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UNITED
NATIONS
A

        General Assembly
Distr.
GENERAL
A/48/96
16 April 1993

ORIGINAL: ENGLISH

Forty-eighth session
Item 86 of the preliminary list*


REPORT OF THE SPECIAL COMMITTEE TO INVESTIGATE ISRAELI
PRACTICES AFFECTING THE HUMAN RIGHTS OF THE PALESTINIAN
PEOPLE AND OTHER ARABS OF THE OCCUPIED TERRITORIES

Note by the Secretary-General


The Secretary-General has the honour to transmit to the members of the General Assembly the attached periodic report covering the period from 27 August to 30 November 1992, which was submitted to him, in accordance with paragraphs 16, 17 and 18 of Assembly resolution 47/70 A of 14 December 1992, by the Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices Affecting the Human Rights of the Palestinian People and Other Arabs of the Occupied Territories.

_____________

*A/48/50.


CONTENTS

LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL

I. INTRODUCTION

II. INFORMATION RECEIVED BY THE SPECIAL COMMITTEE

Treatment of detainees

Measures concerning the release of detainees

Annexation and settlement

Information concerning the occupied Syrian Arab Golan




LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL
22 February 1993

Sir,

The Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices Affecting the Human Rights of the Palestinian People and Other Arabs of the Occupied Territories has the honour to transmit to you herewith, in accordance with paragraphs 16, 17 and 18 of General Assembly resolution 47/70 A, a periodic report updating information contained in the twenty-fourth report, which it adopted and presented to you on 26 August 1992 (A/47/509). The present periodic report has been prepared in order to bring to your attention, and to the attention of the General Assembly, updated information on the human rights situation in the occupied territories.

The present periodic report covers the period from 27 August to 30 November 1992. It is based on written information gathered from various sources among which the Special Committee has selected relevant excerpts and summaries, which are reflected in the report.

Accept, Sir, the assurances of my highest consideration.



Stanley KALPAGE
Chairman of the Special Committee to
Investigate Israeli Practices Affecting
the Human Rights of the Palestinian
People and Other Arabs of the
Occupied Territories
His Excellency
Mr. Boutros Boutros-Ghali
Secretary-General of the United Nations
New York
I. INTRODUCTION


1. By its resolution 47/70 A of 14 December 1992 the General Assembly:

2. The Special Committee continued its work under the rules of procedure contained in its first report to the Secretary-General and held the first of its series of meetings from 6 to 8 January 1993 at Geneva. Mr. Stanley Kalpagé (Sri Lanka) continued to be Chairman. The meetings were also attended by Mr. Alioune Sene (Senegal). In view of General Assembly resolution 47/1 of 22 September 1992, Mr. Dragan Jovanic (Yugoslavia) did not attend the meetings.

3. The Special Committee decided to continue its system of monitoring information on the occupied territories and, in reference to paragraph 18 of resolution 47/70 A, to pay special attention to information on the treatment of prisoners. The Special Committee examined information on developments which had occurred in the occupied territories between 27 August and 30 November 1992. It also examined a number of communications addressed to it by Governments, organizations and individuals in connection with its mandate. The Special Committee took note of a communication addressed to it by the Permanent Representative of Jordan to the United actions Office at Geneva on matters related to its report.

4. The Special Committee also decided upon the organization of its work for the year. It agreed to address itself to the Governments of Egypt, Jordan and the Syrian Arab Republic with a view to seeking their cooperation in the implementation of its mandate. The Special Committee also agreed to address itself to the Observer for Palestine and to the International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC). Finally, the Special Committee decided that at its next series of meetings it would undertake hearings in the area for the purpose of recording relevant information or evidence.

5. On 17 December 1992, the Chairman of the Special Committee addressed a cable to the Secretary-General in which he conveyed the deep concern of the Special Committee about the decision to deport 418 Palestinians from the territories occupied by Israel. The Special Committee, while deploring the unforeseeable negative consequences of such a measure on the situation prevailing in the occupied territories, requested the Secretary-General to bring its concern to the attention of the Israeli authorities about this decision, which was in violation of all relevant international legal norms and standards, in particular the provisions of the 1949 Geneva Convention relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War.

6. On 8 January 1993, the Special Committee addressed a letter to the Secretary-General seeking his intervention in an effort to secure the cooperation of the Government of Israel.

7. The Special Committee addressed a letter to the President of the General Assembly in which it drew attention to the fact that as a consequence of General Assembly resolution 47/1, Mr. D. Jovanic (Yugoslavia) no longer participated in its deliberations, a situation which considerably curtailed the Special Committee's ability to function effectively. The Special Committee therefore requested the President of the General Assembly to resolve this problem with a view to enabling it to continue to discharge the mandate given to it by the General Assembly in the best manner possible.

8. The Special Committee also examined the present report, which was adopted on 8 January 1993.

9. The geographical names as well as the terminology employed in the present report reflect the usage in the original sources and do not imply the expression of any opinion whatsoever on the part of the Special Committee or the Secretariat of the United Nations.

II. INFORMATION RECEIVED BY THE SPECIAL COMMITTEE

A. General situation

1. General developments and Policy statements

10. On 27 August 1992, senior Israel Defence Forces (IDF) sources indicated that a reduction in IDF forces in the major cities and population centres of the territories would be the next step in Prime Minister Rabin's gestures towards Palestinians. The sources stated that the area commanders in the West Bank had already been instructed to close observation posts and strong points. They added that Rabin had also asked Maj. Gen. Danny Rothschild, the coordinator of activities in the territories, and Civil Administration officials to prepare a list of possible measures to ease the lot of the average Palestinian as a means of showing that there had been a change of government and of winning their trust. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 28 August 1992)

11. On 28 August 1992, it was reported that the number of wanted fugitives in the West Bank had gone from 600 to 300 persons in the course of the past months owing to arrests and surrenders. (Ha'aretz, 28 August 1992)

12. On 1 September 1992, it was reported that a new department, which had been established in the Unit of Coordination of Activities in the Occupied Territories, would deal with all matters concerning autonomy, documents regarding negotiations with the Palestinians, the peace process and the transition stages. The newly created department would deal with transition in such fields as police, health, education and taxes and would be operational in October. (Ha'aretz, 1 September 1992)

13. On 2 September 1992, Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin stated at a seminar in Jerusalem that he wished that the Gaza Strip "would fall into the sea". He quickly added "that since that won't happen, a solution must be found for the problem". According to the Israeli daily Hadashot, the statement was confirmed by the Prime Minister's spokesman. The Palestinian peace delegation issued a press release in Washington, maintaining that the statement was "racist" and asking the Israeli side to "avoid provocative statements". (Al Fajr, 14 September 1992)

14. On 6 September 1992, it was reported that the Bank of Jordan had reached an agreement with the Israeli authorities to reopen its three West Bank branches, which were closed in 1967, and open three additional branches in other West Bank cities. Jerusalem, however, would be excluded. The opening of these branches would make the Bank of Jordan the second bank to reopen its branches in the West Bank. The first was the Cairo-Amman Bank, which currently has branches in almost every major West Bank city and town, excluding East Jerusalem. So far, Israelis refused to allow Arab banks to reopen their branches in the West Bank. (Al Fajr, 14 September 1992)

15. On 7 September 1992, it was reported that approximately 800 Palestinian political detainees were released from a prison last week as a "goodwill" gesture ordered by Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin. The measure was to coincide with the start of round six of the Palestinian-Israeli peace talks in Washington. The order concerned Palestinian political prisoners who were convicted of minor charges and had completed over two thirds of their prison terms. Many Palestinians, however, criticized the measure as being nothing more than cosmetic, intended to improve Israel's image and stature abroad. They pointed to the fact that almost all the released prisoners, for example, would have completed their terms within days or weeks. One of the prisoners was actually detained for three days after he had completed his term, only in order to be released with the rest. (Al-Tali'ah, 3 September 1992; Al-Fajr, 7 September 1992)

16. On 7 September 1992, IDF allowed 21 Palestinian families in a dozen villages in the West Bank to unseal rooms that had been blocked as a punishment for security offences committed by a family member more than five years before. (Ha'aretz, 9 September 1992, Jerusalem Post, 8 September 1992)

17. On 9 September 1992, the Chief of General Staff, Lt.-Gen. Ehud Barak, reported that since the beginning of the year, some 700 wanted fugitives had been arrested. Among them, 450 were serious cases and more than 100 had turned themselves in to the authorities. Eleven armed persons were also killed with arms on them. (Ha'aretz, 10 September 1992)

18. On 9 September 1992, the municipal authorities of Jericho inaugurated a new tourist office at Tel-Jericho in the presence of Civil Administration officials. The office was opened because tourism to Jericho had increased this year by 45 per cent to 350,000 persons in the first eight months. (Jerusalem Post, 10 September 1992). Also on 9 September 1992, it was reported that the Gaza-based Palestine Bank petitioned the Israeli High Court to be allowed to open branches in the West Bank. (Al-Fajr, 14 September 1992)

19. On 9 September 1992, it was reported that Jordan had rejected the conditions set by Israel for the reopening of Jordanian banks in the territories. Two banks, the Bank of Jordan and the Arab Bank, had requested permission to reopen their branches. The Bank of Jordan was the second Jordanian financial institution asking to resume operations in the territories. The Cairo-Amman Bank reopened its offices in 1986 and currently operates six branches in the occupied territories. (Jerusalem Post, 6 and 9 September 1992)

20. On 10 September 1992, it was reported that IDF statistics during the past eight months showed that soldiers had killed 69 Palestinians in 1992. There was a steady decline in the number of Palestinians killed by other Palestinians, which amounted to three persons killed in August in the West Bank, while the total killings in August amounted to 19. A total of 168 Palestinians were killed in these circumstances by the end of August, 118 of them in Gaza, and this was more than during any other eight-month period since the beginning of the uprising. Eighty two petrol bombs were thrown in August, with the number of those thrown in the West Bank being double of those thrown in the Gaza Strip. (Jerusalem Post, 10 September 1992)

21. On 10 September 1992, it was reported that the Civil Administration had authorized the establishment of new branches of the Cairo-Amman Bank in Jericho and Kalkiliya. (Jerusalem Post, 10 September 1992)

22. On 14 September 1992, a senior Interior Ministry official stated that approximately 1,000 Palestinians from the territories were permitted to move to Jerusalem annually under the "family unification" programme. Experts estimated that the number of illegal Palestinian immigrants was much higher. (Jerusalem Post, 15 September 1992)

23. On 15 September 1992, it was reported that the General Security Service and the army had lately discovered a number of activist cells, which engaged be in violent activities that operated in the northern West Bank. Some of them were composed of violent "terrorists" whose arrests were made possible after, prolonged intelligence and field activities. Among the cells which were exposed was the "Islamic Jihad Platoons". Security agents arrested 25 young men who were residents of the villages of Deir el-Ruchuv, Atil, Kafr Labed and Zawiya, which are all located near Tulkarem. (Jerusalem Post, 15 September 1992)

24. On 15 September 1992, the Minister for Foreign Affairs, Shimon Peres, met with Issam Shawa, Gazan consultant to ANERA (American Near East Refugee Aid Association), Mohammed Yazji, head of the Gaza Industrialist Association, and Tawfiq Abu Ghazala, a lawyer, during a visit to the Gaza Strip. During the discussion, Abu Ghazala asked why it took 6 to 12 months to register a company in Gaza, while the same procedure lasted only a few minutes in the West Bank. Peres reportedly said that the procedures in Gaza should be improved immediately. The Minister was also urged to have Israel remove obstacles to the export of Gaza products, especially textiles. (Jerusalem Post, 16 September 1992)

25. On 17 September 1992, the IDF announced the recent arrest of two leading fugitives who are members of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine, Ahmed Suleiman Katmash, 42 (sought since 1976) and Ahmed Saad Abdul Ghasoul, 40 (sought since January 1992). (Ha'aretz, 18 September 1992; Jerusalem Post, 18 and 20 September 1992; this information has also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 21 September 1992)

26. On 18 September 1992, it was reported that the IDF was considering the possibility of significantly reducing its forces in the territories, especially in the West Bank, due to the sharp decline in violence. According to the IDF, activists cells were still operating in the territories but their activities were at the level which prevailed before the uprising. (Ha'aretz, 18 September 1992)

27. On 20 September 1992 security sources reported that hundreds of Popular Front activists in the territories had been arrested in the wake of the recent capture of Ahmed Suleiman Katamash, the "terrorist" group's chief operative in the territories. (Jerusalem Post, 20 September 1992)

28. On 21 September 1992, Usama Imad Muhammed Kamil Sakran, from Kabatiya (West Bank), a fugitive who had been wanted for a long time, was arrested by the security forces. A Kalachnikov rifle and other weapons were found in his possession. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 23 September 1992)

29. On 22 September 1992, it was reported that the IDF was considering closing down a significant part of the Ketziot detention centre in the Negev. The centre housed Palestinians involved in terrorist activities, including the throwing of stones and fire bombs. Sources in the Southern Command stated that the expected closure was due to the recent massive release of detainees and the sharp decrease in the number of new detainees. The sources attributed this to the recent decline in uprising-related activities. The IDF was believed to be holding currently between 7,000 and 7,500 Palestinian detainees, convicted prisoners and persons under administrative detention in several prisons and detention centres. In 1991, it held an estimated 15,000 Palestinians. The IDF had already closed the Khan Younis detention centre. The Gaza Beach detention centre was also virtually empty. (Jerusalem Post, 22 September 1992)

30. On 24 September 1992, it was reported that Brigadier General Moshe Ya'alon, who is in charge of the IDF forces in the West Bank, said that the majority of Palestinians who were sought by the security forces in the West Bank a year earlier had been captured. He also indicated that the apparent change in trends concerning the Palestinian uprising from organizing large demonstrations to sporadic armed attacks had required a commensurate change in the implementation of the security forces' operations. General Ya'alon stated that two months earlier, security forces had launched a campaign encouraging wanted Palestinians to give themselves up to the authorities or face a prison sentence to which up to seven years would be added. The warning, presented as a "Wanted Persons Order" to the family of the suspect, gave the suspects 30 days to comply. According to Ya'alon, some 40 Palestinians had turned themselves in as a result of this campaign. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 24 September 1992)

31. On 25 and 26 September 1992, border police arrested in the Balata refugee camp one of the most sought-after fugitives in the West Bank, Hakham Abd al-Fatah Abu Ayshe, also known as "Sannu". A STEN submachine-gun, cartridges, a hand grenade and a knife were found in his possession. Several other residents of the refugee camp were arrested on that occasion. (Ha'aretz, 27 September 1992)

32. On 1 October 1992, two wanted Hamas activists were captured in the Shati and Nuseirat refugee camps. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 2 October 1992)

33. On 8 October 1992, it was reported that Brig, Gen. Moshe Ya'alon, commander of the IDF forces in the West Bank, told Bamahaneh, the IDF weekly magazine, that "the uprising was dead". According to Ya'alon, this was mainly due to the change in the IDF's operating methods. He also stated that the number of wanted fugitives still at large in the West Bank was 150, as compared with 600 in 1991. (Jerusalem Post, 8 October 1992). Also on 8 October, two wanted youths were arrested in Tammoun, near Jenin. Deeb Salem Fadel, 30, and Hani Ali Odeh, 20, were allegedly wanted for shooting at soldiers and burning Israeli fields. (Al-Fajr, 12 October 1992)

34. On 9 October 1992, it was reported that the General Security Service and the police had discovered a "terrorist" gang believed to be responsible for the September shooting of a resident of Moshav Gadish, near Afula. The three members of the gang were from a village near Jenir, in the West Bank. (Ha'aretz, 11 October 1992; Jerusalem Post, 9 October 1992)

35. On 13 October 1992, it was reported that the IDF had decided to strengthen the security forces in the territories following recent violent demonstrations in which soldiers and border police officers were forced to return fire with live ammunition. During a visit to the Gaza Strip, Prime Minister and Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin stated that the uprising had not died down but had only changed form, amounting to fewer demonstrations and more "terrorist" attacks. He added that the ongoing hunger strike by security prisoners was aimed at triggering the recent riots and regaining world attention. According to Rabin, the strike was popular with the Palestinian public: "One should remember that some 80,000 residents of the territories have been detained at one point or another, and there is almost no Palestinian family that has not had a member in detention. This is a particularly sensitive issue." (Jerusalem Post, 13 October 1992). Also on 13 October, it was reported that ICRC had closed all its Gaza Strip offices in protest of Israeli harassment. Israeli soldiers stood at the entrances and prevented employees of ICRC and residents of the Gaza Strip from entering the ICRC offices. (Al-Fajr, 19 October 1992)

36. On 14 October 1992, Marwan Yusuf Arda, 22, a member of the Red Eagles gang, who had been sought since May 1992 for violent interrogations of alleged collaborators, was arrested in Aaraba, near Jenin. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 15 October 1992; this information has also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 19 October 1992)

37. On 16 October 1992, it was reported that the security authorities had urged farmers from the Tanachim settlement region who live along the Green Line to go to work their fields armed and in pairs. According to the Chairman of the Gilboa Regional Council, Avraham Yariv, the region has become a "front line for terrorist attacks". Yariv urged the fencing off of the pre-1967 border or the digging of a deep ditch that would be difficult to cross, in order to prevent further incursions by assailants. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 16 October 1992)

38. On 16 October 1992, it was reported that Prime Minister and Defense Minister Yitzhak Rabin had approved a programme currently being reviewed by the Central Command, the office of the Judge Advocate General and the security authorities. The programme "Avnei Tsedek", the first of its kind in the territories, was to begin in early November and would speed up the judicial process for more than 1,000 Palestinians detained in IDF detention centres who had not been sentenced so far. (Ha'aretz, 16 October 1992)

39. On 20 October 1992, it was reported that during a special meeting of police and security officials, it was decided that 100 policemen would be added to the forces patrolling the Green Line. It was also decided to increase coordination between the police and the IDF and, as of November, to use helicopters to patrol the pre-1967 border. More checkpoints would be established on the area's roads, and the monitoring of the movements of workers from the territories would be increased. Also on 20 October 1992, it was disclosed at a cabinet meeting that a total of 116 Israeli citizens had been killed by Palestinians since the beginning of the uprising in December 1987. Military officials indicated that 1992 had been the year with the fewest Israeli fatalities. The IDF announced a change in regulations concerning appeals in military courts in the territories. Defendants were now able to appeal in military court decisions concerning their detention. The announcement explained that this was part of the recent changes concerning the appeals procedure for security prisoners in the territories. (Ha'aretz, 21 October 1992; Jerusalem Post, 20 and 21 October 1992)

40. On 21 October 1992, a spokesman for the settlers from the occupied territories called for a halt of the peace negotiations in Washington following incidents in which two soldiers were shot and injured in Hebron. (Al'Tali'ah, 22 October 1992)

41. On 22 October 1992, General Ehud Barak, the Chief of Staff of the Israeli Army, reportedly declared that there had recently been a pronounced increase in confrontations in the occupied territories, particularly in the Gaza Strip. This was partly due to the hunger strike which had been staged by Palestinian prisoners. (Al'Tali'ah, 22 October 1992)

42. On 23 October 1992, it was reported that the IDF forces would start using bullets made of salt ("salt bullets") in the near future to break up disturbances and demonstrations in the territories. This type of bullet is said to cause skin burns for one or two days. (Ha'aretz, 23 October 1992; Jerusalem Post, 25 October 1992; this information has also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 2 November 1992). Also on 23 October 1992, Col. Avraham Becher, who is in charge of the home front for the Southern Command, told an emergency meeting of settlement leaders from the area that the frequency of infiltration into the settlements in the Gaza Strip was far greater than in other confrontation areas of the country.

43. On 29 and 30 October 1992, it was reported that eight Palestinians were arrested on various security charges: two from Abwain, one from Deir Abu Misha'al, one from Beit Likya near Ramallah and four from the village of Tamoun near Jenin. (Al-Fajr, 2 November 1992)

44. On 2 November 1992, the Israeli Information Center for Human Rights, B'Tselem, reported that over 14,000 administrative detention orders had been issued against Palestinians from the occupied territories since the beginning of the intifadah. In its report released on 28 October 1992 entitled "Detained without trial: Administrative detention in the occupied territories since the beginning of the Intifada", B'Tselem stated that most of those detained had been interned without trial for six months. (Al-Fajr, 2 November 1992)

45. On 3 November 1992, it was reported that the IDF had arrested a number of wanted youths in Khan Younis (Gaza Strip). Mahmud Ajjaj, 24, of Kufr Sour near Tulkarem was also arrested on charges of membership in the Fatah. (Al-Fajr, 9 November 1992)

46. On 4 November 1992, it was reported that officials close to the Islamic movement were working on the creation of a Palestinian harbour in Gaza and had entered into contact with the Civil Administration in the Gaza Strip for that purpose. (Ha'aretz, 4 November 1992)

47. On 4 November 1992, Maj. Gen. Danny Rothschild, Defense Ministry coordinator of activities in the territories, briefed the Knesset Foreign Affairs and Defense Committee and stated that the Islamic organizations in the territories received more outside funding than the PLO, not only from Iran but also from Saudi Arabia. He indicated that the economic situation of the Palestinians in the territories was worsening, as some of the jobs they used to fill inside Israel were filled by new immigrants. He indicated also that transfers of funds from relatives abroad to their families, which had been cut off during the Gulf war, had for the greater part not been resumed. (Jerusalem Post, 5 November 1992)

48. On 5 November 1992, 100 residents of the territories who did not have valid permits were arrested in Israel during the night in a special police operation. (Ha'aretz, 6 November 1992). Also on 5 November, the IDF was reported to have launched a widespread arrest campaign in the village of Masliya, near Jenin. Two wanted Black Panther activists were arrested during the raid. (Al-Fajr, 9 November 1992)

49. On 10 November 1992, it was reported that the United Nations would increase its economic activities in the territories in coordination with the Israeli Government by investing $20 million in projects and foundations. (Ha'aretz, 10 November 1992)

50. On 11 November 1992, the Head of Administration, Brig. Gen. Gadi Zohar, told Palestinian journalists that the West Bank Civil Administration development budget for 1993 was to be around $51 million, which amounted to a more than 150 per cent increase over the one which had been planned at the beginning of the year. For the first time, the development budget included funds for major long-term projects, including some $3.05 million for a sewage disposal project in Nablus and some $2.3 million for improvements in sewage disposal systems in Jenin, Tulkarem and el-Bireh. In the past 18 months, 180 permits were issued for new factories and plans, of which 80 functioned currently and 22 were to be built within the next 12 months. (Jerusalem Post, 12 November 1992). Also on 11 November 1992, the IDF arrested a wanted Black Panther activist, Khalil Kayim, 28, in Nablus. (Al-Tali'ah, 12 November 1992; Al-Fajr, 16 November 1992)

51. On 12 November 1992, OC Central Command Maj.-Gen. Danny Yatom stated in an interview on Israeli television's Arabic service that the number of Palestinian fugitives had declined from 450 to 150 since the beginning of the year and that the figures continued to be reduced. He stated that terrorist attacks and stone-throwing incidents in the West Bank were 23 per cent fewer in the first 10 months of 1992 despite an upsurge in October. It was reported that the National list won 67 per cent of the votes in Bir Zeit University student council elections, after PLO-affiliated groups united to defeat the two Islamic lists, regardless of their position on the peace process. The elections were the first at the University in more than five years. It reopened in 1992 after being closed for more than four years. (Ha'aretz, 12 November 1992; Jerusalem Post, 13 November 1992; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 19 November 1992)

