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Source: Division for Palestinian Rights (DPR)
21 December 2006





DEVELOPMENTS RELATED TO THE MIDDLE EAST
PEACE PROCESS


Issue 17 Ÿ January-December 2002



The Arab Peace Initiative
Beirut, 28 March 2002

Communiqué by the Quartet
Madrid, 10 April 2002

Message by Prime Minister Ariel Sharon to AIPAC Policy Conference
Jerusalem, 23 April 2002

Remarks by the Quartet principals
Washington, 2 May 2002

Address by Palestinian and Israeli women to the UN Security Council
New York, 8 May 2002

Declaration by the Fourth ASEM Foreign Ministers meeting
on the Middle East peace process
Madrid, 6-7 June 2002

Declaration by the EU on the Middle East
Seville, 21-22 June 2002

Statement by US President Bush on the Middle East
Washington, 24 June 2002

Resolution 1294 (2002) on the situation in the Middle East
adopted by the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe
Strasbourg, 27 June 2002

Statement by the Quartet
New York, 16 July 2002

Statement by the Task Force on Palestinian Reform
Paris, 22-23 August 2002

Communiqué by the Quartet principals
New York, 17 September 2002

Statement by the Task Force on Palestinian Reform
Amman, 14-15 November 2002





UNITED NATIONS
New York, December 2007





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The Arab Peace Initiative
Beirut, 28 March 2002


The League of Arab States met in Beirut on 28 March 2002 and adopted the Arab Peace Initiative. Following is a reproduction of resolution 14/221, adopted at the Summit (A/56/1026-S/2002/932).

The Summit-level Council of the League of Arab States,

Reaffirming the decision of the extraordinary Arab summit conference held in Cairo in June 1996 that a just and comprehensive peace is a strategic choice for the Arab States to be achieved in accordance with international legality and to require an equivalent commitment in this regard on the part of Israel,

Having heard the statement in which His Royal Highness Prince Abdullah bin Abdul-Aziz, Crown Prince of the Kingdom of Saudi Arabia, presented his Initiative and called for Israel’s full withdrawal from all the Arab territories that have been occupied since 1967, in implementation of Security Council resolutions 242 (1967) and 338 (1973) as confirmed by the 1991 Madrid Conference and the principle of land for peace, and for its acceptance of the emergence of an independent and sovereign Palestinian State with East Jerusalem as its capital in return for the establishment by the Arab States of normal relations in the context of a comprehensive peace with Israel,

Proceeding from the conviction of the Arab States that a military solution to the conflict will not achieve peace or provide security for any of the parties,

1. Requests Israel to re-examine its policies and to incline towards peace and declare that a just peace is also its own strategic choice;

2. Further calls upon it:

(a) To withdraw fully from the occupied Arab territories, including the Syrian Golan, to the line of 4 June 1967, and from the territories in southern Lebanon that are still occupied;

(b) To arrive at a just and agreed solution to the Palestine refugee problem in accordance with United Nations General Assembly resolution 194 (III);

(c) To accept the establishment of an independent, sovereign Palestinian State in the Palestinian territories occupied since 4 June 1967 in the West Bank and Gaza Strip, with East Jerusalem as its capital;

3. Undertakes that the Arab States shall then:

(a) Consider the Arab-Israeli conflict at an end and enter into a peace agreement between them and Israel while achieving security for all the States of the region;

(b) Establish normal relations with Israel in the context of this comprehensive peace;

4. Guarantees the rejection of all forms of Palestinian resettlement, which is incompatible with the special situation in the Arab host countries;

5. Urges the Government of Israel and all Israelis to accept the foregoing Initiative in order to safeguard the prospects for peace and spare further bloodshed, thus enabling the Arab States and Israel to live side by side in peace and ensuring for generations to come a secure future in which stability and prosperity can prevail;

6. Invites the international community and all its constituent States and organizations to support this Initiative;

7. Requests the Chairman of the summit to form a special committee, to include interested member States and the Secretary-General of the League, to pursue the necessary contacts to gain support for this Initiative at all levels and in particular from the United Nations, the Security Council, the United States of America, the Russian Federation, the Islamic countries and the European Union.


(Summit resolution 14/221, adopted on 28 March 2002)


Communiqué by the Quartet
Madrid, 10 April 2002

The following is the communiqué issued by the Quartet after the meeting in Madrid on 10 April 2002. The meeting was attended by the Foreign Minister of Spain, Josep Pique, United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan, Foreign Minister of the Russian Federation Igor Ivanov, High Representative for the Common Foreign and Security Policy of the European Union Javier Solana and United States Secretary of State Colin L. Powell.

To enable progress towards our shared goals, we reaffirm that UN Security Council resolution 1402 (2002) must be fully implemented immediately, as called for in Security Council resolution 1403 (2002). We call on Israel to halt immediately its military operations. We call for an immediate, meaningful cease-fire and an immediate Israeli withdrawal from Palestinian cities, including Ramallah, specifically including Chairman Arafat's headquarters. We call on Israel to fully comply with international humanitarian principles and to allow full and unimpeded access to humanitarian organizations and services. We call on Israel to refrain from the excessive use of force and undertake all possible efforts to ensure the protection of civilians.

We call on Chairman Arafat, as the recognized, elected leader of the Palestinian people, to undertake immediately the maximum possible effort to stop terror attacks against innocent Israelis. We call on the Palestinian Authority to act decisively and to take all possible steps within its capacity to dismantle terrorist infrastructure, including terrorist financing, and to stop incitement to violence. We call on Chairman Arafat to use the full weight of his political authority to persuade the Palestinian people that any and all terrorist attacks against Israelis should end immediately and to authorize his representatives to resume immediately security coordination with Israel.

Terrorism, including suicide bombs, is illegal and immoral, has inflicted grave harm to the legitimate aspirations of the Palestinian people, and must be condemned as called for in UN Security Council resolution 1373 (2001).

We call on Israel and the Palestinian Authority to reach agreement on cease-fire proposals put forward by General Zinni without further delay. We commend the efforts of General Zinni to date to achieve this objective.

The Quartet stands ready to assist the parties in implementing their agreements, in particular the Tenet security work plan and the Mitchell recommendations, including through a third-party mechanism, as agreed to by the parties.

