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UNITED
NATIONS
A

        General Assembly
Distr.
GENERAL
A/56/832
26 February 2002

Original: English

Fifty-sixth session
Agenda item 134 (a)
Financing of the United Nations peacekeeping forces in the
Middle East: United Nations Disengagement Observer Force



Budget for the United Nations Disengagement Observer Force
for the period from 1 July 2002 to 30 June 2003

Report of the Secretary-General

Summary
The present report contains the proposed budget for the 12-month period from 1 July 2002 to 30 June 2003 for the maintenance of the United Nations Disengagement Observer Force, which amounts to $38,991,800 gross ($38,072,000 net).

Of the total budget, some 51.3 per cent of resources relate to military personnel costs. Operational requirements account for 31 per cent of the budget, civilian personnel costs reflect 15 per cent, and staff assessment comprises 2.4 per cent of the total. Less than 0.4 per cent of the total resources are related to other programmes.

The action to be taken by the General Assembly is set out in paragraph 3 of the report.


Contents
Paragraphs
Page
I. Overview
1–3
3
II. Political mandate of the mission
4–5
4
III. Operational plan and requirements
6–16
4
IV. Contributions made under the status-of-forces agreement
17
6
V. Voluntary contributions and trust funds
6
VI. Status of reimbursement of troop-contributing Governments
18–19
7
A. Current troop contributors
18
7
B. Status of reimbursement
19
7
VII. Contingent-owned equipment and self-sustainment
20–23
7
A. Method of reimbursement
20
7
B. Requirements
21–23
7
VIII. Staffing requirements
24–25
8
A. Changes in staffing requirements
24–25
8
B. Current and proposed staffing
10
IX. Other issues
26–31
11
X. Objective-setting
32
11
Annexes
    I. Cost estimates for the period from 1 July 2002 to 30 June 2003
13
      A. Summary statement
13
      B. Distribution of gross requirements by major cost component
15
      C. Supplementary information
16
    II. Cost estimates for the period from 1 July 2002 to 30 June 2003: analysis
20
      A. Standard and mission-specific costs
20
      B. Distribution of resources by budgetary cost parameters: standard and mission-specific costs
26
      C. Non-recurrent requirements
27
    III. Implementation of previous recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions
34
    IV. Organization chart
36

I. Overview

1. The present report contains the proposed budget for the 12-month period from 1 July 2002 to 30 June 2003 for the maintenance of the United Nations Disengagement Observer Force (UNDOF), which amounts to $38,991,800 gross ($38,072,000 net).

2. Estimated requirements for the period from 1 July 2002 to 30 June 2003 represent a 12.9 per cent increase ($4,455,500) in total resources (gross) in relation to the apportionment for the current period, from 1 July 2001 to 30 June 2002. The proposed increase reflects a 2.3 per cent increase in military personnel costs, a 12.2 per cent increase in civilian personnel costs, a 36 per cent increase in operational requirements, a 21.4 per cent increase in staff assessment cost, and a 2.5 per cent increase in costs related to training programmes.

Table 1
Financial resources

(Thousands of United States dollars)
Proposed increase/(decrease) over 2001/02
Category of expenditure
2000/01
expenditures
2001/02
apportionment
2002/03
cost estimatesa
Amount
Percentage
Military personnel
19 335.2
19 536.0
19 987.6
451.6
2.3
Civilian personnel
5 088.0
5 210.4
5 846.5
636.1
12.2
Operational requirements
9 046.8
8 887.1
12 088.9
3 201.8
36.0
Other programmes
70.0
145.4
149.0
3.6
2.5
Staff assessment
831.6
757.4
919.8
162.4
21.4
Gross requirements b
34 371.6
34 536.3
38 991.8
4 455.5
12.9
Voluntary contributions
400.0
-
-
-
-
Total
34 771.6
34 536.3
38 991.8
4 455.5
12.9

a The distribution of resources by standard and mission-specific costs is contained in annex II, section B.

b Exclusive of provision for the support account for peacekeeping operations and the United Nations Logistics Base at Brindisi.


Table 2
Human resources
Military and civilian staff resources
2000/01a
2001/02a
2002/03
Increase/(decrease)
over 2001/02
Military observers
-
-
-
-
Military contingents
1 037
1 037
1 037
-
Military liaison officers
-
-
-
-
Civilian police
-
-
-
-
International staff
38
38
41
3
National professional staff
-
-
-
-
Local staff
87
89
89
-
United Nations Volunteers
-
-
-
-

a Represents the highest level of authorized strength.

3. The action to be taken by the General Assembly is as follows:

(a) To appropriate the amount of $38,991,800 gross ($38,072,000 net), for the maintenance of the Force for the 12-month period from 1 July 2002 to 30 June 2003;

(b) To assess the amount in paragraph 3 (a) above at a monthly rate of $3,249,316 gross ($3,172,666 net), should the Security Council decide to continue the mandate of the Force.

II. Political mandate of the mission

(Security Council resolution 350 (1974) of 31 May 1974)

4. The Protocol to the Agreement on Disengagement between Israeli and Syrian Forces (S/11302/Add.1, annexes I and II) requires UNDOF to use its best efforts to maintain the ceasefire, to see that it is scrupulously observed and to supervise the Agreement and Protocol with regard to the areas of separation and limitation.

5. The current mandate expires on 31 May 2002 (Security Council resolution 1381 (2001) of 27 November 2001).

III. Operational plan and requirements

6. In order to carry out its mandate, UNDOF maintains an area of separation some 80 kilometres long that varies in width from approximately 10 kilometres in the centre to less than 1 kilometre in the extreme south. The terrain is hilly and is dominated in the north by Mount Hermon, which necessitates the use of special vehicles designed for those types of road and terrain. The highest United Nations position is at an altitude of 2,800 metres. The area of separation is inhabited and is policed by the Syrian authorities. No military forces other than UNDOF are permitted within it.