52. On 12 November 1992, it was reported that the Deputy Minister of Defense Mordechai Gur had indicated that because of the increase of the use of weapons by the residents of the territories, the IDF had made open-fire regulations stricter in the event that the lives of soldiers were in danger. (Ha'aretz, 12 November 1992; Al-Tali'ah, 19 November 1992)

53. On 24 November 1992, it was reported that the General Security Service, and the IDF had lately exposed and arrested the members of two terrorist cells that engaged in violent activities in the A'ida refugee camp and in the village of al-Hader. Both cells were active in the West Bank. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 25 November 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 30 November 1992)

54. On 25 November 1992, two wanted Fatah fugitives, Ahmed Ata Shurab and Sabri Fahad al-Najar were arrested in Khan Younis. (Ha'aretz, 27 and 29 November 1992)

55. On 25 November 1992, it was reported that the Peace Now movement had addressed itself to both the Prime Minister's office and the Education Ministry in an attempt to stop the creation of a university in the settlement of Elkanah. According to Amiram Goldblum, one of the leaders of the movement, the University of New Haven at West Haven, Connecticut, was planning to open, in conjunction with the Bio-Technical Institute at Tel-Aviv, an extension of the University of New Haven at Elkanah, where students would be able to obtain degrees from this American university. It had been planned to open the university in February 1993, and, according to Goldblum, the necessary permits had been received from former Education Minister Zevulun Hammer. However, the present Education Minister, Shulamit Aloni, had made it clear that Israel would not recognize the programme. Plans called for 2,000 students to enter the programme in February, while the numbers were expected to increase to 7,000 in three years' time. Goldblum indicated that his organization objected to the construction of the school because "every project in the territories is based on a policy of apartheid". (Jerusalem Post, 25 November 1992)

56. On 25 November 1992, it was reported that victims of the Old City of Jerusalem grenade attack on 16 November 1992, were unlikely to receive State compensation because the present laws accorded compensation only to victims of Arab and not of Jewish terrorist attacks. According to the Association for Civil Rights in Israel, the 1970 Law for the Compensation of Victims of Hostile Activity was "discriminatory" and had to be changed in order to deal with incidents caused by Jewish extremism. The Law defined as eligible for state compensation only those persons who were injured in attacks by parties "hostile to Israel". (Jerusalem Post, 25 November 1992)

57. On 26 November 1992, Police Inspector-General Yacov Terner told Jewish residents of Jerusalem's Old City that a new police post was to be opened on 27 November 1992 in the Moslem quarter of the Old City. Three days earlier, following the stabbing of an Ateret Cohanim yeshiva student, he had promised that police presence would be increased immediately, that additional look-out posts would be established and that the civil guard would be expanded as well. (Jerusalem Post, 24 and 27 November 1992; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 26 November 1992). Also on 26 November 1992, Police Inspector-General Yacov Terner confirmed that a Jew had been responsible for the grenade attack in the meat market of Jerusalem's Old City on 16 November 1992. One elderly Palestinian was killed and 10 others wounded in the incident. Terner did not provide any additional details. (Al-Fajr, 30 November 1992)

58. On 29 November 1992, it was reported that the Association for Civil Rights in Israel had withdrawn its petition to the High Court of Justice, after the State Attorney's Office had agreed to allow visiting spouses and children of Palestinian residents to remain in the territories. The agreement meant that spouses and children who had already been deported or who left the country voluntarily, would be permitted to return and apply for renewable six-month residence visas, while those still in the territories could apply for such visas from within the territories. Previously, non-resident spouses and children regularly had to leave the territories and re-apply for visas from abroad. An estimated 1,000 persons were concerned. The agreement basically extended the period of a similar one which was reached in 1990, but it was more liberal in that it included husbands as well as wives of residents and allowed visa holders to work. The Gaza Strip was also included in the arrangements. Visa holders are already allowed to participate in a Civil Administration health insurance scheme and children with visas may attend local schools. (Ha'aretz, 27 and 29 November 1992; Jerusalem Post, 27 and 29 November 1992)

59. On 30 November 1992, it was reported that the General Security Service had arrested 30 members of the Islamic Jihad in Hebron, Ramallah and the northern West Bank area. (Al-Fajr, 7 December 1992). Also on 30 November 1992, the Peace Now movement and the "Yesha" Council (Council of Jewish Communities in the West Bank and Gaza) issued widely varying estimates of the number of Jews living in the territories. According to Peace Now, which released an extensive demographic study about the territories at a press conference held at Jerusalem, there would be some 110,000 Jews in the territories by the end of the year (1992). Tzali Reshef, one of the heads of the movement, stated that the settlers represented only 6 per cent of the total population in the territories. However, according to the Yesha Council figures, there were already 127,000 Jews living in the settlements. The Peace Now study also had the following findings:


2. Incidents linked with the uprising of the Palestinian population against the occupation

60. The following abbreviations of the names of newspapers are used in the tables:

Date
Name and age
Place of
residence
Remarks and source
6 Sept. 1992Jabar Abu Hassid or Kheir Al Din Mustafa Samara, 18Kafr Tamoun,
West Bank
Shot by soldiers who responded to stones thrown at their vehicles. (JP, 7 Sept. 1992; also referred to in AF, 14 Sept. 1992)
9 Sept. 1992Abdullah Ahmed Mahmud Hamarshi,16, or Abdallah Ahmed Mibash, 19Yaabed,
West Bank
Fatally shot when he tried to escape after refusing orders to halt. He and several other youths were caught with knives, axes and chains, and according to some were painting slogans on a school wall. (H, JP, 10 Sept. 1992; also referred to AT, 10 Sept. 1992 and AF, 14 Sept. 1992)
10 Sept. 1992Attiyeh Abu Samhadaneh, 20 or 25; Ahmed Abu Ishiban or (Sheiban), 19 or 22Shabura refugee camp, Gaza StripBoth were killed in a shootout with the army. Belonged to the Fatah Hawks. Were armed and were sought for attacks against other Palestinians and the IDF. (H, JP, 11 Sept. 1992; also referred to in AF, 14 Sept.1992)
14 Sept. 1992Mohammed Suleiman (or Said) Al Sa'adi, 20Jenin refugee camp, West BankAccording to the army, he was spotted in the village of Burkin holding a rifle. After failing to obey orders to halt, he was shot and killed by undercover Border Police. Sought for a long time by the General Security Service. (H, 15 and 16 Sept. 1992; JP, 15 Sept. 1992; also referred to in AF, 21 Sept.1992)
23 Sept. 1992Name not reportedBir Zeit,
West Bank
Shot dead after he and several other residents stoned an IDF patrol, when he failed to obey orders to halt. (H, 24 Sept. 1992)
26 Sept. 1992Faisal (al-) Said Abu Sarhan (or Sirhan), 18Obadeiyeh,
West Bank
According to the army, shot by an IDF patrol after he threw stones at soldiers together with a group of eight other youths and refused to obey orders to halt. (H, JP, 27 Sept. 1992; also referred to in AT, 1 Oct. 1992 and AF, 5 Oct. 1992)
30 Sept. 1992Aymon Abdel Hamid, 22Alham, northern JerusalemWas shot dead when he attacked an IDF officer with an axe and a knife at a Jerusalem bus stop. (H, JP, 1 October 1992; also referred to in AT, 1 Oct. 1992)
30 Sept. 1992Iman Hirbawi, 22A-RamShot dead when he attacked an IDF officer with an axe and a knife at a Jerusalem bus stop. (H, 1 Oct. 1992; JP, 1 and 2 Oct. 1992)
1 Oct. 1992Ramaz Abd al-Afu Abdel Hafez, 17Anza, West BankDied at the hospital in unclear circumstances. The IDF was checking if his death was related to an incident during which a petrol bomb was thrown at an IDF patrol and soldiers fired back at the assailants.
2-3 Oct. 1992Anwar Matar, 15Sa'ir, West BankShot and killed by border police when a group of stone-throwers failed to obey orders to halt during Palestinian demonstrations supporting the hunger strike of security prisoners. (JP, 4 Oct. 1992)
3 Oct. 1992Mohammed (Sadik Mahmud) Kamel Akmil, nicknamed "Tak-Tak", 19 or 20Kabatiya,
West Bank
Killed by soldiers. Reportedly member of the Black Panthers gang wanted for murders of Palestinians. (H, JP, 4 Oct. 1992; also referred to in AT, 8 Oct. 1992 and AF, 12 Oct. 1992)
3 Oct. 1992Badr Ahmed Shafeh Nazal, 26Kabatiya,
West Bank
Threw stones at soldiers while they were trying to capture Mohammed Kamel. Soldiers reportedly called for him to halt and when he refused they shot and killed him. (H, JP, 4 Oct. 1992; also referred to in AT, 8 Oct. 1992 and AF, 12 Oct. 1992)
9-10 Oct. 1992Omar Ahmed Abdallah Hamayib, 23, or Amer Ahmed Jabr HamayedBeita, West BankWas killed by IDF soldiers when he threw stones and petrol bombs at them. (H, 11 Oct. 1992; also referred to in AF, 19 Oct. 1992)
11-12 Oct. 1992Riad Farid Zeer, 20, Riad Sarib Ziyador Riad Ghazi Al Zir, 19Salfit, West BankFatally wounded, apparently by soldiers, when troops opened fire on Palestinians who threw stones at a military post in Salfit. (H, JP, 13 Oct. 1992; also referred to in AT, 15 Oct. 1992, and AF, 19 Oct. 1992)
11-12 Oct. 1992Yunis Mahmoud Tsaidan, 17, Muaz Yunis Tsaidamor Mortaz Yunis SaidamNuseirat refugee camp, Gaza StripWounded on 11 Oct. 1992 during disturbances and died in hospital the following day. (H, JP, 13 Oct. 1992; also referred to in AT, 15 Oct. 1992 and AF, 19 Oct. 1992)
11-12 Oct. 1992Ziad Mahmoud Dagish, 13 or 17Nuseirat refugee camp, Gaza StripAccording to local residents, was shot dead by soldiers, but the IDF claims that the cause of his death is unclear. (H, JP, 13 Oct. 1992; also referred to in AT, 15 Oct. 1992 and AF, 19 Oct. 1992)
13 Oct. 1992Faraj al-Sousi, 13, or Faraj Ziad SoufiGaza CityDied after being shot in the head on 10 Oct., when troops dispersed a march which became violent. (H, JP, 14 Oct. 1992; also referred to in AT, 15 Oct. 1992 and AF, 19 Oct. 1992)
14 Oct. 1992Anwar Zarai Nasser (or Zari Nasr) Dalaih, 20, or Salaih, 24Khan Younis,
Gaza Strip
Fatah Hawks member. Killed in a clash with the IDF. Opened fire at soldiers with a Kalachnikov automatic rifle. (H, JP, 15 Oct. 1992; also referred to in AT, 15 Oct. 1992, and AF, 19 Oct. 1992)
14 Oct. 1992Tahseen Abu Shabna, 18 or Tahseen Ahmed Abu Shahma Zahloum, 16Khan Younis,
Gaza Strip
Shot dead by solders during a riot. (H, JP, 15 Oct. 1992; also referred to in AT, 15 Oct. 1992 and AF, 19 Oct. 1992)
16 Oct. 1992Mustafa (Ali Mussa) Obeidat, 23Jebel Mukaber,
East Jerusalem
Died of wounds sustained on 10 Oct. 1992 after being shot by police during a demonstration in support of the prisoners' hunger strike. (H, 18 Oct. 1992; JP, 18 and 22 Oct. 1992; also referred to in AT, 22 Oct. 1992 and AF, 26 Oct. 1992)
20 Oct. 1992Adel MohamedAkraba, NablusDied of wounds sustained during a confrontation with IDF soldiers three weeks earlier. (AF, 26 Oct. 1992)
23 or 24 Oct. 1992Issa al-Hatib, 18 or Isam Khatibel-Bireh, West Bank or Al Ram, JerusalemDied or wounds sustained on 10 Oct. 1992. Was shot by IDF after he threw stones at them eight times at close range. (H, 25 Oct. 1992; also referred to in AF, 26 Oct. 1992 and 2 Nov. 1992)
30-31 Oct. 1992Hissam or Hisham Amad Abu Amer, 26Khan Younis,
Gaza Strip
Palestinian sources claim he was shot in a clash with security forces. Amer was a member of the Iz El Din Al Kassam units, the armed wing of the Hamas movement. The IDF denied charges, but is investigating the case. (H, JP, 1 Nov. 1992; also referred to in AF, 2 Nov. 1992)
3 Nov. 1992Halima Ireidi, 60Husan near
Bethlehem
Died of heart attack when she saw soldiers open fire at Jamal Hamamra on 19 Oct. 1992. She collapsed after fighting with the soldiers who tried to prevent her from helping the youth. (AF, 9 Nov. 1992; AT, 19 Nov. 1992)
11 Nov. 1992Issam Mohammed Muammar, 20, Mustafa Obeid Ashur, 59Khan Younis,
Gaza Strip
Both were shot dead by troops during demonstrations on the occasion of the funeral of a fugitive killed by troops earlier in the day, Nihad Muammar. (H, JP, 12 Nov. 1992; also referred to in AT, 12 Nov. 1992 and AF, 16 Nov. 1992)
11 Nov. 1992Nihad Mussa Muammar, 18Abassan or
Khan Younis,
Gaza Strip
Killed by the army after he and two other persons threw a grenade at troops and fired on them with a Kalachnikov rifle. (H, JP, 12 Nov. 1992; also referred to in AT, 12 Nov. 1992 and AF, 16 Nov. 1992)
11 Nov. 1992Ibrahim Mohammed Abdel Hamid Halil, 15Beit Omar,
West Bank
Shot by soldiers when he threw stones with other youths at vehicles on the Bethlehem-Hebron road. Died in hospital. (H, JP, 12 Nov. 1992; also referred to in AT, 12 Nov. 1992 and AF, 16 Nov. 1992)
13 Nov. 1992Eyad Ibrahim Musak Misr, 17 or 18Hebron, West BankShot after refusing orders to halt when soldiers caught masked men throwing stones. (JP, 15 Nov. 1992; also referred to in AF, 16 Nov. 1992)
13-14 Nov. 1992Younis Hikmet Saka, 18Nablus, West BankBelieved to have been shot with two other persons after they ignored orders to halt. Died in hospital of gunshot wounds. Wanted by the army for four years. Was buried before the IDF could identify him. Was identified by Arab journalist. (H, JP, 15 Nov. 1992; also referred to in AF, 23 Nov. 1992)
20-21 Nov. 1992Amin Muhammed Rahal, 29, Ahmed Mustafa Assad Daka, 21, nicknamed "al-Kikh"Arrabe, West BankShot dead when they tried to open fire at soldiers with a Galil rifle. However, according to a woman claiming to be an eyewitness, they offered no resistance before being shot. Both had been wanted by the army for 18 months. (H, JP, 22 and 23 Nov. 1992; also referred to in AT, 26 Nov. 1992)
20-21 Nov. 1992Awad Karazan, 22Burkin, West BankShot in Silat al-Harithiyeh when he tried to throw a grenade at soldiers. A pistol and ammunition were found in his possession. Had been wanted by the army. (H, 22 and 23 Nov. 1992; JP, 23 Nov. 1992; also referred to in AF, 23 Nov. 1992)
20-21 Nov. 1992Ashraf Abu Haya, 20Bani Suheila,
Gaza Strip
Troops shot and killed him after he was identified from a lookout post as "being about to shoot at soldiers". He was carrying a loaded pistol. (H, 22 and 23 Nov. 1992; JP, 22 Nov. 1992; also referred to in AF, 30 Nov. 1992)
23 Nov. 1992Anjad Jabal, 12, or Amjad Abd a-Razak JabedA-Ram, West BankHe was killed after arriving by bus to go to a school near which a stone- throwing demonstration was taking place. The commander of the unit involved was relieved after it had been determined that he apparently acted in violation of orders which had been issued for the operation. Military policy were reportedly investigating the incident. (H, 24-26 Nov. 1992; JP, 24 and 25 Nov. 1992; also referred to in AT, 26 Nov. 1992 and AF, 30 Nov. 1992)
27-28 Nov. 1992Ahmad al-Husari, 23Sheikh Radwan,
Gaza Strip
Was fatally wounded when soldiers opened fire, at stone-throwers. (H, JP, 29 Nov. 1992; also referred to in AF, 30
29 Nov. 1992Massad Imuni Muhammed Ramadan, 17 or Wissam Ramadan Heimoni, 19Hebron, West BankWas shot by soldiers while throwing stones at Israeli vehicles and burning tyres. Ramadan refused an order to halt when approached by soldiers on an "initiated action". (H, JP, 30 Nov. 1992; also referred to in AF, 7 Dec. 1992)
(b) List of other Palestinians killed as a result of the occupation

Date
Name and age
Place of
residence
Remarks and source
28-28 Aug. 1992Osama al-Bassyouni, 26Shati' refugee camp, Gaza StripBeaten to death by masked Palestinians. (JP, 30 Aug. 1992)
31 Aug. 1992Mohammed al-Fara, 20, or Zaki Mohammed Ahmed Kadi Kdah, 30Khan Younis,
Gaza Strip
Strangled after he was kidnapped from his home by masked men two days earlier or died at the hospital after being shot and beaten. (H, JP, 1 Sept. 1992)
2 Sept. 1992Rajeeb Salim, 26, or Najvah Rada Salim Halaf (woman)Khan Younis refugee camp, Gaza StripStabbed to death, or shot in the head. (H, JP, 3 Sept. 1992)
2 Sept. 1992Baha (Suleiman Muhammed) Sabri, 47 (woman)Kalkiliya,
West Bank
Stabbed to death. Reasons for her killing unclear. (H, JP, 3 Sept. 1992)
4-5 Sept. 1992Ibrahim Hasmi Salme, 20 or 26Khan Younis refugee camp, Gaza StripShot to death. Body bore marks of violence. (H, JP, 6 Sept. 1992)
4-5 Sept. 1992Ravi'a TsafiKhan Younis,
Gaza Strip
Stabbed to death. (H, JP, 6 Sept. 1992)
6 Sept. 1992Mohammed Yunis el-Rashidiyeh, 24Tekoa,
West Bank
Killed while handling explosive material in a military training area south-east of Bethlehem. Investigation in process. (H, JP, 7 Sept. 1992)
8 Sept. 1992Yussef Juba, 42, or Yussef Akal Mahmud Juha Zuheir Bitar, 30, or Zu'ir Badir HalamiGazaBoth bodies found on the outskirts of the Sheikh Radwan neighbourhood, with beating and stab wounds, after having been kidnapped a week earlier. (H, JP, 9 Sept. 1992)
9 Sept. 1992Fadwa Shador, 44, or Fadwa Assad SadidIllar, West BankShot dead. (H, JP, 10 Sept. 1992)
9 Sept. 1992Jamil Taha, 22 or Amjad Mohammed TahaIllar, West BankShot dead. (H, JP, 10 Sept. 1992)
11-12 Sept. 1992Sabri Abu Rahman, 40Nusseirat,
Gaza Strip
Shot to death. (JP, 13 Sept. 1992)
11-12 Sept. 1992Aysha Muhammed Abd Tsana or Aysha Aysha Abdel-Hadi, 42, or, Shakri Muhammed Karim Shat, 50Khan Younis refugee camp, Gaza StripShot or stabbed to death. (H, 13 and 14 Sept. 1992; JP, 13 and 14 Sept. 1992)

13 Sept. 1992Mahmud Rajeb Salibi, 37, or Muhammed Rajiub, 33Nuseirat refugee camp, or Shati' refugee camp, Gaza StripStabbed to death or shot dead by masked assailant. (H, JP, 14 Sept. 1992)
17 Sept. 1992UnidentifiedBurka, West BankBody bore marks of burns. (H, 18 Sept. 1992)
19 Sept. 1992Khalmi Karkari, 45Salim, West BankBody bore marks of violence. Investigation in process. (JP, 22 Sept. 1992)
20 Sept. 1992Intissar Najab, 23, or Ibtissam Ismail Mahmud al-Najar (woman)Deir el-Balah,
Gaza Strip
Shot to death by masked men. Body bore marks of burns. (H, JP, 21 Sept. 1992)
20 Sept. 1992Mohammed Juha, 42Bureij, Gaza StripShot to death by masked men. (JP, 21 Sept. 1992)
21 Sept. 1992Riyad Kirbani or Riyad al-Nubi, 35, or Rizk Nubani, 30Lubbon Sharkiya (or Luban), West BankFatally wounded when a home-made bomb he was planting near the Eli settlement exploded in his hands. (H, JP, 22 Sept. 1992; also referred to in AF, 28 Sept. 1992)
22 Sept. 1992Khaled Jalous, 26Khan Younis,
Gaza Strip
Shot dead by masked men. (H, JP, 23 Sept. 1992)
22 Sept. 1992Name not reported, about 30East JerusalemBeaten and shot in the head. Found wrapped in a plastic sheet. (H, JP, 23 Sept. 1992)
25-26 Sept. 1992Faruk Ismail JabriKhan Younis refugee camp, Gaza StripKilled by masked men in unclear circumstances. (H, 27 Sept. 1992)
27-29 Sept. 1992Anas (al)-Ashkar, 28Nuseirat refugee camp, Gaza StripShot dead by two masked men. (H, JP, 30 Sept. 1992)
27-29 Sept. 1992Name not reportedHebron area,
West Bank
Died after being beaten by dozens of local residents. Investigation in process. (JP, 30 Sept. 1992)
30 Sept. 1992Mohammed Katarmesh or Husham Hassan Mohammed al-Katrus,24Nuseirat refugee camp, Gaza StripShot dead in Rafah. (H, JP, 1 Oct. 1992)
1 Oct. 1992Amar Haik, 27GazaShot dead by masked men. (JP, 2 Oct. 1992)
3-4 Oct. 1992Mohammed Abu Amra, 25Rafah refugee camp, Gaza StripShot in the head by masked men. Died in hospital. (JP, 4 Oct. 1992)
6-7 Oct. 1992Hassan Balhameh, Hassan Salah or Hassan Saleh Barahma, 20Anzah, West BankDied of wounds sustained during an unidentified explosion. (H, JP, 8 Oct. 1992; also referred to in AT, 8 Oct. 1992 and AF, 12 Oct. 1992)
6-7 Oct. 1992Musa ShawifAkrabe, West BankDied while handling an explosive he as making. (H, JP, 8 Oct. 1992; also referred to in AF, 12 Oct. 1992)
14 Oct. 1992Hussein Namr Mussa Obeidat, Hussein Assad Obeidet, 26Jebel Mukaber,
East Jerusalem
Died of a severe heart infection while in detention. (JP, 15 Oct. 1992; JP, 16 Oct. 1992; H, JP, 18 Oct. 1992; also referred to in AT, 15 Oct. 1992 and AF, 26 Oct. 1992)
16-17 Oct. 1992Hussein Mohammed Mashkar, 35Askar refugee camp, West BankThe three bodies were found shot to death inside a car in the centre of Misilyah village, south of Jenin. (H, JP, 18 Oct. 1992; also referred to in AF, 26 Oct. 1992)
Hussein Saaleh, 26, or Hussein Abu al-Fatah SalahKafr Dan,
West Bank
Jamal Bukri al-Barout, 34, al- Barouti or Hisham BarghoutiFahmah, West Bank
16-17 Oct. 1992Omar Atef (Ismail) Aradeh or Arda, 18 or 19Aarabeh,
West Bank
He was found beaten to death and hung on a tree three days after he was missing. Palestinians claim killing by Israeli undercover unit. (H, JP, 18 Oct. 1992; also referred to in AF, 26 Oct. 1992)
18-19 Oct. 1992Freih Abu-Libda, 40Rafah, Gaza StripShot dead. (JP, 20 Oct. 1992)
18-19 Oct. 1992Sader Shomali, 32Rafah, Gaza StripShot dead. (JP, 20 Oct. 1992)
21 Oct. 1992Ahmed Salah Abu Sadaneh, 40Deir el-Balah,
Gaza Strip
Stabbed and tied. (JP, 22 Oct. 1992)
22 Oct. 1992Yakoub Mohammed Fatri, 21, or Mahmoud Mousa FatriShaboura camp,
Gaza Strip
Brought to Nasser Hospital. Beaten and shot. (H, JP, 23 Oct. 1992)
23-24 Oct. 1992Fawzi (Dib) Issa, 36Sheik Radwan,
Gaza Strip
Stabbed to death by unidentified individuals; reported political motivation. (H, JP, 25 Oct. 1992)
23-24 Oct. 1992Ibrahim Said Ahmed Ziwad, 30Silat al-Hartiya, West BankShot in his apartment by masked men. (H, 25 Oct. 1992)
26 Oct. 1992Abdel Aziz Hussein Hamadan, 74Kablan village, West BankFound dead near Nablus Hospital. (H, 27 Oct. 1992)
27 Oct. 1992Ahmed Muhammed Alikir, 40, or Ahmad Wakir, 42GazaShot in the head. (H, JP, 28 Oct. 1992)
27 Oct. 1992Jalal Halil Haman or Jalil Haman Abus SayedKhan Younis,
Gaza Strip
Kidnapped and found shot dead.
(H, JP, 28 Oct. 1992)
30-31 Oct. 1992Abdallah (Mussa Haman) Zini, 37Khan Younis,
Gaza Strip
Kidnapped on 29 Oct. 1992 and found shot dead. (H, JP, 1 Nov. 1992)
30-31 Oct. 1992Ibrahim Abu Juba, 39Gaza CityShot in the head. (H, JP, 1 Nov.1992)
1 Nov. 1992Jihad Nidal Kosama, 17, or Nadal Jihad Ismail al-KusamaGaza StripBeaten and shot. (H, JP, 2 Nov. 1992)

