141 319
.
864 304
43 529
.
.
197
0.56
14 200
.
209
233 838
.
1 682 184
69 921
.
.
40
0.22
4 127
.
39
999 042
.
5 583 342
316 485
.
.
476
0.23
36 158
.
76
B.Preventive medical care

1. Maternal and child health care
Pregnant women (average
monthly attendance)
Children below 3 years
of age (average
attendance) c/
.
1 669
.
.
11 261
.
1 580
.
.
17 550
.
4 061
.
.
40 160
.
2 793
.
.
22 368
.
7 062
.
.
47 331
.
17 165
.
.
138 670
2. Expanded programme of immunization
(number of full primary series)
Triple (DPT) vaccine
Polio vaccine
BCG vaccine
Measles vaccine

3. School Health
Number of school
entrants examined
Number of booster vaccinations
.
.
5 873
4 804
6 586
5 673
.
.
.
3 603
17 593
.
.
6 851
6 334
6 256
6 269
.
.
.
7 493
22 802
.
.
16 440
14 156
14 007
15 404
.
.
.
11 503
48 118
.
.
7 670
6 793
7 137
8 041
.
.
.
5 311
15 946
.
.
17 709
16 191
16 214
15 133
.
.
.
10 285
31 263
.
.
54 543
48 278
50 200
50 520
.
.
.
38 195
135 722

a/ Includes visits for medical consultations, injections, dressings and eye treatment.

b/ Data presented is on services provided by UNRWA through contractual agreements. It does not, therefore, include in-patient care provided to refugees in government hospitals or UNRWA maternities.

c/ Health monitoring is monthly for those under one year of age, bimonthly for age group 1 to 2 years and trimonthly for age group 2 to 3 years.




Table 9. Trends in utilization of out-patient clinics



Number of medical consultations
(thousands)





Table 10. Incidence trends of selected communicable diseases
Rate per 100,000






Table 11. Staff members arrested and detained

(1 July 1989-30 June 1990)

Gaza
West
Bank
Egypt c/
(Canada
Camp)
Jordan
Syrian Arab
Republic
Lebanon
Total
Arrested or detained and released without charge or trial

Charged, tried and sentenced

Still detained without charge
.
.
39
.
.
5
.
.
391
.
.
53
.
.
-
.
.
18
.
.
-
.
.
-
.
.
-
.
.
2
.
.
-
.
.
-
.
.
-
.
.
-
.
.
1
.
.
6 d/
.
.
-
.
.
1 e/
.
.
100
.
.
8
.
.
51
Total
78 a/
71 b/
-
2
1
7
159

a/ Four staff members were arrested more than once.

b/ Seven staff members were arrested more than once.

c/ Two staff members were deported, one of whom had been arrested in the reporting period.

d/ Three staff members were understood to have been detained by forces in Syrian Lebanon and three kidnapped by unknown military.

e/ Understood to have been detained by Syrian forces in Lebanon.



Table 12. Casualties in the occupied territory

(1 July 1989-30 June 1990) a/ b/
Total
Camp/area
Shot
Beaten
Rubber
bullet wounds
Tear-
gas
Others
All
Residents/ status unknown
Registered refugees
I. Gaza Strip
A.Injuries
Jabalia
Beach Camp
Gaza
Sheik Radwan
Beit Hanoun
Bureij
Nuseirat
Deir el-Balah
Maghazi
Khan Younis
Rafah
1 106
557
697
212
186
405
320
150
175
1 072
1 493
1 861
1 159
3 890
743
362
349
242
121
129
1 145
603
-
8
-
-
-
55
19
16
20
18
7
255
316
369
106
50
206
103
63
105
384
220
4
-
11
1
-
9
3
4
4
6
17
3 226
2 040
4 967
1 062
598
1 024
687
354
433
2 625
2 340
99
11
2 769
10
77
3
3
6
1
282
33
3 127
2 029
2 198
1 052
521
1 021
684
348
432
2 343
2 307
Total injuries6 37310 6941432 177 5919 3563 29416 062
B.Fatalities 83 5 1 1 1 91 9 82
Total casualties6 45610 6091442 178 6019 4473 30316 144
II. West Bank
A.Injuries