7. UNDOF is deployed within and close to the area of separation, with 2 base camps, 44 permanently staffed positions and 11 observation posts. UNDOF headquarters is located at Camp Faouar, and an office is maintained in Damascus. In addition, the Force operates patrols day and night. The Austrian battalion, which includes a Slovak company, is deployed in the northern part of the area of separation, while the Polish battalion is deployed in the southern part. The Polish battalion’s base camp is Camp Ziouani. Mine-clearing activities are conducted by both battalions under the operational control of UNDOF headquarters.

8. The Canadian and Japanese logistics units, which are based in Camp Ziouani with a detachment in Camp Faouar, perform the second-line general transport tasks, rotation transport, control and management of goods received by the Force and maintenance of heavy equipment.

9. First-line logistical support is internal to the contingents and includes transport of supplies to the positions. Second-line logistical support is provided by the Canadians, and third-line support is provided through normal supply channels used by the United Nations in the area. Damascus International Airport serves as the Force’s main airbase, along with Tel Aviv International Airport. The seaports of Latakia and Haifa are used for sea shipments. Most requirements of the Force are procured locally in the mission area.

10. From its various positions and through its patrols, the Force supervises the area of separation and intervenes whenever any military personnel enter or try to operate therein. This is effected by means of permanently staffed positions and observation posts and by foot and mobile patrols operating at irregular intervals, day and night, on predetermined routes.

11. On each side of the area of separation there is an area of limitation with three zones, one up to 10 kilometres, one from 10 to 20 kilometres and one from 20 to 25 kilometres wide. UNDOF inspects these areas every two weeks in order to ascertain that the agreed limitations in armaments and forces are being observed.

12. With an authorized military strength of some 1,037, all ranks, and a civilian component of 127 staff, UNDOF is spread over the length and breadth of its area of operations. As both parties cooperate fully with the Force and have done so for a number of years, there have been no serious incidents.

13. As indicated in the report of the Secretary General to the Security Council dated 15 November 2001 (S/2001/1079), UNDOF undertook a comprehensive review, with the assistance of engineers from the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL), of its facilities, support structure and deployment in the spring of 2001. The rapid development of the civilian infrastructure in the area of separation over the past three years has had an impact on the effectiveness of existing UNDOF checkpoints and observation posts for monitoring access and movement. In addition, a substantial number of UNDOF support structures and facilities, many over 20 years old, are obsolete and in acute need of upgrading. To improve its ability to carry out its mandate effectively, UNDOF has initiated a modernization programme. Key components of this programme are the full integration of the military and civilian administration and the logistics components of the Force, the replacement of outdated facilities, the consolidation of some positions in the area of separation and enhancement of the mobility of the Force.

14. As part of the modernization programme, UNDOF has developed a master plan to replace the old and defunct infrastructure for the entire mission in a phased manner over three years, starting from 2001.

15. UNDOF took advantage of savings identified during the financial period ending 30 June 2001 and purchased, through the use of systems contracts, some prefabricated structures and ablution units as part of the replacement programme. Some prefabricated buildings are being transferred from UNIFIL, which is in the process of downsizing its force, and more accommodation units were purchased from a former UNIFIL troop-contributing Government. For the 2002/03 budget period, however, additional funding for construction and prefabricated buildings for upgrading accommodations is required in line with the three-year master plan.

16. In addition, as an observer force, UNDOF requires effective communication between the camps and positions. Therefore, the continued acquisition and replacement of communication equipment, also an integral part of the UNDOF modernization programme, is essential. The continued acquisition of updated observation equipment is also required.

IV. Contributions made under the status-of-forces agreement

17. No status-of-forces agreement is in force. However, by a note verbale dated 22 February 1976, the Government of the Syrian Arab Republic informed the United Nations that UNDOF would be treated in accordance with the 1946 Convention on the Privileges and Immunities of the United Nations.

V. Voluntary contributions and trust funds

Voluntary contributions
(United States dollars)
Government/Organization
Contribution
Valuea
Switzerland
Air ambulance service
-

a This service was not utilized during the period from 1 January to 31 December 2001.

Trust Funds
Amount
Trust fund
(United States dollars)
Trust fund for support activities of UNDOF
Opening balance as at 30 June 2000
376 208
1 July 2000 to 30 June 2001
Income
291 943
Expenditures
(257 002)
Closing balance as at 30 June 2001
411 149

VI. Status of reimbursement of troop-contributing Governments

A. Current troop contributors

18. The current troop contributors are the Governments of Austria, Canada, Japan, Poland and Slovakia. In the past, troops were also provided to the Force by Finland, the Islamic Republic of Iran and Peru.

B. Status of reimbursement

19. Full reimbursement in accordance with the standard rates established by the General Assembly for troop costs has been made to contributing States through 31 October 2001. An amount of $3,504,029 is due for troop costs for the period ending 31 January 2002.

VII. Contingent-owned equipment and self-sustainment

A. Method of reimbursement

20. Memorandums of understanding have been signed with two troop-contributing Governments. Negotiations with other countries that are providing or will provide troops and equipment to UNDOF are continuing. At this stage it is expected that three troop-contributing Governments will opt for wet-lease arrangements for the reimbursement of contingent-owned equipment.

