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UNITED
NATIONS
S

        Security Council
S/11670 + Corr.1&2
12 April 1975

Distr.
GENERAL

S/11670
12 April 1975

ORIGINAL: ENGLISH

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY-GENERAL ON THE UNITED NATIONS
EMERGENCY FORCE

(for the period 13 October 1974 to 12 April 1975)

CONTENTS

Page
INTRODUCTION2
I. COMPOSITION AND DEPLOYMENT OF THE FORCE2
A. Composition and command2
B. Deployment3
C. Rotation4
II. ACCOMMODATIONS AND LOGISTICS4
A. Accommodations4
B. Logistic support5
III. ACTIVITIES OF THE FORCE5
A. Functions and guidelines5
B. Freedom of movement5
C. Personnel matters5
D. Observance of the cease-fire and implementation of the Disengagement Agreement6
E. Negotiations and agreements 6
IV. HUMANITARIAN ACTIVITIES AND CO-OPERATION WITH THE INTERNATIONAL COMMITTEE OF THE RED CROSS (ICRC) 6
V. FINANCIAL ASPECTS 7
VI. OBSERVATIONS 8.
MAP. UNEF DEPLOYMENT SITUATION AS OF 31 MARCH 1975

75-07427

S/11670 English Page 2
INTRODUCTION

1. This report describes the activities of the United Nations Emergency Force (UNEF) for the period 13 October 1974 to 12 April 1975, including a summary of the information presented to the Security Council in my last progress report (S/11536/Add.1). The purpose of this report is to provide the Security Council with a comprehensive picture of the activities of UNEF in pursuance of the mandate laid down by the Council in its resolutions 340 (1973) and 341 (1973) of 25 and 27 October 1973 and extended by its resolutions 346 (1974) of 8 April and 362 (1974) of 23 October 1974.

2. During the period covered by this report the military situation in the UNEF area of operations has remained stable and UNEF has continued efficiently to carry out its assigned tasks.
I. COMPOSITION AND DEPLOYMENT OF THE FORCE

A. Composition and command

3. As of 12 April 1975, UNEF personnel strength was as follows:

Canada
989
Finland
506
Ghana
501
Indonesia
400
Poland
878
Senegal
402
Sweden
500
4,176

The strength figures for the Canadian and Polish logistic components assigned to the United Nations Disengagement Force (UNDOF) are not included in the above table

4. As agreed with the Government of Panama, the withdrawal of the Panamanian contingent was completed on 25 November 1974. The contingent has not been replaced. This has made necessary an expansion of the sectors of the remaining battalions.

5. The UNEF Office at Suez was closed on 22 October 1974, and its functions concerning inspections were assumed by UNEF headquarters in Ismailia.

6. The civilian component of UNEF headquarters moved from Cairo to Ismailia on 16-17 October 1974.

7. During the past six months, Lieutenant-General Ensio Siilasvuo has continued to be the Commander of UNEF.
B. Deployment

8. During the six-month period under review, the deployment of the Force has remained generally unchanged, except for the enlargement of several battalion sectors mentioned in paragraph 4 above.

9. The deployment of the UNEF battalions (see attached map) as of 31 March, including base camps and sectors within the zone of disengagement, is as follows from north to south in this order:

(a) Swedish battalion: Base camp at El Nagila, east of Rabah. It is manning a forward command post and 15 outposts in the zone of disengagement. Its sector stretches from the Mediterranean Sea to a line north-east of Ismailia.

(b) Indonesian battalion: Base camp at Suez. It is manning a forward command post and 11 outposts in the zone of disengagement. Its sector stretches from the southern limit of the Swedish sector to a line east of the northern tip of Great Bitter Lake.

(c) Ghanaian battalion: Base camp at Fayid-Fanara. It is manning a forward command post and 12 outposts in the zone of disengagement. Its sector stretches from the southern limit of the Indonesian sector to a line east of the southern end of Great Bitter Lake.

(d) Senegalese battalion: Base camp at Suez. It is manning a forward command post and 11 outposts in the zone of disengagement. Its sector stretches from the southern limit of the Ghanaian sector to a line north-east of Suez.

(e) Finnish battalion: Base camp at Suez. It is manning a forward command post and 14 outposts in the zone of disengagement. Its sector stretches from the southern limit of the Senegalese sector to the Gulf of Suez, south-east of Suez city.

(f) Canadian and Polish contingents: The Canadian and Polish logistic elements are located at the Ismailia airfield camp (El Gala Camp). They provide logistics, engineering, transport and communications support for the Force. The Polish field hospital is accommodated in buildings in Ismailia.

(g) UNEF headquarters: The headquarters of the Force is accommodated in buildings in Ismailia. A UNEF office is maintained in Rabah under the command of the Swedish battalion commander. In addition, liaison offices are maintained in Cairo and Jerusalem.
C. Rotation

10. The following personnel rotations took place during the period under review:

(a) Canadian contingent: Personnel are rotated in small groups at regular intervals. During this period, 426 personnel were rotated.

