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UNITED
NATIONS
A

        General Assembly
A/59/PV.22
7 October 2004

Official Records

General Assembly
Fifty-ninth session
22nd plenary meeting
Thursday, 7 October 2004, 3 p.m.
New York
President:Mr. Ping ......................................................................(Gabon)

The meeting was called to order at 3:05 p.m.


Agenda item 10 (continued )


Report of the Secretary-General on the work of the Organization (A/59/1)

Mr. Mekdad (Syrian Arab Republic) (spoke in Arabic): ...

...
The report of the Secretary-General places importance on realizing a just and comprehensive peace. In this regard Syria reaches out for the realization of a just and comprehensive peace in accordance with the relevant resolutions of international legitimacy, particularly Security Council resolutions 242 (1967) and 338 (1973), as well as the Madrid peace framework and the Arab Peace Initiative, in a manner that would restore the occupied Arab territories in Golan, Palestine and Lebanon to their owners. The report, in paragraph 21, alludes to Security Council resolutions on the Middle East and other resolutions adopted by the General Assembly at its resumed tenth emergency special session, particularly resolution ES-10/15 of 20 July 2004 acknowledging the legal opinion of the International Court of Justice on the separation wall being constructed by Israel on occupied Palestinian territories. The Court further required that Israel comply with its legal obligations. The resolution also requested the Secretary-General to establish a record of the damages caused by that wall. While we support the establishment of that record, we appeal to the Secretary-General to expedite the process in view of the suffering of the Palestinian people and of the harm they have suffered because of the wall.

...

The spread of weapons of mass destruction, particularly nuclear weapons, is a source of extreme concern to us, and we share the international community’s concern at the possibility that such weapons might fall into the hands of terrorists, thereby exacerbating threats to international peace and security.

Syria has been at the forefront of those countries calling for the declaration of the Middle East as a zone free of all weapons of mass destruction. We have been working with determination towards that objective. We have acceded to the Treaty on the Non-Proliferation of Nuclear Weapons (NPT); we have concluded a comprehensive safeguards agreement with the International Atomic Energy Agency; and we have contributed to numerous initiatives aimed at realizing this objective, the latest of which was a draft resolution introduced by Syria on behalf of the Arab Group on 29 December 2003, to free the Middle East of nuclear weapons and weapons of mass destruction, under collective international supervision and under the auspices of the United Nations, so as to promote multilateral international agreements in the field of disarmament.

...

Mr. Danesh-Yazdi (Islamic Republic of Iran): ...

...

As noted by the Secretary-General, the situation in the occupied Palestinian territories, and especially the humanitarian living conditions of Palestinians, continues to deteriorate. He rightly asserted a few days ago that recent measures have led to the deaths of scores of Palestinians, among them civilians, including children. It is alarming and very unfortunate that the Security Council has yet to reach an agreement on the way to prevent the persistence of the crimes that continue to be committed against Palestinians.

...

Mr. Moleko (Lesotho): ...

...

The world has degenerated into a more dangerous place for us, its inhabitants. The violence that we have witnessed, directed at the most vulnerable members of our society — women and children — is of great concern to my delegation. We have seen acts of terrorism directed at children in the name of a national cause in Beslan, the Russian Federation. We have seen images of hapless women and children in Darfur, Palestine and other places where they are driven to destitution. These and other acts of violence undermine the efforts of our Organization in the promotion of peace and security. The United Nations should be commended for its efforts in conflict prevention, peacemaking, peace-building and peacekeeping. The efforts of our Organization in denying terrorists access to weapons of mass destruction are commendable.

...

Mr. Sharma (Nepal): ...

...

Clearly, the United Nations has shown a mixed record of achievements during the review period. Some problems have yielded to resolution and others are moving in the right direction. Meanwhile, many old challenges have persisted and new ones have emerged. For instance, in the area of peace and security, Guatemala and Sierra Leone are limping back to normalcy. Afghanistan, though still dangerous, is moving toward democratic elections. Although the handover of power to the Iraqi people on 30 June 2004 is welcome, Iraq continues to be a major concern to the international community. The Israeli-Palestinian conflict is taking innocent lives on both sides and destabilizing the whole region. Those two situations together could cause the entire Middle East to explode and unleash political instability and economic hardships on the whole world.

...

Mr. Rastam (Malaysia): ...

...

My delegation strongly believes that the situation in the Middle East and the question of Palestine remain an important cornerstone of the work of the United Nations. Serious work needs to be done in the General Assembly and in the Security Council, and also by the Secretary-General. We are concerned that efforts in the Security Council have been blocked recently. We are equally concerned at the fact that there are also declared intentions to curtail United Nations activities concerning Palestine in respect of work done in the General Assembly and in subsidiary bodies created by it, as well as work done by the Secretariat and United Nations agencies. The historic advisory opinion rendered by the International Court of Justice on the legal consequences of the construction of a wall in the occupied Palestinian territory was indeed a great achievement. However, it is most unfortunate, as well as unacceptable, that follow-up action to the advisory opinion has not been taken, including in the Security Council.

The situation in the occupied Palestinian territory remains volatile, and the humanitarian situation has deteriorated even further. There is no solution other than the end of Israeli occupation and the creation of a Palestinian State, with East Jerusalem as its capital, with Israel and Palestine coexisting peacefully side by side within secure and recognized borders.

The United Nations must be allowed to play a role, together with other members of the Quartet, to resuscitate the road map. At the same time the international community must also bring its full weight to bear in pushing for an independent and sovereign State of Palestine. To create an environment of confidence for the speedy resuscitation of the road map, we must seriously consider the approval of the deployment of a United Nations peacekeeping force or the placement of an international monitoring mechanism to oversee the implementation of the road map. Malaysia urges the Secretary-General to exert greater efforts in that connection.

...

Mr. Sow (Guinea) (spoke in French ): ...

...

In the Middle East, the peace process between Israel and the Palestinians is bogged down as never before. The joint efforts of the international community and the Quartet, in particular, remain futile. My country is now more concerned than ever by the situation in occupied Palestine. We call upon all the parties to fulfil their respective obligations under the road map. We support the idea that all final settlements on the issues of borders and refugees must be negotiated by the parties and be based on the international peace process plan. We condemn all terrorist acts in the region and demand that Israel, the occupying Power, fulfil its legal obligations, which are mentioned in the International Court of Justice’s consultative opinion regarding the building of the separation wall.

...


The meeting rose at 6.10 p.m.


This record contains the text of speeches delivered in English and of the interpretation of speeches delivered in the other languages. Corrections should be submitted to the original languages only. They should be incorporated in a copy of the record and sent under the signature of a member of the delegation concerned to the Chief of the Verbatim Reporting Service, room C-154A. Corrections will be issued after the end of the session in a consolidated corrigendum.



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