B. Requirements

21. The requirement for reimbursement of major and special equipment to three contingents amounts to $306,800.

22. The estimated requirements of $452,893 for self-sustainment are broken down below:

Category
Amount
(United States dollars)
Catering
135 552
Communications
-
Office furniture and equipment
-
Electrical
-
Minor engineering
82 116
Explosive ordnance disposal
43 968
Laundry and cleaning
-
Tentage
-
Accommodations
-
Medical
80 016
Observation
385
Miscellaneous general stores
110 856
Outstanding contingent liability
-
Total
452 893

23. No mission factors have been applied to UNDOF.

VIII. Staffing requirements

A. Changes in staffing requirements
Number of posts
Category
Current staffing
Proposed staffing
requirements
Net change
International staff
Under-Secretary-General
-
-
-
Assistant Secretary-General
1
1
-
D-2
-
-
-
D-1
-
-
-
P-5
1
1
-
P-4
1
2
1
P-3
3
3
-
P-2/P-1
-
-
-
Subtotal
6
7
1
General Service (Principal level)
-
-
-
General Service (Other level)
6
6
-
Subtotal
6
6
-
Field Service
26
28
2
Security Service
-
-
-
Subtotal
26
28
2
Total, international staff
38
41
3
Local staff
89
89
-
National Professional staff
-
-
-
United Nations Volunteers
-
-
-
Subtotal
89
89
-
Total
127
130
3

24. For the period from 1 July 2002 to 30 June 2003, it is proposed that the civilian staffing establishment for UNDOF be increased by three international staff posts, comprising one Professional post and two Field Service posts, as follows:

(a) Office of Force Construction Engineering. The establishment of one new Professional post at the P-4 level is proposed for a Chief Civilian Engineer. During its visit to the Force at the end of October 2001, a team from the Department of Peacekeeping Operations at United Nations Headquarters recommended the immediate recruitment of a Chief Civilian Engineer, since the Force was undertaking a major infrastructure replacement project in accordance with the three-year master plan;

(b) Office of the Force Commander. The establishment of one Field Service post at the FS-2 level is proposed for a driver for the Force Commander. Under the current 2001/02 budget, a military contingent member is being paid mission subsistence allowance to serve as a driver for the Force Commander. However, in line with United Nations personnel policies, UNDOF has been asked to explore alternatives to that arrangement. The 2002/03 budget proposal therefore includes a Field Service post to perform the function, in addition to providing security services to the Force Commander;

(c) General Services Section. The establishment of one new Field Service post at the FS-4 level is proposed for a general services assistant. In the context of restructuring the logistics battalion supply platoon organization in Camp Ziouani in accordance with the recommendation of auditors, this post will help to ensure accountability of the second-line supply unit stocks and stricter control over the movement of United Nations property. The establishment of this post is also a part of the process of integration to enhance coordination between military and civilian staff in line with the UNDOF modernization plan.

25. Following a recent review by UNDOF management of the situation of posts and for operational reasons, it has been concluded that no conversion of General Service staff posts into local staff posts is possible at this time.


B. Current and proposed staffing
Professional category and above
General Service and related categories
USG
ASG
D-2
D-1
P-5
P-4
P-3
P-2/

P-1

Sub-total
Field Service
Principal level
Other level
Security Service
Sub-total
Local staff
National Officers
United Nations Volun-teers
Total
Office of the Force Commander
Current
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
-
-
1
-
1
-
-
-
2
Proposed
-
1
-
-
-
-
-
-
1
1
-
1
-
2
-
-
-
3
Division of Administration
Current
-
-
-
-
1
1
3
-
5
26
-
5
-
31
89
-
-
125
Proposed
-
-
-
-
1
2
3
-
6
27
-
5
-
32
89
-
-
127
Total
Current
-
1
-
-
1
1
3
-
6
26
-
6
-
32
89
-
-
127
Proposed
-
1
-
-
1
2
3
-
7
28
-
6
-
34
89
-
-
130

IX. Other issues

26. It is recalled that the General Assembly, in paragraph 7 of its resolution 53/226 of 8 June 1999, requested the Secretary-General to expedite the process of improving the working conditions of the Force, taking into account the difficulties arising from the relocation of Force headquarters from Damascus to Camp Faouar, and to report thereon to the Assembly at its fifty-fourth session.

27. In his report on the financing of UNDOF for the period from 1 July 2000 to 30 June 2001 (A/54/732, paras. 33-34), the Secretary-General provided information on measures that had been taken by the UNDOF administration in response to that request of the General Assembly.

28. Subsequently, in paragraph 2 of its resolution 54/266 of 15 June 2000, the General Assembly requested the Secretary-General to continue the process of improving the working conditions of the local staff, including by making allowance for difficulties resulting from the relocation of the headquarters of the Force from Damascus to Camp Faouar, through mutual and fruitful dialogue.

29. In his report on the financing of UNDOF for the period from 1 July 2001 to 30 June 2002 (A/55/778, paras. 30-34), the Secretary-General provided information on measures that had been taken by the UNDOF administration in response to that request of the General Assembly.

30. The General Assembly, in paragraph 1 of its resolution 55/264 of 14 June 2001, noted that some of the concerns regarding the improvement of the working conditions of the local staff at UNDOF had been addressed. However, in the same resolution, the Assembly reaffirmed its request to the Secretary-General to continue the process of improving the working conditions of the local staff; and noted that paragraph 2 of its resolution 54/266 had not been fully implemented, in particular with regard to making allowance for the difficulties mentioned in that paragraph, and in that regard requested the Secretary-General to take concrete measures to ensure the full implementation of the matter and to report thereon to the Assembly during the first part of its resumed fifty-sixth session.

31. In response to the requests of the General Assembly, the Secretariat is further reviewing the matter to determine whether additional measures can be taken and implemented in future. The outcome of the review will be reported to the Assembly once it has been completed.

X. Objective-setting

32. In its resolution 55/220 C of 14 June 2001, the General Assembly requested the Secretary-General to ensure the use of objective-setting by the administrations of peacekeeping missions and to ensure that the development and attainment of those objectives were reported on to the Assembly through the financial performance reports of the missions. In this connection, the objectives set by UNDOF for the period from 1 July 2002 to 30 June 2003 are as follows:


Objective 1 : To proceed with the first tier of the modernization programme, which relates to improved operational capacity.