6-7 Nov. 1992Ahmed Khaled Ismail, 27Rafah refugee camp, Gaza StripShot down. (JP, 8 Nov. 1992)
9-11 Nov. 1992Iyad Sayej, 27GazaShot dead by unidentified gunmen.
(JP, 10 Nov. 1992)
10 Nov. 1992Mahmoud Mustafa Nimr, 55GazaShot by masked men. (H, JP,
11 Nov. 1992)
12 Nov. 1992Nabil Abu Khadra, 38Rafah refugee camp, Gaza StripGunned down by the Fatah Hawks vigilantes. (JP, 12 Nov. 1992)
13-14 Nov. 1992Abdel Hamid Hawaji, 25Radwan, Gaza StripBody found near Shati' refugee camp. Believed to have been kidnapped by masked men several days earlier.
(JP, 15 Nov. 1992)
13-14 Nov. 1992Walid (or Yussuf) Barakawi, 28Rafah, Gaza StripDied in hospital after being shot by unidentified gunmen. (H, JP,
15 Nov. 1992)
16 Nov. 1992Abed Razak Adkaidek, 62, or Marzuk A-dakaik, 65, or Abdul Razak Idkeidek, 71A-Ram, West BankKilled by a grenade explosion in the Moslem quarter of the Old City of Jerusalem. (H, JP, 17 Nov. 1992; also referred to in AF, 23 Nov. 1992)
16 Nov. 1992Name not reported Kfar Has, West BankBurned and tied. (H, 17 Nov. 1992)



(c) Other incidents linked with the uprising

61. On 27 August 1992, a home-made grenade exploded in the hall of the Civil Administration in Deir el-Balah. In the West Bank, an Israeli vehicle was stoned near the Tapuah junction. The driver was slightly injured by pieces of broken glass when the windshield of his car was smashed. Palestinian sources reported several incidents between the army in Khan Younis, Jabalia, Shati, and Ramallah; two residents were reported injured. (Ha'aretz, 28 August 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 31 August 1992)

62. On 28 and 29 August 1992, a Palestinian was beaten to death by masked Palestinians (see list). A petrol bomb was thrown at an IDF outpost in the Tulkarm refugee camp and a curfew was subsequently imposed on the camp. A burning torch was thrown at an IDF patrol near the Jelazoun refugee camp (West Bank). A search of the area revealed another firebomb ready to be thrown. An Israeli youth was injured when rocks were thrown at the Hebron road he was travelling on. The IDF imposed a curfew on the area of the incident and launched searches. An IDF patrol detonated a mine placed on the roadside near the village of Bokata in the Golan Heights. No one was injured, but an IDF vehicle was damaged. Four cars bearing Israeli license plates were torched in Jerusalem. (Jerusalem Post, 30 August 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 7 September 1992)

63. On 30 August 1992, an Arab resident of Israel was attacked by an unknown assailant with an iron bar in the Ramallah area. The man was slightly injured. Palestinian sources reported that two Palestinians from Gaza City were injured during stone-throwing incidents. (Ha'aretz, 31 August 1992)

64. On 31 August 1992, the body of a resident of Khan Younis was brought to Nasser Hospital (see list). An Israeli man was shot in the leg when he accidentally drove into the Balata refugee camp (West Bank) and got out of his car. A curfew was imposed on the camp. An improvised bomb was thrown at IDF forces in the el-Khader village south of Bethlehem. Three petrol bombs were thrown at an Israeli settler's car south of Hebron. No injuries or damage were reported. A 16-year-old Arab from Jerusalem tried to stab a soldier in the back. The soldier was wearing a protective vest and was not injured. Four (or five) cars bearing Israeli license plates were torched in various parts of East Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 1 September 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 7 September 1992)

65. On 1 September 1992, two firebombs were thrown at an Israeli vehicle travelling on the Kalkiliya-Nablus road near Azun. No damage was reported and the IDF imposed a curfew on Azun. A third petrol bomb was thrown at the army camp opposite the Deisheh refugee camp in Bethlehem (or at an Israeli bus), but caused no damage or injuries (also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 3 September 1992). Three petrol bombs were thrown at an Israeli vehicle in the Hebron district without causing harm. Palestinian sources reported several stone-throwing incidents in Ramallah and Jenin. Two residents of the Shati' refugee camp were injured. A resident of Dura in the Hebron area was injured in the leg by police shooting during a chase. Another man was also arrested. Both were suspected of stealing cars in the area. Three cars were torched in East Jerusalem, two of which were totally destroyed. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 2 September 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 7 September 1992)

66. On 2 September 1992, the body of a woman resident of Khan Younis was brought to hospital (see list). In Kalkiliya, police were investigating the death of a woman who had been stabbed to death (see list). Palestinian sources reported that two residents were injured in Gaza City during an incident. The IDF spokesman did not report any injuries occurring in the Gaza Strip. A tour guide was slightly injured when a firebomb demolished his car near the New Gate of the Old City in Jerusalem. Border policemen arrested two men from Khan Younis whom they found in a car with two rifles and ammunition. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 3 September 1992; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 3 September 1992 and Al-Fajr, 7 September 1992). Also on 2 September 1992, a Molotov cocktail was thrown at an army patrol in the Shabura quarter of Rafah (Gaza Strip). No one was hurt. Stone-throwing incidents were reported in Rafah and Gaza City. Two Israeli soldiers were injured. (Al-Fajr, 7 September 1992)

67. On 3 September 1992, an IDF patrol was stoned in Jaiyus village, in the Tulkarm district. One soldier was slightly injured (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 7 September 1992). According to Palestinian sources, two residents were injured during clashes in the Khan Younis and Jabalia refugee camps. (Ha'aretz, 4 September 1992). Also on 3 September 1992, two masked youths hijacked an Israeli bus in Beit Lahya (Gaza Strip) and drove it to Khan Younis where they set it on fire, after forcing all passengers to leave the bus. Shots were fired at an army patrol in Rafah and an explosive device was thrown at soldiers who gathered on the site. No injuries were reported. One soldier was injured when stones were thrown at an army patrol in the village of Jayus, in the Tulkarm area. (Al-Fajr, 7 September 1992)

68. On 4 and 5 September 1992, two residents of Khan Younis were killed by other Palestinians over the weekend (see list). Several shots were fired from a passing Arab car at a military jeep near Rafah. No one was injured. The assailants managed to escape. In Hebron, an IDF vehicle was stoned and a soldier slightly injured by broken glass. Soldiers fired back at the stone-throwers. There were no reports of casualties. An unidentified assailant stabbed and lightly wounded a yeshiva student in the Muslim quarter of Jerusalem. A 15-year-old girl from East Jerusalem attacked a policeman who stopped her from entering the Temple Mount compound. The policeman was very lightly wounded and the girl was arrested. (These incidents have also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 7 September 1992.) Palestinian sources reported that four residents of the Gaza Strip were injured by IDF shooting in the refugee camps of Jabalia, Khan Younis, Shati' and Nuseirat. Two Israeli cars were torched in East Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz, 6 and 7 September 1992; Jerusalem Post, 6 September 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 14 September 1992)

69. On 5 September 1992, IDF soldiers opened fire at stone-throwers in Al-Mazra'ah al-Sharqiyah, near Ramallah, injuring a youth in the head. A Molotov cocktail was thrown at an Israeli car in the old city of Ramallah. It exploded without causing any damage. (Al- Fajr, 14 September 1992)

70. On 6 September 1992, a shepherd from Tekoa was killed when he apparently handled explosive material in a military training area south-east of Bethlehem (see list). A 10-year-old boy who was with him was slightly wounded. A resident of the West Bank was fatally shot by soldiers (see list). Two Israeli women were lightly injured by broken glass when a petrol bomb was thrown into their bus near Kafr Ara, near the Green Line, but it failed to ignite. Four residents of Gaza Strip and one West Bank resident were reportedly injured by IDF shooting in the Nuseirat refugee camp. One man was arrested while two escaped after border police spotted a suspicious car whose occupants tried to flee when approached. Pistols, rifles, ammunition and grenades were found in the car. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 7 September 1992). Also on 6 September 1992, soldiers fired tear-gas and rubber bullets at youths demonstrating in the Shajayeh quarter of Gaza City. There were no reports of injuries. Stone-throwing at army patrols was also reported in Khan Younis. Several youths were arrested. According to army reports, a patrol discovered bombs and a Karl Gustav machine gun in a car in the Nuseirat refugee camp (Gaza Strip). A Palestinian youth who attempted to flee from the car was arrested, allegedly in possession of a 9 mm gun. (Al-Fajr, 14 September 1992)

71. On 7 September 1992, a policeman and a policewoman were slightly injured when stones were thrown at their car in Ramallah. A fire-bomb was thrown at an Israeli vehicle west of Ramallah. There were no injuries or damage. A car was torched in East Jerusalem, sustaining heavy damage. (Jerusalem Post, 8 September 1992). Also on 7 September 1992, three Molotov cocktails were thrown at an army patrol near Mughayer village, in the area of Ramallah, and another one was thrown at an army post in the Jabalia refugee camp (Gaza Strip). No injuries or damage were reported. Two police officers were injured when stones smashed the windows of a police car in Ramallah. (Al-Fajr, 14 September 1992)

72. On 8 September 1992, the bodies of two men who had been kidnapped a week earlier were found in Gaza City (see list). A 30-year-old man was shot and the seriously wounded by masked men in Khan Younis. According to Palestinian sources, four residents of the Gaza Strip were injured during incidents (Jabalia refugee camp, two; Gaza, two). The IDF spokesman did not report any injuries among the residents of the Gaza Strip. (Ha'aretz) and Jerusalem Post, 9 September 1992)

73. On 9 September 1992, the border police shot dead a 16- (or 19-) year-old masked Palestinian, near Jenin, after he and several other masked youths tried to flee, when they were caught painting slogans on a school wall (see list). The two or three other youths were wounded. During the chase, Border Police shot and hit the rear window of a passing van, showering the three passengers with glass. A curfew was placed on Yaabed village after the incident. Near Tulkarm, the bodies of two shot residents were found (see list). (These incidents have also been referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 10 September 1992.)

76. Palestinian sources reported that two residents of the Khan Younis refugee (see camp were injured by IDF shooting. The Tel Aviv-Jerusalem highway was partially closed for a short time after nails were thrown on the road from a car with occupied territories licence plates. A regular monthly strike was observed to mark the uprising. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 10 September 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 14 September 1992). Also on 9 September 1992, three youths attempted to set fire to a car in Jerusalem. One youth, Nasser Jafar, 22, from Al-Sawahirah al-Sharqiyah, was seriously injured in the head when he was hit with a rifle butt by soldiers who arrested him.. Two Molotov cocktails were thrown at army patrols in Beit Rima, near Ramallah, and in Deir El Balah (Gaza Strip). No injuries were reported. (Al-Tali'ah, 10 September 1992; Al-Fajr, 14 September 1992)

74. On 10 September 1992, two wanted armed fugitives were killed and a third one wounded and arrested during a shootout in Rafah (see list). Two other men apparently managed to escape (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 14 September 1992). Violent clashes erupted in the city, which had been under curfew for three days, when people threw stones at troops while the IDF searched for gunmen after the killings. Palestinian sources indicated that soldiers fired back, injuring two residents. A 38-year-old man was shot in the leg in Khan Younis. A tour bus driver was beaten by several Arab teenagers and slightly injured near the Old City. The man managed to set himself free and scare them off with his gun. Two petrol bombs were thrown at a tour bus in East Jerusalem without causing harm. A third petrol bomb was thrown at an Israeli bus in the centre of Hebron smashing its windshield. A Palestinian armed with two bombs tried to attack an IDF installation in the Gaza Strip. The man opened fire at the installation and was pursued by soldiers but managed to escape. Security forces captured two youths in Kusin village near Nablus. One was shot in the leg after ignoring orders to halt. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 11 September 1992). Also on 10 September 1992, two Molotov cocktails hit an Israeli military vehicle in the village of Abud, near Ramallah. The vehicle was damaged. An extensive search was conducted in the village. (Al-Fajr, 14 September 1992)

75. On 11 and 12 September 1992, two men were murdered (see list). Following the killing of two fugitives on 10 September 1992 in Rafah, clashes were reported in several localities in the Gaza Strip: Khan Younis, Nuseirat, Deir el-Balah and especially Rafah, despite the fifth day of curfew. Thirty or thirty-four persons were reportedly injured. A commercial strike was observed in the large Gaza towns and in some camps to commemorate the deaths of the two fugitives. An Arab man who was slightly wounded by a gunshot sought refuge in an army camp south-west of Jenin. A shot was fired at an army patrol near Jenin without causing any harm. (These incidents have also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 14 September 1992.) A bottle with inflammable liquid was thrown at a government building in Nablus. No injuries were reported. Three cars were torched in East Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 13 September 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 21 September 1992)

76. On 13 September 1992, masked assailants murdered a man in the Gaza Strip (see list). In Azun, West Bank, four girls required medical treatment after inhaling tear-gas fired by soldiers in response to stones thrown at them. One of the girls required hospitalization. (These incidents have also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 21 September 1992.) In Hebron, the window of two Israeli buses were smashed with stones. A woman was slightly wounded in one while the driver was injured in the other. Several suspects in a car in the Gaza Strip were arrested. One was shot in the leg and slightly injured when he tried to escape. Palestinian sources reported that seven residents were injured during clashes with the IDF in the Rafah, Gaza, and Jabalia refugee camps, although the IDF spokesman did not report any injuries among Arab residents. In Gaza, most shops remained closed for the third consecutive day, to protest the killing of two gunmen in Rafah on 10 September. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 14 September 1992). Also on 13 September 1992, a Molotov cocktail was thrown at an army patrol in the Jabalia refugee camp, causing no damage. One youth was arrested. IDF soldiers fired tear-gas at stone-throwing youths in the Shajayeh quarter of Gaza City. There were no reports of injuries. An Israeli woman was injured when the bus she was riding in was stoned near Sa'ir, in the Hebron area. Four bus windows were smashed. (Al-Fajr, 21 September 1992)

77. On 14 September 1992, an armed man was shot and killed by undercover police border officers near Jenin (see list). A second suspect escaped. A curfew was imposed as the army launched a massive manhunt for the fugitive. Three settlers were injured by fragments of glass when their bus was stoned at the entrance to Hebron. Palestinian sources reported two injuries among the Jabalia refugee camp during clashes with the IDF; two additional injuries were reported in the Khan Younis refugee camp. Disturbances were reported in Gaza City. Three cars were burned in East Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 15 September 1992; also referred to Al-Fajr, 21 September 1992). Also on 14 September 1992, a 16-year-old girl from Hebron attacked an officer at the Civil Administration building in Hebron with a knife. The officer was not hurt, however, and was able to arrest the girl. She was taken to Hebron prison for interrogation. (Al-Fajr, 21 September 1992)

78. On 15 September 1992, a soldier was stoned in his vehicle in Tulkarm and wounded in the head. A curfew was imposed on the area. Another Israeli was stoned and injured in the head in the Hebron district. A petrol bomb was reportedly thrown at an Israeli bus in the Bethlehem district. The bomb did not cause any injuries or damage. Three petrol bombs were thrown at a police building in Nablus. A petrol bomb was also thrown in Jenin. No damage was reported in any of the incidents. (These incidents have also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 21 September 1992.) A small bomb exploded at a bus stop on a main Jerusalem thoroughfare. No one was injured and the bus stop sustained no damage. Palestinian sources reported that several stone-throwing incidents had occurred and that soldiers shot at residents in the refugee camps of Shati' and Jabalia, injuring four. Two cars were burned in the Old City of Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 16 September 1992)

79. On 16 September 1992, a petrol bomb was thrown at an Israeli vehicle in the area of Kissofim, in the Gaza Strip. The car was slightly damaged but no one was hurt. Four residents were reportedly injured during clashes with the IDF, two in the refugee camp in Ramallah and two in the refugee camps of the Gaza Strip. Two buses carrying workers to Israel were torched by masked men in the Gaza Strip. A strike was observed throughout the territories, commemorating the massacre of Palestinians in the Sabra and Shatila camps in Lebanon in 1982. (Ha'aretz, 17 and 18 September 1992; Jerusalem Post, 18 September 1992; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 17 September 1992, and Al-Fajr, 21 September 1992). Also on 16 September 1992, IDF soldiers opened fire on a group of youths who refused to obey orders to halt in the village of Kabalan, near Nablus. Two youths were injured and were taken to hospital for treatment. Soldiers fired tear-gas at youths throwing stones at army patrols in Khan Younis (Gaza Strip). (Al Fajr, 21 September 1992)

80. On 17 September 1992, a body was found in Burka village in the Nablus district (see list). Two IDF soldiers were lightly injured in separate incidents. One was injured when his truck was stoned in Ramallah and its windshield shattered. The second soldier was injured, near Jenin when a hand-made bomb exploded at the passage of his patrol. Shots were fired at a member of the Meirav Kibbutz inside the Green Line, but the man was not injured. Six residents of the Jabalia and Nuseirat refugee camps were shot and lightly wounded when they stoned IDF soldiers. A strike, commemorating the massacre of Palestinians in the Sabra and Shatila camps in Lebanon, was observed for the second consecutive day in the territories. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 18 September 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 1 September 1992)

81. On 18 September 1992, an IDF soldier was kidnapped and seriously injured in the Gaza Strip. The soldier, who had been travelling home, was picked up by a car with Israeli licence plates. As they drove along, one of the passengers took out a knife and stabbed the soldier, who was thrown out of the car near the Netarim junction. (This information has also been referred to in Al-Talilah, 21 September 1992.) The IDF sealed the area off and conducted intensive searches. An IDF patrol was stoned in Hebron. Soldiers, who were soon joined by Jewish settlers, pursued the stone-throwers. One assailant was arrested. An army jeep was burned after being left in a village in the West Bank after soldiers had been stoned. (Ha'aretz, 20 and 21 September 1992; Jerusalem Post, 20 September 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 28 September 1992)

82. On 19 September 1992, the body of a West Bank resident was found in a village near Nablus (see list). (Jerusalem Post, 22 September 1992). Also on 19 September 1992, IDF soldiers opened fire at a group of youths in Assira Al Shamaliyeh, a village in the Nablus area, critically injuring a 16-year-old boy. Army reports stated that the patrol opened fire when the youths refused to obey orders to halt. Two youths were arrested. Two Molotov cocktails were thrown at an army patrol in Nablus and another one was thrown at a post office in East Jerusalem. No damage was reported. An Israeli car was set on fire at the American Colony in East Jerusalem. (Al-Fajr, 28 September 1992)

83. On 20 September 1992, two Palestinians were shot to death by masked men in the Gaza Strip (see list). Nine Palestinian shoppers were wounded when a grenade was thrown at an IDF patrol in Nablus. (These incidents have also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 28 September 1992.) No soldiers were hurt. A curfew was placed on the area. According to Palestinian sources, three residents were injured by IDF shooting in the refugee camps of Shati' and Rafah. In Ramallah, 150 students staged a sit-in at the offices of the Red Cross to protest the arrest of Ahmed Katamash. Two cars were burned in Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 21 September 1992). Also on 20 September 1992, in Barta'a village, near Jenin, soldiers opened fire on three youths, who allegedly refused orders to halt. There were no reports of injuries, and the youths apparently managed to escape. Soldiers raided Kufr Rai, in the area of Jenin, searching for activists. The residents clashed with the soldiers who fired tear-gas back at them. One person was arrested. Shots were fired at an army patrol in Deir el Balah (Gaza Strip). No one was hurt. (Al-Fajr, 28 September 1992)

84. On 21 September 1992, a Palestinian was killed when a bomb he was planting near a Jewish settlement exploded in his hands (see list). Two wanted members of the Fatah Hawks from the Gaza Strip were captured in Bani Suheila after a gun battle that lasted several hours . Both men were slightly wounded. A Gaza resident tried to attack a soldier near the Bureij refugee camp. The man was fired at and wounded. A petrol bomb was thrown at an Israeli bus in Bethlehem. It did not cause any injury or damage. An explosive device went off near a military camp in the proximity of the Bureij refugee camp without causing any harm. (These incidents have also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 28 September 1992.) In the centre of Hebron, a Jewish woman was slightly injured in the head by a stone that was thrown at her. A curfew was imposed on the area of the incident. According to Palestinian sources, four residents of Gaza Strip were injured by IDF shooting, and incidents also occurred in the Gaza Strip (Shati' refugee camp, Khan Younis and the Sheikh Radwan neighbourhood). (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 22 September 1992)