We affirm that the Tenet and Mitchell plans must be fully implemented, including an end to all settlement activity. We affirm that there must be immediate, parallel and accelerated movement towards near-term and tangible political progress, and that there must be a defined series of steps leading to permanent peace - involving recognition, normalization and security between the sides, an end to Israeli occupation, and an end to the conflict. This will allow Israel to enjoy enduring peace and security and the Palestinian people to realize their hopes and aspirations in security and dignity.

In support of these objectives, we call on the international community, particularly the Arab States, to preserve, strengthen and assist the Palestinian Authority, including through efforts to rebuild its infrastructure, security and governance capacity. We call also on the donor community and the international financial institutions to renew their commitment to provide urgent humanitarian assistance to the Palestinian people, and to assist in economic and institutional reconstruction. We pay tribute to the courageous efforts of the humanitarian agencies and workers.

We agreed on the need to keep the situation in the Middle East under review by the Quartet at the principal's level through regular consultations. Our Special Envoys will continue their efforts on the ground to assist the parties in reaching an end to confrontation and resumption of political negotiations."


Message by Prime Minister Ariel Sharon to the AIPAC Policy Conference
23 April 2002

On 23 April 2002, Israel’s Prime Minister Ariel Sharon delivered, at a video conference, a message to the American Israel Public Affairs Committee Policy Conference. Following are excerpts of his message:

/...

I am optimistic about the future. Operation Defensive Shield has opened a window of opportunity to put the peace process back on a different, more realistic track.

Free from the threat of terrorism, we can reach the threshold of a new horizon – one where regional peace is within our grasp. I have proposed a regional peace conference to achieve this goal.

A regional peace conference, sponsored by the United States, can create the framework and modalities to bring about a cessation of hostilities. It can foster a coalition of countries committed to peace and able to contain the forces of terrorism and evil threatening our lives.

A regional peace conference will enable Israel to present its peace plan. This plan contains three phases: a complete cessation of violence, hostilities, and especially incitement which leads to violent terrorist acts; a long-term intermediate agreement, similar to an armistice; and, finally, a permanent agreement, in which Israel's final borders and the Palestinians’ final borders will be established, ending the conflict between us and the Palestinians, and the Arab countries. This must be based on Israel's right to exist in secure borders and provide for normalized relations with all countries in the region.

Source: Israel Ministry of Foreign Affairs: http://www.mfa.gov.il



Remarks by the Quartet principals
Washington, 2 May 2002

After meeting in Washington, D.C., on 2 May 2002, US Secretary of State Colin Powell made the following remarks with United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan, Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov of the Russian Federation, Foreign Minister Josep Pique of Spain, holder of the European Union Presidency, and Javier Solana, High Representative for the Common Foreign and Security Policy of the EU:

Good afternoon, ladies and gentlemen. I am pleased to welcome to the State Department today Secretary General Annan, Foreign Minister Ivanov, Foreign Minister Pique, and High Representative Solana of the European Union to the Department to continue the discussion that we began in Madrid on April 10th on ways to end the violence and move towards peace in the Middle East.

I expressed my appreciation to my colleagues for the declaration that we produced in Madrid on the 10th of April, and I expressed to them how important it was for me to have this unified body of opinion and thought behind me as I went through the Middle East and continued my work on behalf of President Bush and all of my colleagues represented here to try to move the process forward in the Middle East.

We also determined that it was important for us to remain together, to continue the dialogue, because this is quite a grouping up here; and I think it is a grouping that, working with the parties in the region, can produce success if we stick with it, if we show persistence and determination.

The United States, the United Nations, the European Union and the Russian Federation are committed to helping bring about a just, comprehensive and lasting peace in the Middle East. We are working for realization of the vision expressed by President Bush on April 4th of a Middle East where two states, Israel and Palestine, live side by side in peace and security with an internationally recognized border.

Terrorism and use of force only move the parties further from that goal. The only way forward is through negotiations guided by United Nations resolutions 242 (1967), 338 (1973) and 1397 (2002). Saudi Crown Prince Abdullah's important initiative, recently endorsed by the Arab League, should also play a very, very important and helpful role as we move forward.

We are encouraged by the peaceful resolution of the standoff in Ramallah, and we are especially pleased that international diplomacy could play a constructive role in defusing a situation that many predicted could only end in violence. We are pleased that Chairman Arafat now has the opportunity to show leadership. No longer contained in the muqataa, I trust that the Chairman will now move in a new direction, a new direction that will allow his leadership position to be used to denounce terrorism, denounce violence, and to say to the Palestinian people and to the organizations within the Palestinian movement that this is the time to find a peaceful way forward. And I have encouraged the Chairman to speak and act in this way in the meetings that I had with him, and I hope that now he will speak and act in that way as we move forward.

We are also hopeful that we will see a non-violent end to the current standoff at the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem. This is a holy place, and all of us will be in touch with the parties to encourage them to find an immediate solution to this problem so that the world does not continue to see this terrible picture on its television screens every evening.

We, the Quartet, as we have named ourselves, are committed to working with the Israelis and the Palestinians, with Arab Governments and with the international community to restore the hope of all the people in the region for a peaceful, secure and prosperous future. Our strategy, embracing the principles and goals set forth by President Bush, by Crown Prince Abdullah and by the UN resolutions that I made reference to earlier, consists of three elements. First, a restoration of security, security from terror and violence for Israelis and Palestinians. We will be encouraging Chairman Arafat to rebuild his security apparatus. We will ask for maximum efforts from the Palestinian Authority to restore calm.

To assist in this, the Quartet agrees on the need for making an assessment of Palestinian capabilities, setting clear security performance standards, and working to establish effective and responsible Palestinian security institutions, and to find ways for those institutions to work closely with Israeli institutions as we move forward to restore confidence between the two sides.

Our Director of Central Intelligence, George Tenet, has played an important role in the past in this kind of work, and I expect he will play an important role in the future. And General Tony Zinni, who has become very familiar with the security situation in the region in recent months, is also available to return to the region in the near future.

The second part of our strategy is to address the urgent humanitarian needs and make sure to get about the task of rebuilding strong, accountable, democratic, and market-oriented institutions for Palestinians as the basis for a vibrant Palestinian State. And I am encouraged by what I have heard from my colleagues here today about their willingness to join in this effort of economic reconstruction and humanitarian relief. The people in the region are in great need. The Palestinian people need access to jobs, need access to markets, need food, need medical supplies, need all kinds of things to relieve their suffering, and we are united in our determination to bring that about.