Expected accomplishmentsIndicators of achievement
To improve UNDOF patrolling schemes in the area of separation in order to be more proactive as an observer force.The Force has achieved more accurate overall visibility in the area of separation during the day and at night through the acquisition of up-to-date observation equipment.

External factors: Availability and quality of equipment provided by suppliers.

Objective 2 : To proceed with the second tier of the modernization programme, which is the infrastructure replacement programme for the 2002/03 budget year of the master plan.

Expected accomplishments Indicators of achievement
To replace decrepit living and working accommodations that have been identified at the military positions and company headquarters that have reached the end of their useful life.Engineering projects identified for the 2002/03 budget period have been completed or are on or nearly on schedule.

External factors: The objectives and expected accomplishments are expected to be achieved assuming that vendors and contractors are able to meet deadlines set by the mission in accordance with the engineering programme.

Objective 3 : To proceed with the third tier of the modernization programme, which is the continuation of integration between military and civilian personnel as well as between UNDOF operations and the operations of the Observer Group Golan of the United Nations Truce Supervision Organization.

Expected accomplishments Indicators of achievement
Continuation towards integration of the military and civilian sections and UNDOF/Observer Group Golan operations as projected for the 2002/03 period. At least three additional units have been relocated and/or integrated.

External factors: None.




C. Supplementary information

1. The proposed budget for the 2002/03 financial period is based on the strength of 1,037 military contingent personnel, supported by 41 international and 89 local-level staff.

Military personnel

Apportionment: $19,536,000; estimate: $19,987,600; variance: $451,600

2. The increase under this heading is attributable to an increase of $619,700 in the cost estimate under military contingents, offset by a decrease of $168,100 in the cost estimate under other requirements pertaining to military personnel.

Military contingents

Apportionment: $18,308,200; estimate: $18,927,900; variance: $619,700

3. The increased cost estimates for standard troop cost reimbursement and clothing and equipment allowance take into account the provision of General Assembly resolution 55/274 of 14 June 2001. Additional provision is made to cover increased requirements under rations due to an expected 10 per cent increase in the rations contract price for the option to renew the current contract. Detailed information on provisions for military contingents is provided in annex II, section A.

Other requirements pertaining to military personnel

Apportionment: $1,227,800; estimate: $1,059,700; variance: ($168,100)

(a) Contingent-owned equipment

4. Provision of $306,800 is made to cover the reimbursement of three troop-contributing Governments for trucks, ambulances, an excavator, a bulldozer, an x-ray unit, containers, a forklift, heavy cargo trailers and crew-served machine guns to be brought into the mission area, based on wet-lease arrangements.

(b) Self-sustainment

5. The provision of $452,900 is made for the first-time inclusion of reimbursement to one self-sustained battalion, as detailed in annex II, section A.

(c) Death and disability compensation

6. Provision of $300,000 has been made, $767,300 less than that for the 2001/02 financial period, based on past expenditure experience, to cover potential claims for the death, disability or injury of military personnel (compared with $414,800 if the standard provision of 1 per cent of all contingent personnel, based on an annual maximum cost of $40,000 per claim, had been applied).

Civilian personnel

Apportionment: $5,210,400; estimate: $5,846,500; variance: $636,100

7. The increase of $636,100 under this heading relates to international and local staff costs.

8. Increased salary and common staff cost requirements for international and local staff are attributable mainly to the request for three additional international staff posts (Chief Civilian Engineer, Force Commander’s driver and general services assistant) (see para. 24 of the main report).

9. International staff salaries have been calculated on the basis of the 2002/03 standard cost rates for New York, while local staff salaries reflect the scale currently applicable in the mission area. Based on post incumbency experience, a 5 per cent vacancy rate has been applied to the Force’s proposed international staffing establishment of 41 total posts, including the 3 new posts requested. The estimate for the 89 local staff takes into account an increase in local staff salaries, effective 1 July 2001, and is based on level 4, step 6, which is the midpoint of the local salary scales. No vacancy factor has been applied to the local staffing establishment based on past incumbency experience.

10. The estimate of $97,000 under other travel costs is higher than the provision of $67,000 for the current period, 1 July 2001 to 30 June 2002, and will finance the travel of Headquarters and UNDOF personnel during the next period, as detailed in annex II, section A.

Operational requirements

Apportionment: $8,887,100; estimate: $12,088,900; variance: $3,201,800

11. The estimate of $12,088,900 includes non-recurrent cost requirements amounting to $7,660,900.

12. The net increase of $3,201,800 under this heading is attributable to a total increase of $4,117,100 under premises/accommodation ($2,426,600), communications ($1,054,300), other equipment ($599,600) and supplies and services ($36,600), offset by a decrease in requirements of $915,300 for transport operations.

Premises/accommodation

13. The increased requirement under this heading is due mainly to the funding requirement for infrastructure improvement in accordance with the three-year master plan, as stated previously.

14. Of the more than 100 prefabricated buildings at UNDOF, half are over 20 years old, 30 per cent are over 15 years old and the rest are over 10 years old. Similarly, the utilities (water supply, sewage and electricity) and other infrastructure, such as roads, pathways and communication facilities, have never been updated since the start of the operation more than 20 years ago. As only minimum maintenance has been performed on UNDOF infrastructure in the past years, it has outlived its useful life and cannot be maintained any further, according to expert opinion and advice of the Chief Engineer of UNIFIL.

Transport operations

15. Requirements for the replacement and acquisition of vehicles, as detailed in annex II, section C ($1,368,700), are lower than those requested for the current period ($1,566,700) because fewer vehicles are scheduled for replacement during the next period.

Communications

16. Requirements for an accelerated replacement programme for communications equipment, as detailed in annex II, section C ($1,354,200), are higher than those requested for the current period ($317,900). The increased budget under this heading is required to a large extent for the essential updating of communications equipment. It is also attributable to increased costs for the rental of the satellite transponder and Brindisi leased line.