85. On 22 September 1992, two men were shot dead (see list). A border policeman, Avinoam Peretz, 23, was shot dead in Jerusalem by a Palestinian, Mohamed Aref from Tamoun, in the West Bank, disguised as an IDF soldier. (These incidents have also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 28 September 1992.) In Gush Katif (Gaza Strip), a Palestinian was shot and moderately injured, when his car backfired at a checkpoint, causing the guard to believe that he was being shot at. A Jewish resident of Hebron was lightly injured in the head when a rock was thrown at his car. Two petrol bombs were thrown at a bus near the Ariel settlement. Two additional petrol bombs were thrown at an Israeli car on the Hebron-Beersheba road. No injuries were reported. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 23 September 1992)

86. On 23 September 1992, a resident of the West Bank was shot dead by the army (see list). A resident of Moshav Gadish, near Afula, just inside the Green Line, was shot from a passing car and wounded. Three Israeli Arabs were arrested in connection with the shooting, although the police originally thought that the attackers might have been members of the PLO's Black Panthers gang. In Jerusalem, two persons were stabbed in different parts of the city. Both were lightly wounded. Palestinian sources reported several disturbances in the Gaza Strip, during which two residents were injured. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 24 September 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 28 September 1992). Also on 23 September 1992, IDF soldiers opened fire and critically wounded Daoud Diab Abu Dayyeh, 22, from Bir Zeit, near Ramallah. According to army reports, the soldiers opened fire at a group of youths who were throwing stones at an army vehicle in the village. In Hebron, stones were thrown at a bus and smashed one of its windows. A soldier in the bus was injured by broken glass. (Al-Fajr, 28 September 1992)

87. On 24 September 1992, an Israeli from Moshav Takoma, in the Negev, was stabbed in his bed during the night. The assailant escaped but several suspects from the Gaza Strip were arrested. A petrol bomb was thrown at an Israeli bus in Hebron. No injury or damage was reported. Two Palestinians complained about being stoned in their car in Hebron. Both were injured and treated in the city hospital. Palestinian sources reported incidents in the Gaza Strip (Rafah, Khan Younis, Shati' and Jabalia), where three residents were injured, and in Ramallah (West Bank), where two residents were wounded. (Ha'aretz, 25 and 27 September 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 28 September 1992)

88. On 25 September 1992, an Israeli woman was injured when the car she was in was hit by stones in Hebron. Also in Hebron, a Molotov cocktail was thrown at an Israeli bus and exploded without causing damage. In Tulkarm, a border guard was injured when his vehicle was hit by stones. (Al-Fajr, 28 September 1992)

89. On 25 and 26 September 1992, an 18-year-old youth was killed by an IDF patrol (see list). Masked men shot dead a resident in the Khan Younis refugee camp (see list). In Ramallah, four petrol bombs were thrown at the police station. One bomb exploded, but caused no damage. (These incidents have also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 5 October 1992.) In Hebron, an unidentified person threw a tear-gas canister in the market. Shots were fired at the military headquarters in Jenin without causing damage. In Khan Younis, shots were fired at soldiers from a car. Police returned fire. There were no casualties. The car fled and evaded the roadblocks set up to block its passage. In Tulkarm and Hebron, stones were thrown at border police without causing any injuries. Palestinian sources reported that four residents were injured by IDF shooting (one seriously) in the refugee camps of Jabalia and Khan Younis. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 27 September 1992)

90. On 26 September 1992, according to eyewitnesses in the village of Abidiya, a youth, Faisal Abu Sarhan, was beaten by IDF soldiers after having been hit by a bullet in the chest. The ambulance driver who took Abu Sarhan to the hospital stated that soldiers also delayed the ambulance intentionally at checkpoints. Residents indicated that such behaviour on the part of the soldiers was motivated by revenge since the soldiers knew that Abu Sarhan's brother, Amer, who is in prison was sentenced for stabbing three Israelis in Jerusalem. (Al-Tali'ah, 1 October 1992)

91. On 27, 28 and 29 September 1992 (New Year holidays), two Palestinians were killed by other Palestinians (see list). Several petrol bombs were thrown at IDF patrols (Yatta village, one; Hebron, two; Nablus area, one; Abu Tor, one; Bethlehem, two). No injuries or damage were reported. Yatta village was placed under curfew. In Samu'a village (West Bank), a gas tank, which had been placed in one of the roadblocks made of stones and burning tyres, exploded as soldiers were passing by, but caused no injuries or damage. The area was placed under curfew. As many as 20 (or 100) schoolgirls who were demonstrating reportedly had to be treated for tear-gas inhalation in Khan Younis. (These incidents have also been referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 1 October 1992.) Eleven Palestinians were lightly wounded in clashes with soldiers in the Gaza Strip (Shati' refugee camp, three; Gaza City, three; Bureij, five) and four in the West Bank (Ramallah, two; Jenin, two). A 26-year-old Arab girl tried to stab a soldier in Nablus and was arrested without having injured him. Stone-throwing incidents were reported in Jenin, Bethlehem and in Tapuah village. One soldier and two tourists were slightly injured in the incidents. Several cars were stoned in Jerusalem, and one of the drivers was injured. One rented car was torched in East Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 30 September 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 5 October 1992)

92. On 29 September 1992, a resident of Tamun village, in the area of Jenin, was critically wounded when soldiers opened fire at a group of people who were allegedly throwing stones at them. (Al-Fajr, 5 October 1992)

93. On 30 September 1992, an Arab was shot dead by an IDF officer whom he attacked at a Jerusalem bus stop (see list). The officer was not injured. The body of a Palestinian was brought to the police station in Rafah (see list). Three Israeli buses were stoned (in Hebron, in Halhul and in Jericho). Two Israeli civilians and one soldier were lightly injured in the incidents. Three Arab residents were injured by rubber bullets during the breaking-up of disturbances in Rafah (Gaza Strip). (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 1 October 1992; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 1 October 1992; Al-Fajr, 5 October 1992)

94. On 1 October 1992, a man from Gaza was shot dead by masked men (see list). A petrol bomb was thrown at an IDF patrol in Anza village in the Jenin district. Soldiers fired at the assailants. Later on, a 17-year-old resident of the village was brought to the hospital where he succumbed to his wounds. The IDF was investigating the circumstances of his death (see list). On the fifth day of the hunger strike staged by security prisoners, more than 100 youths who joined a women's march from the Red Cross office in Gaza to the Gaza military prison, stoned the building before being dispersed by soldiers. One soldier was hurt by a stone. Commercial strikes were partially observed in Jenin, Ramallah, Hebron and Gaza. An Israeli bus carrying soldiers was stoned in Jericho. Its windshield was smashed and one soldier was slightly wounded by fragments of glass. Other stone-throwing incidents, during which two residents of Ramallah were injured, were also reported. Two fugitives were badly injured when their car overturned during a chase by the army in Ramallah. Four residents were reportedly injured by IDF shooting in Jabalia and Shati'. A home-made bomb exploded near Misilya village, in the Jenin district, without injuring anyone. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 2 October 1992)

95. On 2 and 3 October 1992, a 15-year-old resident of the West Bank was shot and killed during demonstrations by Palestinians in support of the week-long hunger strike staged by security prisoners (see list). According to local sources, five protesters were wounded in Ramallah during a demonstration. Military sources claimed that some of the protesters threw stones. Demonstrations were also held outside the Red Cross offices in Gaza and in Majdal Shams (Golan). Non-violent protests were also staged in Hebron and Nablus. A Palestinian activist was killed by soldiers in the West Bank (see list) during a pre-emptive operation. Another Palestinian who threw stones at soldiers while they tried to capture the fugitive was also killed (see list). A third resident who was with the fugitive during the shoot-out was slightly injured. A resident of the Gaza Strip was shot dead by masked men (see list). Stones were reportedly thrown at Arab cars, apparently by residents of Kiryat Arba. (These incidents have also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 12 October 1992.) In the Khan Younis refugee camp, 17 persons were wounded in clashes between Fatah and Hamas gunmen. (Ha'aretz, and Jerusalem Post, 4 October 1992; Jerusalem Post, 6 October 1992). Also on 3 October, Israeli soldiers shot and wounded a youth from the Aroub refugee camp near Hebron when he refused to stop for questioning. A border patrolman was injured in Jerusalem when army vehicles were attacked with stones and glass bottles. Four Molotov cocktails were thrown at the Rockefeller Museum in the Mount of Olives, causing slight damage to the premises. (Al-Fajr, 12 October 1992)

96. On 4 October 1992, Arab demonstrators clashed with police in East Jerusalem in the worst outbreak of violence seen in the city in months. Youths threw rocks and bottles at police who responded by firing tear-gas at more than 150 demonstrators who gathered in support of the ongoing hunger strike. Five or seven youths were arrested, and an UNRWA spokesman stated that two of its officials were slightly injured during the clash. Several dozen women gathered at the Red Cross office in the Sheikh Jarrah neighbourhood in East Jerusalem, while an attempt to hold a march in support of the hunger strikers in Nablus was foiled by soldiers who closed off most of the city. A march was staged around the Gaza Central Prison. (These incidents have also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 12 October 1992.) A resident of Halhul (Hebron district) was shot and slightly injured by a Jewish resident. A small pipe-bomb was discovered at a bus stop in Jerusalem. The bomb was neutralized by the police without causing any injuries. Several incidents, including stone-throwing, in which four residents were injured (Gaza City, two; Khan Younis, two) were reported in the territories. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 5 October 1992). Also on 4 October, a Palestinian youth from Nablus was admitted to a hospital with critical gunshot wounds. Radio Israel reported that the army was investigating the incident. A Molotov cocktail was thrown at an army post in Rafah (Gaza Strip). No damage was reported. (Al-Fajr, 12 October 1992)

97. On 5 October 1992, four firebombs and one empty bottle were thrown in the Bethlehem and Ramallah areas, slightly wounding an Israeli and damaging one car. (Also referred to in Al-Fajr, 12 October 1992). Two residents of Gaza were injured, according to Palestinian sources. (Ha'aretz, and Jerusalem Post, 6 October 1992). Also on 5 October, a 17-year-old youth from Halhul, near Hebron, was injured when soldiers opened fire at a group of Palestinians who were allegedly pelting them with stones. The youth was taken to hospital for treatment. A Molotov cocktail was thrown at an army post near the Dheisheh refugee camp but caused no damage. The camp was placed under curfew for the night. (Al-Fajr, 12 October 1992)

98. On 6 and 7 October 1992 (Yom Kippur day) two men from Anzah, near Jenin, were seriously wounded during an unidentified explosion in the village; one of them later succumbed to his wounds (see list). In a separate incident, a resident of Akrabe, also near Jenin, reportedly died while handling an explosive (see list), according to Arab sources. Dozens of casualties were reported in the Gaza Strip during mass protests of solidarity with the hunger strike staged by Palestinian security prisoners. Official military sources reported at least 12 injuries when troops started dispersing demonstrations after stones were thrown. Palestinian sources put the number of casualties at over 60, after border police responded by opening fire with rubber and plastic bullets and throwing tear-gas. More than two thirds of the casualties were reportedly from Rafah. Demonstrations were also held in the Bureij, Jabalia and Nuseirat refugee camps. A number of marches and protests in the towns of the West Bank ended more or less peacefully. (These incidents have also been referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 8 October 1992.) Several Arab-owned cars were damaged in East Jerusalem while one was torched and completely destroyed. In the Old City of Jerusalem, windshields of 10 Israeli or 5 Arab cars were smashed and their tyres punctured. A soldier was stabbed and lightly wounded in the Jewish quarter of the same city. (Ha'aretz, 8 October 1992; Jerusalem Post, 8 October 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 12 October 1992)

99. On 8 October 1992, a soldier was slightly wounded by a grenade thrown in the vicinity of an army camp in Khan Younis. A fire-bomb was thrown at a truck near Anabta. There were no injuries or damage. Rocks were thrown at an army patrol in the Ramallah district. Soldiers responded with gunfire, lightly injuring one of the stone-throwers. Several persons were injured during disturbances in the Gaza Strip that were organized in support of the prisoners on the hunger strike. IDF sources reported six injuries, while Palestinian sources reported that 19 or 80 people were hurt. Demonstrations were also held near the American Consulate in East Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz, 9 October 1992; Jerusalem Post, 9 October 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 12 October 1992). Also on 8 October, a four-year-old boy, Ibrahim Abu Jahl, was killed when an Israeli army vehicle ran him over in the Shajiya quarter of Gaza City. Confrontations were reported in the Jabalia, Bureij, Nuseirat and Rafah refugee camps in the Gaza Strip. The army imposed a curfew on Rafah after 11 Palestinians were injured. Israeli soldiers opened fire at stone-throwers in Salfit, near Tulkarm, but no injuries were reported. An Israeli soldier was injured when a hand grenade was thrown at an army vehicle in Khan Younis. (Al-Fajr, 12 October 1992)

100. On 9 and 10 October 1992, a resident of the West Bank was shot and killed by IDF soldiers after he threw stones and petrol bombs at them. Two other residents were also injured in the incident (see list). Violent demonstrations and processions were held in several localities of the Gaza Strip (Gaza City and Nuseirat and other refugee camps) and demonstrators were dispersed by border police with the use of gas grenades and rubber bullets. According to Palestinian sources, 64 Palestinians were injured. Two border police guards were reportedly also injured (Al-Fajr, 19 October 1992), while the IDF reported 40 injuries. In Ramallah, following the stoning of a border police patrol, a resident was shot and injured when he refused to obey orders to halt. (These incidents have also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 12 October 1992.) Two border policemen were injured, one seriously, in the Gaza Strip, during stone-throwing incidents. An Arab youth was shot and injured by a border policeman in East Jerusalem in unclear circumstances. During a pre-emptive operation, the army came across masked men stoning Israeli vehicles in the A-Ram area of the West Bank. Two of the stone-throwers were injured, one seriously, when the army shot at them. The third managed to escape. (Ha'aretz, 11 October 1992; Al-Fajr, 19 October 1992). Also on 10 October, more than 70 Palestinians were admitted to hospitals when soldiers dispersed a march in Jerusalem. Mustafa Ali Obeidat, 22, was shot and injured after allegedly trying to steal a border patrolman's gun during the demonstration. Four other youths were arrested on the same allegation. Obeidat was taken to Makassed Hospital, reportedly in serious condition. Amjad Deeb Kawasmi, 17, of Beit Fajar near Bethlehem was moderately injured when soldiers shot into a crowd of demonstrators in the village. In Jenin, border patrolmen shot and injured three residents when army vehicles were attacked with glass bottles and rocks. Among the injured was 14-year-old Sadek Ahmad Jaradat, who was shot in the abdomen and pelvis. (Al-Fajr, 19 October 1992 and Al-Tali'ah, 22 October 1992)

101. On 11 and 12 October 1992 (the first days of the Succot holidays) Arntsia Ben-Haim, 45, from the Yad Mordekhai Kibbutz was beaten and killed by an Arab worker in the Ganei-Tal settlement in the Gaza Strip. Several suspects were arrested. Violent clashes subsequently ensued and IDF soldiers used tear-gas and rubber bullets to break up the disturbances. According to the IDF spokesman, five soldiers and up to 45 Palestinians were injured. Palestinian sources reported that three residents were killed (see list) and 70 injured. In an attempt to calm the violence, curfews were imposed on several cities and refugee camps of the Gaza Strip. A large part of the Gaza Strip was already under curfew because of previous clashes. Schoolgirls at a Hebron girls school threw stones at soldiers and a 17-year-old girl was subsequently hospitalized with a rubber-bullet wound in her leg. In Tal, west of Nablus, three youths were wounded by soldiers after they threw stones at them. In the Balata camp, one youth, Jihad Abdul Karim Tayim, 21, was injured after stones were thrown at an army patrol. In the Nablus Casbah, a youth, Shadi Burhan Amoudi, 25, was shot in the leg after soldiers had been stoned. Three petrol bombs were thrown at an Israeli vehicle and one at an IDF patrol in the Ramallah district. No injuries or damage were reported. (Ha'aretz, and Jerusalem Post, 13 October 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 19 October 1992). Also on 11 October, four Palestinians were wounded during confrontations in Jenin and were admitted to Rafidiya Hospital in Nablus. Another youth was critically injured in Silat Al Dahr, near Jenin. Radio Israel reported that soldiers opened fire at the youth when he did not obey orders to halt. A 13-year-old boy, Khaled Abdullah Bano Odeh, from Tamoun near Nablus, was admitted to-hospital after being severely beaten by soldiers during confrontations which took place in his village. Two Israeli cars were set ablaze in the Pisgat Ze'ev settlement near Jerusalem. (Al-Fajr, 19 October 1992). On 12 October, Israeli soldiers fired plastic bullets at 4,000 demonstrators in Khan Younis, injuring 18. Two other Palestinians were injured during confrontations in the Maghazi refugee camp (Gaza Strip). In the Sheikh Jarrah neighbourhood of Jerusalem, unknown persons set fire to a Jewish holy site, causing heavy damage and destroying its contents. (Al-Fajr, 19 October 1992)

102. On 13 October 1992, a 13-year-old boy from Gaza City died of wounds sustained a week earlier during a violent march (see list). A youth was wounded in the leg after he threw stones at soldiers in the Askar camp near Nablus. A boy was burned in Bani Suheila, Gaza Strip, when he tried to throw a fire-bomb at a military patrol. Minor clashes were reported in Khan Younis. Stones were thrown at an IDF patrol in Nablus, and soldiers shot at the stone-throwers when they refused to obey orders to halt. One youth was badly injured. (These incidents have also been referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 15 October 1992.) A soldier was slightly injured by fragments of glass near Elon Moreh (West Bank) when his IDF vehicle was stoned. Five members of a Jewish family were slightly injured in East Jerusalem when their car was stoned. Border police forces were also stoned in the same part of the city. Palestinian sources reported that 15 residents were injured by IDF shooting (Ha'aretz, and Jerusalem Post, 14 October 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 19 October 1992). Also on 13 October, an Egged company bus was pelted with stones in East Jerusalem. One Israeli was injured. In Beit Hanina, north of Jerusalem, 10 Palestinians were arrested for interrogation following stone-throwing and tyre-burning incidents in the town. A Molotov cocktail was thrown at a border patrol in Khan Younis. No damage was reported. (Al-Fajr, 19 October 1992)

103. On 14 October 1992, riots erupted in Jerusalem some hours after a security prisoner died of a heart attack, and Israeli police and army troops were placed on alert throughout the territories (see list). Residents burned tyres and threw stones at police patrols. The police used tear-gas and rubber bullets to disperse them. Violent clashes were also reported in the Gaza Strip, especially in Khan Younis, where a gunman of the Fatah Hawks was killed in a clash with the IDF (see list). Eyad Musca Moamar, 19, was slightly injured and arrested. An Israeli soldier was seriously injured during the shoot-out. While the curfew was in force, a 16- or 18-year-old resident was shot dead (see list) during riots in the Khan Younis area and 8 to 20 persons were injured. Two local youths were slightly wounded when soldiers fired at stone-throwers in Halhoul. Four residents were reportedly injured by IDF shooting in the West Bank. (These incidents have also been referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 15 October 1992.) In East Jerusalem, a bus was stoned and an Israeli girl slightly injured by fragments of glass. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 15 October 1992). Also on 14 October, Israeli soldiers shot and injured nine Palestinians during confrontations in the occupied territories: Deir El Balah, three; Askar refugee camp, three; Halhul, two; and Nablus, one. Violent student demonstrations also took place in the Beitunia and Jalazun refugee camps, both near Ramallah, and in Ramallah itself Soldiers used percussion and tear-gas bombs, as well as rubber bullets, to disperse the protesters. No injuries were reported. (Al-Fajr, 19 October 1992)

104. On 15 October 1992, farmer Shimon Avraham, 35, from Meitav, a moshav south of Afula within the Green Line, was found stabbed to death in a field near his home. A massive manhunt for the assailants was organized. Sixteen residents of the territories were arrested. Businesses and schools were closed in East Jerusalem, and minor rioting broke out in several Arab areas of the capital in response to the death of a security prisoner on 14 October. A general strike was observed in the cities of the West Bank on the same occasion. A convoy of Israeli cars driving towards Jerusalem from Hebron was stoned near Halhoul, and one passenger suffered a light hand injury. An Israeli bus was struck by stones near Jericho. Its windows were smashed and four passengers were lightly wounded by glass shards. A youth, Mahmud Rateb Abu Dhaher, 21, was shot and wounded after stones were thrown at soldiers near Ramallah. Four Israeli cars were stoned near the Ofra settlement, and one Israeli was injured. (These incidents have also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 19 October 1992.) A youth was injured by IDF shooting in the Abu Shehade village. Palestinian sources reported stone-throwing incidents in Ramallah and in the West Bank refugee camps. Curfews were imposed on several localities of the Gaza Strip. (Ha'aretz, and Jerusalem Post, 16 October 1992). Also on 15 October, soldiers surrounded the Alexander Khoury Secondary School in Beit Jala, near Bethlehem, and used tear-gas to disperse a protest which was taking place there. Many students were hospitalized due to gas inhalation. The school was ordered closed indefinitely. Two Molotov cocktails were thrown at an Israeli patrol as it passed through Ramallah. No injuries were reported. An Israeli car was attacked with stones in Jericho and its windshield was shattered. The driver was taken to a hospital for treatment. (Al-Fajr, 19 October 1992)

105. On 16 and 17 October 1992, one Israeli woman, Yehudit Ostran, 57, was killed and nine other passengers were wounded when a bomb exploded by the roadside near their van as it approached moshav Mattilyahu. near the Green Line. Four violent Palestinian deaths were reported in the Jenin area (see list). A resident of East Jerusalem died of wounds sustained several days earlier (see list). (These incidents have also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 26 October 1992.) Incidents were reported in the Khan Younis and Maghazi refugee camps and in Gaza City. Five residents were reportedly injured. Incidents were also reported in the refugee camps of the West Bank, in Ramallah and Jenin. According to Palestinian sources, several persons were injured. In Hebron, youths threw stones at IDF forces and one or three of the stone-throwers was slightly injured when soldiers shot at them. Two other youths were slightly wounded as they ran away. An Israeli was stabbed and slightly injured by two Arabs on the Jewish neighbourhood of the Old City of Jerusalem. One petrol bomb was thrown at an Israeli vehicle in the Ramallah area. No damage was reported. A six-day curfew was lifted in Gaza City and Rafah. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 18 October 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 19 October 1992). Also on 17 October, Mustafa Obeidat died of wounds sustained on 10 October (see incident of 10 October) after being shot by a border guard. The Israeli army claimed that Obeidat had tried to steal a border guard's machine gun. However, according to two Israeli newspapers, Zu Haderekh and Kol Ha'ir, Obeidat was shot at point-blank range in broad daylight, in front of dozens of eyewitnesses. Roli Rosen, a journalist with the weekly Kol Ha'ir, reported that Obeidat was participating in a demonstration of solidarity with the prisoners participating in the hunger strike. A group of women had been arguing with the soldiers. The soldiers subsequently threw a tear-gas bomb. Mustafa threw it back at them. The soldiers, feeling very humiliated, chased him and threw him onto the ground. Two soldiers started beating him with their rifle butts. A third soldier appeared and fired at him from close range. A film of the event taken by a Visnews crew clearly shows that Obeidat was shot as he was held to the ground. The film was also shown on Israeli television. The Israeli Justice Ministry indicated that the case was under investigation. Meanwhile, the soldier who shot Obeidat had not been removed from duty. (Al-Tali'ah, 22 October 1992, and Al-Fajr, 26 October 1992)

