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Source: Department of Public Information (DPI)
27 September 2010

General Assembly
GA/11004

        Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Sixty-fifth General Assembly
Plenary
19th & 20th Meetings (AM & PM)


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Background

The General Assembly met today to continue its annual general debate.

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ALI OSMAN MOHAMED TAHA, Vice-President of Sudan, ...

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...  Regarding the Arab-Israeli conflict, he asked why the Palestinian people continued to suffer, and called for the freezing of Israeli settlements.  ...

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MOHD NAJIB ABDUL RAZAK, Prime Minister of Malaysia, ...

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...Turning to the Middle East, he said on 7 June 2010 the Malaysian Parliament had passed a resolution condemning the brutal Israeli attack on the humanitarian convoy headed for Gaza.  His Government also understood the necessity of letting the multilateral system work and had been pleased with the findings of the Fact Finding Mission of the Human Rights Council and felt vindicated by the findings.  It was now waiting for the United Nations Investigation Panel to complete its work.  Malaysia wanted to see the perpetrators brought to justice and adequate compensation given for the innocent victims.

On the Middle East peace process, he supported direct dialogue between the parties on achieving a two-State solution, which should address the following prerequisite issues:  first, Israel must heed the high expectations of the international community to end the conflict and the Quartet must persuade Israel to end the construction of new settlements; second, reconciliation efforts must bear fruit and political unity among the Palestinians was vital; and third, both parties must eschew violence and ensure the protection of civilians.

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ABBAS EL FASSI, Prime Minister of Morocco, ...

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Achieving peace in the Middle East was not an impossible goal, but one that could only be solved with a two-State solution.  The international community was called upon to support the direct negotiation process, which was a good opportunity to strive to achieve a final settlement in compliance with international laws and relevant United Nations resolutions.  An active participant in the process, Morocco recognized that talks must address the issues of establishing a fully sovereign Palestinian state, with Al-Quds al-Sharif as its capital.  For negotiations to succeed, unilateral actions must be avoided and settlement building must end.  As president of the Al-Quds Committee, he said the city must remain a symbol of coexistence between the Palestinian and Israeli peoples.

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BERNARD KOUCHNER, Minister for Foreign Affairs and European Affairs of France, ...

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As for peace and security, he discussed the Arab-Israeli conflict, saying that amid ongoing efforts, it was also important to work on the Lebanese and Syrian tracks to ensure that opportunities presented today not be lost.  The best security guarantee for Israel would be a new United Nations Member State whose creation many had urged:  Palestine.  All regional States had a critical role to play in achieving such an end, including peace throughout the wider Middle East.  Most important was that Israelis and Arabs took strategic decisions to end the conflict.

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MOURAD MEDELCI, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Algeria, ...

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He reiterated the call to the international community to ensure fairness and coherence with regard to efforts to end conflicts.  A definitive solution to the Middle East conflict lay in the implementation of the Arab Peace initiative.  Algeria expressed its friendship and support to the Palestinian people and called for an immediate halt to settlement building and for the adoption of a peace agreement that included a return of land to the Palestinians based on the pre-1967 border and the return of refugees.  ...

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SHAIKH KHALID BIN AHMED BIN MOHAMED AL KHALIFA, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Bahrain, ...

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Describing the Arab-Israeli conflict as one of the most important issues confronting the international community, he noted that it had been stuck for decades now, as failure followed on the steps of hope, and as frustration at the constant regression of the peace process overshadowed optimism.  Yet, his country persevered hoping for a just, durable and comprehensive peace that restored rights to their legitimate owners and opened doors for mutual acceptance as neighbours, friends and partners with all the respect and commitment required.  Bahrain valued the historic commitment and tireless efforts of United States President Barack Obama, who had given impetus to the peace process in the Middle East and renewed hope by launching resumed direct negotiations between Palestine and Israel.  Those efforts required the unfailing commitment and support of all parties to take the necessary measures towards the attainment of peace, and to refrain from placing hurdles in its path.  They needed to take steps towards coexistence among all through enhanced communication and outreach, to offer each party the opportunity to convince the other to coexist and become a partner.

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MICHEÁL MARTIN, Minister for Foreign Affairs of Ireland, ...

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In regards to the Middle East peace process, he reminded the Assembly that Ireland’s experience in the Northern Ireland peace process showed that political progress could only be achieved through dialogue.  “Maximum restraint for the duration of these talks, which are intended to be — and should be — completed within 12 months, would be a small price for lasting peace,” he stated, and he echoed the sentiment of regret his colleague, the European Union High Representative, expressed that Israel had decided not to extend the moratorium on settlements.  A witness to the “appalling humanitarian plight of the people of Gaza” during his visit in February of this year, he heralded the dignity and resilience of the people there, living in conditions that were “quite simply unacceptable”.  Even with the delivery of humanitarian and consumer goods, the need for normal commercial activity to resume was essential to Gaza’s recovery.

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MANUEL SALVADOR DOS RAMOS, Minister of Foreign Affairs and Communications of Sāo Tomé and Príncipe, ...

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Touching on a number of conflicts, he said that the consensus established until now around the question of Western Sahara should urge the parties involved to continue on the path of dialogue aimed at a peaceful settlement of that conflict. Global security was vital for the sustainable development of countries, and the international community needed to be cautious and aware of the risks that the spread of the Palestinian conflict caused for the entire Middle Eastern region and to international peace.  Sāo Tomé and Príncipe welcomed the resumption of dialogue and encouraged Israel and the Palestinian Authority to continue on that course in hopes of peaceful coexistence.

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OLDEMIRO BALOI, Minister of Foreign Affairs and Cooperation of Mozambique, ...

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As concerned the maintenance of international peace and security, Mozambique was committed to continue sharing its experience in the peaceful resolution of conflicts, particularly with southern Africa, which he noted, had improved in that regard.  Mozambique remained concerned, however, about the volatile situation in the Middle East, where conflict between Israel and the Palestinians continued to deprive the Palestinian people of the realization of all their fundamental human rights.  ...

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For information media • not an official record

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