Other equipment

17. Requirements under other equipment, as detailed in annex II, section C ($1,600,600), are also higher than those for the current period ($1,001,000). The increased requirements are due mainly to: (a) routine replacement of office equipment during the budgetary period; (b) higher requirements for data-processing equipment, including both hardware and software, in connection with the upgrade and enhancement of the information technology infrastructure of the mission; (c) significantly higher funding requirements for routine replacement of generators; and (d) the replacement of old night-observation devices (long- and short-range) and the acquisition of thermal imaging systems and global positioning systems to maintain the observation standards during the day and at night.

Supplies and services

18. The estimate of $1,387,800 under supplies and services is $36,600 higher than the current approved amount of $1,351,200. The increased requirements are due mainly to the hiring of an engineer and additional skilled workers to assist the Office of Force Construction Engineering to undertake the upgrading of accommodations as stipulated in the UNDOF master plan.

Training programmes

19. The increased estimate under this heading would provide for training of UNDOF technical and finance staff, as detailed in annex II, section A.

Staff assessment

Apportionment: $757,400; estimate:$919,800; variance: $162,400

20. The amount budgeted under this heading represents the difference between gross and net emoluments, that is, the amount of staff assessment to which United Nations staff members are subject, in accordance with the staff regulations of the United Nations. Staff assessment is estimated on the basis of the proposed 41 international posts, including the 3 new posts requested, and 89 local-level posts. The estimate is also based on the 2002/03 standard cost rates for New York in accordance with the latest salary scale.

Income from staff assessment

Apportionment: ($757,400); estimate:($919,800); variance:($162,400)

21. The income from staff assessment provided for under this item will be credited to the Tax Equalization Fund established by the General Assembly in its resolution 973 A (X) of 15 December 1955. Member States are given credit in the Fund in proportion to their rate of contribution to the UNDOF budget.


Annex II

Cost estimates for the period from 1 July 2002 to 30 June 2003: analysis

A. Standard and mission-specific costs
Proposed cost estimates
(United States dollars)
Description
Previous submission
Average
strength
Standard
Unit or daily
Monthly
Annual
Explanation
1. Military personnel
Military contingents
Infantry
821
821
Logistical support
216
216
2. Troop reimbursement
(a) Pay and allowance
988
1 028
1 028
Based on rates approved by the General Assembly effective 1 January 2002.
(b) Specialist allowance
291
303
303
Based on rates approved by the General Assembly effective 1 January 2002.
Infantry
10%
Payable for 10 per cent of troop strength.
Logistical support
25%
Payable for 25 per cent of troop strength.
3. Clothing and personal equipment allowance
Military contingents
70
73
73
4. Welfare
10.5
10.5
Payable for 14 days for personnel serving 12 months.
Other
5.4
5.4
5. Rations
6
9
6.6
For the option to renew the current rations contract.
6. Travel costs for military personnel
Israel
55
a
55
Syrian Arab Republic
69
a
69
Lebanon
65
a
65
Force Commander driver
18 173
Civilian post proposed for Force Commander driver.
Holiday overlap for replacement driver
1 104
Civilian post proposed for Force Commander driver.
7. Contingent-owned equipment
160 500
306 819
Based on draft and signed memorandums of understanding.
8. Death and disability
1 067 300
400 000
300 000
Based on projected claims payable to Governments.
9. Self-sustainment First-time inclusion of provision for self-sustainment for one battalion.
Catering
26.33
11 296
Payable for 429 troops.
Minor engineering
15.95
6 843
Payable for 429 troops.
Explosive ordnance disposal
7.27
3 664
Payable for 504 troops.
Medical (level 1)
13.23
6 668
Payable for 504 troops.
Observation
1.07
32.10
Payable for 30 troops.
Miscellaneous general store
Bedding
15.13
7 020
Payable for 464 troops.
Welfare
6.01
2 218
Payable for 369 troops.
10. Civilian personnel
International staff
38
38
41
Three additional posts proposed. For supplementary explanation, see annex I, section C.
Local staff
87
89
89
Net salary
9 479
11 230
Salary scale effective 1 July 2001, level 4, step 6 (midpoint), at United Nations latest operational exchange rate.
Common staff costs
3 691
3 690
Staff assessment
1 232
2 134
11. Travel costs for civilian personnel
Travel of Force Commander
7 000
17 000
One additional trip added.
Chief Administrative Officer and other personnel to New York
25 000
25 000
Mission staff travel within mission area
22 000
22 000
Office of Internal Oversight Services
20 000
20 000
Headquarters air safety officer travel to UNDOF
2 000
2 000
Headquarters staff travel to UNDOF
11 000
12. Rental of premises
Austrian battalion position 27, building No. 1
1 560
a
1 560
Austrian battalion position 27, building No. 2
436
a
440
Sewage disposal place
637
a
637
Garbage disposal place
a
Garage in Tiberias
9 000
a
9 000
Electricity for rented premises at position 27
7 500
a
8 500
Based on past spending experience.
13. Utilities
Electricity
358 000
a
338 000
Based on past spending experience.
Water
42 000
a
42 000
14. Vehicles
Civilian-pattern
274
281
Reclassified military and civilian vehicles.
Military-pattern
116
109
Reclassified military and civilian vehicles.
15. Spare parts and repair and maintenance of vehicles
Civilian-pattern
1 595
6 000
945
Based on past spending experience.
Military-pattern
4 537
6 000
4 537
Repair and refit of armoured personnel carriers
110 000
110 000
Construction of 6 specialty flat racks
30 000
30 000
16. Petrol, oil and lubricants b
Diesel
Camp Ziouani
0.290
a
0.290
Camp Faouar
0.150
a
0.150
Filling stations
0.306
a
0.306
Transport workshop
0.150
a
0.150
Benzine
Camp Ziouani
0.300
a
0.300
Camp Faouar
0.400
a
0.400
Filling stations
0.250
a
0.250
17. Vehicle insurance
General purpose
490
376
413
Worldwide insurance plan to cover 376 primary-pattern vehicles.
Armoured personnel carriers
286
13
287
Worldwide insurance plan to cover 13 military-pattern vehicles.
18. Commercial communications
Commercial telex/telegram
12 000
a
12 000
Pouch
12 000
a
12 000
Satellite transponder
94 000
a
112 000
Increased lease cost.
Official post-box rental
5 000
a
5 000
Brindisi leased line
8 000
a
8 000
Official telephone calls and line rental in mission area
38 500
a
38 500
PABX service support
5 000
5 000
Softech ringmaster 2000
500
500
Rights to use United Nations Headquarters lines at $200 per month per line
19 200
19 200
19. Miscellaneous services
Audit services
55 700
54 800
Contractual services
Barber services
18 060
a
18 060
Tailoring services
37 872
a
37 872
Laundry services
67 932
a
67 932
Garbage removal/hazardous materials disposal
87 120
a
87 120
Labour contract
53 400
a
53 400
Contractual services of engineer and skilled workers
a
100 000
To assist in upgrading of accommodations.
Medical treatment and services
77 000
a
76 900
Downward adjustment based on past spending experience.
Official hospitality
5 000
a
5 000
Miscellaneous other services
77 900
a
77 900
20. Miscellaneous supplies
Stationery and office supplies
110 000
209 520
110 000
Medical supplies
112 000
391 104
70 200
One self-sustained battalion budgeted.
Sanitation and cleaning materials
80 000
69 840
103 700
Based on past expenditure experience and taking into consideration one self-sustained battalion.
Subscriptions
2 200
a
2 200
Uniform items, flags and decals
40 000
26 900
Based on past expenditure experience.
Field defence stores
30 000
a
29 600
Based on past expenditure experience.
Quartermaster and general stores
500 000
a
460 100
Based on past expenditure experience and taking into consideration one self-sustained battalion.
21. Training programmes
145 400
149 000
Technical training courses at:
(a) United Nations Logistics Base
Communication
28 050
30 320
Four courses for 8 staff members.
Diesel engine
14 597
7 580
One course for 2 staff members.
Electronic data processing/ finance
67 320
64 500
Nine courses for 17 staff members.
(b) Progen/Sun systems training
2 805
Included above.
(c) Cyprus: management courses
3 728
8 800
Four staff members.
(d) London:
Digital microwave system
6 330
3 470
Two courses for 2 staff members.
Vehicle manufacturer’s training
6 330
(e) Lebanon: electronic data- processing courses
9 400
7 050
Three courses for 6 staff members.
(f) Israel: fibre-optic technology
6 840
2 280
One course for 1 staff member.
(g) Syrian Arab Republic: drafting skills and miscellaneous courses
10 000
In-house training for 25 staff members.
(h) Field Administration and Logistics Division of the Department of Peacekeeping Operations: personnel, finance and budget
15 000
22. Commercial freight and cartage
185 000
a
185 000

