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UNITED
NATIONS
S

        Security Council
S/PV.692/Rev.1
4 March 1955

Provisional agenda
(S/Agenda/692/Rev.1)

1. Adoption of the agenda.

2. The Palestine question:

(a) Complaint by Egypt concerning:
Violent and premeditated aggression committed on 28 February 1955 by Israel armed forces against Egyptian armed forces inside Egyptian controlled territory near Gaza, causing many casualties, including 39 dead and 32 wounded, and the destruction of certain military installations, in violation of, inter alia, article 1, paragraph 2, and article II, paragraph 2, of the Egyptian-Israeli General Armistice Agreement;

(b) Complaint by Israel of continuous violations by Egypt of the General Armistice Agreement and of resolutions of the Security Council, to the danger of international peace and security, by means of:

(i) Attacks of regular and irregular Egyptian armed force against Israel armed forces;

(ii) Assaults of raiders from Egyptian-controlled territory on lives and property in Israel;

(iii) Failure of the Government of Egypt to adopt and enforce effective measures against such acts of violence;

(iv) Assertion by Egypt of the existence of a state of war and the exercise of active belligerency against Israel, particularly the mainte-nance and enforcement of blockade measures;

(v) Warlike propaganda and threats against the territorial integrity and political independence of Israel;

(vi) Refusal of Egypt to seek agreement by negotiations for an effective transition from the present armistice to peace.

Expression of thanks to the retiring President

1. The PRESIDENT: Before submitting the provi-sional agenda to the approval of the Council, I wish to pay a tribute to Mr. Belaunde, representative of Peru, for the manner in which he has discharged the duties of President during the preceding month. It is indeed a very pleasant duty for me to do that, because Mr. Belaunde's knowledge and experience, his humane and impartial approach to the problems which confront us, his devotion to the principles and ideals of the Charter, the competence and wisdom with which he has directed our work, have certainly won the respect and admiration of us all around this table.

2. Mr. Belaunde's eminent personality is well known to all those who have followed the activities of the United Nations, and stands as a brilliant example of the deeprooted culture which is known to flourish in his noble country.

3. In taking over the Chair from him, I wish to assure my colleagues that, in discharging my duties as President, I shall be guided by the principles of our Charter, and I will endeavour, with the cooperation of my colleagues around this table, to follow the pattern set forth by my distinguished predecessor.

4. Mr. BELAUNDE (Peru) (translated from Spanish): Only the great-heartedness which is characteristic of the President, and his friendly feelings towards me, can explain the warm words we have just heard.

5. I can assure the President that we all have every confidence in the success of his term of office; for we have followed his brilliant career in the United Nations, we have seen him preside over the Security Council on previous occasions, and we know something of the fine traditions of the great country which he so worthily represents in the Organization.

Adoption of the agenda

The agenda was adopted.

The Palestine question

(a) Complaint by Egypt concerning:

Violent and premeditated aggression committed on 28 February 1955 by Israel armed forces against Egyptian armed forces inside Egyptian-controlled territory near Gaza, causing many casualties, including 39 dead and 32 wounded, and the destruction of certain military installations, in violation of, inter alia, article 1, paragraph 2, and article 11, paragraph 2, of the Egyptian-Israeli General Armistice Agreement (S/3365, S/3367);

(b) Complaint by Israel of continuous violations by Egypt of the General Armistice Agreement and of resolutions of the Security Council, to the danger of international peace and security, by means of : (i) attacks of regular and irregular Egyptian armed forces against Israel armed forces: (ii) assaults of raiders from Egyptian-controlled territory on lives and property in Israel; (iii) failure of the Government of Egypt to adopt and enforce effective measures against such acts of violence; (iv) assertion by Egypt of the existence of a state of war and the exercise of active belligerency against Israel, particularly the maintenance and enforcement of blockade measures; (v) warlike propaganda and threats against the territorial integrity and political independence of Israel; (vi) refusal of Egypt to seek agreement by negotiations for an effective transition from the present armistice to peace (S/3368).

6. The PRESIDENT: The Council will begin consideration of part

(a) of the Palestine question.

At the invitation of the President, Mr. Loutfi, representative of Egypt, and Mr. Eban, representative of Israel, took places at the Council table.