At the moment, we are particularly concerned about the humanitarian situation in Jenin, and we continue to work with all concerned on an urgent basis to meet the pressing needs in that city, as well as throughout the West Bank and Gaza. We welcome the commitment of the international community at Oslo last week on April 25th to provide over $1 billion in assistance. The United States has over $300 million dedicated to aid the Palestinian people.

In this regard, the Quartet underscores the need for immediate action by Israel to lift closures and facilitate the access that I touched on earlier, as well as maximum efforts by the Palestinian Authority to ensure that the situation on the ground remains calm and no new vulnerabilities are opened up by opening up access. It was agreed that the Quartet will follow up at the working level to address the rebuilding of Palestinian institutions.

And third, we committed to ourselves to the promotion of serious and accelerated negotiations toward a settlement. We discussed how best to begin to prepare for an international conference meeting this summer. The United States, with our partners in the Quartet, will spend the weeks ahead to begin to not only talk amongst ourselves, but with the parties and with other interested members of the international community, to come up with a set of principles that can be the basis for a meeting in the early summer. Details with respect to where and when and who the conveners would be remain to be determined. But this is a time for prompt action to take advantage of this new window of opportunity that has been presented to us, and we intend to do just that.

President Bush has said that conflict in the Middle East is not inevitable; neither is peace. The United States will do its part, and I'm pleased that our fellow members in the Quartet have made that same commitment. The Israelis, the Palestinians, our Arab friends, and the international community must also rise to the challenges ahead.

Speaking of our Arab friends in the region, I must say that we are very pleased with the new attitude shown by the Arab League, by their adoption of the Crown Prince's initiative, but more importantly by their willingness to play a more, I should say, effective role and a more aggressive role in representing the interests not only of the Arab world but the interests of the Palestinian people, and we look forward to working with them.


Address by Palestinian and Israeli women to the UN Security Council
New York, 8 May 2002

Palestinian and Israeli women on 8 May 2002 addressed the UN Security Council, calling for an international peacekeeping force and the inclusion of women in peace negotiations. The following press release contains the details of the address:

NEW YORK, May 8 – Yesterday, the United Nations Security Council held an Arria Formula meeting requested by Equality Now, an international women's rights organization, with Palestinian Maha Abu-Dayyeh Shamas and Israeli Terry Greenblatt. The two women, accompanied by Gloria Steinem and other supporters, jointly addressed the Security Council urging the immediate deployment of an international peacekeeping force to the region and calling for a greater role for women, and for civil society, in the peace process. Chairing the closed session, the Norwegian Ambassador to the United Nations, H.E. Mr. Ole Peter Kolby, welcomed the initiative, noting that in their extensive recent discussions on the Middle East, this was the first opportunity the Security Council had had to hear the views of women from the region.

Equality Now requested this meeting of the Security Council in an effort to bring meaning to Security Council resolution 1325 (2000) on women and peace and security, adopted in October 2000. Resolution 1325 (2000) affirms the importance of equal participation and the full involvement of women in all efforts in the maintenance of peace. Yesterday, both Ms. Abu-Dayyeh Shamas and Ms. Greenblatt called for equal (50%) representation of women on all sides in the planned upcoming peace negotiations organized by the so-called Quartet (the United Nations, the European Union, the United States and Russia). The women also urged the Security Council to take the next step and rise to the challenge of creating a means through which women can contribute formally and integrally to Middle East conflict resolution efforts, for example by creating a women's commission of peace activists from both countries and third parties.

"You need us," said Ms. Greenblatt, speaking on the role of women, "because we have developed a process that keeps authentic and productive dialogue moving forward, even as the violence escalates and both sides continue to terrorize one another. We have developed the courage to cross the lines of difference drawn between us." Ms. Abu-Dayyeh Shamas urged the Security Council not to give up on the region despite all the setbacks experienced lately. "Peace is made between peoples and not between leaders," she said. "The participation of women in any future peace process is essential. If we leave it only to men we get Israeli generals and Palestinians who will not be defeated and there is no room to negotiate." Following the meeting, upon learning of the latest suicide bombing that day in Israel, the two women underlined the urgency of their plea, noting that incidents of violence accelerate the need for dialogue and must not be allowed to stop efforts for peace from moving forward.



Declaration by the Fourth ASEM Foreign Ministers meeting on the Middle East peace process
Madrid, 6-7 June 2002

The Fourth Asia-Europe Foreign Ministers eeting (ASEM) was held in Madrid on 6 and 7 June 2002. The following declaration on the Middle East peace process was issued at the meeting:

ASEM Foreign Ministers, concerned about the danger of continuing violence in the Middle East, reaffirm the need for a peaceful and comprehensive political solution of the conflict. To this end, they take note of the efforts of the Quartet and others, and support the idea of convening soon an international conference with agreed goals and time frame, which will allow the parties concerned to move forward simultaneously with political, economic and security issues, on the basis of international law, UN Security Council resolutions 242 (1967), 338 (197), 1322 (2000) and 1397 (2002), and the Madrid Formula "Land for Peace". In this context, Ministers stress the important role of the United Nations and, in particular, the United Nations Security Council in the political solution of the issue and warmly welcome the Saudi Arabian Initiative and the historic Declaration of the Arab Summit in March 2002.

Ministers urge the parties to take all the relevant measures within their reach to overcome the present crisis and, in particular, the full implementation of UN Security Council resolutions 1402 (2002) and 1403 (2002), including the establishment of a meaningful ceasefire and the permanent withdrawal of Israeli forces from Palestinian areas and a more determined action by all parties concerned for immediate cessation of all acts of violence including acts of terror, provocation, incitement and destruction. Ministers are also fully supportive of any feasible idea of allowing a third party mechanism, to provide security for both Palestinians and Israelis.
Ministers welcome the Palestinian Authority’s intention to undertake in-depth reforms and to hold elections as soon as possible. All parties should ensure that these elections take place under conditions that allow a free and fair casting of votes.

Ministers call on the international community to preserve, strengthen and assist the Palestinian Authority, including through efforts to rebuild its infrastructure, security and governance capacity. They call also on the donor community and the international financial institutions to renew their commitment to provide urgent humanitarian assistance to the Palestinian people, and to assist in economic and institutional reconstruction.