a No standard cost exists for this item.

b Explanation:
Unit cost
Estimated requirement
(litres)
Diesel
Camp Ziouani
$0.29
374 929
Camp Faouar
$0.15
2 092 820
Filling stations
$0.31
143 000
Transport workshop
$0.15
12 000
Benzine
Camp Ziouani
$0.30
39 600
Camp Faouar
$0.40
231 645
Filling stations
$0.25
40 307


C. Non-recurrent requirements

(Thousands of United States dollars, unless otherwise indicated)

(1)
(2)
(3)
(4)
=(2)+(3)
(5)
(6)
=(4)x(5)

Current
inventory as at
30 June 2001a
Proposed units
Replacement
Additional
Total
Unit costb
Total cost
1. Premises and accommodation
(a) Rental of premises
-
-
(b) Alteration and renovation of premises
-
(c) Maintenance supplies
-
(d) Maintenance services
-
(e) Utilities
-
(f) Accommodations:
Containerized accommodations
4
Containerized kitchens
2
Prefabricated ablution units
1
Miscellaneous prefabricated items
12
Prefabricated softwalls
6
(g) Prefabricated buildings:
Containerized ablution units
4
Containerized accommodations
16
Prefabricated accommodation buildings
72
Prefabricated kitchen buildings
7
Miscellaneous prefabricated items
8
Prefabricated softwalls
1
(h) Refrigerated containers
5
-
(i) Sea containers
57
Subtotal
195
-
-
-
-
(j) Construction of premises
Austrian battalion
390 000
Construct buildings at Camp Faouar: building No. 146, 24-person ($113,000); building No. 141, headquarters offices ($179,000); shelter No. 2, 16-person ($20,000); shelter No. 5, 8-person ($15,000); shelter No. 6, 13-person ($20,000); shelter No. 8, 16-person ($28,000); shelter No. 9, 6-person ($15,000).
Logistics battalion (Canadian/Japanese)
1 102 200
Upgrade power distribution ($120,000); replace fuel tanks ($40,000); fence and roof hazardous materials compound ($25,000); replace trailer ($27,200); replace junior ranks’ quarters ($550,000); install 2 observation posts ($10,000); upgrade water line, Camp Ziouani ($50,000); repair building No. 116, Camp Ziouani ($50,000); upgrade sewer line ($70,000); replace Japanese contingent’s shelter ($120,000); replace various roofs (40,000)
Polish battalion
1 273 000
Construct new accommodation, 140-person, Camp Ziouani ($500,000); construct container accommodations, positions 62, 69, 85, area of operations ($216,000); construct container ablutions at battalion positions ($30,000); construct kitchens, positions 62, 69, 85 ($150,000); construct battery buildings, positions 60, 80 ($60,000) and positions 69, 85 ($25,000); construct new shelters, positions 60, 80 ($80,000); construct water towers, positions 62, 69, 85 ($12,000); renovate and extend kitchen, Camp Ziouani ($110,000); construct utility grids, positions 60, 62, 68, 69, 80, 85 ($70,000); construct sewage disposal systems, positions 62, 69, 85 ($20,000)
Headquarters projects
739 800
Infrastructure improvements, headquarters:
Austrian battalion: position 37 ($30,000); position 27 ($70,000); position 31 ($50,000); position 25 ($50,000); position 10 ($50,000). Polish battalion: position 60 ($10,000); position 62 ($50,000); position 69 ($50,000); position 80 ($25,000); position 85 ($50,000). Upgrade roads in the area of operations: Austrian battalion area ($12,500); Polish battalion area ($12,500). Camp Faouar: upgrade electrical distribution ($100,000); upgrade filtration and disinfecting system ($15,000); construct 2 new steel roofs, buildings 30 and 31 ($60,000); replace top floor roof of pentagon ($30,000); construct headquarters communications offices ($20,500); replace various transit quarters with flat-pack/ablution trailers ($29,300); replace filtration and disinfecting system for 4 water wells ($25,000).
Subtotal
3 505 000
Total, line 1
3 505 000
2. Infrastructure repairs
-
3. Transport operations
(a) Purchase of vehicles
Armoured personnel carrier, trackedc
5
2
-
-
-
-
Armoured personnel carrier, wheeledc
8
-
23
-
-
-
Bulldozer
3
1
-
1
260 000
260 000
Jeep, 4 x 4
145
10
-
10
14 500
145 000
Mini-bus
41
4
-
4
12 750
51 000
Over-snow vehicle
3
1
-
1
220 000
220 000
Truck, cargo, medium, 4 x 4, 8 ton
28
2
-
2
75 000
150 000
Truck, recovery, 8 ton
1
1
-
1
82 000
82 000
Truck, recovery, 16 ton
3
1
-
1
150 000
150 000
Truck, refrigerator
2
1
-
1
80 000
80 000
Subtotal
239
23
23
46
1 138 000
Freight at 15 per cent
170 700
Subtotal
239
23
23
46
1 308 700
Provided through surplus stock
-
Subtotal, line 3 (a)
239
23
23
46
1 308 700
(b) Rental of vehicles
-
(c) Workshop equipment
-
Civilian vehicle workshop
34 500
Military vehicle workshop
25 500
Subtotal, line 3 (c)
60 000
Total, line 3
239
23
23
46
1 368 700
4. Air operations
-
5. Naval operations
-
6. Communications
(a) Complementary communications
Communications equipment
VHF equipment
Base station radios
7
1
-
1
1 000
1 000
Digital microwave link
4
1
2
3
50 000
150 000
Handy-talkie, general
194
28
287
315
400
126 000
Mobile sets
233
33
40
73
500
36 500
Omni-directional antenna
270
39
-
39
400
15 600
Repeaters
19
3
2
5
4 500
22 500
Satellite equipment
Global positioning system receivers
2
-
2
2
500
1 000
INMARSAT mini-M terminal
9
1
-