7. Mr. WADSWORTH (United States of. America): I believe that it would not be proper to discuss fully at this time the shocking incident at Gaza. We do not have before us the results of the deliberations of the Mixed Armistice Commission or the final report which is expected from the Chief of Staff of the Truce Supervision Organization. It would be premature to form judgments or, opinion, to begin A full debate before the findings United Nations organs charged with responsibility in these matters have been received. nevertheless, that we must state that, if the preliminary reports which we have received are shown to be true, the incident has occurred in the Gaza district is indefensible from any standpoint.

8. My Government has repeatedly made its position clear in this Council. We oppose any policy of reprisal or retaliation.

9. We had felt that, since the last meeting of the Security Council on the Palestine border situation in fact, for most a year now, despite a number of incidents a general improvement in the maintenance of stability and quiet on the borders between Israel and the Arab States was prevailing. This, in turn, led us to hope that all the parties concerned had recognized that this was the fruit of restraint and of a sincere effort at understanding. If the border situation had improved to the extent that I have indicated and the official report should make this clear-then resort to force is all the more to be deplored.

10. In all of our experience in this Council with the Palestine question, one thing has remained clear; it is that the use of armed force will not produce peace negotiations. On the other hand, a display of restraint face of extreme provocation is to be highly commended. We feel that this has been the case thus far in connection with the incident at Gaza. We would strongly counsel a continuance of this behavior. That include full co-operation by both parties with the Truce Supervision Organization, which has and deserves this Council's support.

11. The United States believes that a consideration of the facts will be greatly expedited if General Burns, the Chief of Staff of the Truce Supervision Organization, can appear in person before the Security Council to assist its deliberations. We hope that at this meeting we to call General Burns to New York for then decide to call General Burns to New York for the Council’s next meeting. When he has made his report and we have heard the parties, we should promptly consider what further action is necessary.

12. Mr. HOPPENOT (France) (translated from French): The French delegation shares the grave anxiety that is certainly felt by all the members of this Council as the result of the events which took place at Gaza on the night of 28 February 1955. We cannot remain indifferent to the fact that about sixty soldiers and civilians, most of them Egyptians, died during the attack by Israel forces against positions held by Egyptian troops. Such a cruel and vain sacrifice of human lives cannot fail to move us all profoundly. We extend our sympathy to the bereaved families in their sorrow and also to their country. We cannot but congratulate the Egyptian Government and nation on the calmness and self-control that they have preserved in the face of these lamentable events, and the determination that they have shown to seek the settlement of the question only through the peaceful means open to them by recourse to the procedures of our Organization.

13. The incident seems the more regrettable to us because it occurred at a time when comparative peace seemed to reign in that sensitive part of the world. In our opinion, acts of violence are never justifiable, even when they are committed as reprisals; they seem to us to be even more regrettable when they deliberately introduce a new element of tension into a situation which was certainly unstable, but in which the frontier incidents that occurred could not be compared in seriousness with the events which have been brought before us today.

14. Having made these preliminary remarks, my delega-tion wishes to say that it considers that the Council is not yet in a position to deal effectively with the substance of the matter. The only official document before us is the Press release issued on I March by the Truce Supervision Organization. Only when we have received and examined the report requested from the Chief of Staff of that organization and the results of the deliberations of the Mixed Armistice Commission will the Council be able to give a considered decision on the Egyptian delegation's request. The first document will provide us with the facts, and the decision of the Mixed Armistice Commission will show where the responsibility lies. If General Burns' duties allow him to leave his post, any supplementary information which he could give us personally on the situation prevailing on the Egyptian-Israel frontier would obviously help to clarify our views.

15. I consider that, after we have studied these documents, the Council should be convened again to hear the statements of the two parties and to compare them with the results of impartial inquiries carried out on the spot. I feel that our work today should be confined to including the item in our agenda and to making clear the importance we attach to it and the serious anxiety with which it fills us.

16. The Council should not adjourn, however, without addressing an urgent appeal to the two parties to refrain from any act of violence, provocation or reprisal and to spare no effort which might help to ease the tension in the area.

17. As I have already said, the French delegation has h satisfaction the attitude taken by the Egyptian authorities in that connection.

18. DIXON (United Kingdom): Her Majesty’s Government in the United Kingdom was deeply disturbed to learn of the incident that occurred in the Gaza area on the night of 28 February to 1 March 1955

19. At this first meeting on the matter, we do not have before us all the information which would enable us to go fully into the substance of the question. It ready established, however, that a large number of lives were lost and persons wounded as a result of this incident. Indeed, the incident is undoubtedly the most serious of its kind which has occurred on the Israeli-Egyptian demarcation line since the signing of the General Armistice Agreement in 1949. I take this occasion of expressing my deep sympathy to the Egyptian Government for the casualties which the Egyptian Army suffered in the performance of its duty.