Declaration by the EU on the Middle East
Seville, 21-22 June 2002

The European Council met in Seville on 21 and 22 June 2002 at which time it issued the following Declaration:

The crisis in the Middle East has reached a dramatic turning point. Further escalation will render the situation uncontrollable. The parties on their own cannot find a solution. There is an urgent need for political action by the whole international community. The Quartet has a key role to play in starting a peace process.

The European Council supports the early convening of an international conference. That conference should address political and economic aspects as well as matters relating to security. It should confirm the parameters of the political solution and establish a realistic and well-defined timescale.

The European Council strongly condemns all terrorist attacks against Israeli civilians. The peace process and the stability of the region cannot be hostage to terrorism. The fight against terrorism must go on; but so at the same time must the negotiation of a political solution.

A settlement can be achieved through negotiation, and only through negotiation. The objective is an end to the occupation and the early establishment of a democratic, viable, peaceful and sovereign State of Palestine, on the basis of the 1967 borders, if necessary with minor adjustments agreed by the parties. The end result should be two States living side by side within secure and recognised borders enjoying normal relations with their neighbours. In this context, a fair solution should be found to the complex issue of Jerusalem, and a just, viable and agreed solution to the problem of the Palestinian refugees.

The reform of the Palestinian Authority is essential. The European Council expects the PA to make good its commitment to security reform, early elections and political and administrative reform. The European Union reaffirms its willingness to continue to assist in these reforms.

Military operations in the Occupied Territories must cease. Restrictions on freedom of movement must be lifted. Walls will not bring peace.

The European Union stands ready to contribute fully to peace-building, as well as to the reconstruction of the Palestinian economy as an integral part of regional development.

The European Union will work with the parties and with its partners in the international community, especially with the United States in the framework of the Quartet, to pursue every opportunity for peace and for a decent future for all the people of the region.



Statement by US President Bush on the Middle East
Washington, 24 June 2002

US President George W. Bush on 24 June 2002 delivered the following speech:

For too long, the citizens of the Middle East have lived in the midst of death and fear. The hatred of a few holds the hopes of many hostages. The forces of extremism and terror are attempting to kill progress and peace by killing the innocent. And this casts a dark shadow over an entire region. For the sake of all humanity, things must change in the Middle East.

It is untenable for Israeli citizens to live in terror. It is untenable for Palestinians to live in squalor and occupation. And the current situation offers no prospect that life will improve. Israeli citizens will continue to be victimized by terrorists, and so Israel will continue to defend herself.

In the situation the Palestinian people will grow more and more miserable. My vision is two states, living side by side in peace and security. There is simply no way to achieve that peace until all parties fight terror. Yet, at this critical moment, if all parties will break with the past and set out on a new path, we can overcome the darkness with the light of hope. Peace requires a new and different Palestinian leadership, so that a Palestinian State can be born.

I call on the Palestinian people to elect new leaders, leaders not compromised by terror. I call upon them to build a practicing democracy, based on tolerance and liberty. If the Palestinian people actively pursue these goals, America and the world will actively support their efforts. If the Palestinian people meet these goals, they will be able to reach agreement with Israel and Egypt and Jordan on security and other arrangements for independence.

And when the Palestinian people have new leaders, new institutions and new security arrangements with their neighbours, the United States of America will support the creation of a Palestinian State whose borders and certain aspects of its sovereignty will be provisional until resolved as part of a final settlement in the Middle East.

In the work ahead, we all have responsibilities. The Palestinian people are gifted and capable, and I am confident they can achieve a new birth for their nation. A Palestinian State will never be created by terror – it will be built through reform. And reform must be more than cosmetic change, or veiled attempt to preserve the status quo. True reform will require entirely new political and economic institutions, based on democracy, market economics and action against terrorism.

Today, the elected Palestinian legislature has no authority, and power is concentrated in the hands of an unaccountable few. A Palestinian State can only serve its citizens with a new constitution which separates the powers of government. The Palestinian parliament should have the full authority of a legislative body. Local officials and government ministers need authority of their own and the independence to govern effectively.

The United States, along with the European Union and Arab states, will work with Palestinian leaders to create a new constitutional framework, and a working democracy for the Palestinian people. And the United States, along with others in the international community will help the Palestinians organize and monitor fair, multi-party local elections by the end of the year, with national elections to follow.

Today, the Palestinian people live in economic stagnation, made worse by official corruption. A Palestinian State will require a vibrant economy, where honest enterprise is encouraged by honest government. The United States, the international donor community and the World Bank stand ready to work with Palestinians on a major project of economic reform and development. The United States, the EU, the World Bank, the International Monetary Fund are willing to oversee reforms in Palestinian finances, encouraging transparency and independent auditing.
And the United States, along with our partners in the developed world, will increase our humanitarian assistance to relieve Palestinian suffering. Today, the Palestinian people lack effective courts of law and have no means to defend and vindicate their rights. A Palestinian State will require a system of reliable justice to punish those who prey on the innocent. The United States and members of the international community stand ready to work with Palestinian leaders to establish finance – establish finance and monitor a truly independent judiciary.

Today, Palestinian authorities are encouraging, not opposing, terrorism. This is unacceptable. And the United States will not support the establishment of a Palestinian State until its leaders engage in a sustained fight against the terrorists and dismantle their infrastructure. This will require an externally supervised effort to rebuild and reform the Palestinian security services. The security system must have clear lines of authority and accountability and a unified chain of command.

America is pursuing this reform along with key regional states. The world is prepared to help, yet ultimately these steps toward statehood depend on the Palestinian people and their leaders. If they energetically take the path of reform, the rewards can come quickly. If Palestinians embrace democracy, confront corruption and firmly reject terror, they can count on American support for the creation of a provisional state of Palestine.

With a dedicated effort, this state could rise rapidly, as it comes to terms with Israel, Egypt and Jordan on practical issues, such as security. The final borders, the capital and other aspects of this state's sovereignty will be negotiated between the parties, as part of a final settlement. Arab states have offered their help in this process, and their help is needed.

I've said in the past that nations are either with us or against us in the war on terror. To be counted on the side of peace, nations must act. Every leader actually committed to peace will end incitement to violence in official media, and publicly denounce homicide bombings. Every nation actually committed to peace will stop the flow of money, equipment and recruits to terrorist groups seeking the destruction of Israel – including Hamas, Islamic Jihad, and Hezbollah. Every nation actually committed to peace must block the shipment of Iranian supplies to these groups, and oppose regimes that promote terror, like Iraq. And Syria must choose the right side in the war on terror by closing terrorist camps and expelling terrorist organizations.