106. On 18 and 19 October 1992 (the last days of Succot) two men from Rafah were shot dead (see list). A youth and an IDF soldier were wounded during a clash in the Jabalia camp. In Husan, near Bethlehem, a young stone-thrower was shot and wounded in the leg by soldiers. A bomb exploded outside the main gate of the Ginot Shomron settlement in the West Bank without causing any harm. A home-made bomb was thrown at an IDF position in Gaza but did not cause any injuries or damage. A hand-grenade was thrown at an IDF patrol in the Bani Suheila area but did not cause any harm. Palestinian sources reported incidents in which stones and bottles were thrown at IDF soldiers in the refugee camps of the Gaza Strip. According to the same sources, four residents were injured during these incidents, although the IDF claimed only one injury. Curfews remained in force in Khan Younis town and refugee camp, and in the Nuseirat camp. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 20 October 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 26 October 1992)

107. On 20 October 1992, a sabotage of the Jerusalem sewage system created massive run-offs of waste from the capital's north-eastern neighbourhoods near the village of Anata. At the entrance to Gaza City, an Israeli security guard on a fuel truck was struck in the head by stones and lost one eye, when dozens of youths reportedly blocked the truck's passage as it was leaving the gas station. Palestinian sources reported several incidents in the Khan Younis (Rafah, Bureij), Jabalia and Shati' refugee camps and in Gaza City, where four or five residents were injured. (These incidents have also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 26 October 1992.) Two residents were reportedly also wounded in Ramallah. (Ha'aretz, and Jerusalem Post, 21 October 1992)

108. On 21 October 1992, the body of a resident was discovered stabbed and tied in Deir el-Balah (see list). Two soldiers were wounded, one seriously, when activists fired more than 20 bullets at them from a speeding car near Hebron. One petrol bomb was thrown at a bus in Shilo, two at an Israeli car in Tulkarm and two at a bus near the Yakir junction in the West Bank and at an Israeli patrol in Rafah. There were no injuries or damage. A bus carrying workers to their jobs in Israel was torched in Khan Younis. In Hebron, soldiers shot and slightly wounded a youth who was throwing stones at an IDF patrol. An IDF patrol was also stoned in the Jenin district. One soldier and one Palestinian youth were slightly injured. (Ha'aretz, and Jerusalem Post, 22 October 1992; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 22 October 1992 and Al-Fajr, 26 October 1992)

109. On 22 October 1992, the body of a Shaboura camp resident was brought to Nasser Hospital in Khan Younis (see list). The driver of a fuel truck was slightly injured by stones thrown at him in the village of Khader, near Bethlehem. In Beit Omar and in Nablus, two Palestinians were wounded when soldiers fired on youths who threw stones at them and then tried to flee. Five fire-bombs were thrown at an Israeli car near Kalkiliya without causing harm. Stones were thrown at a military outpost in the el-Arrub refugee camp, slightly injuring one soldier. (These incidents have also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 26 October 1992.) Palestinian sources reported that three residents were injured in the Gaza Strip. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 23 October 1992)

110. On 23 and 24 October 1992, a man from Gaza was stabbed to death in a hospital yard (see list) while the body of a second Palestinian was brought to Jenin hospital (see list). (These incidents have also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 26 October 1992.) An 18-year-old youth died in hospital of wounds sustained two weeks earlier (see list). In Atarot, in north Jerusalem, persons believed to be Arab activists set fire to a customs warehouse, causing millions of dollars worth of damage. No injuries were reported. Four vehicles were torched in Jerusalem. A tourist bus was stoned in East Jerusalem and two passengers slightly injured by broken glass. (These incidents have also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 2 November 1992.) An Israeli was attacked and slightly wounded by two Arab youths in the Old City of Jerusalem. One Arab youth was slightly injured while two of his companions were arrested after the three refused to obey orders to halt. Palestinian sources reported that four residents of the Gaza Strip were injured: two in Khan Younis and two in Gaza City. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 25 October 1992). Also on 23 October, an Israeli patrol opened fire at a group of demonstrators in Tel, near Nablus, injuring one youth. A Molotov cocktail was thrown at an Israeli car near the Shufat refugee camp, north of Jerusalem. No damage was reported. (Al-Tali'ah, 22 October 1992)

111. On 25 October 1992, workers waiting to get into Israel from Gaza at the Erez checkpoint turned into a rock-throwing mob when rumours spread that the army was limiting the number of those who would be allowed in to work. Three buses were partially burned in the riot while the windows of 30 more were smashed together with those of a police car and several vehicles with local licence plates. News of the riot spread to Gaza, including reports of dead and wounded, triggering protests, which included the burning of tyres. Stones were thrown at the former police station in the Shajarya neighbourhood. Fifteen persons were reported to have been injured and a day-long commercial strike was declared in Gaza. One soldier was injured during the disturbances. A soldier, Schmuel Geresh, 32, was killed and another one was wounded in Hebron when gunmen opened fire from automatic weapons at a rooftop IDF outpost overlooking the Cave of the Patriarchs. The assailants managed to escape in a car. The IDF imposed a curfew on Hebron. (These incidents have also been referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 29 October 1992.) Four residents were reportedly injured during disturbances. A petrol bomb was thrown at a Civil Administration vehicle in the Jenin area. No injuries or damage were reported. An Israeli car was stoned in Ramallah district. A woman passenger was slightly injured by fragments of glass. In the same area, a petrol bomb was thrown at a bus without causing any harm. (Ha'aretz, and Jerusalem Post, 26 October 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 2 November 1992)

112. On 26 October 1992, the body of a West Bank resident was found near Nablus Hospital (see list). A farmer from moshav Yarhiv was severely burned when a firebomb set his tractor on fire near the village of Habla in the West Bank. The IDF launched searches and imposed a curfew on the village. Hebron remained under curfew. Petrol bombs were thrown at an Israeli vehicle near the Itamar settlement, in the Nablus district, without causing any harm. Two other petrol bombs were thrown at the Idra Yeshiva in the Old City of Jerusalem. There were no injuries or damage. (These incidents have also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 2 November 1992.) Palestinian sources reported incidents in which three residents were injured in the refugee camps of the Gaza Strip. (Ha'aretz, 27 October 1992)

113. On 27 October 1992, two residents of the Gaza Strip were shot dead by unknown persons (see list). A settler from Netzer Hazani (Gaza Strip) was attacked by two men carrying an axe and a knife. The settler suffered a fractured skull. Several suspects were arrested for interrogation. An Israeli from moshar Ganim, east of Jenin, was shot and injured in a grocery store in Jenin. His wife was also slightly injured by a grenade thrown by the assailants. Several suspects were arrested on that occasion. An Arab resident attacked a resident of Kiryat Arba in the Old City of Jerusalem. The assailant was arrested. In Ramallah, three petrol bombs were thrown at the police building in two separate incidents. No one was injured and no damage was caused. A petrol bomb was thrown at a bus in the Nablus district. No injuries were reported. An Arab was slightly injured by IDF shooting when an Israeli vehicle was stoned in the Ramallah district. An Israeli bus was torched near Mughazi and in Bani Suheila in the Gaza Strip. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 28 October 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 2 November 1992)

114. On 28 October 1992, two youths were wounded in Illar village near Nablus. One was injured when a soldier opened fire at stone-throwers; the second was injured when he tried to drive through a road block at the entrance to the village where the first incident took place. Several incidents, especially in the refugee camps, were reported in the Gaza Strip. A home-made bomb exploded in the village of Samua, in the Hebron district, as an IDF vehicle was passing by. No injuries or damage were reported. (These incidents have also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 2 November 1992.) An IDF patrol came across masked men in the Ramallah district and ordered them to halt. When they did not obey, the soldiers shot at them, injuring one slightly. (Ha'aretz, 29 and 30 October 1992; Jerusalem Post, 29 October 1992)

115. On 27 and 28 October 1992, two Palestinians were reportedly shot and injured during clashes with soldiers in the Al Ram and Jabaliya refugee camps. An Israeli tractor driver sustained heavy burns when a Molotov cocktail was thrown at him as he passed Habla village, near Tulkarm. The village was placed under curfew. A Molotov cocktail was also thrown at an army patrol in the Nuseirat refugee camp (Gaza Strip), without causing damage. In Deir Dibwan, IDF soldiers shot and injured a youth alleging that he had been masked. (Al-Fajr, 2 November 1992)

116. On 29 October 1992, a border policeman was slightly injured by stones thrown at his vehicle near the village of Filt a-Dahar, in the Jenin district. Several other stone-throwing incidents were reported in the territories especially in the refugee camps of the Gaza Strip. Five residents reportedly sustained slight injuries in Rafah and Jabalia. A petrol bomb was thrown at a military vehicle near Dar al-Kara, in the Ramallah district. Two cars were torched in East Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz, 30 October 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 2 November 1992)

117. On 30 and 31 October 1992, two Gaza Strip residents were shot and killed (see list). Another man was reportedly shot in a clash with security forces (see list). Matti Biton, 35, from Moshare Ganim, who was shot in Jenin on 27 October, succumbed to his wounds. A home-made pipe bomb exploded near an IDF patrol in Rafah. No one was injured and no damage was caused. An Egged company bus bringing workers to the Jenin area to their jobs across the Green Line was torched. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 1 November 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 2 November 1992). Also on 31 October, three Palestinians were reportedly shot and injured during demonstrations following the killing of Hisham Abu Amer in Khan Younis. In Jenin, settlers continued to vandalize Arab-owned property after the killing of a settler. A juice factory was set on fire by settlers and considerable damage was caused. Other settlers attacked the village of Luban Gharbiya after their cars were pelted with stones. They broke windows on several houses and set fire to an Arab-owned car. They also kidnapped Abdallah Hmeidi Samhat, aged 24, for 24 hours, in the course of which he was severely beaten. (Al-Fajr, 9 November 1992)

118. On 1 November 1992, Gaza military sources reported that the body of a 17-year-old youth was brought to Shifa Hospital (see list). Violence erupted at the Erez checkpoint within the Gaza Strip boundaries for the second time in a week. According to Israeli sources, the cause was that drivers had raised the fares for drives to workplaces in Israel. Palestinian sources alleged that tempers rose because workers thought the time it took to pass through the checkpoint was excessive. Soldiers fired in the air to break up disturbances when the windows of five cars were hit by stones. There were no injuries. A commercial strike was observed in the Gaza Strip in protest of the killing of a member of the Ezzeddin al-Kassem gang on 31 October. Gaza sources reported three persons were wounded in clashes that erupted after his death. A police vehicle was destroyed by fire in the Sheikh Jarrah neighbourhood of Jerusalem. Eight civilian vehicles had their windows broken and were scratched. An Israeli vehicle was stoned near that neighbourhood and the driver slightly injured. A petrol bomb exploded in Jenin city without causing any damage. (These incidents have also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 9 November 1992.) Stone-throwing incidents were reported in Jenin and Hebron. The IDF lifted the curfew that had been in force in Hebron. Palestinian sources reported that two residents were injured in the refugee camps of the Gaza Strip during clashes with the IDF. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 1 November 1992)

119. On 2 November 1992, Arab merchants in Hebron prevented an attacker with an axe from seriously injuring an Israeli near the Cave of the Patriarchs in Hebron. A week-long curfew was reimposed on Hebron. (This incident has also been referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 5 November 1992.) In Gaza Strip a general strike called by the Hamas movement was observed in numerous localities to mark the anniversary of the Balfour Declaration. Clashes erupted in the Gaza, Rafah, Shati', Jabalia and Deir el Balah refugee camps, causing four to six casualties according to Palestinian sources (three according to the IDF). An Israeli bus was reportedly burned in Issawiya (or Eizereya, near Jerusalem), and a fire-bomb was thrown at a military post in the Deheishe refugee camp. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 3 November 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 9 November 1992)

120. On 3 November 1992, more than 1,500 dunams of forest near Beit Shemesh (inside the Green Line) were destroyed by fire, probably set by Arab activists since it began in several spots at the same time. (Jerusalem Post, 4 November 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 9 November 1992). Also on 3 November 1992, Halima Ireidi, a woman from Husan, near Bethlehem died of a heart attack (see list). Three Palestinian youths were injured when border patrolmen shot at demonstrators in the Jabalia refugee camp. Five border guards were also injured by stones during the clashes. A Molotov cocktail was thrown at an army patrol passing through Rafah (Gaza Strip), but caused no damage. (Al-Fajr, 9 November 1992; Al-Tali'ah, 19 November 1992)

121. On 4 November 1992, five Arab residents and two women soldiers were injured during incidents in the territories. The two women soldiers were stoned in a military bus near the A-Ram village, in the West Bank. One youth was shot and injured by the army in Beit Jallah while throwing stones at an IDF vehicle. (These incidents have also been referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 5 November 1992; Al-Fajr, 9 November 1992.) Four other residents from the refugee camps of Jabalia and Shati' and from Gaza City were also injured. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 5 November 1992)

122. On 5 November 1992, a stun-grenade was thrown at a Jerusalem police station and a hand-grenade was thrown at a Gaza police station causing no injury or damage. Three cars were torched in the centre of Jerusalem. (These incidents have also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 9 November 1992.) An Israeli taxi was stoned near the Mount of Olives and its windows were smashed. The driver shot in the air. No one was injured. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 6 November 1992)

123. On 6 and 7 November 1992, masked men gunned down an Arab taxi driver in the Gaza Strip (see list) (Jerusalem Post, 8 November 1992). Also on 6 and 7 November 1992, two youths were injured during demonstrations in the Bureij refugee camp and in Beit Lahiya (Gaza Strip). Seven youths were injured in Khan Younis City and in the Jabalia refugee camp (Gaza Strip) as IDF soldiers tried to disperse demonstrations there. (Al-Fajr, 9 and 16 November 1992)

124. On 8 November 1992, two petrol bombs were thrown at the house of a resident of the Tulkarm refugee camp. No injuries or damage were reported. Another petrol bomb was thrown in Idna (West Bank) at a border police patrol. (These incidents have also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 16 November 1992.) The bomb hit the car but did not damage it. The IDF placed the village under curfew (Ha'aretz, 9 November 1992). Also on 8 November 1992, a Palestinian was wounded when soldiers opened fire at a group of youths demonstrating in Khan Younis. A Molotov cocktail was thrown at an army post overlooking the Jabalia refugee camp, while another one was thrown at a Jewish religious school, the Ateret Cohanim in the Old City of Jerusalem. No injuries or damage were reported. (Al-Fajr, 16 November 1992)

125. On 9 November 1992, a resident of Gaza was shot dead by unidentified gunmen (see list). A man threw a bottle containing an unidentified liquid at a group of children in a playground abutting the Hebron casbah. One girl was slightly injured. Two fire-bombs were thrown at a truck passing by the al-Aida refugee camp in Bethlehem, causing slight damage. According to Palestinian sources, stones were thrown in the refugee camps of the southern Gaza Strip (Rafah and Khan Younis) and clashes were reported in the main street of Gaza City. According to the same sources, four residents were injured. Stone-throwing incidents were also reported in the West Bank. A curfew remained in force in the Derekh Hashalan area of Hebron. A strike was observed to commemorate the 60th month of the uprising. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 10 November 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 16 November 1992)

126. On 10 November 1992, masked men shot and killed an Arab resident of Gaza (see list). Two Israelis were slightly injured in separate incidents when their vehicles were stoned, one in Hebron and the other near Ramallah. An Israeli truck driver reported that shots were fired at his vehicle near the Askar camp. (These incidents have also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 16 November 1992.) A soldier was slightly injured by a rock thrown at him when he was on a roof in the Hebron casbah. The soldier fired back. No injuries were reported. (Ha'aretz, 11 and 12 November 1992; Jerusalem Post, 11 November 1992). Also on 10 November 1992, five Palestinian workers were injured when their bus was pelted with stones near the Talbiut neighbourhood south of Jerusalem. (Al-Tali'ah, 12 November 1992)

127. On 11 November 1992, four Palestinians died in clashes with the IDF and an IDF soldier remained in serious condition after being wounded by submachine gunfire. Palestinian sources reported that up to nine other persons were slightly wounded during disturbances in Khan Younis (also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 12 November 1992). Two residents of the Bureij refugee camp were injured during clashes with soldiers. Khan Younis and Rafah were declared closed military areas (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 12 November 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 16 November 1992). Also on 11 November 1992, two Israelis were slightly injured when their car was pelted with stones in the area of Hebron. Stone-throwing incidents against settlers' cars were also reported in Bethlehem and Nablus. Two Israeli cars were set on fire and destroyed in the Ramot settlement near Jerusalem. (Al-Tali'ah, 12 November 1992; Al-Fajr, 16 November 1992)

128. On 12 November 1992, a man was gunned down by Fatah Hawks vigilantes (see list). A small pipe-bomb was thrown at a crowded Egged company bus near the Old City of Jerusalem, damaging a seat but causing no injuries. Three Gaza residents told the police they were slightly wounded by gunfire while travelling home south from Rishon Lezion. Shots were fired at an Israeli bus carrying Arab workers near Yaabed, in the vicinity of Jenin. There were no injuries. Stones were thrown at an Israeli bus el-Bireh. A girl was injured by a stone thrown in the Ramallah area. Four border policemen and 20 Palestinians were slightly wounded in disturbances near Khan Younis, which was under curfew following demonstrations a day earlier. (These incidents have also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 16 November 1992.) Bani Suheila was also placed under curfew. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 13 November 1992)

129. On 13 and 14 November 1992, soldiers shot dead two suspects in Nablus and Hebron (see list), and masked men apparently killed two men whose bodies were subsequently found in Gaza (see list). An IDF officer was stabbed and moderately wounded by a woman in Kalkiliya. The woman, Muna Ahmed Bani Odeh, 23, was arrested. A firebomb was thrown at a patrol in Gaza without causing any harm. A home-made bomb was thrown at the Bethlehem police station. It caused no injuries or damage. The market area was placed under curfew. Troops shot at two suspects in Tamoun when they refused to stop when ordered to do so, wounding one of them seriously. A small bomb exploded prematurely, injuring two activists in Bethlehem who were reportedly on their way to carry out an attack in Jerusalem. One of them was moderately injured. Arab sources stated that three people were reportedly wounded in the Nuseirat camp when soldiers opened fire on a demonstration marking the fourth anniversary of PLO leader Yasser Arafat's proclamation of a Palestinian State. (These incidents have also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 23 November 1992.) A vehicle with foreign licence plate was torched near the Old City. Only minor damage was caused. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 15 November 1992)

130. On 15 November 1992, according to Palestinian sources, 23 Palestinians were injured during clashes with the IDF on the day of the fourth anniversary of the proclamation of the Palestinian State. A number of processions and demonstrations were held in the cities of the territories (Gaza, Khan Younis, Ramallah and Jenin). Stones were thrown at soldiers. In the Old City of Jerusalem, demonstrations were broken up by the firing of rubber bullets. A woman tourist who found herself in the area was slightly injured by one bullet. A Border Police unit operating in Abu Dis, East Jerusalem, spotted two masked men, one of whom was carrying an axe. When they ignored orders to halt, the soldiers opened fire wounding one and arresting the other. In Kfar Tamoun, a masked man was slightly injured and three others were arrested. Two petrol bombs were thrown at an IDF patrol in Jenin without causing any injuries or damage. A home-made bomb was thrown at the Civil Administration building in Khan Younis without causing harm. Two cars were torched in the Sheikh Jamah neighbourhood of East Jerusalem. A United Nations vehicle was also torched in Abu Tor. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 16 November 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 23 November 1992). Also on 15 November 1992, several bomb-throwing incidents were reported in the occupied territories: in Tulkarm, at a car (one); in the Ya'bad village near Jenin and in Rafidya, near Nablus, at army patrols (three); in the Nebi Yakub settlement north of Jerusalem, at an Israeli Egged company bus, south of Jenin, at an army patrol (one); and in Turmus Aya near Ramallah, at a car (one). None caused any damage or injuries. A bomb was also reportedly thrown at the Israeli Civil Administration headquarters in Deir El Balah, causing no damages. (Al-Fajr, 23 November 1992)

131. On 16 November 1992, a grenade exploded in a crowded street in the Moslem quarter of the Old City of Jerusalem, killing one man (see list) and wounding eight/twelve others. Jewish extremists claimed responsibility for the attack. After the attack, Arab youths threw stones at police and broke the windows of several cars parked outside the Old City. Palestinian sources reported that six residents were injured during clashes with the IDF: Jabalia refugee camp, two; southern Gaza Strip, three; and Ramallah, one. A man was killed in the West Bank (see list). A soldier was injured by a stone thrown at his military vehicle near the village of Medama (West Bank). (These incidents have also been referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 19 November 1992.) Two petrol bombs were thrown at an Israeli vehicle near the village of Nalin (West Bank) without causing any harm. Disturbances and demonstrations in several refugee camps of the West Bank were reported by Palestinian sources. (Jerusalem Post, 17 November 1992; Al-Fajr, 23 November 1992)

132. On 17 November 1992, several shots were reportedly fired at a bus on the Trans-Samaria highway, near the village of Masha. No one was hurt and no damage was caused. (Jerusalem Post, 18 November 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 23 November 1992)

133. On 17 and 18 November 1992, during the night, settlers allegedly set fire to four cars belonging to Arab residents in Al Ram, near Jerusalem. Two cars were totally destroyed while the other two were damaged. Several Israeli buses were pelted with stones in Al Ram, in the Shu'fat refugee camp and in Jerusalem, injuring fifteen Israelis. A 35-year-old woman, Kamela Dib Al Barghouthy, from Kafr Ein in Ramallah, was shot and injured by IDF soldiers, who opened fire when their vehicle was pelted with stones. Molotov cocktails were thrown at an Israeli patrol in Jerusalem and at an army post in the Tulkarm refugee camp, causing no injury or damage. (Al-Tali'ah, 19 November 1992; Al-Fajr, 23 November 1992)

134. On 19 November 1992, a small bomb exploded in the Neve Yaakov neighbourhood of East Jerusalem without causing injuries or damage. A petrol bomb was thrown at an Israeli car passing near the al-Askar refugee camp. No injuries were reported. The camp was placed under curfew (Al-Fajr, 23 November 1992). In the Ramallah area, an Israeli woman was slightly wounded by stones thrown at her vehicle. (Ha'aretz, 20 November 1992)