Area not
specified
Hebron
Jericho
Jerusalem
Nablus
.
.
40
96
1
82
644
.
.
83
88
2
121
1 184
.
.
26
61
-
131
615
.
.
16
110
-
61
306
.
.
4
4
2
15
252
.
.
169
359
5
410
3 001
.
.
145
91
1
183
1 849
.
.
24
268
4
227
1 152
Total injuries 863 1 478833 493277 3 9442 269 1 675
B.Fatalities 138 1 3 5 17 164 134 30
Total casualties1 001 1 479836 498294 4 1082 403 1 705

a/ The figures are those reported to or made known to UNRWA and should not be treated as exhaustive. It should be noted that, particularly for the West Bank, the statement provides an incomplete picture of the number of injuries because injured persons have recourse to facilities other than Agency health centres. Indeed, the figures for injuries, when compared with those of fatalities in the West Bank, indicate that almost certainly the majority of injuries have not been reported.

b/ The figures given for fatalities do not include the killings of 132 alleged collaborators (61 in the Gaza Strip and 71 in the West Bank).



Table 13. Contributions in cash and in kind by Governments
and by the European Community
(United States dollars)
(1 January 1988 - 31 December 1989)
Total
contribution
1988
1989
regular
budget a/
1989
emergencies b/
1989
total
Argentina
Australia
Austria
Bahamas
Bahrain
Barbados
Belgium
Brazil
Brunei Darussalam
Burma
Cameroon
Canada
Chile
China
Colombia
Cuba
Cyprus
Czechoslovakia
Denmark
Egypt
Finland
France
Germany, Federal Republic of
Greece
Holy See
Iceland
India
Indonesia
Iran (Islamic Republic of)
Iraq
Ireland
Israel
Italy
Jamaica
Japan
Jordan
Kuwait
Lebanon
Libyan Arab Jamahiriya
Luxembourg
Malaysia
Maldives
Malta
Mauritius
Mexico
Monaco
Morocco
Netherlands
New Zealand
Norway
Pakistan
Philippines
Portugal
Qatar
Republic of Korea
Saudi Arabia
Seychelles
Spain
Sri Lanka
Sweden
Switzerland
Syrian Arab Republic
Thailand
Togo
Tunisia
Turkey
United Arab Emirates
United Kingdom of Great Britain
and Northern Ireland
United States of America
Venezuela
Yugoslavia
15 000
1 007 182
228 472
-
15 000
1 000
485 302
20 000
10 000
1 000
-
7 791 221
5 000
50 000
-
-
2 242
-
5 942 745
-
2 433 788
1 781 123
6 165 583
106 605
-
9 500
-
8 000
-
3 200 000
104 228
458 770
21 306 502
3 091
13 692 769
532 006
7 600 000
452
2 799 965
10 486
5 000
1 000
1 190
1 313
6 000
2 947
28 358
3 062 747
80 460
9 761 171
20 000
-
-
2 100 000
10 000
1 200 000
800
1 570 164
2 200
14 630 943
7 660 579
63 392
14 215
2 449
29 997
94 868
3 000 000

9 117 501
61 300 000
-
-
-
2 176 514
145 000
1 000
30 000
1 000
455 696
-
10 000
1 000
3 506
9 478 575
5 000
716 886
4 095
166 990
4 507
-
5 470 776
8 853
3 051 601
1 534 269
5 518 367
75 000
34 500
9 500
31 953
8 000
30 000 c/
-
102 888
68 900
10 968 913
3 093
19 495 332
334 637
1 000 000
365
-
20 760
10 000
1 000
1 111
1 148
3 000
3 180
-
2 770 602
70 776
9 214 578
18 215
2 000
40 000
200 000
10 000
1 200 000
-
2 146 601
2 000
14 025 558
5 313 352
69 196
14 038
-
9 419
35 000
-

9 123 692
61 300 000
10 000
-
-
-
344 928
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
19 428
-
1 024
-
214 664
1 447 999
359 966
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
2 027 900
-
6 970 400
-
500 000
-
1 000 000
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1 052 570
-
-
218 560
283 500
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
-
1 533 860
-
-
-
-
-
-
-