Leaders who want to be included in the peace process must show by their deeds an undivided support for peace. And as we move toward a peaceful solution, Arab states will be expected to build closer ties of diplomacy and commerce with Israel, leading to full normalization of relations between Israel and the entire Arab world.

Israel also has a large stake in the success of a democratic Palestine. Permanent occupation threatens Israel's identity and democracy. A stable, peaceful Palestinian State is necessary to achieve the security that Israel longs for. So I challenge Israel to take concrete steps to support the emergence of a viable, credible Palestinian State.

As we make progress towards security, Israel forces need to withdraw fully to positions they held prior to September 28, 2000. And consistent with the recommendations of the Mitchell Committee, Israeli settlement activity in the occupied territories must stop.

The Palestinian economy must be allowed to develop. As violence subsides, freedom of movement should be restored, permitting innocent Palestinians to resume work and normal life. Palestinian legislators and officials, humanitarian and international workers, must be allowed to go about the business of building a better future. And Israel should release frozen Palestinian revenues into honest, accountable hands.

I've asked Secretary Powell to work intensively with Middle Eastern and international leaders to realize the vision of a Palestinian State, focusing them on a comprehensive plan to support Palestinian reform and institution-building.

Ultimately, Israelis and Palestinians must address the core issues that divide them if there is to be a real peace, resolving all claims and ending the conflict between them. This means that the Israeli occupation that began in 1967 will be ended through a settlement negotiated between the parties, based on UN resolutions 242 (1967) and 338 (1973), with Israeli withdrawal to secure and recognize borders.

We must also resolve questions concerning Jerusalem, the plight and future of Palestinian refugees, and a final peace between Israel and Lebanon, and Israel and a Syria that supports peace and fights terror.

All who are familiar with the history of the Middle East realize that there may be setbacks in this process. Trained and determined killers, as we have seen, want to stop it. Yet the Egyptian and Jordanian peace treaties with Israel remind us that with determined and responsible leadership progress can come quickly.

As new Palestinian institutions and new leaders emerge, demonstrating real performance on security and reform, I expect Israel to respond and work toward a final status agreement. With intensive effort by all, this agreement could be reached within three years from now. And I and my country will actively lead toward that goal.

I can understand the deep anger and anguish of the Israeli people. You've lived too long with fear and funerals, having to avoid markets and public transportation, and forced to put armed guards in kindergarten classrooms. The Palestinian Authority has rejected your offer at hand, and trafficked with terrorists. You have a right to a normal life; you have a right to security; and I deeply believe that you need a reformed, responsible Palestinian partner to achieve that security.

I can understand the deep anger and despair of the Palestinian people. For decades you've been treated as pawns in the Middle East conflict. Your interests have been held hostage to a comprehensive peace agreement that never seems to come, as your lives get worse year by year. You deserve democracy and the rule of law. You deserve an open society and a thriving economy. You deserve a life of hope for your children. An end to occupation and a peaceful democratic Palestinian State may seem distant, but America and our partners throughout the world stand ready to help, help you make them possible as soon as possible.

If liberty can blossom in the rocky soil of the West Bank and Gaza, it will inspire millions of men and women around the globe who are equally weary of poverty and oppression, equally entitled to the benefits of democratic government.

I have a hope for the people of Muslim countries. Your commitments to morality, and learning, and tolerance led to great historical achievements. And those values are alive in the Islamic world today. You have a rich culture, and you share the aspirations of men and women in every culture. Prosperity and freedom and dignity are not just American hopes, or Western hopes. They are universal, human hopes. And even in the violence and turmoil of the Middle East, America believes those hopes have the power to transform lives and nations.

This moment is both an opportunity and a test for all parties in the Middle East: an opportunity to lay the foundations for future peace; a test to show who is serious about peace and who is not. The choice here is stark and simple. The Bible says, "I have set before you life and death; therefore, choose life." The time has arrived for everyone in this conflict to choose peace, and hope, and life.

Source: http://www.whitehouse.gov/news/releases/2002/06/20020624-3.html


Resolution 1294 (2002) on the situation in the Middle East,
adopted by the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe
Strasbourg, 27 June 2002

On 27 June 2002, the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe (PACE) adopted resolution 1294 (2002) on the situation in the Middle East. The text of the resolution is reproduced below.

Resolution 1294 (2002)
Situation in the Middle East

1. The Parliamentary Assembly is extremely concerned at the new aggravation in the conflict between Israelis and Palestinians. It urges the two parties to stop immediately all violence and hostilities, and resume the peace process.

2. It refers to its previously adopted relevant texts, in particular resolution 1013 (1993), recommendation 1221 (1993), resolution 1103 (1996), resolution 1156 (1998), resolution 1183 (1999), resolution 1245 (2001), and resolution 1281 (2002), and confirms its conviction that there is no military solution to the Middle East problem. A comprehensive settlement of the Arab-Israeli conflict can only be achieved through negotiations on the basis of United Nations Security Council resolution 1397 (2002) calling for a region where two states, Israel and Palestine, live side by side within secure and recognised borders.

3. The Assembly welcomes the proposal to organise an international conference under the aegis of the Quartet – namely the United Nations, the United States, the Russian Federation and the European Union – to resume the peace process with the participation of all the parties involved in the Arab-Israeli conflict, including Israel, the Palestinian Authority, Syria and Lebanon. The Assembly believes, however, that a more clear and unbiased American position on the Middle East would certainly improve the prospects for this international effort.

4. The human rights of both Israelis and Palestinians, including the very right to live, are being systematically violated. The living conditions on both sides, those of Israelis living in constant fear of bomb attacks, and those of Palestinian civilians deprived of basic freedoms and suffering frequent casualties as a result of Israeli military activity, are equally unbearable.

5. The Assembly is deeply troubled by the worsening of the economic situation both in Israel and in the Palestinian Territories due to the ongoing conflict.

6. It stresses the need for serious reforms of the Palestinian Authority in order to guarantee a democratic, viable and peaceful Palestinian State that respects human rights. It is prepared to deploy active political efforts to help implement such reforms in the legislative, legal and administrative fields.

7. The Assembly strongly condemns the terrorist activities of armed Palestinian groups, which are among the major obstacles to resuming the peace process. The Palestinian Authority must take the most resolute steps to curtail the extremist activities of these groups, and the smuggling of weapons and war materials.