(b) Finnish contingent: Personnel are rotated in small groups at regular intervals. During this period, 361 personnel were rotated.

(c) Ghanaian contingent: The entire contingent was rotated between 5 and 17 February 1975.

(d) Indonesian contingent: The contingent was repatriated and replaced in September 1974.

(e) Polish contingent: The entire contingent was rotated between 15 November and 30 December 1974. The next planned rotation is to take place in the period 15 May to 30 June 1975.

(f) Senegalese contingent: The entire contingent was rotated between 7 and 20 February 1975.

(g) Swedish contingent: The entire contingent was rotated between 13 and 17 December 1974. The next planned rotation is to take place in June 1975.
II. ACCOMMODATIONS AND LOGISTICS

A. Accommodations

11. In my last report (S/11536, para. 17), I mentioned the efforts being made to improve the accommodation in base camps for the whole Force. Good progress has been made, and the efforts continue. Within the buffer zone itself, both the operational and safety conditions continue to be improved.

12. In all areas the general living conditions of the soldiers have been improved with the acquisition of such items as refrigerators, beds and other furniture.
B. Logistic support

13. As I mentioned in my previous report, the location of the Canadian and Polish logistic elements at El Gala Camp in Ismailia greatly contributed to enhancing the effectiveness and efficiency of the logistic support for the Force (S/11536, para. 19). The logistic element continues to improve, and an efficient routine has been established. The principal problem is the slow delivery of some items, particularly spare parts, for vehicles and other machinery.
III. ACTIVITIES OF THE FORCE

A. Functions and guidelines

14. The functions and guidelines of UNEF have not changed since my last report (S/11536, para. 23). Similarly, the specific tasks assigned to the Force (ibid., para. 24) remain unchanged.

15. The Force Commander has continued the practice of separate meetings with military representatives of Egypt and Israel concerning the implementation of the terms of reference of the Force and the inspections carried out by UNEF in the areas of limited forces and armaments. Close contact and liaison have been maintained with the military liaison staffs of Egypt and Israel. These relations have been cordial and productive.
B. Freedom of movement

16. The problem of restrictions on the freedom of movement of personnel of certain contingents still exists despite my efforts and those of the Force Commander. I remain of the opinion that UNEF must function as an “integrated and efficient military unit”, that its contingents must serve on an equal basis under the command of the Force Commander and that no differentiation can be made regarding the United Nations status of various contingents. I will continue to pursue the matter.
C. Personnel matters

Discipline

17. The general discipline, understanding and bearing of all members of UNEF has been exemplary, reflecting credit on the soldiers and their commanders, as well as on the countries contributing contingents.

Casualties

18. Three members of the Canadian contingent were killed in an automobile accident on 24 December 1974.
D. Observance of the cease-fire and implementation
of the Disengagement Agreement

19. In addition to manning fixed posts in the buffer zone, the Force patrols and otherwise controls the zone of disengagement, as well as conducting weekly inspections, with the assistance of UNTSO military observers, of the Egyptian and Israeli limited forces areas (LFA). According to the terms of the Agreement, the findings of the inspections are made available only to the parties. The Force Commander has continued to lend his assistance and good offices in cases where one of the parties raises questions concerning the observance of the agreed limitations on armaments and forces.

20. During the period under review, no significant incidents have been observed. Overflights of the zone of disengagement have been made by both parties, but penetrations into the zone have been limited. Incursions into the buffer zone by personnel on foot and in vehicles have been similarly minor and for the most part were rectified immediately. In some cases, persons and vehicles have been escorted out of the zone. There have been several cases of restrictions of UNEF freedom of movement, as well as shooting in the area of UNEF outposts and patrols. In each case, official protests were lodged. UNEF has continued to make every effort to maintain the integrity of the buffer zone.
E. Negotiations and agreements

21. The Force Commander and his staff have continued their active role, within the context of the UNEF mandate, in meetings and discussions, as well as in the implementation of agreements reached by the parties in matters pertaining to the cease-fire, disengagement of forces and humanitarian questions.
IV. HUMANITARIAN ACTIVITIES AND CO-OPERATION WITH THE INTERNATIONAL
COMMITTEE OF THE RED CROSS (ICRC)

22. UNEF has maintained close contact with ICRC representatives and has extended its assistance in the family reunification and student exchange programme, which continues to function satisfactorily. During the six-month period under review, 5,684 persons passed from Israel to Egypt and 2,167 from Egypt to Israel. In addition, on 4 April 1975, Egyptian authorities handed over 39 dead bodies of Israeli soldiers under UNEF auspices.