20. Her Majesty's Government regards this incident as all the more deplorable in that, according to our information, the situation on this demarcation line, though never so quiet as all of us would wish, had not deteriorated in the past few months. We were hopeful that the situation there would improve, as it has recently improved in other border areas.

21. I shall wish to express my Government's views at greater length when the time comes for the Council to o into the substance of the question. I would, however, draw the Council's attention to the communiqué which I understand was issued by the United Nations Truce Supervision Organization in Jerusalem on 1 March, a few hours after the incident occurred. The communique reported that “Israeli armed forces violently attacked the Egyptian military position near the Gaza railway station ". That was the report of the United Nations body.

22. Without, therefore, wishing to anticipate the findings of the Mixed Armistice Commission or the report which we shall no doubt receive from the Chief of Staff of the Truce Supervision Organization, I feel bound to say that the prima facie evidence points to the fact that a premeditated attack by Israel armed forces on Egyptian-controlled territory took place on that date and resulted in a very serious loss of life. Moreover, it took place in an area where very large numbers of refugees are concentrated, in camps under the supervision of the United Nations. It is not surprising that the attack should have caused a wave of emotion among the refugees, and that in its turn adds to the tension along the border. The Egyptian Government has acted with commendable restraint and I am sure will continue to do so.

23. We shall need to study carefully the report of the Chief of Staff and the findings of the Mixed Armistice Commission. I agree with the representative of the United States that it would be helpful to us in the consideration of the matter if General Bums could come in person to New York to present his report on this serious incident, provided of course that he can be spared from his duties in Palestine at the present juncture. I hope that the Secretary-General will be ready to discuss this possibility urgently with General Burns.

24. In the meantime, it is our hope that there will be no further acts of provocation or any reprisal, and we look to the parties concerned to cooperate fully in assisting the Council in its consideration of this very serious incident.

25. Finally, pending the report of the Chief of Staff and the findings of the Mixed Armistice Commission, I do not think that the Council can usefully take any further step at this moment. I feel that it would be of greater benefit to our deliberations if, before hearing the two parties, Egypt and Israel, we waited until the Council was in a position to embark on a discussion of the substance of the question, after receipt of the further information which we await.

26. Mr. ENTEZAM (Iran) (translated from French): I should have preferred the Council not to begin discussing this unfortunate incident until it had received the reports from the Chief of Staff of the Truce Supervision Organization and the Mixed Armistice Commission, for the responsibilities involved are so great that we cannot rely on the information given us in the Press. I shall do my very best, for the same reason, not to allow myself to be carried away by the horror and indignation which I felt on hearing this news. I shall therefore wait until the report of the Chief of Staff has been received before stating my Government's attitude.

27. Nevertheless, I should like to associate myself here and now with the feelings of indignation expressed by previous speakers. It is the Security Council's duty to condemn all acts of aggression. Indeed, mere condem-nation is not enough when aggression has caused so many deaths. The Security Council must shoulder its responsibilities and act accordingly.

28. In addition to this feeling of indignation, which is shared by all, my Government is particularly disturbed by the way these incidents, which upset the peace in that area of the world to which Iran belongs, are recurring.

29. I shall say no more for the moment, but simply express our deepest sympathy to the Egyptian Govern-ment and the families of the victims.

30. In conclusion, I support the United States representative's suggestion that General Burns should be invited to appear before the Council to comment on his report, provided that he himself feels that he can leave Palestine. If he feels that it would be more useful for him to remain there, I think that we should not insist. Otherwise I am sure that his presence in New York would throw more light on this incident and help the Council in its work.

31. LANGENHOVE (Belgium) (translated from French): I should like to associate my delegation with the views and feelings which have just been expressed of the Council. I should also like to echo the appeal they have made.

32. Events such as those which took place in the region on 28 February 1955 are certainly very serious: the direct concern of the Security Council and call for its intervention.

