UNISPAL Home

French.pdf
Press Release
UNITED NATIONS
Department of Public Information · News Coverage Service · New York


Fifty-ninth General Assembly
Plenary
24th & 25th Meetings (AM & PM)
GA/10273
11 October 2004

SPEAKERS IN GENERAL ASSEMBLY STRESS NEED FOR MORE REPRESENTATIVE,
 
DEMOCRATIC, ACCOUNTABLE SECURITY COUNCIL


...

Background

The General Assembly met today to take up the report of the Security Council and to hold a joint debate on the question of equitable representation on and increase in the membership of that body and related matters.  It was also expected to take up the report of the Fifth Committee (Administrative and Budgetary) on the scale of assessments for the apportionment of the expenses of the United Nations.

...

Statements

...

ABDALLAH BAALI (Algeria) ...

...

The Council, he continued, had taken direct action in dealing with problems affecting the world.  He was pleased with the efforts it had displayed in areas of conflict or those emerging from conflict, particularly in west Africa.  The mission to that region had had a positive impact, and he called for similar missions to other areas of conflict.  In other situations that showed no threat to peace and security, the Council had transcended its mandate, such as in Resolution 1559, which dealt with the situation in Lebanon.  At the same time, he expressed regret that the Council had not shown more determination in the occupied Palestinian territories.  The Council had not been able to make progress to encourage the peace process and ensure the protection of Palestinians in the occupied territories.  The credibility of the Council was in question, and would further erode if it did not show the world its capacity for the settlement of disputes on its agenda.  ...

...

DUMISANI S. KUMALO (South Africa) ...

...

While the Council had been able to address some threats, he remained concerned at its inability to demonstrate the requisite political will and a commitment to effective decision-making that had prevented it from being able to address other challenges.  In particular, he remained concerned that the Council was still unable to take a definitive decision on the conflict in the Middle East. The Council would soon have to transcend the division among its members and speak with one voice on that tragic situation, or face the erosion of its credibility as an organ mandated to maintain international peace and security.

...

ABDULAZIZ NASSER AL-SHAMSI (United Arab Emirates) reaffirmed his country’s support of the position of the Non-Aligned Movement on the issue of Council reform.  Noting the progress made to date in the improvement of the working methods of the Council during the last few years, he said was nonetheless deeply concerned about the double-standard policy followed by the Council in considering some of the issues pertaining to the Middle East, such as the Palestinian question, which he said impaired the Council from discharging its responsibilities fully and appropriately.  He urged the Council to act in accordance with the principles of the Charter, international law and relevant international resolutions.

...

He said that imbalanced representation in the Council and unequal distribution of powers and prerogatives among its members had resulted in impeding the Council’s ability to address some of the most important items on its agenda, specifically those pertaining to the maintenance of international peace and security.  That had led to prolonging the duration of those issues, and creating human crises.  He believed the enlargement of permanent and non-permanent membership should be consistent and approved by at least two-thirds of the members of the General Assembly, and based on equitable geographical representation.  Any future composition of the Security Council, he continued, must reflect better representation of developing countries, based on equitable geographical representation, to enhance political balance in the Council.

He also reiterated his country’s support for the allocation of a permanent seat for the Arab Group, to be filled by Arab countries on a rotating basis, in accordance with the practices applied in the League of Arab States.  Finally, he said controls and criteria should be established for the use of the veto to ensure the impartiality and objectivity of the Council in the decision-making process, and in the use of its prerogatives and powers while addressing pressing global issues requiring urgent intervention.

...

STAFFORD NEIL (Jamaica) ...   On the Middle East, he highlighted that the Council had been unable to act to curtail the escalation of violence and that political realities restricted that body’s options and ability to be unified, authoritative and decisive.  It was evident that the Quartet and its Road Map were going nowhere.  A bolder approach was needed which constrained the parties to respect the will of the international community for a comprehensive settlement.  ...

...

AMR ABOUL ATTA (Egypt) said the Council’s report indicated that the majority of the issues the body had dealt with concerned the African continent.  He praised the Council’s attention and hoped that its emerging body of work could lead to a broader understanding of the challenges facing all African countries.  The report also showed that the Council had been unable to stem the tide of violence in the Middle East.  He added that the Council must undertake its wider peace and security duties, in consultation with regional groups and the other main bodies of the Organization –- the General Assembly and the Economic and Social Council.

...

AMINU BASHIR WALI (Nigeria) ...

...

Turning to the challenges faced by the Council, he said that Nigeria appreciated the role of the Council in the search for solutions to the crises in Côte d’Ivoire, the Democratic Republic of the Congo, and the Sudan, and commended the support the Council had given the subregional and regional organizations of the Economic Community of West African States (ECOWAS) and the African Union.  He also hoped that, despite the setbacks reflected in the violence and heavy death tolls on both sides of the Middle East crisis, the Council would continue to lend its weight to a permanent solution that recognized the existence of two States, living side by side.

...

ALI HACHANI (Tunisia) said the report of the Security Council still seemed like a compilation of resolutions and decisions, as well as other factual inputs.  And even though there had been a number of public meetings, much still had to be done to make the Council’s work more transparent.  The Council had not lived up to expectations on the Middle East, while the selective use of Chapter VII was a matter of concern.  The crucial importance of reform had been reiterated since 1993.  His country was well aware of the delicate and complex nature of the process, but there must be a comprehensive reform of that body, as soon as possible.  The United Nations was still the source of international legality and given that, the Council must immediately win back the trust of States and public opinion.  It must also become more representative of the international community, as well as geo-political realities.  While there had been a variety of proposals offered, an acceptable formula had not yet been drafted.

...

FAYSSAL MEKDAD (Syria) said that the Assembly’s consideration of the report of the Security Council reaffirmed the vital role it played in all issues under the Charter, and was also an opportunity for Member States to express their views on the work of the Council in maintaining international peace and security.  Given the importance of regaining stability in conflict areas around the world, African issues had perhaps taken up much of the Council’s time.  It was necessary to hold public meetings of the Council in order to achieve more credibility for its work and to give an opportunity for Member States to express their views.  He said the Israeli practices in the occupied Palestinian territories were a manifestation of the Council’s inability, at times, to maintain international peace and security and to put an end to Israeli policies, due to the impunity Israel enjoyed within the Council.

...

YERZHAN KH. KAZYKHANOV (Kazakhstan) commended the Security Council for maintaining a busy agenda regarding Africa, the Middle East and Afghanistan, as well as on other important issues. ...

...

* *** *
______________________________________________________________________
For information media - not an official record