23. Although the search operations for the remains of soldiers killed during the hostilities in the Suez Canal area terminated on 1 July 1974, the occasional discovery of bodies in the UNEF area of operations continues. During this period, the remains of 14 soldiers were found and turned over to the parties.
V. FINANCIAL ASPECTS

24. By its resolutions 3101 (XXVIII) of 11 December 1973 and 3211 B (XXIX) of 29 November 1974, the General Assembly appropriated and apportioned a total of $79.8 million for the operation of the United Nations Emergency Force (UNEF) and the United Nations Disengagement Observer Force (UNDOF) for the 12-month period ended 24 October 1974. By its resolution 3211 B (XXIX), the General Assembly also appropriated and apportioned an amount of $40 million for the operation of UNEF and UNDOF from 25 October 1974 to 24 April 1975 and, in addition, authorized the Secretary-General to enter into commitments for UNEF and UNDOF at a rate not to exceed $6,666,667 per month for the period from 25 April to 31 October 1975 should the Security Council decide to continue the Force beyond 24 April 1975.

25. Contributions received as at 31 March 1975 pursuant to General Assembly resolutions 3101 (XXVIII) and 3211 B (XXIX) totalled $60.6 million in respect of the appropriations for the first year of the operation of the Force and $9.9 million in respect of the six-month period from 25 October 1974 to 24 April 1975. Unpaid contributions were respectively $19.7 million and $30.1 million. As at 31 March 1975, only 23 Member States had paid their total assessments for the three periods from 25 October 1973 to 24 April 1975; nine additional Member States had paid their total assessments for the two periods from 25 October 1973 to 24 October 1974; 40 additional Member States had paid their initial assessments for the two periods from 25 October 1973 to 24 October 1974 but had not paid the additional assessment for those periods approved by General Assembly resolution 3211 B (XXIX); and 34 additional Member States had paid only their assessments for the initial six-month period from 25 October 1973 to 24 April 1974. As of the same date, 29 Member States had not yet paid any of the amounts for which they were assessed for the Force. A sum of $7.7 million of the unpaid assessed contributions of $49.3 million represents amounts due from 4 Member States which, in view of their declarations, are assumed to be uncollectable.

26. It has thus far been possible to keep the rate of obligations and expenditures of the Force within the level of the appropriations authorized by the General Assembly. There are, of course, items which have not yet been dealt with, such as the claim in respect of the Canadian aircraft that crashed in Syria while in United Nations service. In these circumstances the Secretary-General believes that, should the Council decide to continue the Force beyond 24 April 1975, costs for the contemplated period of extension will remain within the level of the authorization provided by the General Assembly in its resolution 3211 B (XXIX).

27. Needless to say, the Secretary-General will continue to exert his best efforts to ensure that the Force functions as economically as possible without impairing its efficiency.
VI. OBSERVATIONS

28. During the period under review the situation in the UNEF area of operation has remained quiet. Both sides have continued generally to comply with the Egyptian-Israeli Agreement on Disengagement of Forces of 18 January 1974 and to extend their co-operation to UNEF in the performance of its tasks. There have been no significant incidents.

29. Pending the conclusion of an over-all settlement, the situation in the area as a whole remains fundamentally unstable. Whether it is possible to maintain the present quiet and prevent a new outbreak of hostilities will depend on the prospects of achieving further progress in the search for a just and lasting settlement of the Middle East problem, as called for by the Security Council. The continued presence of UNEF at the present crucial time is, in my opinion, essential not only to maintain quiet in the Egypt-Israel sector, but also to provide an atmosphere conducive to further efforts towards the achievement of a just and lasting peace in the Middle East and to assist in such further efforts, if required.

30. I therefore recommend that the Security Council extend the mandate of UNEF. The Government of Egypt has indicated that it will not, under the circumstances, object to the renewal of the mandate of UNEF for an additional period of three months ending 24 July 1975. The Government of Israel has stated that it favours renewal of the Force's mandate for a period of no less than six months on the grounds that UNEF is an integral part of the Disengagement Agreement of 18 January 1974.

31. The present strength of UNEF is approximately 4,200. This strength is considered adequate for the Force to carry out the tasks that are now entrusted to it. Naturally I shall continue to keep this matter under review and shall report to the Security Council if a change of circumstances or of the responsibilities given to the Force should make it necessary to alter the present strength.

32. In concluding this report, I wish to place on record my deep gratitude to the Governments contributing troops to the United Nations Emergency Force. I wish also to take this opportunity to pay tribute to the Commander of the Force, Lieutenant-General Ensio Siilasvuo, to its officers and men and its civilian staff, as well as to the military observers of UNTSO who co-operate with and assist UNEF in the fulfilment of its tasks. They have performed their difficult and important duties with exemplary devotion, efficiency and courage.
Distr.
GENERAL

S/11670/Corr.1
17 April 1975

ORIGINAL: ENGLISH

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY-GENERAL ON THE UNITED NATIONS
EMERGENCY FORCE

(for the period 13 October 1974 to 12 April 1975)

Corrigendum

Page 6
75-07835


Distr.
GENERAL
S/11670/Corr.2
8 May 1975

ORIGINAL: ENGLISH

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY-GENERAL ON THE UNITED NATIONS EMERGENCY FORCE

(for the period 13 October 1974 to 12 April 1975)

Corrigendum

Page 2
The strength figures for the Canadian and Polish logistic components assigned to the United Nations Disengagement Observer Force (UNDOF) are not included in the above table.

75-09591


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