135. On 20 and 21 November 1992, border police looking for fugitives in the Village of Arrabe (West Bank), shot two men dead, and another man was shot dead by soldiers in the Jenin area. A fourth armed Palestinian was gunned down by the army in the Gaza Strip (see list). Four residents were injured during clashes in the refugee camps of Jabalia, Khan Younis and Shati'. A resident was slightly injured in Ramallah. A petrol bomb was thrown at an IDF patrol in A-Tur neighbourhood, without causing any harm. A massive terrorist bombing was prevented in Or Yehuda when a suspicious-looking van was chased and was found to contain five gas canisters wired to explode. Two of the three men in the van (from Salfit, West Bank) were captured. Eight cars were set ablaze in the Jerusalem area. The door of the income tax office in East Jerusalem was also set on fire, but only minor damage was caused. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 22 November 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 30 November 1992). Also on 21 November 1992, the IDF shot and killed two Palestinians near Jenin, alleging that they were armed and about to open fire. According to an eyewitness, Hanan Nawaf Hammad, the army had surrounded the house the two men were in and told them to come out with their hands raised, which they did. The soldiers handcuffed them, placed them against a wall and shot them execution-style. Evidence gathered by the Palestinian organization for human rights, Al-Haq, shows that the two men were killed while in the custody of the Israelis. The Jerusalem-based Palestinian Human Rights Information Center also called for a comprehensive investigation. Four residents were injured during clashes in Deir Dibwan and El Bireh, both near Ramallah and in the Bureij refugee camp (Gaza Strip). (Al-Fajr, 30 November 1992)

136. On 22 November 1992, commercial strikes were observed in Nablus, Jenin and Khan Younis to commemorate the death of four Palestinians who were shot by the army over the weekend. Five or seven residents were injured during clashes in the refugee camps. An IDF soldier was lightly injured when a grenade was thrown at an army patrol in the Jabalia refugee camp. A student of the Jerusalem Ateret Cohanim yeshiva was stabbed, and a fellow student responded by shooting and wounding the female assailant, Suad Iubeh, 18, from Al Ram. In the refugee camp of Ein Beit Ilma (West Bank), a lieutenant accidentally fired a bullet, wounding his commander and an Arab woman. Stone-throwing incidents in the refugee camps of Jabalia and Khan Younis were reported by Palestinian sources. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 23 November 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 30 November 1992)

137. On 23 November 1992, soldiers shot dead a 12-year-old Palestinian near Jerusalem (see list), and a 10-year-old boy was wounded in the leg. In Illar (West Bank), a patrol attacked by stone-throwers opened fire, wounding two youths, one of them seriously. In the Gaza Strip, up to 12 Palestinians and 8 soldiers were slightly wounded in clashes during a strike of solidarity with the imprisoned Hamas leader Sheikh Ahmed Yassin (in the Gaza City, Bani Suheila, Shati' Jabalia and Bureij camps). In the Nuseirat refugee camp, a bomb exploded without causing harm. Six petrol bombs were thrown in separate incidents: in Nablus (two) at the labor exchange; near the village of Mu'air (West Bank) (two); at an Egged company bus, in Gilo (one); at an Israeli taxi and near the village of Deir-Istya (one); at an Israeli vehicle. They did not cause injuries or damage. The village of Deir-Istya was placed under curfew. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 24 November 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 30 November 1992). Also on 23 November 1992, Ibrahim Ahmed Yamin, 24, of Nablus, was shot in the chest by soldiers. The army gave no reason for opening fire with live ammunition. (Al-Fajr, 30 November 1992)

138. On 24 November 1992, three soldiers were wounded in Palestinian demonstrations when cinder blocks where thrown during 6 protest in Gaza. According to military sources, five Palestinians were injured during the protest. A resident of Abu-Gosh (West Bank) was slightly injured when stones were thrown at his vehicle and its windshield smashed. A strike was partially observed throughout the territories, protesting continued construction across 25 November 1992; also referred the Green Line. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, to in Al-Fajr, 30 November 1992)

139. On 25 November 1992, shots were fired at an IDF outpost in the Sheikh Radwan neighbourhood (Gaza Strip) (also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 26 November 1992). No one was injured and no damage caused. A hand-grenade was thrown at a military position in Gaza without causing harm. Four or six residents were injured during clashes with the IDF in the Gaza Strip. (These incidents have also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 30 November 1992.) An 18-year-old resident of Rafah was wounded in the shooting of masked men. Another woman resident was axed and injured by masked men. (Ha'aretz, 26 November 1992)

140. On 26 November 1992, an Egged company bus driver was slightly injured when his bus was stoned in Hebron. A resident of Jabalia was injured during a clash with the army. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 27 November 1992)

141. On 27 and 28 November 1992, soldiers opened fire on stone-throwing Palestinians in the Gaza Strip, killing one man (see list), and wounding seven Palestinians (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 30 November 1992). Four or five residents were wounded during disturbances in Gaza and in the refugee camp of Jabalia. A resident of Kafr Raba (West Bank), was also injured by army gunfire. A soldier was wounded by a stone when soldiers broke up a demonstration in Gaza. An 18-month-old Jewish boy was hit in the eye by a stone thrown at his family's car on the road to the Maaleh Adumim settlement. The stones were thrown from the Issawiya village. (These incidents have also been referred to in Al-Fajr, 7 December 1992.) A fire-bomb was thrown at an Israeli car in the A-Tur neighbourhood. It caused no injuries or damage. A young woman from Ramallah who was carrying a knife was arrested in Jerusalem. Five cars were torched in East Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 29 November 1992)

142. On 29 November 1992, soldiers shot and killed a masked stone-thrower in Hebron (see list). In the Jabalia refugee camp, some 100 youths threw stones at the military base during several hours. Soldiers, who were behind a wire fence, held back their fire for a while and then shot at the youths, wounding two. A home-made bomb exploded near the Adura settlement (West Bank) as an Israeli vehicle was passing by, without causing harm. Five residents and two soldiers were injured during clashes in Gaza City and the refugee camps of the Gaza Strip. Several shots were fired at an Israeli vehicle near the village of Beitilu (West Bank). Although the car was hit by nine bullets, none of the passengers were wounded. A general strike was observed to mark the 1947 United Nations partition plan throughout the territories. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 30 November 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 7 December 1992)

143. On 30 November 1992, a resident of Ramallah stabbed and slightly injured a teenager at a crowded bus stop in north Jerusalem and was thrown to the ground by a bystander who had rushed to the scene. Palestinian sources reported that four residents were injured during clashes with the IDF in Jabalia, Khan Younis and Shati'. Three petrol bombs and stones were thrown at several caravans of Jewish residents in Tel-Romeida, in Hebron. No one was injured (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 7 December 1992). A Kfar Hawara resident complained at the Nablus police station that he had been shot in his car by a Jewish man. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 1 December 1992)

B. Administration of justice, including the right to a fair trial

1. Palestinian Population

144. On 3 September 1992, the Gaza Military Court sentenced Assad Mahmud al-Magari, 27, from the Nuseirat refugee camp, to four life imprisonment terms plus 215 years; Majad Suleiman al-Namnala, 21, from the Nuseirat refugee camp, to four life terms plus 195 years; and Ravi Hassan Ahmed Balawi, 28, from the Bureij refugee camp, to two life terms plus 100 years. The three men were convicted of belonging to "shock committees" of the Popular Front and of kidnapping, interrogating, torturing and killing tens of alleged collaborators. (Ha'aretz, 4 September 1992)

145. On 3 September 1992, the Ramallah Military Court sentenced Mahmud Jum'a Hamad Ali, 35, from the Bethlehem area, to 12 years of imprisonment for terrorist activities. (Ha'aretz, 4 September 1992)

146. On 7 September 1992, the Gaza Military Court sentenced Bassam Salim Abdullah Ba'ari, 22, to four life terms and another 80 years in prison for wilfully causing the deaths of four Arabs suspected of collaborating with the authorities. He was also convicted of nine attempts to wilfully cause the death of other Arabs. (Jerusalem Post, 8 September 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 14 September 1992)

147. On 8 September 1992, the Hebron Military Court sentenced Sami Ismail Isa, 24, from el-Hader (West Bank), to 25 years of imprisonment for planting bombs and for belonging to the Popular Front. (Ha'aretz, 9 September 1992)

148. On 10 September 1992, the Ramallah Military Court sentenced Mahmud Karzun, 23, and Hani al-Hamda, 21, both from the Ramallah area, to life imprisonment for kidnapping and murdering two Arab residents they suspected of collaboration. (Ha'aretz, 11 September 1992)

149. On 15 September 1992, the Gaza Military Court sentenced Nasser Muhammed Duidar, 25, from the Nuseirat refugee camp, to 11 life terms and another 20 years in prison for intentionally causing the death of 11 suspected collaborators from the Gaza Strip, for kidnapping a resident of the Gaza Strip, for hiding fugitives and for preparing explosive devices. (Ha'aretz, 16 September 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 21 September 1992)

150. On 17 September 1992, it was reported that the detention order on security charges against Mohamed Al Natah, 45, from the village of Adna, near Hebron, was renewed for an additional four years. Al Natah was serving a three-year prison term at the Ansar 3 detention camp and had 20 days left before the end of the term. (Al-Tali'ah, 17 September 1992)

151. On 20 September 1992, Fathi Badawi, 35, and Salah Badawi, 29, from the el-Arroub refugee camp were each sentenced to 12 years of imprisonment by the Ramallah Military Court for shooting at cars on the Hebron road in 1991 and for shooting at the residents of the el-Arroub refugee camp. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 21 September 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 28 September 1992)

152. On 21 September 1992, the cabinet Security Committee decided to reduce from 18 to 8 days the term that juveniles and adult suspects charged with disorderly conduct could be held in detention without being brought before a judge (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 28 September 1992). The committee decided to leave the 18-day limit in force for the next three months in all other cases and would then proceed to review the matter. Five years earlier, a committee headed by former Supreme Court president Moshe Landau had recommended limiting the period of pre-trial detention for Palestinians to eight days. (Ha'aretz, 22 September 1992; Jerusalem Post, 23 September 1992)

153. On 23 September 1992, two Deir el-Balah residents, Mahmed Fuad, 26, and Naim Abu-Kassem, 29, were sentenced to 20 years of imprisonment by the Tel Aviv District Court for, the attempted murder of a construction worker in Rehovot in March. (Jerusalem Post, 24 September 1992)

154. On 15 October 1992, it was reported that Adnan al-Afandi, 27, from the Dheisheh refugee camp, was sentenced by the Jerusalem District Court to 30 years of imprisonment for the attempted murder of two Israeli youths on 9 May 1992. (Ha'aretz, 15 October 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 12 October 1992; Al-Tali'ah, 15 October 1992)

155. On 22 October 1992, it was reported that the Israeli authorities had renewed the administrative detention orders against Ali Jaradat, 37, from Sair, and Hassan Noaman, 33, from Turkemeya, for an additional six months. (Al-Tali'ah, 22 October 1992)

156. On 26 October 1992, the administrative detention order against Khaled Daleisha, 29, from the Jalazun refugee camp, was renewed for an additional six months. (Al-Tali'ah, 29 October 1992)

157. On 1 November 1992, the Jenin Military Court sentenced Salah Awad Muhammed Bazur (or Al Bhutour), 27, from Kfar Raba (West Bank) to 8 terms of 40 (340) years of imprisonment for participating in the killing of 8 Arab residents, for planting bombs, for attacking and interrogating Arab residents suspected of collaboration, for possession of weapons and for Membership in the Shabiba (or Black Panthers) organization. (Ha'aretz, 2 November 1992)

158. On 4 November 1992, the Nablus Military Court sentenced Muhammed Isa Wafana to 38 years of imprisonment for the murder of a suspected collaborator in February 1992 (Ha'aretz, 5 November 1992). Also on 4 November 1992, Omar Mohammed Afaneh, 29, was sentenced to life plus 18 years in prison for possession of arms, throwing grenades and membership in the Fatah. (Al-Fajr, 9 November 1992)

159. On 6 November 1992, it was reported that a Palestinian who had been shot and partially disabled by plainclothes soldiers was awarded approximately $62,740 in damages from the State by the Nazareth District Court. This was the first award of its kind related to IDF elite undercover unit activity. Jamal Bani Odeh, 31, was shot on 18 August 1988 when two undercover and five regular soldiers surrounded a metal workshop in the village of Tamoun, near Jenin. When the undercover soldiers tried to arrest the people in the shop, Odeh and his cousin, Saud Bani Odeh, 24, fled. Soldiers opened fire, killing Saud and wounding Jamal in the knee. Saud Odeh's family was awarded about $19,010. (Jerusalem Post, 6 November 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 9 November 1992)

160. On 9 November 1992, Mohammed Aluna, 24, from Jenin was sentenced to 17 years in prison by the Tel Aviv District Court for capturing a young woman from Ra'anana, dragging her at knife-point to a bomb shelter and repeatedly raping her over several hours on 30 October 1991. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 10 November 1992)

161. On 10 November 1992, Anwar Abdallah Maslamani, 36, of Nablus, was sentenced to 20 years in prison and 10, suspended after being charged with possession of arms and membership in the Fatah. It was also reported that a Palestinian was sentenced by the Ramallah Military Court to an additional four months in prison plus six months suspended for contempt of court. According to Israeli reports, the Palestinian continued to embrace his family and friends in spite of orders by the judge to stop. Also on 10 November 1992, the Kteifan family from the Sheikh Radwan neighbourhood in Gaza was awarded 20,000 Israeli shekels in damages after soldiers shot and killed their 12-year-old child, Rami, on 26 September 1991 as he was on his way to school. (Al-Fajr, 16 November 1992)

162. On 11 November 1992, the Ramallah Military Court sentenced Talat Muhammed Abu Naim, 23, from Ramallah to 10 years of imprisonment for joining the Fatah organization, for giving training in the handling of weapons and for preparing explosives in 1987. (Ha'aretz, 12 November 1992)

163. On 16 November 1992, Bassem Nazal, 27, of Kabatiya (West Bank), was sentenced by the Haifa District Court to life imprisonment for the February murder of Boris Osharov, 33, in Haifa. He was also sentenced to 18 years in jail for the attempted murder of two Polish sailors three days later. (Jerusalem Post, 17 November 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 23 November 1992)

164. On 16 November 1992, Mohammed Zakarana, 23, from Kabatiya (West Bank) was sentenced by the Jenin Military Court to life imprisonment for the killing in May of a suspected informer. He was also given an additional 30 years for attacking and attempting to murder other Arabs and for belonging to the Fatah-affiliated Black Panthers gang. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 17 November 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 23 November 1992)

165. On 16 November 1992, the Nablus Military Court sentenced Iyad Ziad Ahmed Hazran, 21, from the Farah refugee camp, to 15 years of imprisonment for the attempted murder of two soldiers. He had already been sentenced by the Tel Aviv District Court to life imprisonment for the murder of Shlomo Yahia of Kadima. He was also convicted for the possession of weapons, for throwing stones at IDF forces and for his activities in a "terrorist" organization (Ha'aretz, 17 November 1992). Also on 16 November 1992, Rashed Kaisi, 19, from the Jenin refugee camp, was sentenced to nine years in prison on charges of membership in Fatah's military wing, the Black Panthers. (Al-Fajr, 23 November 1992)

166. On 19 November 1992, the Tulkarm Military Court sentenced Hassan Jama'a Ufi, from the territories, to 16 years of imprisonment plus six suspended for his involvement in nine shooting attacks on IDF soldiers, for detonating three makeshift explosive devices and for throwing dozens of firebombs in the Tulkarm region between 1990 and 1991. He was also convicted for attacking Arabs in local refugee camps, manufacturing guns, and for a number of other offenses. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 20 November 1992)

167. On 22 November 1992, the Ramallah Military Court sentenced Musa Kamal Tayim, 22, from Dahiyat Al Barid, near Jerusalem, to 15 years in prison for attempting to kidnap Israeli soldiers and steal their weapons, throwing Molotov cocktails at settlers and verbally threatening collaborators. (Al-Fajr, 30 November 1992)

168. On 23 November 1992, the Jenin Military Court sentenced Imad Jamil Mahmad from the Askar refugee camp to 14 months of imprisonment and 24 suspended for the creation of a cell whose members were taught to prepare bombs and instructed on how to plant them and for throwing a petrol bomb at the house of a man suspected of collaboration. (Ha'aretz, 24 November 1992)

169. On 25 November 1992, Faraj Ramahi, 27, of Khan Younis (Gaza Strip), was sentenced to life imprisonment by the Tel Aviv District Court for the murder of 84-year-old Avraham Kinsler four months earlier. He was also sentenced to a consecutive 17-year prison term for stealing and possession of a gun one month before the murder. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 26 November 1992)

170. On 25 November 1992, the Gaza Military Court sentenced five Fatah members to life imprisonment for a wide range of "terrorist" activities in the city over the past few years, including involvement in the deaths of three local residents. Ibrahim Muhammad Matar, 23, and Hatam Muhammad Ziam, 21, of the Shati' refugee camp, each received three consecutive life terms and an additional 140 years of imprisonment for their roles as leaders of the Masked Panthers Committee. Kamal Abd (or Abel Hadi) Juda, 19, Muhammad Ali Hassasna, 19, and Ashraf Kamal Halif al-Nalady (or Khaldi), 15, from Shati', received three consecutive life sentences and an additional 120 years of imprisonment. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 26 November 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 30 November 1992)

171. On 29 November 1992, Abdul Majid Jubeh, 26, from Jerusalem, was sentenced 14 to 18 years of imprisonment on charges of throwing Molotov cocktails burning Israeli cars, planning to kidnap soldiers and attempting to kill Jews. (Al-Fajr, 7 December 1992)

172. On 30 November 1992, the Ramallah Military Court sentenced Khaled Majid Rabhi Joada, 25, of Dahiyat al-Barid (West Bank), to 18 years of imprisonment for membership in a Fatah-affiliated gang which had tried to kill soldiers, steal weapons and destroy property belonging to Jews. He was also convicted of throwing fire-bombs at Israeli vehicles. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 1 December 1992)

2. Israelis

173. On 31 August 1992, the Supreme Court rejected the appeal of two former border policemen with the same name, Eli Gabai, 24, of Mazheret Batya and Eli Gabai, 25, of Beersheba. Both were convicted of torturing together (with several other border policemen) eight Arab hotel workers, during three nights in May 1987 in Tel Aviv. One of the two was sentenced to a year of imprisonment while the second one was sentenced to eight months. Both defendants were ordered to pay damages in the amount of $420. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 1 September 1992)

174. On 31 August 1992, the Southern Region Military Court sentenced a Lieutenant with IDF to nine months of imprisonment plus nine months suspended, for stealing about $540 from a Palestinian prisoner at the "Ansar 2" prison in the Gaza Strip and for falsifying a document. The officer was also sentenced to demotion to the rank of private. (Ha'aretz, 1 September 1992)

175. On 2 September 1992, a Givati brigade captain, who was originally charged with lying and obstructing the investigation of the killing of a Gaza resident in January 1991, was given a three-month suspended sentence by the Southern Command Military Court following a plea bargain. He was also demoted to lieutenant. The officer was found guilty of improper behaviour. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 3 September 1992)

176. On 10 September 1992, the Tel Aviv District Court sentenced four residents of the Yizhar settlement in the West Bank to short prison terms, suspended sentences and fines for opening fire on 4 March 1990 at an Arab school in Burin while children were in the classrooms. Dror Yehi-Shalom, 33, was sentenced to three months in prison and nine months suspended. Arye Malachi, 40, and Yoel Neumann, 27, were sentenced to two months in prison and 10 months suspended. Dan Ruchler, 40, received a suspended sentence of one year and was fined in the amount of approximately $625. Malachi, Neumann and Ruchler were ordered to pay damages in the amount of $3,540 to the village. (Jerusalem Post, 11 September 1992)

177. On 13 September 1992, Yonatan Ben-Efrat, 19, was sentenced to 56 days in a military prison for refusing to serve in the territories. (Jerusalem Post, 14 September 1992)

178. On 8 October 1992, two members of the Kach movement, Noam Federman and Yehuyada Kahalani, were remanded for 3 additional days by the Jerusalem Magistrates Court on suspicion of attempting to burn an Arab car in Hebron and for not obeying orders issued by security forces. They had already been remanded for three days by the same court on 5 October. (Ha'aretz, 6 and 9 October 1992; Jerusalem Post, 6 October 1992)

179. On 14 October 1992, it was reported that the Tel Aviv District Court had sentenced an Israeli Arab, Ahmed Barid, 40, from Kafr Qassim, to two years of imprisonment for selling arms to a resident of Kalkiliya (West Bank). (Ha'aretz, 14 October 1992)

180. On 14 October 1992, Kach movement activist Baruch Marzel was placed under house arrest by the Jerusalem Magistrates Court, pending the completion of an investigation of his involvement in a fight between settlers and Arabs in Hebron earlier that week. (Ha'aretz, 11 October 1992; Jerusalem Post, 15 October 1992)

181. On 20 October 1992, it was reported that the State Attorney had appealed to the Supreme Court to "significantly increase" the sentence of a soldier who beat two Arabs in Jerusalem in 1990, claiming later that they had tried to take his weapon. Yitzhak Lagmi was fined in the amount of approximately $210 and was ordered by the Jerusalem District Court to pay the two Arabs approximately $1,670 in compensation. Lagmi was charged with assault and giving false testimony. (Jerusalem Post, 20 October 1992)

182. On 30 October 1992, Kamal Abu-Saif, 25, from Ramle, was sentenced by the Tel Aviv District Court to two years' probation and fined about $125 for selling a stolen pistol to a resident of the Gaza Strip. (Ha'aretz, and Jerusalem Post, 1 November 1992)

183. On 8 November 1992, Michel Cohen, a settler from Hebron, was fined in the amount of approximately $460 and given a two-month suspended sentence by the Jerusalem Magistrates Court for firing shots in an inhabited area (Halhoul), on the basis of his own testimony before the police when he reported a stone-throwing attack on his car. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 9 November 1992)

184. On 13 November 1992, it was reported that an officer, Avi Mandler, 29, and a soldier, Ya'acov Sapir, 28, who had attempted to cover up for a colleague who killed a resident of the Farah refugee camp (West Bank) on 14 August 1989, were convicted of obstruction of justice and sentenced to 18 months' probation by the Tel Aviv District Court. (Jerusalem Post, 13 November 1992; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 19 November 1992)

185. On 15 November 1992, a Jenin District Court judge who was carrying out an investigation for the Justice Ministry's Police Investigations Department ruled that the Border Policeman who had shot dead a masked Palestinian (Mussa Abu Eid, 23) in 1991 in the Old City of Jerusalem had acted "negligently and recklessly" and not out of self-defence. The ruling raised serious questions about the interpretation of open-fire orders by the police. Open-fire regulations allow a policeman to open fire if his life or another policeman's life is in immediate danger. (Jerusalem Post, 16 November 1992)

186. On 22 November 1992, the IDF announced that OC Central Command Maj. Gen. Danny Yatom had suspended a lieutenant who had accidentally fired a bullet on 22 November 1992 in the refugee camp of Ein Beit Ilma (West Bank), wounding his commander and an Arab woman, Aisha Aramahi, 48. (Jerusalem Post, 23 November 1992)