-
4 000 000
-
17 800
-
2 176 514
489 928
1 000
30 000
1 000
455 696
-
10 000
1 000
3 506
9 478 575
5 000
716 886
4 095
166 990
4 507
19 428
5 470 776
9 877
3 051 601
1 748 933
6 966 366
434 966
34 500
9 500
31 953
8 000
30 000
-
102 888
68 900
12 996 813
3 093
26 465 732
334 637
1 500 000
365
1 000 000
20 760
10 000
1 000
1 111
1 148
3 000
3 180
1 052 570
2 770 602
70 776
9 433 138
301 715
2 000
40 000
200 000
10 000
1 200 000
-
2 146 601
2 000
15 559 418
5 313 352
69 196
14 038
-
9 419
35 000
-

9 123 692
65 300 000
10 000
17 800
Subtotal189 554 326166 561 94219 992 599186 554 541
European Community 30 617 807 37 326 497 507 215 37 833 712
Grand total220 172 133
===========
203 888 439
===========
20 499 814
==========
224 388 253
===========

a/ Actual receipts for general fund and projects.

b/ Actual receipts for the emergency operations in Lebanon and the occupied territory.

c/ Contributions for 1988.



ANNEX II

Pertinent records of the General Assembly
and other United Nations bodies a/


1. General Assembly resolutions

Resolution No.

194 (III)
212 (III)
302 (IV)
393 (V)
513 (VI)
614 (VIII)
720 (VIII)
818 (IX)
916 (X)
1018 (XI)
1191 (XII)
1315 (XIII)
1456 (XIV)
1604 (XV)
1725 (XVI)
1856 (XVII)
1912 (XVIII)
2002 (XIX)
2052 (XX)
2154 (XXI)
2252 (ES-V)
2341 (XXII)
2452 (XXIII)
2535 (XXIV)
2656 (XXV)
Date of adoption

11 December 1948
19 November 1948
8 December 1949
2 December 1950
26 January 1952
6 November 1952
27 November 1953
4 December 1954
3 December 1955
28 February 1957
12 December 1957
12 December 1958
9 December 1959
21 April 1961
20 December 1961
20 December 1962
3 December 1963
10 February 1965
15 December 1965
17 November 1966
4 July 1967
19 December 1967
19 December 1968
10 December 1969
7 December 1970
Resolution No.

2672 (XXV)
2728 (XXV)
2791 (XXVI)
2792 A to E (XXVI)
2963 A to F (XXVII)
2964 (XXVII)
3089 A to E (XXVIII)
3090 (XXVIII)
3330 (XXIX)
3331 (XXIX)
3410 (XXX)
31/15 A to E
32/90 A to F
33/112 A to F
34/52 A to F
35/13 A to F
36/146 A to H
37/120 A to K
38/83 A to K
39/99 A to K
40/165 A to K
41/69 A to K
42/69 A to K
43/57 A to J
44/47 A to K
Date of adoption

8 December 1970
15 December 1970
6 December 1971
6 December 1971
13 December 1972
13 December 1972
7 December 1973
7 December 1973
17 December 1974
17 December 1974
8 December 1975
24 November l976
13 December 1977
18 December 1978
23 November 1979
3 November 1980
16 December 1981
16 December 1982
15 December 1983
14 December 1984
16 December 1985
19 December 1986
2 December 1987
6 December 1988
8 December 1989


2. General Assembly decision

Decision number Date of adoption

36/462 16 March i982

3. Reports of the Commissioner-General of UNRWA

1988: Official Records of the General Assembly, Forty-third Session, Supplement No. 13 (A/43/13 and Add.1).

1989: Ibid., Forty-fourth Session, Supplement No. 13 (A/44/13 and Add.1).

4. Audited financial statements

1988: Official Records of the General Assembly, Forty-third Session, Supplement No. 5C (A/43/5/Add.3).

1989: Ibid., Forty-fourth Session, Supplement No. SC (A/44/5/Add.3).

5. Reports of the United Nations Conciliation Commission for Palestine

1988: Official Records of the General Assembly, Forty-third Session, Annexes, agenda item 76, document A/43/582.

1989: Ibid., Forty-fourth Session, Annexes, agenda item 76, document A/44/497.