1
3 000
3 000
Telephone equipment
2-channel rural digital telephone links
39
6
-
6
12 000
72 000
GSM phones
15
2
10
12
300
3 600
Telephone exchange, medium
4
1
-
1
90 000
90 000
Telephone exchange, small
12
2
-
2
25 000
50 000
Miscellaneous equipment
Battery charger
90
13
-
13
150
1 950
Communications shelter
5
1
6
7
10 000
70 000
DC-AC inverter
4
1
-
1
2 500
2 500
DC-DC inverter
16
2
-
2
400
800
Field telephones, military
100
40
-
40
650
26 000
Rohn tower
31
4
-
4
4 500
18 000
Shipping container
-
-
2
2
2 750
5 500
UPS, 10 kVA
5
1
-
1
4 000
4 000
UPS, 5 kVA
4
1
2
3
2 500
7 500
Military-pattern radio equipment
Antenna, RS1729
10
1
-
1
500
500
Antenna base, MT-68
28
10
-
10
82
815
Antenna set, RC292
28
5
-
5
1 375
6 875
Antenna set sticks, RC292
28
13
-
13
168
2 184
Back-up military radio system
-
-
46
46
4 200
193 200
Battery chargers 7725
40
25
-
25
115
2 875
Battery chargers BB588/U
13
3
-
3
750
2 250
Complete antenna, SHG118FQ
10
4
-
4
250
1 000
Intercom set with parts for vehicles
-
-
36
36
10 560
380 160
Loudspeaker, model LSA 100T
43
25
-
25
25
625
Military radio, PRC126
57
5
-
5
4 311
21 555
Military radio, PRC77
202
20
-
20
1 535
30 700
Military switchboard
38
2
-
2
2 000
4 000
Subtotal, line 6 (a)
1 560
293
435
728
1 354 189
(b) Workshop equipment
Civilian communications workshop
32 000
Military communications workshop
15 425
Subtotal, line 6 (b)
47 425
Total, line 6
1 560
293
435
728
1 401 614
7. Other equipment
(a) Office furniture
Bookshelf
24
12
-
12
75
900
Chair, rotary, high back
29
7
-
7
150
1 050
Chair, rotary, with arms
324
35
-
35
65
2 275
Chair, visitor
224
4
-
4
40
160
Chair, visitor, padded, with arms
13
3
-
3
50
150
Coffee table sets
15
3
-
3
100
300
Computer desk
155
8
-
8
50
400
Desk, double pedestal
19
15
-
15
175
2 625
Desk, single pedestal
111
7
-
7
120
840
Display shelf for Force Commander
2
1
-
1
150
150
Filing cabinet, 2-drawer
76
16
-
16
125
2 000
Filing cabinet, 4-drawer
228
10
-
10
150
1 500
Locker, metal
221
2
-
2
150
300
Map storage drawers
3
1
-
1
300
300
Pigeonholes
9
1
-
1
50
50
Shelving units
56
5
-
5
100
500
Subtotal, line 7 (a)
1 509
130
-
130
13 500
(b) Office equipment
Copier, low-volume
18
3
-
3
3 000
9 000
Copier, medium-volume
13
4
4
10 000
40 000
Fax machine
47
7
-
7
1 500
10 500
Subtotal, line 7 (b)
78
14
-
14
59 500
Total, line 7
1 587
144
-
144
73 000
8. Electronic data-processing equipment
(a) Equipment
Cisco wireless local area network
-
-
1
1
20 000
20 000
Cisco work group fibre-optic switches
-
-
14
14
4 000
56 000
Compaq server remote-control switches
-
-
4
4
2 000
8 000
Desktop, Pentium
258
45
-
45
1 500
67 500
Fibre channel storage area network
-
-
1
1
125 000
125 000
HP digital sender
-
-
4
4
4 000
16 000
HP LaserJet colour printers
3
-
1
1
4 500
4 500
HP optical disk storage device
-
-
1
1
16 000
16 000
InFocus computer projector
3
-
1
1
6 000
6 000
Intel computer camera
-
-
10
10
100
1 000
Internal/external modems (servers)
-
-
6
6
275
1 650
Scanners
5
-
7
7
5 000
35 000
Server
14
2
1
3
30 690
92 070
Subtotal, line 8 (a)
283
47
51
98
448 720
(b) Software acquisition
Lotus Notes maintenance and support
-
-
258
258
125
32 250
Wide-area network (WAN) support software
-
-
258
258
80
20 640
Field mission logistics system software support and maintenance
-
-
258
258
40
10 320
Microsoft desktop software
-
-
258
258
100
25 800
Cisco 3000 series support
-
-
2
2
500
1 000
WAN service support — Cisco (per year)
-
-
1
1
5 000
5 000
Mission-critical software
-
-
258
258
40
10 320
MS 2000 X/P licences
-
-
-
-
12 500
12 500
Internet surf control super scout licence
-
-
-
-
7 000
7 000
Norton anti-virus corporate edition
-
-
-
-
4 000
4 000
Microsoft SQL server
-
-
-
-
3 500
3 500
MS Windows 2000 advanced server licence
-
-
-
-
3 000
3 000
VSI electronic fax distribution
-
-
-
-
7 000
7 000
Veritas back-up system for MS 2000
-
-
-
-
10 000
10 000
Computer learning software
-
-
-
-
3 000
3 000
Reolix incoming fax software support
-
-
-
-
2 000
2 000
NSI software for digital senders
-
-
-
-
2 000
2 000
Sun finance systems licence renewal
-
-
-
-
3 835
3 835
Progen payroll systems licence
-
-
-
-
2 540
2 540
Lease-line/Internet access charges
-
-
-
-
2 700
2 700
Subtotal, line 8 (b)
-
-
-
-
-
168 405
(c) Generator set
Heavy-duty, 150-1500 kVA
10
-
-
-
-
-
Intermediate-duty, 10-50 kVA
95
-
18
18
6 858
123 444
Medium-duty, 50-150 kVA
17
-
2
2
8 470
16 940
Light-duty, up to 10 kVA
10
-
-
-
-
-
Subtotal, line 8 (c)
132
-
20
20
140 384
(d) Observation equipment
Binoculars, hand-held (various)
214
51
-
51
250
12 750
Night observation devices
Short-range
77
6
-
6
2 500
15 000
Long-range
57
13
-
13
8 000
104 000
Searchlights, handheld
38
10
-
10
100
1 000
Global positioning system/hand-held
9
-
35
35
180
6 300
Thermal imaging system
-
-
2
2
72 000
144 000
Subtotal, line 8 (d)
395
80
37
117
283 050
(e) Medical and dental equipment
44 000
(f) Accommodation equipment
106 000
(g) Miscellaneous equipment
122 000
Total line 8
810
127
108
235
1 312 559
Total
4 196
587
566
1 153
7 660 873