187. On 26 November 1992, an IDF Lieutenant Colonel, the former commander of the undercover Shimshon unit which operated in the Gaza area, was demoted to the rank of major by a military court of appeals. The Court accepted an appeal by the prosecution against the leniency of the defendant's previous sentence. The defendant was originally charged with manslaughter, but the Lower Military Court had acquitted him. Instead, he was found guilty of negligence and given a one-month prison sentence, which was suspended. The appeals court found him guilty of exceeding his authority in a manner that endangered human life, and decided to demote him. The charge sheet stated that on 4 October 1989, the defendant caused the death of a masked man, Darwish Kadmah, from the Bureij refugee camp (Gaza Strip), by ordering one of his subordinates to shoot, in violation of standing open-fire regulations. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 27 November 1992)

188. On 30 November 1992, it. was reported that OC Central Commander Maj. Gen. Danny Yatom had suspended from the border patrol a lieutenant who had killed Amjad Abdul Razak Jaber, 12, in Al Ram on 23 November 1992. Yatom stated that the border guard had not obeyed open-fire regulations. (Al-Fajr, 30 November 1992)

C. Treatment of civilians

1. General developments

(a) Harassment-and physical ill-treatment

189. On 6 September 1992, Marwan al-Ghool (or al-Rul), 30, a Palestinian cameraman for the British television company Visnews was beaten by soldiers and taken to Shifa hospital after having filmed a clash in Gaza City. Al-Ghool told reporters that soldiers in the Shati' refugee camp confiscated his camera and threw his press card to the ground when he showed it. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 7 September 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 14 September 1992)

190. On 14 September 1992, it was reported that three Palestinian photojournalists and a television cameraman were possibly beaten, arrested or had their cameras smashed and their films damaged by Israeli soldiers and Border Policemen while filming intifadah-related incidents this month. The photojournalists concerned were: Ishak Kawasmi, from Al-Fajr; Awad Awad, employed by Agence France Press; and Mahfuz Abu Turk, a free-lance journalist. (Al-Fajr 14 September 1992)

191. On 16 September 1992, it was reported that a 78-year-old Palestinian from the Shu'fat refugee camp was held at the Russian Compound prison in Jerusalem so that his detained son would be forced to confess. The Israeli newspaper, Kol Ha'ir, which reported the incident, indicated that Jaradat went to prison where his son Mazen was detained at the request of an Israeli officer. He was promised that his son would not be sentenced to more than two months of imprisonment if the father told him to confess. When Jaradat refused, he was taken to an interrogation room and released half an hour later, as he suffered from asthma. Three days after the incident, Kol Ha'ir reported that Nazen had been released when the police found out that the complaint against him had been made by a disgruntled neighbour and was unfounded. (Al-Fajr 21 September 1992)

192. On 22 September 1992, the Israeli authorities were reported to have released Awad Ikmeil, 62, after detaining him for two and one half months, apparently in order to put pressure on his son, Ahmad, to give himself up to the authorities. The army stated that Ahmad was the leader of Fatah's Black Panthers group, which operates in the Jenin area. (Al-Fajr, 28 September 1992)

193. On 22 September 1992, it was reported that the Israeli authorities had seized the work permits of Mohamed Yacob Nubani and Rifat Nubani, from the Mazare Nubani village in the Ramallah area, in order to pressure their sons, who have been sought by the army for some time, to give themselves up. (Al-Fajr, 28 September 1992)

194. On 13 November 1992, the Center for Rights and Law, a Gaza human rights group, reported that security forces had raided eight houses in the Khan Younis neighbourhood for six hours, causing extensive damage, while apparently searching for fugitives they never found. According to the organization, the residents of the houses that were raided were moved to neighbouring houses before the raid began, and it was described as of unprecedented in scope since the beginning of the uprising". Men were handcuffed and blindfolded before the raid and their identity cards were taken away. The cards were all returned except in the case of Shakir an-Najjah, who was arrested. (Jerusalem Post, 16 November 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 23 November 1992)

(b) Collective Punishment

(i) Houses or rooms that were demolished or sealed

195. On 8 September 1992, in Rafah (Gaza Strip), the IDF destroyed the house of Ibrahim Hassan Atiya Abu Shamhadana on the pretext that he was hiding a fugitive. No one was found in the house after it was demolished. (Ha'aretz, 20 September 1992)

196. On 10 September 1992, it was reported that the High Court ruled that the Israeli army could only seal the floor of the building where Saleh Abed Hreimi resides with his family instead of demolishing the entire three-floor building in Bethlehem. The family petitioned the Court not to issue a military order to demolish the entire building after Hreimi was arrested in April on security charges. (Al-Fajr, 14 September 1992)

197. On 5 October 1992, crews of the Jerusalem municipality demolished an illegally built home in Issawiya. (Jerusalem Post, 6 October 1992)

198. On 13 October 1992, the IDF sealed the top floor of a building in Bethlehem owned by the Hreimi family after one of the sons, Saleh Abed, was accused of anti-occupation activities. (Al-Fajr, 19 October 1992)

199. On 29 October 1992, al-Yamun Security Forces sealed off part of the home of Adli Adal Ahmed Samudi, who was arrested in May 1992. He confessed to killing the head of the Health Chamber in Jenin, to attacks on dozens of Arab residents suspected of collaboration and to the throwing of a home-made bomb at an IDF position in Jenin, (Ha'aretz, 1 November 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 2 November 1992)

200. On 10 November 1992, in Jenin, security forces sealed off the house of Muhammed Yussuf Suleiman Turkman, 19, who had confessed to the shooting of the Bitons, a couple from Ganim, several weeks earlier. (Ha'aretz, 12 November 1992; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 12 November 1992; Al-Fajr, 16 November 1992)

201. On 15 November 1992, the IDF sealed the house of Ahmad Said Abu Aziz, 20, of Jenin, who was suspected of killing a settler in Jenin a month before. Abu Aziz has still not been arrested. (Al-Fajr, 23 November 1992)

202. On 25 November 1992, the house of Adnan Afandi, 21, in the Dheisheh refugee camp near Bethlehem, was ordered sealed by the Israeli High Court. Afandi stabbed two Israelis in West Jerusalem in May and was sentenced to 30 years' imprisonment. (Al-Fajr, 30 November 1992)

(ii) Imposition of curfews, sealing off or closing areas

203. On 28 and 29 August 1992, a fire-bomb was thrown at an IDF outpost in the Tulkarm refugee camp, and a curfew was subsequently imposed on the camp. A curfew was imposed on the Hebron road following the throwing of s tones at an Israeli car. (Jerusalem Post, 30 August 1992)

204. On 31 August 1992, a curfew was imposed on the Balata refugee camp after an Israeli man was shot in the leg when he accidentally drove into the camp. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 1 September 1992)

205. On 1 September 1992, the IDF imposed a curfew on Azun following the throwing of a petrol bomb. (Jerusalem Post, 2 September 1992; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 3 September 1992; Al-Fajr, 7 September 1992)

206. On 3 September 1992, a curfew was imposed on the village of Jayus, in the Tulkarm area, after a soldier was injured by stones. (Al-Fajr, 7 September 1992)

207. On 7 September 1992, it was reported that the night curfew imposed on the Gaza Strip had been advanced by one hour (from 9 p.m. to 3 a.m), because of transition to winter time. (Ha'aretz, 7 September 1992)

208. On 9 September 1992, a curfew was placed on Ya'abed village following the fatal shooting of a masked youth. (Ha'aretz, 10 September 1992; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 10 September 1992)

209. On 9 or 10 September 1992, Rafah was placed under curfew for three days while the IDF were searching for gunmen. (Jerusalem Post, 11 September 1992; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 10 September 1992; Al-Fajr, 14 September 1992)

210. On 11 and 12 September 1992, the curfew remained in force in Rafah for the fifth consecutive day. In Illar (West Bank) a curfew was imposed on the village when Civil Administration officials collected taxes. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post 13 September 1992)

211. On 14 September 1992, a curfew was placed on Burkin (West Bank) following the killing of an armed fugitive. (Jerusalem Post, 15 September 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 21 September 1992)

212. On 15 September 1992, a curfew was placed on the Tulkarm area following the stoning of a soldier. (Ha'aretz, 16 September 1992)

213. On 20 September 1992, a curfew was imposed on the centre of Nablus following the throwing of a grenade at an IDF patrol. (Ha'aretz, 21 September 1992)

214. On 21 September 1992, the centre of Hebron was placed under curfew following the stoning of a Jewish woman. (Ha'aretz, 22 September 1992)

215. On 25 and 26 September 1992, the centre of Hebron was placed under curfew following disturbances by Jewish settlers. (Ha'aretz, 27 September 1992)

216. On 28 September 1992, Yatta village (West Bank) was placed under curfew after a gas tank which had been placed in roadblocks made of stones and burning tyres exploded. (Ha'aretz, 30 September 1992; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 1 October 1992)

217. On 29 September 1992, Samu'a village was placed under curfew when a gas tank, which had been placed in a roadblock made of stones and burnings tyres, exploded. (Ha'aretz, 30 September 1992)

218. On 4 October 1992, most of Nablus was closed off in order to thwart an attempt to hold a march in support of the hunger strikers. (Jerusalem Post, 5 October 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 12 October 1992)

219. On 8 October 1992, a curfew was imposed on Salfit, near Tulkarm, following stone-throwing incidents. (Al-Fajr, 22 October 1992)

220. On 11 and 12 October 1992, preventive curfews were imposed on the Jabalia, Bit Lahiya, Nuseirat and Bureij refugee camps, on Gaza City and on a neighbourhood of Rafah owing to previous clashes that had taken place there. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 13 October 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 19 October 1992)

221. On 14 October 1992, Khan Younis was placed under curfew, and several refugee camps in the Gaza Strip, particularly the southern Gaza Strip, remained under curfew. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 15 October 1992)

222. On 15 October 1992, several localities of the Gaza Strip were placed under curfew. (Ha'aretz, 16 October 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 19 October 1992)

223. On 16 and 17 October 1992, a six-day curfew was lifted in Gaza City and Rafah, which still left a curfew on 250,000 Palestinians in the Jabalia, Bureij, Nuseirat and Khan Younis towns and camps in force. The curfew had been imposed following violent demonstrations of solidarity with the hunger-strikers in prison. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 18 October 1992)

224. On 18 and 19 October 1992, the curfew that had been imposed on the Gaza Strip during the security prisoners' hunger strike a week earlier was lifted in most parts of Gaza. Curfews remained in force for the sixth consecutive day in Khan Younis town and camp, and in the Nuseirat camp. (Jerusalem Post, 20 October 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 26 October 1992)

225. On 20 October 1992, the curfews imposed on Khan Younis and the Nuseirat refugee camp were lifted after eight days, thus ending all curfews that had been imposed on the Gaza Strip. (Jerusalem Post, 21 October 1992)

226. On 21 October 1992, a curfew was imposed on Hebron and the village of Dura after two soldiers were shot and injured. (Al-Tali'ah, 22 October 1992)

227. On 25 October 1992, a curfew was imposed on Hebron following the shooting and killing of an Israeli soldier at an IDF outpost. (Jerusalem Post, 26 October 1992; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 29 October 1992)

228. On 26 October 1992, a curfew was imposed on Habla village (West Bank) following the throwing of a petrol bomb at an Israeli man. Hebron remained under curfew. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 27 October 1992)

229. On 30 October 1992, it was reported that the curfew imposed three days earlier on Sura, near Nablus, remained in force. The curfew was imposed when a Molotov cocktail was thrown at an army vehicle. (Al-Fajr, 2 November 1992)

230. On 31 October 1992, the city of Hebron remained under curfew for the seventh consecutive day, after an Israeli soldier was killed by a Palestinian. (Al-Fajr, 9 November 1992)

231. On 1 November 1992, a curfew imposed on Hebron was lifted after more than a week. (Ha'aretz, 2 November 1992)

232. On 2 November 1992, a long curfew which had been imposed on central Hebron (and Halhul) was imposed once more. (Jerusalem Post, 3 November 1992; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 5 November 1992; Al-Fajr, 9 November 1992)

233. On 8 November 1992, the village of Idna (West Bank) was placed under curfew following the throwing of a petrol bomb at a border police patrol. (Ha'aretz, 9 November 1992)

234. On 9 November 1992, a curfew was imposed once again on the Derekh Hashalam area of Hebron. (Ha'aretz, 10 November 1992)

235. On 11 November 1992, Khan Younis and Rafah were declared closed military areas following disturbances. (Jerusalem Post, 12 November 1992)

236. On 12 November 1992, Khan Younis remained under curfew. Bani Suheila was placed under curfew. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 13 November 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 16 November 1992). Also on 12 November 1992, the Askar Al Jedid refugee camp in Nablus was placed under curfew following the stoning of a settler's car in the camp. (Al-Tali'ah, 12 November 1992)

237. On 13 and 14 November 1992, the Bethlehem market area was placed under curfew after a home-made bomb was thrown at the police station. (Ha'aretz, 15 November 1992). Also on 14 November 1992, the Israeli army imposed a curfew on Rafah, in the Gaza Strip, in view of the possibility of demonstrations there the next day to mark the fourth anniversary of the proclamation of the Palestinian State. (Al-Fajr, 23 November 1992)

238. On 19 November 1992, a curfew was placed on al-Askar refugee camp following the throwing of a petrol bomb at an Israeli vehicle that had been passing by. (Ha'aretz, 20 November 1992)

239. On 20 November 1992, Arrabe was placed under curfew following the shooting and the killing of two fugitives. (Ha'aretz, 21 November 1992)

240. On 23 November 1992, the village of Deir-Istya was placed under curfew following the throwing of a petrol bomb at an Israeli vehicle. (Ha'aretz, 24 November 1992)

241. On 29 November 1992, it was reported that the army had decided that the light curfew in the Gaza Strip (imposed since 1988) was to begin at 7 p.m. rather than 9 p.m., except for Gaza City, where the curfew continued to begin at 9 p.m. Army sources explained that the hour was changed because it got dark much earlier, though a different source added that the earlier hour was an attempt to prevent shootings, which had been increasing, particularly in Rafah and Khan Younis. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 29 November 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 30 November 1992)

(iii) Other forms of collective punishment

242. On 24 November 1992, it was reported that Meretz (a left-wing party) was expected to ask Prime Minister Rabin to give orders to improve the treatment of the Palestinian population, after having heard of assessments that human rights conditions in the territories had not improved since the Labour Party had taken power. The Gaza group, headed by Dr. Haim Gordon of Ben-Gurion University, described a "sad state of bureaucracy in which Palestinians are banned from receiving hospital treatment in Israel, families are prevented from being reunited ...". Gordon indicated that matters had deteriorated a week earlier when the IDF fired tank shells at eight houses in the Gaza Strip, badly damaging them. (Jerusalem Post, 24 November 1992)

(c) Expulsions

243. On 25 October 1992, it was reported that the Supreme Court had issued an interim order prohibiting the expulsion of 18 relatives of West Bank residents pending a final decision to be taken in November. Two other petitions concerning 43 additional persons had been brought before the High Court of Justice earlier on the same matter. (Ha'aretz, 25 October 1992)

244. On 1 November 1992, Palestinian sources reported that Ahmed Sliman Katamash, 42, from el-Bireh, a senior activist of the Popular Front who was arrested on 1 September 1992 after having been wanted by the General Security Services for 16 years, had rejected a proposal of voluntary exile of two and a half years. (Ha'aretz, 1 November 1992)

(d) Economic and social situation

245. On 3 September 1992, a Palestinian research group, the East Jerusalem based Arab Thought Forum, reported that one third fewer Palestinian labourers had been employed on construction sites in Jewish communities in the territories since the Rabin Government came to office. According to the report, 18,000 Palestinian labourers were working in the settlements in late August, as compared to 27,000 just before the June elections. Many of the 9,000 who were no longer working on settlement construction were transferred by the construction companies to projects inside the Green Line. Others have appeared asking for jobs at the Civil Administration's Ramallah Labour Office. (Jerusalem Post, 3 September 1992)

2. Measures affecting certain fundamental freedoms

(a) Freedom of movement

246. On 31 August 1992, the IDF continued to implement the Government's confidence- building measures towards the Palestinians, removing the cement barrels which had sealed several streets (20 in the Gaza Strip and 30 in the West Bank). (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 1 September 1992)

247. On 1 September 1992, OC Southern Command Major-General Matan Vilnai, responding to a request made by Kav L'oved, a non-profit group that defends the rights of the workers from the territories, and the Association for Civil Rights in Israel, stated that the time had not yet come to lift the ban on 16- to 20-year-old workers from the Gaza Strip crossing into Israel. The two organizations opposed the entry limitations across the Green Line for workers from the Gaza Strip. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 2 September 1992)

248. On 14 September 1992, the Israeli Minister of the Interior, Aryeh Deri, is reported to have said that travel documents of Palestinians from the occupied territories would be issued for a period of three years, instead of the current one year. The travel permit serves as a kind of re-entry visa. (Al-Fajr, 21 September 1991)

249. On 21 September 1992, it was reported that Vie Israeli authorities had recently adopted a new policy whereby Palestinians without residence permits who are married to residents and are already living in the West Bank would be able to renew their visitors permits every six months without having to leave the country. According to Eliahu Abram, a lawyer with the ACRI, this policy would apply to all non-resident spouses who were married to resident Palestinians before 8 July 1992, the date the policy was adopted. Abram added that he was not sure whether the policy applied to the Gaza Strip. (Al-Fajr, 21 September 1992)

250. On 21 September 1992, the Arab Journalists Association is reported to have asked the Israeli authorities to allow all Palestinian journalists from the West Bank and Gaza Strip to enter East Jerusalem without restrictions. According to an Israeli law implemented in the aftermath of the Gulf war, Palestinian males between the ages of 16 and 65 - recently reduced to 50 - are required to obtain a special permit from the Civil Administration to enter East Jerusalem and Israel. (Al-Fajr, 21 September 1992)

251. On 27 September 1992, it was reported that because of the Hebrew New Year, the IDF was not allowing Arabs from the territories to cross the Green Line, since early morning, unless they had a special permit from the Civil Administration. The territories were to remain closed until 4 a.m. on 30 September 1992. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 27 September 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 28 September 1992)

252. From 6 October in the evening to 8 October 1192 in the morning, the territories were sealed off on the occasion of Yom Kippur. (Ha'aretz, 6 October 1992; Jerusalem Post, 8 October 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 12 October 1992)

253. On 30 November 1992, it was reported that according to new military regulations, Gazans aged 16 to 20 would be permitted to work in Israel if they were married or the sole wage-earners in their families. Men in this age were banned from crossing into Israel after the May murder of group Helena Rapp in Bat Yam by a man from Gaza. The movements of this age group continued to be restricted even after the ban on older workers was lifted. Palestinian sources indicated that, as a result of the agreement, the Gaza of Trade Union Federation had withdrawn a petition to the High Court of Justice or demanding that the IDF withdraw the ban on 18- to 20-year-olds. (Ha'aretz, 29 and 30 November 1992; Jerusalem Post, 30 November 1992)

(b) Freedom of education

254. On 28 August 1992, it was reported that the security authorities had decided to open all the educational institutions in the West Bank at the same 19 time on 1 September and not gradually, as it was the practice during past years. (Ha'aretz, 28 August 1992)

255. On 4 October 1992, the first four-year college was opened in Gaza, with an expected enrollment of 150 to 200 students. It was built from a donation made by a wealthy expatriate Palestinian and is run by the Civil Administration. (Jerusalem Post, 5 October 1992)

256. On 12 October 1992, the Sa'diya Secondary Boys School in Kalkiliya was closed by the Israeli authorities until further notice, after demonstrations took place there. (Al-Fajr, 19 October 1992)

257. On 15 October 1992, it was reported that eight schools were ordered closed in the Gaza Strip: five in Rafah, two in Khan Younis and one in Gaza City. (Al-Tali'ah, 15 October 1992)

258. On 22 October 1992, the military authorities decided to close the Jenin Secondary School for Boys for one month after demonstrations broke out during which a border guard was injured in the eye by a stone. (Al-Fajr, 26 October 1992)

259. On 4 November 1992, the Girls' Junior High School in the Jalazun refugee camp was ordered closed until 28 November 1992 because of continued stone-throwing incidents against Israeli vehicles by pupils of the school. It was also reported that four elementary and junior high schools in Gaza that had been closed by the Israeli authorities three weeks before were reopened. (Al-Tali'ah, 5 November 1992 and Al-Fajr, 9 November 1992)

260. On 8 November 1992, the Jerusalem police closed an Arab school in the Old City of Jerusalem after pupils threw stones and a firebomb at the Atetet Cohanim yeshiva students. No one was injured in the incident, which gave rise to the first closure of an eastern Jerusalem school in over a year. The school was to reopen on 9 November 1992. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 9 November 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 16 November 1992)

261. On 18 November 1992, it was reported that five days after a two-week closure, the Al Khedr Secondary School near Bethlehem was ordered closed for an additional eight days. (Al-Fajr, 23 November 1992)

262. On 21 November 1992, the IDF closed the Technical Training Centre of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East in Gaza for one month on charges that students had celebrated the declaration of independence of the Palestinian State. The Gaza Secondary School was also ordered closed for one month for the same reason. (Al-Fajr, 30 November 1992)

(c) Freedom of expression

263. On 1 October 1992, the Israeli authorities ordered the closure of an East Jerusalem research centre for one year. The Aseel Research and Information Centre specializes in surveys and public opinion polls. (Al-Fajr, 19 October 1992)

264. On 2 October 1992, it was reported that copies of the communist Haifa-based daily newspaper Al-Ittihad were distributed to readers in the territories for the first time. The distribution of the Arabic-language daily in the West Bank and Gaza Strip was made possible following the lifting of a Defence Ministry ban on its circulation. The newspaper reported that under the ban, which was similar to the one which had been imposed during the Jordanian occupation, residents of the territories faced six months' imprisonment if they were found in possession of a copy of Al-Ittihad. (Jerusalem Post, 2 October 1992)

265. On 14 October 1992, three Palestinian journalists and a foreign correspondent working for international press agencies were detained at the Ramallah police station. The police reportedly examined pictures of demonstrations in the city that the journalists had taken tie same day. They were released an hour later. (Al-Tali'ah, 15 October 1992)

(d) Freedom of religion

266. On 15 October 1992, the IDF ordered the closure of the Al Haras mosque in Hebron for two weeks. (Al-Tali'ah, 15 October 1992)

3. Information on settlers' activities affecting the civilian population

267. On 18 and 19 September 1992, several Jewish settlers joined an IDF patrol which had been stoned while pursuing stone-throwers in Hebron. Although the army tried to move the settlers away, they were unable to prevent them from damaging several Arab-owned cars (20 according to the settlers; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 24 September 1992).

