Question of Palestine home || Permalink || About UNISPAL || Search

English (pdf) ||Arabic||Chinese||Français||Русский||Español||



Follow UNISPAL Twitter RSS

UNITED
NATIONS
A

        General Assembly
Distr.
GENERAL
A/SPC/46/SR.14
4 November 1991

ORIGINAL: ENGLISH

SPECIAL POLITICAL COMMITTEE
14th meeting
held on
Thursday, 31 October 1991
at 10 a.m.
New York

SUMMARY RECORD OF THE 14th MEETING

    Chairman:
Mr. PIBULSONGGRAM
(Thailand)
    later:
Mr. SCHAFER
(Vice-Chairman)
(Germany)
    later:
Mr. PIBULSONGGRAM
(Thailand)

AGENDA ITEM 74: COMPREHENSIVE REVIEW OF THE WHOLE QUESTION OF PEACE-KEEPING OPERATIONS IN ALL THEIR ASPECTS (continued)


The meeting was called to order at 10.15 a.m.

/...

32. Mr. MAKKAWI (Lebanon), ...

/...

35. The Middle East remained the major source of instability and potential or imminent conflagrations. In particular, the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) was still unable to fulfil its mandate under resolution 425 (1978) due to the continued Israeli occupation of southern Lebanon, which despite efforts by the Lebanese Government to restore its legitimate authority in the area, was being fortified, thus dispelling any illusion regarding Israel's claims that its presence was merely temporary. That the occupation, based on a deliberate policy of expansion and annexation of a rich and strategic area, should have been allowed to continue unchallenged by the international community was a sad reflection of the failure to implement the ideals and principles of the United Nations Charter. A further disturbing development was that the Israeli imposed administrative structures, which, under resistance from the local population, carried out civilian functions in the occupied areas, were now being consolidated by the recently established and intimidating General Security Service Lebanon (GSSL).

36. During 1991, however, the Lebanese Government had successfully extended its authority further south by continuing to implement the Taif agreement. Moreover, a substantial number of well-trained army units had been deployed in the south to restore the effective authority of the Government, a deployment which UNIFIL was mandated to assist. Although arrangements were now being devised to transfer responsibility for security in UNIFIL-controlled areas to the Lebanese Army with a view to implementing resolution 425 (1978), it seemed unlikely, in view of its inflexibility, that Israel would voluntarily end its occupation at the present time.

37. UNIFIL, the spirit of sacrifice and courage of whose personnel had won the hearts of the Lebanese people, had clearly been prevented throughout from implementing its mandate. With the establishment of any peace-keeping operation, the cooperation of all concerned parties was essential, as was the full confidence and backing of the Security Council. In the case of UNIFIL, however, such conditions remained unfulfilled, given Israel's overwhelming and indiscriminate use of force to demonstrate its opposition, and given that neither the Security Council nor any influential Member State had carried out its assumed task of ensuring compliance with the decision in question. None the less, his delegation was hopeful that the very positive developments now occurring in Lebanon would shed new perspective on its abilities to control and secure its borders, thus giving the Security Council members cause to consider anew the speedy implementation of resolution 425 (1978).

/...
The meeting rose at 12.45 p.m.

Follow UNISPAL RSS Twitter