33. According to the first reports which have been received, those events would appear to constitute a flagrant violation of the General Armistice Agreement between Egypt and Israel, for it was not a matter of isolated incidents but of operations on a larger scale which resulted in the loss of many lives. One of the first tasks of the Council should be to determine who was responsible for those events. It cannot confidently do so at present, and will in fact be able to do so only when it has received precise and verified information. It is for the Chief of Staff of the Truce Supervision Organization to assemble this information and to report it with all possible speed. It has been suggested that he should be invited to come to New York to submit the results of his investigations and to provide members of the Council with any further explanations they may desire. My delegation thinks that that would be a useful step. Such a procedure would, of course, involve some delay, but that is inevitable if the Council is to act on the basis of full and reliable information, and with the complete impartiality which it is its duty to observe.

34. Nevertheless, the Belgian delegation wishes to condemn here and now the violation of the General Armistice Agreement, while making the necessary reservations as regards responsibility for the incident. Altogether, it is strongly opposed to the use of force and to the ends by violent means. Nothing could be more contrary to the rules and principles which guide us.

35. Sir Leslie MUNRO (New Zealand): I am in full agreement with my colleagues who have expressed grave concern at the unhappy events which have today been t to the attention of the Council. At this stage, we are of course considering only the first of the two items on our agenda. It is true that the Egyptian complaint has yet to be adjudicated by the machinery established under the General Armistice Agreement.

36. Apart from the accounts given by the two Governments, which are conflicting, the only information avail-able to the Council at the moment is contained in a brief Press release issued by the United Nations Truce Supervision- Organization on 1 March 1955. I agree that we cannot proceed today with a full consideration of this disturbing matter, interrupting as it does a sensible of tension in the area in question. There are, nevertheless, a number of serious features which stand out on even a preliminary examination of the available facts.

37. In the first place, there is the military nature of the incident. The Press release of the Truce Supervision Organization states that Israel armed forces violently attacked the Egyptian military position near the Gaza railway station. I am not, of course, suggesting, at a time when we all profoundly sympathize with the relatives of the dead, that it is a worse offence to kill soldiers than to kill civlians far from it. At the same time, the incident as recounted to us does not have the character of a spontaneous foray. It is described to us as a military attack. Therefore, if one side is exclusively at fault, it is at fault not as a result of the lawlessness of its citizens, but as a result of a deliberate, planned and disciplined act which must be regarded as carrying governmental responsibility.

38. In the second place, the attack apparently was a sustained and determined one. According to the Truce Supervision Organization, a wide variety of weapons was used. Casualties were heavy. According to the Egyptian account, there was a second attack, in which a body of Egyptian reinforcements was allegedly ambushed so effectively that not one escaped death or injury.

39. Finally, the incident took place in an area where the United Nations has a special responsibility in regard to Arab refugee camps. The unfortunate riots which occurred in these camps are directly attributable to passions inflamed by this incident. In itself, this would be enough to make the incident a matter of special concern to the United Nations.

40. My delegation therefore trusts that every effort will be made to expedite the consideration of this matter by the Mixed Armistice Commission and, if need be, by the Special Committee. I reserve the right to explain the position of my delegation more fully when a report is received from the Chief of Staff of the Truce Supervision Organization. In the meantime, however, it is obviously incumbent on the parties to observe strictly the terms of the armistice agreement. Incidents such as these are the sparks which can cause conflagrations. It is equally in the interest of each party, whether or not it is the aggrieved party, to take what precautions it can to reduce tension and to avoid further incidents which might lead to a more widespread conflict. Her Majesty's Government in New Zealand therefore urges on both sides the need for the utmost restraint.

41. In conclusion, I agree with the suggestion that General Burns should attend our deliberations, providing that after consultation with the Secretary-General it is clear that he can be spared from his important and indeed paramount duties in the area.

42. Mr. DE BARROS (Brazil) (translated from French): Once again we are faced by a grave and bloody incident in the succession of regrettable events provoked by the disagreements between the State of Israel and the Arab States. Throughout this long and difficult crisis, the position of Brazil in the Security Council, in the General Assembly and at all international conferences has remained unchanged. It has been characterized by unwavering impartiality in every case submitted to us for our consideration.

43. Our only purpose has been to contribute to the peaceful settlement of the questions of substance which underlay this long dispute. Determined to maintain the objectives of the United Nations, to defend the prerogatives of the Council and to secure respect for its decisions, we have had as our constant objective the eradication of the causes of this dangerous antagonism. Although I do not wish to repeat the statements made by the delegation of Brazil in earlier debates on the Palestine question, should like to point out that we have consistently urged that a solution must be found for the problem of the Palestine refugees, which is growing steadily worse and prevents the consolidation of the armistice. We have not hesitated to point out the responsibility incurred by the State of Israel in certain incidents which have been verified by the Truce Supervision Organization. We have hesitated to reject the Egyptian argument concerning Cairo Government's right to take measures, which are inadmissable except in time of war, establishing restrictions on Israel trade. At the same time, we have protested against Israel's stubborn refusal to accept the neutralization and internationalization of Jerusalem. Speaking on behalf of my delegation, in this Council, I If was unable to agree that Egypt had a right to intercept Israel ships using the Suez Canal, the free navigation of which is guaranteed to all nations under the Constantinople Convention.