8. The Assembly denounces the ongoing process of land seizure by Israel of the occupied Palestinian territories, and reminds Israel that it is absolutely illegal under international law, including the United Nations resolutions which lie at the foundation of the very existence of the State of Israel. The establishment of new settlements and the expansion of existing ones are not consistent with the aim of building the mutual confidence necessary for a lasting solution to the conflict, and must therefore be stopped.

9. The Assembly notes with concern the humanitarian situation of Palestinian refugees, in particular those living in refugee camps, which is unacceptable both for humanitarian reasons and also because it constitutes a major source of insecurity and tension in the region. A durable solution must be found and both sides should show more flexibility in their approach. The establishment of the Palestine refugee and displaced persons final status fund under the aegis of the United Nations, with a view to financing the forthcoming cost of resettlement and compensation, would largely contribute to this purpose.

10. The Assembly regrets the Israeli Government’s refusal to comply with United Nations Security Council resolution 1405 (2002), which required that the international commission set up by the United Nations Secretary General be allowed access to the Jenin refugee camp.

11. The Assembly is deeply worried by the decision of the Israeli Government to retake control of the Palestinian towns, and impose severe restrictions on the movement of people and goods.

12. It notes, regrettable as it is, the Israeli Government’s decision to start building a fence installation on the West Bank.

13. The Assembly strongly condemns the turning of the Holy Sites into battlefields by both sides, and in particular the destruction by the Israeli forces of four mosques in Nablus and of the Saint Barbara Greek Orthodox Church near Ramallah, as well as the unsanctioned incursions by Israeli troops into the territory of the Russian Orthodox Church House, which was used as a stronghold to shoot at the Church of the Nativity in Bethlehem. The Assembly strongly condemns the destruction of Jewish holy sites, including Joseph’s tomb in Nablus. It stresses the imperative of respecting the inviolability of and free access to the Holy Sites, as requested by United Nations General Assembly resolution 181 (II).

14. The Assembly calls on the Government of Israel:

15. The Assembly calls on the Palestinian Authority, and in particular President Arafat:

16. The Assembly calls on the European Union to establish a more effective control on the use of the financial means given to the Palestinian Authority, including the control of the budgets for education and the media to ensure that neither are utilized to incite hatred and violence.

17. The Assembly reiterates its readiness to contribute to re-establishing contacts and rebuilding a climate of confidence between the parties involved, in particular in fields where its expertise and experience are recognized, namely the promotion of democratic institutions, the protection of human rights, the recognition of the rights of minorities, and reforms in the field of education. To this effect, it offers parliamentarians from the Knesset and the Palestinian Legislative Council a forum for a structured dialogue based on an agenda to which both sides would be invited to propose items for discussion, including confidence-building measures.

18. The Assembly considers that the balance of its relations with the Israelis and Palestinians should be redressed and in this connection declares its readiness to examine the possibility of granting Observer status to the Palestinian Legislative Council once the above-mentioned reforms have been carried out and once they meet all the requirements for Observer status with the Parliamentary Assembly of the Council of Europe, including the denial of any kind of terror.

Text adopted by the Assemblyon 27 June 2002 (23rd Sitting).


Statement by the Quartet
New York, 16 July 2002

After meeting on 16 July 2002 at the Waldorf Astoria Hotel in New York City, the Quartet issued the following
statement:

United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan, Russian Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov, US Secretary of State Colin Powell, Danish Foreign Minister Per Stig Møller, High Representative for the Common Foreign and Security Policy of the European Union Javier Solana and European Commissioner for External Affairs Chris Patten met in New York today. The Quartet members reviewed the situation in the Middle East and agreed to continue close consultations, as expressed in the Madrid Declaration, to which the Quartet remains fully committed, to promote a just, comprehensive, and lasting settlement of the Middle East conflict. The Quartet expresses its support for the convening of a further international Ministerial meeting at an appropriate time.

The Quartet deeply deplores today’s tragic killing of Israeli civilians and reiterates its strong and unequivocal condemnation of terrorism, including suicide bombing, which is morally repugnant and has caused great harm to the legitimate aspirations of the Palestinian people for a better future. Terrorists must not be allowed to kill the hope of an entire region, and a united international community, for genuine peace and security for both Palestinians and Israelis. The Quartet expresses once again its profound regret at the loss of innocent Israeli and Palestinian lives, and extends its sympathy to all those who have suffered loss. The Quartet members expressed their increasing concern about the mounting humanitarian crisis in Palestinian areas and their determination to address urgent Palestinian needs.

Consistent with President Bush’s June 24 statement, the UN, EU and Russia express their strong support for the goal of achieving a final Israeli-Palestinian settlement which, with intensive effort on security and reform by all, could be reached within three years from now. The UN, EU and Russia welcome President Bush’s commitment to active US leadership toward that goal. The Quartet remains committed to implementing the vision of two states, Israel and an independent, viable and democratic Palestine, living side by side in peace and security, as affirmed by UN Security Council resolution 1397 (2002). The Quartet members, in their individual capacity and jointly, pledge all possible efforts to realize the goals of reform, security and peace and reaffirm that progress in the political, security, economic, humanitarian, and institution-building fields must proceed together, hand-in-hand. The Quartet reiterates its welcome of the initiative of Saudi Arabia, endorsed by the Arab League Beirut Summit, as a significant contribution towards a comprehensive peace.

To assist progress toward these shared goals, the Quartet agreed on the importance of a coordinated international campaign to support Palestinian efforts at political and economic reform. The Quartet welcomes and encourages the strong Palestinian interest in fundamental reform, including the Palestinian 100-Day Reform Program. It also welcomes the willingness of regional states and the international community to assist the Palestinians to build institutions of good government, and to create a new governing framework of working democracy, in preparation for statehood. For these objectives to be realized, it is essential that well-prepared, free, open and democratic elections take place. The new international Task Force on Reform, which is comprised of representatives of the US, EU, UN Secretary-General, Russia, Japan, Norway, the World Bank and the International Monetary Fund, and which works under the auspices of the Quartet, will strive to develop and implement a comprehensive action plan for reform. The inaugural meeting of this Task Force in London, on 10 July 10, discussed a detailed plan including specific Palestinian commitments. It will meet again in August to review actions in areas including civil society, financial accountability, local government, the market economy, elections, and judicial and administrative reform.

