Question of Palestine home || Permalink || About UNISPAL || Search

English (pdf) ||Arabic||Chinese||Français||Русский||Español||



Follow UNISPAL Twitter RSS

UNITED
NATIONS
A

        General Assembly
A/66/PV.22
24 September 2011

Official Records

General Assembly
Sixty-sixth session

22nd plenary meeting
Saturday, 24 September 2011, 9 a.m.
New York

President: Mr. Al-Nasser ....................................(Qatar)




/...

We must employ all assets at our disposal so as to fully exploit mediation as a tool for conflict prevention and resolution. The good offices of the Secretary-General in conflict prevention and resolution are an instrument that may be very effective in mediating conflicts. Those offices must be strengthened and given the human and other resources necessary to undertake mediation early enough to prevent conflicts and to deal effectively with those that are ongoing.

/...

By the same token, we are convinced that the solution to the settlement of the question of Palestine will be attained through genuine mediation. The stalemate in the negotiations is a source of grave concern to my country. We urge all the parties involved to resuscitate the negotiations between the State of Palestine and Israel without any further delay.

/...

/...

... The further development of United Nations capacities in this domain will contribute to the timely and peaceful resolution of conflicts before their complexities lead to serious international repercussions.

In that regard, Montenegro strongly supports the peaceful resolution of all existing conflicts, especially those in the wider region of the Middle East and North Africa. Priority should be given to the urgent signing of a peace agreement between Israel and Palestine, which is in their mutual interest. Only if both sides refrain from violent actions will room be created for confidence-building and a comprehensive solution to the Middle East issue, making Israel a safe country, to the benefit of both internationally recognized sides and meeting the prerequisites for Palestine to establish a stable State.

/...

/...

The Palestinian question remains unresolved and a source of great instability and violence. India is steadfast in its support for the Palestinian people’s struggle for a sovereign, independent, viable and united State of Palestine, with East Jerusalem as its capital, living within secure and recognizable borders side by side and at peace with Israel. We look forward to welcoming Palestine as an equal Member of the United Nations.

/...
/...

In our diplomatic efforts, we have to be consistent with our historical commitments and, above all, faithful to all who selflessly helped us in the struggle for the affirmation of our dignity.

From that perspective, we welcome the decision of the Palestinian Authority to submit a request for the recognition of the State of Palestine as a full Member of the United Nations. We encourage a constructive dialogue on the basis of the possibility of peaceful coexistence and mutually advantageous cooperation between countries and peoples.

/...

/...

In recent months the winds of change have encircled the globe, reaching and reshaping the unlikeliest corners of our planet, for good and for ill. Those winds have swept the nation of South Sudan into these hallowed halls as a welcome and esteemed new member of our global family. They are blowing away the flimsy impediments to Palestinian statehood, and breathing fresh air into stagnant negotiating processes. ...

/...

The collective voices of the international community are rising to a crescendo in support of full Palestinian statehood. Saint Vincent and the Grenadines echoes the relevant portions of yesterday’s Group of 77 ministerial declaration, which welcomed the State of Palestine’s application for full membership in the United Nations. The State of Palestine has brought its case to this world Assembly in keeping with the finest traditions of multilateralism. No one should call the Palestinian acts unilateral. They come here to the multilateral body. We have no doubt that its action and the solidarity of the international community will resuscitate the moribund negotiating process between the Palestinian and Israeli States.

/...

/...

The long-drawn-out peace process in the Middle East is a matter of serious concern for us all. We must find a comprehensive and just solution to these problems. It is our principled position that we support a fully independent and sovereign Palestinian State based on United Nations resolutions. We look forward to its materialization at the earliest date.

/...
/...

We also look forward to a more all-inclusive United Nations system that can effectively address issues of international security, with the admission of Palestine as a Member State. The United Nations and the international community have a duty to restore to the Palestinian people their dignity and their right to statehood and security. Mauritius supports the application for full membership of the United Nations, submitted to the Secretary-General yesterday by the President of the State of Palestine (A/66/371, annex), and the legitimate aspiration of the Palestinian people to take their rightful place in the international community. We welcome the statement by President Abbas at the 19th meeting that Palestine extends its hands to the Israeli Government and the Israeli people for peacemaking and for building cooperative relations between the States of Palestine and Israel.

