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Source: General Assembly
2 October 2006


General Assembly
GA/10510

Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Sixty-first General Assembly
Plenary
24th & 25th Meetings (AM & PM)


GENERAL ASSEMBLY SPEAKERS SEE PROGRESS IN 2005 WORLD SUMMIT AGENDA,

BUT HIGHLIGHT SERIOUS SHORTCOMINGS, FURTHER EFFORTS NEEDED
 
Greater Cooperation Urged Between ‘Politically Powerful’ Nations,
Weaker Countries in South; Note is Taken of Secretary-General’s Annual Report


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Background

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The General Assembly convened today to continue its general debate by taking up the Secretary-General’s report on the work of the Organization (document A/61/1).

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Statements on Secretary-General’s Report

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LIU ZHENMIN ( China) ...

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On peace and security, he said that while there had been solid results in places like Burundi and in the Balkans region, China believed it was necessary to resolve outstanding conflicts and ease simmering tensions through peaceful means.  The Middle East situation was at an impasse and was a source of major concern, with the Palestinian question at the core of the issue.  Overcoming that particular impasse would go a long way towards ensuring some progress on other concerns in the region, including the Israeli-Lebanon issue.  Every effort must be extended to ensure that the parties coexisted in peace.

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HAMIDON ALI ( Malaysia) said that under the Charter, the main purpose of the Organization was the maintenance of international peace and security.  While, by and large, that goal had been achieved, problems in the Middle East remained, particularly regarding the Palestinian question.  The devastation wrought on Gaza, Baghdad and Lebanon had left an indelible impression on Muslims worldwide of the complicity of the West to humiliate them, fanning the feelings of outrage and anger, which often erupted in violence.

“It is imperative to find a comprehensive solution to the Middle East crisis”, he said, stressing that no one party or country could determine how that troubled region was to be reshaped.  The views of all concerned must be addressed, and in that regard, Malaysia believed that the United Nations could play a more pronounced and decisive role by bringing all the concerned parties to the negotiating table.

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For information media • not an official record

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