268. On 22 September 1992, an Arab-owned car was torched in Hebron, apparently by members of the Kach, in protest against the stoning of a Jewish resident. (Ha'aretz, 24 September 1992)

269. On 24 September 1992, reports from Hebron indicated that Jewish settlers had increased acts of aggression and provocation against the Palestinian residents of the city during the past week. Incidents included breaking into Joseph's Tomb in the Al Ibrahimi shrine and damaging houses and cars belonging to the Palestinian residents of the Al Sheikh quarter. According to reliable sources, the non-intervention of the IDF and alleged occasional support of the army during such incidents has reportedly encouraged settlers to increase their anti-Arab activities. (Al-Tali'ah, 24 September 1992)

270. On 27 September 1992, it was reported that settlers destroyed the stands of Arab merchants in the centre of Hebron in protest against the stoning of a Border Policeman and of an Israeli woman. According to Palestinian sources, the settlers also beat several residents (also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 1 October 1992). They were dispersed by the army, which placed the area under curfew. (Ha'aretz, 27 September 1992)

271. On 4 October 1992, soldiers slightly wounded a radical anti-Arab activist during the night when they fired at an Israeli car, which they saw fleeing from the site where an Arab car was burning in central Hebron. In the car were Noam Federman, the spokesman for the Kach movement, and Yehuyada Kahalani, who were found in possession of a stack of Kach pamphlets, burglar's tools and a can of gasoline. Both were handed to the police. During the past few days, several attacks by Jews (shooting and stoning) on Arabs were reported in the Hebron area. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 6 October 1992; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 8 October 1992). Also on 4 October, Jewish settlers are reported to have attacked and destroyed the property of bedouins near Khan Al Ahmar (Ma'aleh Adumim), claiming that the bedouins had set fire to a field near the Ma'aleh Jericho settlement. The bedouins denied the charges, stating that they had used the fields for grazing their herds. (Al-Fajr, 12 October 1992)

272. On 5 October 1992, a car belonging to a settler ran over and killed 10-year-old Nida al Hirbawi of Hebron. The incident occurred on the road leading to the Kiryat Arba settlement in Hebron. It is not known whether any legal action has been taken against the driver. (Al-Fajr, 12 October 1992)

273. On 13 October 1992, settlers shattered the windows of two junior high schools near Ramallah, alleging that they had been pelted with stones when they passed by. Other settlers are also reported to have burned 200 olive trees in a grove in Kafr Kadoum, near Nablus. They had been forced to move out of the cited grove, where they had built houses illegally, by an order of the High Court. (Al-Fajr, 19 October 1992)

274. On 15 October 1992, following the stoning of a convoy of Israeli vehicles near Halhoul, passengers got out of their cars and fired shots, shattering the windows of several other cars and damaging the wheels of a bus. Soldiers arrived on the scene and forced the Israelis to return to their cars and drive on. Several Palestinians were reportedly injured during the incident. Residents of the Ofra settlement throw stones in the neighbouring village of Ein Yabrut after four Israelis had been stoned near the settlement. The settlers were subsequently dispersed by soldiers. (Ha'aretz, and Jerusalem Post, 16 October 1992; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 22 October 1992)

275. On 21 October 1992, a large number of settlers from Hebron blocked the road from Hebron to Beersheba. The army was obliged to intervene. (Ha'aretz, 22 October 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 26 October 1992)

276. On 22 October 1992, to protest the lack of security, approximately 200 residents of Beitar Illit held a demonstration during the night in the nearby Arab village of Husan, blocking the roads in the village. (Jerusalem Post, 23 October 1992)

277. On 26 October 1992, it was reported that more than 10 Palestinians from Jenin were severely beaten by Israeli settlers the week before, following the killing of an Israeli north of Jenin on 15 October. Three days later, some 40 cars loaded with armed settlers went on a rampage in El Bireh, near Ramallah, following the death of an Israeli in a roadside explosion. (Al-Fajr, 26 October 1992)

278. On 29 October 1992, settlers from the Kedumim settlement were reported to have blocked the road between Nablus and Kafr Saba, thus preventing Palestinian workers from reaching their places of employment in Israel. An incendiary bottle had been thrown at an Israeli bus two days earlier near the village of Sura, west of Nablus. (Al-Tali'ah, 29 October 1992)

279. On 3 November 1992, groups of armed settlers raided the Sabah Al Kheir neighbourhood in Jenin, firing bullets at random and throwing stones at houses. The raid came after a Jewish settler was killed in the area two weeks before. (Al-Tali'ah, 5 November 1992)

280. On 8 November 1992, about 30 cars loaded with settlers drove through the city of Jenin, terrorizing the local population. They were later evicted by the IDF. On 9 November 1992, settlers were also reported to have vandalized a number of Palestinian cars in Ramallah. (Al-Fajr, 16 November 1992)

281. On 10 November 1992, 25 Jews occupied three rooftops overlooking the Hebron casbah to protest the lack of security for their children following an attack on a kindergarten in the area the previous day. The settlers asked for the establishment of an additional military outpost. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 11 November 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 16 November 1992)

282. On 19 November 1992, settlers attacked the residence of Na'man Saloum, 35, in Karawat Bani Hassan, near Nablus. Complaining that they had been pelted with stones on the main road half a kilometre away, they smashed all the windows of his home. After Israeli cars were stoned in front of the Jalazun refugee camp, settlers set up a roadblock and smashed Palestinian-owned cars. (Al-Fajr, 23 November 1992)

283. On 20 and 21 November 1992, Hebron police arrested two Jewish boys from Kiryat Arba on suspicion of throwing stones at Arab vehicles. Fourteen Arab motorists from the Hebron area had filed complaints. (Jerusalem Post, 22 November 1992)

284. On 22 November 1992, it was reported that some 40 settlers had smashed windows and damaged vehicles belonging to Arabs in Hebron following the a stoning of several settlers' cars and the throwing of a petrol bomb in the area. No suspects were arrested. (Ha'aretz, 22 November 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 30 November 1992)

D. Treatment of detainees

285. On 31 August 1992, some 182 Palestinians (81 from the Gaza Strip and 101 from the West Bank) were released from the Ketziot detention center. They were the first among some 600 prisoners due to be freed .(also referred to in Al-Fajr, 7 September 1992). All those released had served more than two thirds of their sentences and had not been convicted of violent crimes. The 600 were part of the 7,400 (or 10,000) Palestinian prisoners that the IDF claimed were detained. (Ha'aretz, 28 and 31 August 1992 and 1 September 1992; Jerusalem Post, 31 August 1992 and 1 September 1992)

286. On 3 September 1992, Hashem Mahamid, a member of the Knesset from the Democratic Front for Peace and Equality requested that the Israeli Police Minister grant permission for visits to the Nafha, Nablus, Beersheba and Ashkelon prisons following complaints by detainees about detention conditions, in particular isolation measures. It was reported that new isolation sections were to be opened in the Beersheba prison and that additional cells in the Jneid prison would also be used for this purpose. (Al-Tali'ah, 3 September 1992)

287. On 3 September 1992, the family of detainee Saleh Thabet appealed to humanitarian organizations to intervene with the Israeli authorities in order to have their son released from the isolation cell in which he had been kept for one month. Thabet was not allowed any visits and had not received any clothes or soap. (Al-Tali'ah, 3 September 1992)

288. On 9 September 1992, three joint Palestinian-Israeli human rights groups Derekh Hanitzotz, the Association for Israeli-Palestinian Physicians for Human Rights and the Public Committee Against Torture in Israel reported on the inhumane conditions in the special General Security Services ward of the Ramlah prison (Nitzan) and demanded immediate action by the Government. Ward 8 has allegedly been operational since September 1989 and was used for about 30 Palestinian detainees, nearly all of whom were members of Hamas. According to the testimony of an inmate that was presented at an East Jerusalem press conference, prisoners "were being held in narrow, closed, underground cells", with poor ventilation, and were often denied visitation rights and even reading material (also referred to in Al-Fajr, 14 September 1992). The prison spokesman categorically denied the charges. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 10 September 1992)

289. On 10 September 1992, it was reported that Hashem Mahamid, a member of the Knesset, sent letters to the Israeli Ministers of Police and Justice concerning the vital and urgent demands of Palestinian prisoners detained in Nafha prison. Mahamid stated that the situation in the prison was explosive and warned against a strike that could spread to all prisons if the demands were not met. (Al-Tali'ah, 10 September 1992)

290. On 22 September 1992, the Justice Minister David Liba'i met with representatives of the International Committee of the Red Cross on the issues of administrative detention and the methods employed during the interrogation of prisoners. (Jerusalem Post, 23 September 1992)

291. On 27 September 1992, it was reported that Adameer, a Palestinian prisoners' support association, affirmed that Ahmed Katamesh, who was arrested as the leading operative of the Popular Front for the Liberation of Palestine on 1 September 1992 (reported on 17 September), suffered from kidney problems and an ulcer and that his condition had been aggravated by his treatment in prison. The group claimed that during interrogation, he was allowed one hour's sleep each day, had a hood placed over his head and was forced to remain in physically painful positions. (Jerusalem Post, 27 September 1992)

292. On 30 September 1992, a hunger strike staged by some 3,000 (or 4,000) Palestinian security prisoners on both sides of the Green Line entered its fourth day. A list of 25 to 28 demands was released, with calls for the holding of solidarity rallies abroad (also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 1 October 1992). The strike, which began on 27 September 1992 in eight prisons run by the Prison Authority (Juneid, Jenin, Khan Yona, Ashkelon, Nafha, Beersheba, Gaza, Tel-Mond), had not yet spread to IDF-run detention centres, where the majority of security prisoners are held. About one third of all security prisoners participated in the strike. Among the demands were the closure of the isolation section of the Nitsan prison in Ramallah, the release of prisoners under the age of 18, the establishment of a commission to investigate interrogation and detention conditions, the establishment of an independent court of appeals and replacement of life imprisonment by a term limited to a maximum of 15 years' imprisonment. Demonstrations in support of the prisoners' strike were held outside the Red Cross offices in Jerusalem, Gaza and in several other locations in the territories. (Ha'aretz, 30 September 1992 and 1 October 1992; Jerusalem Post, 30 September 1992 and 1 October 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 5 October 1992)

293. On 12 October 1992, Prison Authority officials announced the end of the hunger strike staged by Palestinian security prisoners after a number of Concessions had been made and after the prison authorities had agreed to investigate demands made by the inmates. Prisoners began eating again in all Prisons except Nafha prison, where the inmates continued with a partial strike until 15 October 1992. The end of the 16-day strike was announced following an unusual step made by the Prison Authority and the Police Ministry, whereby the gates of the central prison in Nablus, which houses 850 prisoners, were opened to the press on 11 October. Following a briefing by prison officials, in four languages, some 80 journalists were allowed to interview the fasting inmates. On 6 October, the number of prisoners on strike had reported risen to 9,000 when 4,000 prisoners from the Ketziot military prison in the Negev joined the strike, in which a reported 5,000 inmates from the Prison Service jails were already participating. Prisoners demanded free movement between cell blocks, better food, more family visits, less crowding, better medical care and fewer searches. However, according to members of the West Bank Association, the main issues remained the closure of isolation cells in the Nitzan and the Beersheba prisons and the release for home care of long-term prisoners who were either too old or too sick to represent a security threat. According to Police Minister Moshe Shahal, the Government had not given in to any of the prisoners' demands, but had only agreed to look into humanitarian issues which the Police Ministry had been planning to investigate for some time. Shahal also stated that the committee that had been set up to investigate the conditions of security prisoners would present its recommendations within a month. During the entire hunger strike, Palestinians in the West Bank and Gaza staged daily sit-ins at all the offices of the Red Cross, including the one in East Jerusalem. Marches, rallies and demonstrations also took place throughout the territories. Students of several universities (an-Najah, Bir Zeit and Bethlehem) had also declared an open-ended hunger strike of their own, in support of the strike staged by the prisoners. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 2 October 1992; Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 4 October 1992; Ha'aretz, 6 October 1992; Jerusalem Post, 8 October 1992; Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 9 October 1992; Ha'aretz, 11 October 1992; Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 13 October 1992; Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 14 October 1992; Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 16 October 1992; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 8 and 15 October 1992; Al-Fajr, 12 and 19 October 1992)

294. On 14 October 1992, security prisoner Hussein Namer Musa (Assad) Obeidat (or Hussein Assad) 26, from Jebel Mukaber (East Jerusalem), died in Barzilai Hospital, a day after being taken there complaining of chest pains. Obeidat had been serving a six-year term in Ashkelon prison for belonging to a "terrorist" organization, also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 15 October 1992). He had also participated in the security prisoners' hunger strike. According to the Prison Service spokesman Shuli Meiri, prisoners taking part in the strike were checked by a medical team every 48 hours, and Obeidat had hunger been found physically fit. According to pathologist Dr. Yehuda Hess of the Abu Kabir Forensic Laboratory, the result of the autopsy, which had been ordered by the Ashkelon Magistrates Court and was performed on 17 October, showed that the detainee died of a heart infection. Hess stated that the heart infection which killed the detainee was not a hereditary one, as earlier reports had indicated, but could occur suddenly, regardless of the patient's medical history and health condition. According to the autopsy report, no signs of violence were detected on the body. Hess also stated that there was no evidence that Assad suffered from malnutrition or the side effects of the hunger strike. A pathologist acting on behalf of the prisoner's family was present at the autopsy. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 15 October 1992; Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 16 October 1992; Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 18 October 1992)

295. On 28 October 1992, B'Tselem, the human rights information centre, announced that 14,000 Palestinians had been held in administrative detention since the uprising began in December 1987. The B'Tselem report mentioned that in most cases the detention procedures violated international law, which stipulates that the procedures may be used only as "a preventive measure in exceptional circumstances". The human rights organization added that it was frequently used "as a substitute for punishment and political control". It also indicated that 10 to 15 per cent of detainees were placed in administrative detention after interrogation. It said that administrative detainees were often treated worse than prisoners who had been sentenced, since they were usually placed in the Ketziot prison camp in the Negev. About 70,000 Palestinians had been imprisoned for security reasons during the uprising, 12,000 of whom remain in detention. The IDF stated that the number of administrative detainees had steadily declined over the past three years and was currently at about 300. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 29 October 1992)

296. On 2 November 1992, it was reported that the IDF had started a new operation, code-named "Mills of Justice", to shorten the legal procedures facing some 1,500 Palestinian detainees who had been held in IDF detention centers for more than a year without trial. The IDF had hastily built new courtrooms in the territories, including a new court in Tulkarm and an additional court in Nablus. The IDF had also called up judges into reserve service, reinforced the military police and brought reinforcements of soldiers to escort detainees to the Courts and back. According to sources in the Judge Advocate-General's office, there were currently about 14,000 Palestinian detainees and prisoners in the territories. (Jerusalem Post, 2 November 1992)

297. On 6 November 1992, it was reported that Justice Minister David Liba'i had ordered an investigation by the State Prosecutor of claims by B'Tselem, a human rights organization, that Hassan Bader Abdallah Zabaideh, 34, from Anabta (West Bank) had been reduced to a catatonic state following incarceration in the Tulkarm and Fara prisons. Zabaideh was freed on 28 October 1992. Lawyers for Zabaideh, an accountant, stated that his family maintained that he was completely normal when he was arrested on 25 September 1992, but that Zabaideh was unable to speak or react to his lawyers when they met him for the first time on 23 October 1992. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 6 November 1992)

298. On 15 November 1992, the Police Ministry announced that the majority of the demands for better conditions made by Palestinian security prisoners should be met on the basis of recommendations by the committee which was established in October to investigate the matter. The committee's recommendations, which were adopted by the Ministry , included increasing visiting time by 15 minutes allowing televisions and radio in the cells, putting heating in cold cells, replacing asbestos roofing with reinforced plastic and allowing studies in open universities The committee rejected prisoners' demands to allow the celebration of Palestinian national holidays, to allow prisoners to receive presents and to remove the protective shields used to separate the prisoners from their families in visiting rooms. The Committee also found that the number of prisoners to a cell did not need to be reduced, thus rejecting one of the prisoners' most important demands. The recommendations were to be handed over to Prime Minister Rabin. However, the Prisons Authority and police officials confirmed some of the recommendations were already being implemented. (Ha'aretz, 13 and 16 November 1992; Jerusalem Post, 16 November 1992; also referred to in Al-Tali'ah, 19 November 1992)


Measures concerning the release of detainees

299. On 1 September 1992, the security authorities released 155 Palestinian prisoners from the Ketziot detention centre (86 from the Gaza Strip and 69 from the West Bank). (Ha'aretz, 2 September 1992)

300. On 1 September 1992, it was reported that 27 Palestinian prisoners were released from Meggido prison and taken in a prison bus to the Civil Administration headquarters in Jenin, where they were reunited with their families. Seventy more prisoners were released from Ketziot prison in the Negev and taken to the Nahal 02 junction where families awaited them. (Jerusalem Post, 2 September 1992)

301. On 2 September 1992, the IDF released 145 (or 167) Palestinian security prisoners (including minors), bringing to 510 (or 520) the number of prisoners who were released during the past week. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 3 September 1992)

302. On 6 September 1992, it was reported that owing to the release of some 500 Palestinian detainees, the IDF would soon close a number of some wings in its detention centres, especially in Ketziot prison. According to the same sources, 7,000 to 10,000 Arab prisoners there are currently detained in detention centres. (Ha'aretz, 6 September 1992)

E. Annexation and settlement

303. On 27 August 1992, Jewish settlers in the Hebron area were reported to have accelerated the construction work in the Gharus Valley on more than 1,200 dunums of land. According to Hebron residents, the police was making very few efforts to stop the construction activities' which were taking place in many parts of the city. (Al-Tali'ah, 27 August 1992)

304. On 31 August 1992, a Police Ministry spokesman announced that the police had decided to retain control of two buildings in the Moslem Quarter of Jerusalem's Old City, which had been seized from their Arab owners for security reasons in 1969 and handed over to the Ateret Cohanim settlement group 17 months earlier. (Jerusalem Post, 1 September 1992; also referred to in Al-Fajr, 7 September 1992)

305. On 31 August 1992, the Civil Administration in the West Bank announced that building could continue on privately funded construction in the settlements, where foundations for homes had already been laid. The announcement came after settlers in Hebron and Alfei Menashe made it clear to the Civil Administration that if private construction were to be halted in the territories, they would take the issue to the High Court of Justice. (Jerusalem Post, 1 September 1992)

306. On 10 September 1992, official Israeli sources reportedly announced that the budget plan for the financial year 1992 had earmarked more than 1 billion United States dollars for construction work in the occupied territories. The amount would be used for the completion of 11,000 housing units for settlers, road construction and other facilities in the territories. (Al-Tali'ah, 10 September 1992)

307. On 13 September 1992, the cabinet instructed Attorney-General Yosef Harish to investigate whether anyone involved in the Government's acquisition of housing an East Jerusalem was guilty of criminal action. The decision was one of a series adopted by the Government after the findings of the Klugman Report, which was presented to the cabinet by Justice minister David Liba'i and Finance Minister Avraham Shohat. According to the findings of the interministerial committee that were published on 10 September, the Housing Ministry and its representatives had violated standing regulations and procedures by the manner in which they had acquired and alloted housing in East Jerusalem. The cabinet made a distinction between the legal aspects of the issue and the question of its attitude towards Jewish settlements in the Arab sections of the Old City and its environs. (Jerusalem Post, 11 and 14 September 1992)

308. On 13 October 1992, several residents of Kiryat Arba were arrested by the IDF and handed over to the police when they refused to leave a nearby housing site in Givat Kharsina when ordered to do so. The current Government had frozen building on the site, which had previously been slated for development. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 14 October 1992)

309. On 15 October 1992, Housing Minister Binyamin Ben-Eliezer visited Gush Etzion and reaffirmed the Government's commitment to retain Israeli Sovereignty over the area, which he described as part of greater Jerusalem. Financially, Ben-Eliezer stated that Gush Etzion would be treated in exactly the same way as other development towns inside the Green Line. He warned, however, that the battle against unemployment came first and that funds for development were currently lacking. (Jerusalem Post, 16 October 1992)

310. On 12 November 1992, it was reported that all development in the small Jerusalem neighbourhood of Walaja was to be virtually frozen, including the construction of new homes, schools and roads, according to a zoning plan Currently being finalized by the municipality. (Jerusalem Post, 12 November 1992)

311. On 23 November 1992, engineers completed the opening of a 275-metre tunnel through the Judean Hills, the first phase of the $38 million "uprising bypass road" that would link Gush Etzion with Jerusalem. The road was begun by the Likud Government and it was to be completed in about three years. Construction and Housing Minister Binyamin Ben-Eliezer, who attended the ceremony, stated that the Government viewed Gush Etzion, along with Ma'ale Adumim, Givat Ze'ev, and Betar, as integral parts of greater Jerusalem. The 11-kilometer road would make it possible to travel from Gush Etzion to Jerusalem without going through Bethlehem or near the Dheisheh refugee camp. (Jerusalem Post, 24 November 1992)

F. Information concerning the occupied Syrian Arab Golan

312. On 1 September 1992, a delegation of approximately 180 Druze religious dignitaries from the Golan Heights crossed into Syria to take part in the annual pilgrimage to the tomb of the Druze prophet Nebi Habil, near Damascus. This was the first such visit in 25 years. (Ha'aretz and Jerusalem Post, 2 September 1992)

313. On 6 September 1992, the Golan Heights settler leaders, including representatives from the Hula and Jordan Valleys, met with Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin in order to try to allay their growing concerns over the future of the regions, following reports that Israel was prepared to make some "minor" territorial concessions in return for a peace treaty with Syria. (Jerusalem Post, 17 September 1992)

314. On 13 September 1992, a group of 18 members of the Knesset, all of whom are members of the Avigdor Kahalani Commission, toured the Golan Heights in a show of solidarity with Jewish settlers opposed to territorial concessions in return for a peace agreement with Syria. (Jerusalem Post, 14 September 1992)

315. On 16 September 1992, scores of people staged silent demonstrations at 40 major intersections throughout the country in support of Jewish settlers in the Golan Heights. The protesters included members of One Israel, a new right-wing umbrella organization that had been set up to fight compromise over territory. (Jerusalem Post, 17 September 1992)

316. On 18 September 1992, the Jerusalem Post reported that Druzes from the Golan Heights had appealed to Syrian President Hafez el-Assad to help them to be allowed to visit Egypt as "Syrian citizens". The request was made during a recent visit to Syria by a delegation of Druze religious leaders from the Golan Heights. Also on 18 September 1992, residents of the Golan Heights began a march to Jerusalem to protest possible territorial concessions in the region. (Jerusalem Post, 18 and 20 September 1992)

317. On 21 September 1992, several thousand Jewish Golan residents mostly religious teenagers, demonstrated in front of the Knesset in Jerusalem while a group of persons marching from Mount Hermon arrived at the home of Prime Minister Rabin, urging the Government to rule out any territorial concessions. (Jerusalem Post, 22 September 1992)

318. On 2 and 3 October 1992, some 200 Druze residents from the Golan Heights demonstrated outside the Red Cross offices in Majdal Shams in solidarity with the striking prisoners. (Jerusalem Post, 4 October 1992)

319. On 4 October 1992, more than 20 residents of Druze villages in the Golan Heights were reported to be serving prison sentences for security offences and had joined the hunger strike staged by Palestinian detainees. (Jerusalem Post, 4 October 1992)

320. On 11 November 1992, it was reported that a group of 25 young Druze residents from the Golan Heights was to cross into Syria in order to begin studies there. (Jerusalem Post, 11 November 1992)

321. On 29 November 1992, it was reported that the Interior Ministry had allowed the Hassun family from the Druze village of Bukata in the Golan Heights to bring over two sisters from Syria. The sisters were to marry two brothers from the Druze family. (Ha'aretz, 29 November 1992)

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