/...

/...

From this rostrum, President Abbas made his request to the General Assembly for Palestine’s membership of the United Nations as an independent State. While my Government fully supports the idea of an independent Palestine, I believe that unilateral action will not be helpful. That is why I call on our Palestinian friends to support the statement made yesterday by the Quartet, in which it drew a clear road map for action to address this fundamental question of our time.

/...
/...

In the general debate of the sixty-fifth session, I as well as others called for lasting peace in the Middle East (see A/65/PV.20). I also issued a call for implementation of the two-State solution, which would have Israel and Palestine living side by side in peace and security. Neither of these notions is new; sadly, neither is anywhere close to realization, Given the current state of affairs, it should come as no surprise to anyone that the Palestinian people would seek a different option — full membership in our Organization or, failing that, a vote by the General Assembly that would elevate the status of Palestine from non-voting observer entity to Observer State, a status equal to that of the Holy See.

As we have said in previous debates, we remain fully supportive of the aspirations of the Palestinian people and of the idea of a two-State solution, which would allow the Palestinian people the right to govern themselves and reach their potential in a sovereign and contiguous State. It was against this backdrop that we decided to join with others that have already done so and grant recognition to the State of Palestine. As we did then and do now, we believe that recognition of the State of Palestine will contribute to the quest for a negotiated solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict and to the creation of lasting peace and stability in the region, and ultimately result in a viable Palestine and a secure Israel, based on the 1967 lines, with mutually agreed swaps to ensure that secure, recognized borders exist for both sides.

/...

/...

Without peace and security, it is difficult to create and maintain the social conditions that constitute a prerequisite for economic progress and prosperity. The protracted conflict in the Middle East between Israel and the Palestinians has become a disturbing anomaly in a world where so many other disputes have been peacefully resolved. It is an anomaly because everyone knows what the solution is. It is disturbing because the only thing preventing a resolution of the issue is an unhappy convergence of dysfunctional political currents at the domestic level.

The State of Israel has a right to exist, and the people of Israel have a right to live in security and to do so with the full and undisputed recognition of the rest of the world. On the other hand, the Palestinians are entitled also to enjoy the fruits of prosperity within their own sovereign State. Much else in this conflict may be negotiable. Surely, those two postulates are not. The Holy Land has for centuries been the locus of humanity’s hopes. It is high time that it now become a symbol, not of humanity’s divisions, but of humanity’s unity. This state of affairs will ensue only when the disgracefully long wait of the Palestinians for a homeland is brought to an end.

/...

/...

At a time when people in the Middle East, North Africa and beyond have embarked on a new path towards freedom, dignity and prosperity, we must also invest our efforts and determination to fulfil the long-sought aspirations of the Palestinian people. The dramatic developments unfolding in the Arab world make progress on the Israeli-Palestinian track even more urgent than before.

Malta was heartened by, and welcomed, the speech of President Obama last May, in which he laid out the foundation for future negotiations and outlined a comprehensive vision for peace between Israelis and Palestinians. The resumption of meaningful and sustainable negotiations seemed, at the time, to be within reach.

Unfortunately, that was not to be. The time frames set by the international community for the establishment of a Palestinian State are now with us. A political stalemate persists, despite the fact that from an institutional perspective, the preparations for statehood have been successfully completed. The situation on the ground further complicates matters and undermines the resumption of negotiations and the goal of two viable States living side by side in peace.

No effort should be spared to break the deadlock in the Israeli-Palestinian talks. Getting Israelis and Palestinians back to the negotiating table with the political will necessary to embark on meaningful and sustainable negotiations must remain the overriding goal. Agreement on parameters for negotiations would clearly be a step in the right direction. In this regard, Malta fully stands behind the efforts of the European Union, particularly those of its High Representative for Foreign Affairs and Security Policy, to make this happen.

/...

The Acting President (spoke in Spanish): I now call on His Excellency Mr. Mohamed Kamel Ali Amr, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Egypt, who will speak also on behalf of the Non-Aligned Movement.

/...