6. Reports of the Working Group on the Financing of UNRWA

1988: Official Records of the General Assembly, Forty-third Session, Annexes, agenda item 76, document A/43/702.

1989: Ibid., Forty-fourth Session, Annexes, agenda item 2,6, document A/44/641.

7. Reports of the Secretary-General

1988: Report of the Secretary-General to the Security Council in accordance with resolution 605 (1987), S/19443, dated 21 January 1988.

Report of the Secretary-General in pursuance of resolution 42/69 D of 2 December 1987 (Official Records of the General Assembly, Forty-third Session, Annexes, agenda item 76, document A/43/652 (Offers by Member States of grants and scholarships for higher education, including vocational training, for the Palestine refugees)).

Report of the Secretary-General in pursuance of resolution 42/69 E and J of 2 December 1987 (Official Records of the General Assembly, Forty-third Session, Annexes, agenda item 76, documents A/43/653 and A/43/657 (Palestine refugees in the Gaza Strip and in the West Bank)).

Report of the Secretary-General in pursuance of resolution 42/69 F of 2 December 1987 (Official Records of the General Assembly, Forty-third Session, Annexes, agenda item 76, documents A/43/654 (Resumption of the ration distribution to Palestine refugees)).

Report of the Secretary-General in pursuance of resolution 42/69 G of 2 December 1987 (Official Records of the General Assembly. Forty-third Session, Annexes, agenda item 76, document A/43/655 (Population and refugees displaced since l967)).

Report of the Secretary-General in pursuance of resolution 42/69 H of 2 December 1987 (Official Records of the General Assembly, Forty-third Session, Annexes, agenda item 76, document A/43/581 (Revenues derived from Palestine refugee properties)).

Report of the Secretary-General in pursuance of resolution 42/69 I of 2 December 1987 (Official Records of the General Assembly, Forty-third Session, Annexes, agenda item 76, document A/43/656 (Protection of Palestine refugees)).

Report of the Secretary-General in pursuance of resolution 42/69 K of 2 December 1987 (Official Records of the General Assembly, Forty-third Session, Annexes, agenda item 76, document A/43/408 (University of Jerusalem "Al-Quds" for Palestine refugees)).

1989: Report of the Secretary-General in pursuance of resolution 43/57 D of 6 December 1988 (Official Records of the General Assembly, Forty-fourth Session, Annexes, agenda item 77, document A/44/505 (Offers by Members States of grants and scholarships for higher education, including vocational training, for the Palestine refugees)).

Report of the Secretary-General in pursuance of resolution 43/57 E of 6 December 1988 (Official Records of the General Assembly, Forty-fourth Session, Annexes, agenda item 76, document A/44/608 (Palestinian refugees in the Palestinian territory occupied by Israel since 1967)).

Report of the Secretary-General in pursuance of resolution 43/57 F of 6 December 1988 (Official Records of the General Assembly, Forty-fourth Session, Annexes, agenda item 77, document A/44/506 (Resumption of the ration distribution to Palestine refugees)).

Report of the Secretary-General in pursuance of resolution 43/57 G of 6 December 1988 (Official Records of the General Assembly, Forty-fourth Session, Annexes, agenda item 76, document A/44/507 and Corr.1 and 2 (Population and refugees displaced since 1967)).

Report of the Secretary-General in pursuance of resolution 43/57 H of 6 December 1988 (Official Records of the General Assembly, Forty-fourth Session, Annexes, agenda item 77, document A/44/431 (Revenues derived from Palestine refugee properties)).

Report of the Secretary-General in pursuance of resolution 43/57 I of 6 December 1988 (Official Records of the General Assembly, Forty-fourth Session, Annexes, agenda item 76, document A/44/508 (Protection of Palestine refugees)).

Report of the Secretary-General in pursuance of resolution 42/69 K of 6 December 1988 (Official Records of the General Session, Annexes, agenda item 77, document A/44/474 (University of Jerusalem "Al-Quds" for Palestine Refugees)).

Notes

a/ A list of pertinent reports and other documents of the General Assembly and other United Nations bodies concerning UNRWA (notably those prior to 1987) can be found in the publication entitled UNRWA at the United Nations 1948-1986, which is available from the UNRWA Public Information Office.


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