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Source: Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs (OCHA)
17 July 2013



An Overview of Global
Humanitarian Action at Mid-Year
based on the mid-year reviews of the 2013 consolidated appeals


Global humanitarian action at mid-2013 has entered uncharted territory in terms of the number of people needing help and resources still to be secured, mainly because of the Syria crisis. The Syria Humanitarian Assistance Response Plan aims to help 6.8 million people inside Syria in 2013, and the Syria Regional Response Plan for refugees and affected host communities intends to help another 5.3 million people. Their combined resource requirements have added $4.4 billion to the amount needed for humanitarian action in major crises this year, which now totals an unprecedented $12.9 billion to help 73 million people. Funding response has been impressive, especially considering the continuing climate of slow economic growth – $5.1 billion to date (the largest total ever recorded at mid-year). However this is fast approaching the full-year amount that donors directed to appeals for major crises in 2011 and 2012.

It is clear that relying on humanitarian aid budgets that are similar in scale to last year’s will leave an enormous gap this year for the many more millions of people in need. Donors have a heavy burden in the second half of this year, to make available further resources commensurate with the new scale of needs.

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ANALYSIS OF FUNDING TO DATE

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Uneven funding across appeals: The donors’ distribution of their funds among appeals diverges considerably from the requirements therein. At the high end, the appeals for the Democratic Republic of the Congo, South Sudan, the occupied Palestinian territory, and Afghanistan are better than 50% funded; at the low end, Djibouti, Somalia and Mali are all less than 35% funded.

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Complete document in PDF format (Requires Acrobat Reader)

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