I reiterate here today the support of the Non-Aligned Movement for the historic struggle of the brotherly Palestinian people to regain their legitimate rights, for the efforts made towards declaring the establishment of the independent State of Palestine, with East Jerusalem as its capital, and for its admission as a full Member of the United Nations. I also call on the countries that have not yet recognized the State of Palestine to do so as a contribution to the pursuit of a just, lasting and comprehensive settlement of the Middle East conflict based on the two-State solution.

/...

We feel nothing but deep sorrow every time we realize that, for decades, grave historic injustice has been inflicted on a people while, to date, the entire world has failed to end it. The just question of Palestine endures after two entire decades of fruitless negotiations without the desired settlement. To this day, the Palestinian people remain deprived of their legitimate fundamental rights, including their rights to freedom, independence and to establish their own sovereign State on the basis of the 1967 borders, with East Jerusalem as its capital.

That is the very State for which the Palestinian President yesterday submitted a request for membership of the United Nations (A/66/371, annex), after serious and just efforts towards a final settlement had stalled and any chance of achieving significant progress in the negotiating process had dwindled, in particular since the other party insists on keeping the negotiating process open forever. Yesterday, we saw the Quartet fail yet again to come up with a balanced vision to achieve the goal that we all know and approve of, yet differ on how to realize.

It is utterly absurd to carry on talking about a peace process, while Israel continues, in all comfort and complete disregard for the objections of the countries of the world, to construct settlements on the Palestinian territories in the West Bank, altering the features of occupied East Jerusalem, using violence against civilians and continuing its blockade of Gaza, in violation of the provisions of international law.

Regrettably, anyone with a sense of justice following the situation will see in Israel’s actions the embodiment of its continuing refusal to admit that the only way to achieve its security is by reaching a just settlement with the Palestinians through serious negotiations based on clear parameters and terms of reference and a specific time frame. What is urgently needed now is to intensify all our efforts in order to put an end to the conflict.

Egypt has been and will remain committed to the goal of achieving the just and comprehensive peace that it initiated in the Middle East, and will continue to actively support it. Egypt will continue its efforts to end the Israeli occupation of the occupied Palestinian territories and to resolve all final-status issues within a specific, agreed and internationally guaranteed time frame. Egypt will also maintain its efforts to capitalize on the successes achieved in Cairo through the signing of the Palestinian reconciliation agreement, thereby strengthening Palestinian unity and efforts to achieve peace.

/...

/...

We would also like to see success in the Middle East peace process. Sixty years have passed and there is no time left for advances and retreats, the status quo, or unilateral actions that are prejudicial to negotiations. The recipes, principles, concrete formulas and road maps are all well known. We do not have to reinvent the wheel. Peace may be difficult, but it is within the reach of Palestine, which already embodies all the characteristics of a State, to which the European Union has greatly contributed. Peace in this time of change is also within Israel’s reach in the framework of a stable relationship and, above all else, security.

The recognition of a new State naturally falls to the responsibility of each State Member of this Organization. Portugal has backed the concept that the European Union, through its High Representative, in the context of the Quartet and in coordination with other members of the European Union in the Security Council, has a constructive and decisive role to play in this process, which is at a crossroads. Europe can speak with one voice to build bridges and facilitate compromise. It should be clear that, just as the creation of a Palestinian State is a promise that must be honoured, so, too, the security of Israel must be firmly guaranteed by the international community.

The President of the Palestinian Authority decided to present to the Security Council a request for Palestine’s admission to the United Nations as a State. This step must be the result and logical outcome of negotiations. We therefore understand the request to be an expression of interest that will be fulfilled with the signing of a peace agreement ending one of the longest conflicts of our era.

Until then, we are open to supporting an enhanced status for Palestine in the United Nations. This would be an important step towards the creation of a new State, and represent an additional commitment by the Palestinians to the negotiation process, reinforcing the confidence needed for a definitive and global peace agreement to be reached. Portugal has a unique sensibility in its dialogue with the Middle East. We will use that sensibility and our close relationships to assist in finding the only result that is of interest to us all: peace.

/...



This record contains the text of speeches delivered in English and of the interpretation of speeches delivered in the other languages. Corrections should be submitted to the original languages only. They should be incorporated in a copy of the record and sent under the signature of a member of the delegation concerned to the Chief of the Verbatim Reporting Service, room U-506. Corrections will be issued after the end of the session in a consolidated corrigendum.


Follow UNISPAL RSS Twitter