Implementation of an action plan, with appropriate benchmarks for progress on reform measures, should lead to the establishment of a democratic Palestinian State characterized by the rule of law, separation of powers, and a vibrant free market economy that can best serve the interests of its people. The Quartet also commits itself to continuing to assist the parties in efforts to renew dialogue, and welcomes in this regard the recent high-level ministerial meetings between Israelis and Palestinians on the issues of security, economics and reform.
The Quartet agreed on the critical need to build new and efficient Palestinian security capabilities on sound bases of unified command, and transparency and accountability with regard to resources and conduct. Restructuring security institutions to serve these goals should lead to improvement in Palestinian security performance, which is essential to progress on other aspects of institutional transformation and realization of a Palestinian State committed to combating terror.

In this context, the Quartet notes Israel’s vital stake in the success of Palestinian reform. The Quartet calls upon Israel to take concrete steps to support the emergence of a viable Palestinian State. Recognizing Israel’s legitimate security concerns, these steps include immediate measures to ease the internal closures in certain areas and, as security improve, through reciprocal steps, withdrawal of Israeli forces to their pre-September 28, 2000 positions. Moreover, frozen tax revenues should be released. In this connection, a more transparent and accountable mechanism is being put into place. In addition, consistent with the Mitchell Committee’s recommendations, Israel should stop all new settlement activity. Israel must also ensure full, safe and unfettered access for international and humanitarian personnel.

The Quartet reaffirms that there must be a negotiated permanent settlement based on UN Security Council resolutions 242 (1967) and 338 (1973). There can be no military solution to the conflict; Israelis and Palestinians must address the core issues that divide them, through sustained negotiations, if there is to be real and lasting peace and security. The Israeli occupation that began in 1967 must end, and Israel must have secure and recognized borders. The Quartet further reaffirms its commitment to the goal of a comprehensive regional peace between Israel and Lebanon, and Israel and Syria, based upon resolutions 242 (1967) and 338 (1973), the Madrid terms of reference, and the principle of land for peace.

The Quartet looks forward to upcoming consultations with the Foreign Ministers of Jordan, Egypt, Saudi Arabia, and other regional partners, and determines to continue regular consultation on the situation in the Middle East at the principals’ level. The Quartet envoys will continue their work on the ground to support the work of the principals, to assist the Task Force on Reform, and to aid the parties in resuming a political dialogue in order to reach a solution to the core political questions.



Statement by the Task Force on Palestinian Reform
Paris, 22-23 August 2002

After meeting in Paris on 22 and 23 August 2002, the following statement was issued by the Task Force on Palestinian Reform:

The Task Force on Palestinian Reform, composed of representatives of the Quartet (US, EU, Russia, and the UN Secretary-General), Norway, Japan, the World Bank, and the International Monetary Fund, met in Paris on 22 and 23 August. This was the second meeting of the Task Force, which met for the first time in London on 10 July.

The role of the Task Force is to monitor and support implementation of Palestinian civil reforms, and guide the international donor community in its support for the Palestinians' reform agenda. Following the 10 July meeting in London, the Task Force worked with the Palestinians to develop in greater detail the Reform Action Plan. The Action Plan highlights Palestinian commitments, establishes benchmarks, and identifies areas for donor assistance. The Task Force consults directly and frequently with Palestinian officials leading the reform effort, with Palestinian civil society, with the Israeli Government, and with the international donor community.

Day-to-day activities of the Task Force are delegated to seven working groups (called Reform Support Groups), composed of donor representatives working in the West Bank and Gaza. The Reform Support Groups – in the areas of civil society, economics, financial accountability, judicial reform, local government, market economics, and ministerial and civil service reform – work to operationalize the reform plans and monitor implementation.
At the meeting in Paris, the Task Force reviewed status reports provided by the seven Reform Support Groups, discussed progress toward benchmarks in the continuing reform efforts, identified priority areas for donor assistance, and discussed the need for continued Palestinian commitment to the reform process, Israeli facilitation, and support from the international community. The Task Force met with Palestinian Authority ministers and the Israeli Government representatives to examine the steps which need to be taken to facilitate the reform process.

Given its impact on Palestinian reform efforts, the Task Force also discussed serious concerns about the deteriorating Palestinian humanitarian situation. It reiterated the Quartet's call for full, safe, and unfettered access for international and humanitarian personnel. Following the discussions in Paris, the Task Force will provide a detailed progress report to the Quartet, which will meet at the ministerial level in New York in September on the margins of the UN General Assembly. The Task Force will also fully inform the Ad Hoc Liaison Committee (AHLC) which coordinates international donor support for the Palestinians. The Task Force considers these efforts critical to building the foundations of a viable, independent Palestinian State living side by side in peace and security with Israel.


Communiqué by the Quartet principals
New York, 17 September 2002

After their meeting on 17 September 2002 in New York, the Quartet principals issued the following communiqué:

United Nations Secretary-General Kofi Annan, US Secretary of State Colin Powell, Russian Foreign Minister Igor Ivanov, Danish Foreign Minister Per Stig Møller, High Representative for the Common Foreign and Security Policy of the European Union Javier Solana, and European Commissioner for External Affairs Chris Patten met on 17 September 2002 in New York.

Reaffirming their previous statements, the Quartet members reviewed developments since their last meeting, on July 16, 2002. They deplored and condemned the morally repugnant violence and terror, which must end. They agreed to intensify their efforts in support of their shared goal of achieving a final Israeli-Palestinian settlement based on their common vision, as, inter alia, expressed by President Bush, of two states, Israel and an independent, viable and democratic Palestine, living side by side in peace and security.

The Quartet will continue to encourage all parties to step up to their responsibilities to seek a just and comprehensive settlement to the conflict based on UN Security Council resolutions 242 (1967), 338 (1973) and 1397 (2002), the Madrid terms of reference, the principle of land for peace, and implementation of all existing agreements between the parties. The Quartet reaffirms the continuing importance of the initiative of Saudi Arabia, endorsed at the Arab League Beirut Summit, which is a vital part of the foundation of international efforts to promote a comprehensive peace on all tracks, including the Syrian-Israeli and Lebanese-Israeli tracks.

The Quartet is working closely with the parties and consulting key regional actors on a concrete, three-phase implementation roadmap that could achieve a final settlement within three years. Comprehensive security performance is essential. The plan will not succeed unless it addresses political, economic, humanitarian, and institutional dimensions and should spell out reciprocal steps to be taken by the parties in each of its phases. In this approach, progress between the three phases would be strictly based on the parties' compliance with specific performance benchmarks to be monitored and assessed by the Quartet.