44. Since the initial success achieved with the signature the armistice, we have witnessed with regret the repeated failure of the conciliatory efforts of the United Nations as a result of the intransigence of the Government of Israel and the Arab Powers. According to the at issue, the Security Council's decisions have laid the responsibility either on Israel or on the Arab States for the incidents which have taken place since 1949. Although these decisions reflect the calmness, spirit of justice and firmness of our action, they have not, unfortu-nately, hitherto succeeded in solving the Palestine problem. Nevertheless, we are secure in the knowledge we have never failed in the duties imposed on us by functions, that we have always considered the questions submitted to us in an objective manner and taken our decisions on the basis of the information, documentation and evidence which we have received.

45. The States parties to the dispute have therefore never been able to allege that the resolutions adopted in this Council have been partial or unjust. They merely endeavor to justify their own conduct in their own fashion.

46. In the case of the most recent incident between Israel and Egypt, the information on which a final decision must be based is not yet available to the Council. There can be no doubt, however, that a new violation of the General Armistice Agreement has taken place. Article II, paragraph 2, of that agreement stipulates that no military forces of either party “shall advance beyond or pass over for any purpose whatsoever the armistice demarcation line set forth in article VI of this agreement."

According to the first Press communiques from the United Nations Truce Observation Organization, there seems to be no doubt that this article, the interpretation of which is unambiguous, was not respected by the Israel forces.

47. In addition to placing the responsibility where it belongs and naming the guilty party, the Council must now more than ever insist on strict compliance with the General Armistice Agreement which it and the United Nations have guaranteed. In the face of these events which disturb international life, the Brazilian delegation is convinced that, except at the risk of serious consequences, our Organization can no longer be exposed to irresponsible attacks by its own Members. The loyal cooperation of the Member States of the United Nations, and particularly of the majority of States which are bound together by common principles and ideals, is an essential requirement deriving from the commitments assumed by all the signatories when they agreed to and ratified the Charter.

48. Hence we cannot on any pretext agree to the violation of our statutes or to a failure to respect the Council's decisions.

49. What will be left of our prestige, our authority, our moral force and our legal structure if Member States themselves continue to undermine the very foundations of this Organization? The United Nations is a world parliament to which the world looks with hope. Our words, our deeds and our decisions are judged by world public opinion, and we cannot therefore fail to qualify the Gaza incident as a violation of the General Armistice Agreement; it is our duty to insist that the Council should demand the loyal co-operation of all the Member States of the United Nations.

50. At the same time, however, we have not yet received the final report of the Mixed Armistice Commission on this unfortunate incident. It has been suggested that the Council should invite General Burns to come to New York and give it further information on the events which have recently occurred in Egypt. The Brazilian delegation feels that this constructive suggestion should be adopted.

51. I reserve my delegation's position on the problem as a whole until we have received more complete information.

52. Mr. BELAONDE (Peru) (translated from Spanish): The events which have led to this meeting of the Security Council came to the Peruvian delegation as an unpleasant surprise, particularly as only recently, in my capacity as President of the Security Council, it fell to me to take Steps which seemed likely to result in the successful conclusion of the Suez Canal incident, with which the Council was then dealing.

53. These events are apparently of the utmost gravity. The comniunique from the Mixed Armistice Commission, which the representatives of the great Powers have advisedly quoted here, indicates that events have occurred which, as the Belgian representative said, constitute a violation of the armistice.

54. It is obvious that we must not prejudge our future consideration of the matter on the basis of this infor-mation nevertheless, from the legal point of view, the present incidents would appear prima facie to involve a violation of the armistice. And this armistice is the guarantee of peace in the Middle East. It is the work of the Security Council, and the Council should watch over it and take all necessary steps to ensure that it is respected.

55. Hence the item with which we are dealing is of the utmost importance not only from the legal point of view that is to say because there has been a violation of the armistice but also, as the New Zealand representative said, because responsibility cannot be laid at the door of individual, but must be placed on a State or a government. There is, moreover, another regrettable aspect of the question to which the Peruvian delegation cannot remain indifferent: 37 people were killed and 30 wounded. I should like, therefore, to begin by expressing my sympathy to the bereaved families and associating myself in their country's mourning.

56. The important thing at the present time is to restore calmness of mind. For this purpose it would be valuable if the Security Council, in fulfillment of its legal functions and in its response to universal public opinion, were to make an appeal to the parties to avoid any action which might cause an increase in international tension and a deterioration the situation.

57. In this connection, I should like to associate myself the words of praise which have been spoken regarding attitude of the Egyptian Government at the present time.

58. Our first duty is to make exhaustive efforts to determine the facts because, as the representative of Iran has suggested, we must have a full knowledge of the in order to take action. Full knowledge of the facts implies not only the receipt of the official reports and a detailed examination of the situation perhaps through subcommittee but also, I believe, as the representative of the United States has so aptly suggested, the presence of General Burns to give us firsthand information.

59. In conclusion, I should like to repeat the hope expressed by all representatives here, that the parties concerned will avoid all action likely to increase international tension. I should also like to support the United States proposal that, if it is possible, and if his duties permit, General Burns should come here to give us firsthand and report.

60. Mr. Shuhsi HSU (China): My delegation supports the proposal that General Burns should be invited to participate in the Council's deliberations on this item. We do so not only because it is always advisable to have reports on a case by a neutral, but also, and particularly, use the issue raised in the present case is a serious one. Violent and premeditated aggression by one party, if substantiated, cannot be justified merely by continuous violations by the other party. That is particularly so since the Security Council is not paralyzed in the Palestine question and there is therefore a place to which appeal for remedy may be made. The Council certainly wishes to know the truth about this situation before it goes more deeply into the case.

61. The PRESIDENT: As I have no other speakers on my list, I should like to make a brief statement, in my capacity as the representative of TURKEY, setting forth the views of my Government on this matter at this preliminary stage.

62. The special interest which the Turkish Government has always had in the establishment and maintenance of peace and stability in the Middle East has caused us to view the preliminary reports of this unfortunate incident with very grave concern. We are convinced that the report of the Mixed Armistice Commission will clarify the details of this incident and show the degree of responsibility which rests on those who have resorted to the use of force. However, in the meantime, we are obliged to express our deep regret that an incident of this nature should have taken place and that the tranquillity of the Middle East should thus be gravely disturbed at a time when the area is more than ever in need of stability and peace.

63. As I said at the beginning of my statement, the tranquillity and security of the Middle East is a matter of particular interest to my Government. This concern for the establishment of a just peace and for the strengthening of security in the Middle East has recently found expression in the signing by Turkey and Iraq of a defensive treaty which thrusts upon my Government a responsibility requiring an even more direct and active interest than before. It is in the light of these considerations that we feel obliged to stress our deep concern over the grave incident which has taken place in Gaza.

64. In considering this question at this stage, we also feel that we must express our satisfaction at the restraint which has been shown so far by the Egyptian authorities.

65. In conclusion, I should like to extend our deepest sympathy to the people and the Government of Egypt for the lives which have been lost in this regrettable incident.

66. Speaking now as PRESIDENT, I think it is in accordance with the opinion of the majority, as expressed here in the Council, to request the Secretary-General kindly to inform General Burns that a personal and oral report by him to the Security Council will be appreciated, provided, of course, that he can be spared from his duties in Palestine.

67. The SECRETARY-GENERAL: I will as a matter of course inform General Burns at once about the views expressed around this table. We will have the written report shortly, I hope, and I will discuss urgently with the general the possibility of his attending the next meeting of the Security Council. But I have noted that, according to the views expressed here, it is fully recognized that his presence in Palestine might be necessary.

68. The PRESIDENT: The Council has expressed the desire to continue the examination of the item under consideration after the receipt of the written report of General Burns, or after he has arrived here for a personal report to the Security Council, if the latter procedure is possible. That being the case, I have nothing else to say, other than, of course, to give a final and clear expression, as President of the Security Council, to the views expressed here.

69. As President of the Security Council, I strongly urge both of the parties concerned to do their utmost to maintain calm and tranquillity by abstaining from any use of force or otherwise aggravating the situation over which the members of the Security Council have already pressed their deep concern.

The meeting rose at 4:45 p.m.


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