The Quartet also supports, in preparation for establishment of a Palestinian State, efforts by the Palestinians to develop a constitution which ensures separation of power, transparency, accountability, and the vibrant political system which Palestinians deserve.

The plan will contain in its initial phase (2002-first half of 2003) performance-based criteria for comprehensive security reform, Israeli withdrawals to their positions of September 28, 2000, as the security situation improves, and support for the Palestinians' holding of free, fair, and credible elections early in 2003, based on recommendations established by the Quartet's International Task Force on Palestinian Reform. The first phase should include a ministerial-level meeting of the Ad Hoc Liaison Committee (AHLC) to review the humanitarian situation and prospects for economic development in the West Bank and Gaza and identify priority areas for donor assistance, including to the reform process, before the end of the year. The Quartet Principals will meet alongside the AHLC ministerial.

In the plan's second phase (2003), our efforts should focus on the option of creating a Palestinian State with provisional borders based upon a new constitution, as a way station to a permanent status settlement.

In its final phase (2004-2005), the plan envisages Israeli-Palestinian negotiations aimed at a permanent status solution in 2005. Consistent with the vision expressed by President Bush, this means that the Israeli occupation that began in 1967 will be ended through a settlement negotiated between the parties and based on UN resolutions 242 (1967) and 338 (1973), with Israeli withdrawal to secure and recognized borders.

The Quartet welcomes the Task Force's report on the progress of the seven Reform Support Groups, and notes that a number of significant achievements, especially in the area of financial reform, have been realized in a short period of time under very difficult circumstances. Under the aegis of the Quartet, the Task Force will continue its work of supporting the Palestinians and the Palestinian Authority as they establish and prioritize reform benchmarks, particularly on the issues of elections, judicial reform, and the role of civil society.

Both the reform effort and the political process must include Israeli measures, consistent with Israel's legitimate security concerns, to improve the lives of Palestinians, including allowing the resumption of normal economic activity, facilitating the movement of goods, people, and essential services and to lift curfew and closures. Consistent with transparent and accountable Palestinian budget arrangements, the Quartet welcomes Israel's decision to transfer part of the Palestinian VAT and customs revenue that has been withheld since September 2000, and calls on Israel to continue this process and re-establish regular monthly revenue transfers to the Palestinian Ministry of Finance. And consistent with the recommendations of the Mitchell Commission, Israeli settlement activity in the occupied territories must stop.

The Quartet welcomes the report of UN Secretary-General's Personal Humanitarian Envoy Catherine Bertini, as well as the latest UNSCO report on the impact of closures. It calls on Israel and the Palestinians to recognize and act upon their respective responsibilities and to move quickly to ameliorate the sharply deteriorating humanitarian situation in the West Bank and Gaza. In particular, Israel must ensure full, safe and unfettered access for international and humanitarian personnel.

Reiterating the critical importance of restoring lasting calm through comprehensive performance on security, the Quartet calls on the Palestinians to work with the US and regional partners to reform the Palestinian security services, strengthen policing and law and order for the civilian population, and fight the terror that has severely undermined the legitimate aspirations of the Palestinians. Israelis and Palestinians should re-establish security cooperation, and reciprocal steps should be taken by Israel as the Palestinians work to combat terrorism in all its forms.

The Quartet will continue to discuss the timing and modalities of an international conference.

The Quartet also met and discussed these issues with the Foreign Ministers of Egypt, Jordan, Lebanon, Saudi Arabia, and Syria, as representatives of the Arab League Follow-up Committee, and with representatives of Israel and the Palestinian Authority. The Quartet looks forward to continuing consultations.




Statement by the Task Force on Palestinian Reform
Amman, 14-15 November 2002

The Task Force on Palestinian Reform, composed of representatives of the Quartet (US, EU, Russia and the UN Secretary-General), Norway, Japan, the World Bank, and the International Monetary Fund, met in Jordan on 14 and 15 November. This meeting, hosted by the Danish EU Presidency, was the Task Force's third, having met previously in London on 10 July, and in Paris on 22 and 23 August.

The role of the Task Force is to monitor and support implementation of Palestinian civil reforms, and guide the international donor community in its support for the Palestinians' reform agenda. Since its formation, the Task Force has worked with Palestinians to develop in greater detail the Reform Action Plan, which highlights Palestinian commitments, establishes benchmarks, and identifies obstacles to reform and areas for donor assistance. The Task Force has done this by consulting directly with Palestinian executive and legislative officials, with Palestinian civil society, with the Israeli Government, and with the donor community.

Day-to-day activities of the Task Force are delegated to seven Reform Support Groups, composed of donor representatives working in the West Bank and Gaza, in the areas of Civil Society, Elections, Financial Accountability, Judicial and Rule of Law Reform, Market Economics, Local Government, and Ministerial and Civil Service Reform. The Reform Support Groups work to operationalize the reform plans and monitor implementation, inter alia, through identifying appropriate benchmarks to measure successful implementation of – and barriers that impede – reforms.

At the meeting in Jordan, the Task Force reviewed status reports from the seven Reform Support Groups, which showed that progress in some areas has been considerable, while the reform process in others has been slow. Based on the reports from the seven Reform Support Groups, and consultations with Palestinian officials, the Task Force identified the highest priority actions in order to keep momentum in the reform process, including the immediate resumption of monthly transfers of Palestinian tax revenues and transfer of arrearages in accordance with an agreed monitoring mechanism to ensure transparency and financial accountability. The Task Force also met with Palestinian Authority ministers and Israeli Government representatives to discuss the steps that need to be taken to facilitate the reform progress.

Given its serious impact on the Palestinian reform efforts, the Task Force also discussed the ongoing Palestinian humanitarian crises with particular focus on the follow-up to the report of United Nations Secretary General Special Envoy Bertini. The Task Force recognizes that the continued violence and terror, continued restrictions on the movement of persons and goods, and deterioration of the humanitarian situation constitute a significant hindrance to reforms. Following the discussions in Jordan, the Task Force will provide a detailed progress report to the Quartet, which will meet in December 2002. The Task Force will also fully inform the Ad Hoc Liaison Committee (AHLC), which coordinates international donor support to the Palestinians. The Task Force considers these efforts critical to building the foundations of a viable, independent Palestinian State living side by side in peace and security with Israel.


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