a As contained in the mission’s expenditure report as at 30 June 2001.

b As reflected in the standard cost manual.

c To be transferred from other peacekeeping missions.


Annex III

Implementation of previous recommendations
of the Advisory Committee on Administrative
and Budgetary Questions
Request (A/55/874/Add.1) Response
In the opinion of the Committee, the process of identification of accommodation needs has been unduly ad hoc; a procedure should be put into place to review the state of accommodations on a systematic and regular basis (para. 17). With the assistance of an independent engineering assessment team from UNIFIL in May 2001, UNDOF undertook a comprehensive review of its facilities and support structure and developed the master plan for the recapitalization of the ageing UNDOF infrastructure, as mentioned in the present report.
The Committee was informed that the major “customer” of the Procurement Section was the Logistics Branch, which was staffed by military personnel and reported to the Force Commander. Procurement, on the other hand, was staffed by civilian personnel and was under the Chief Administrative Officer. Thus, a large portion of the UNDOF purchase requests were made by military personnel. The disadvantage in such an arrangement is that military personnel serve in the mission for only six months, and therefore do not have time to become familiar with United Nations procurement policies and procedures. The Committee concurs with the opinion of the Chief Administrative Officer that the Logistics Branch should either be integrated into the civil component of UNDOF or that the Force should be restructured so that the Logistics Branch reports directly to the Office of the Chief Administrative Officer. In the view of the Advisory Committee, the current logistics arrangements in UNDOF militate against proper procurement planning. This issue should be addressed as a matter of urgency in this mission and in the context of all the peacekeeping operations, with a view to introducing new arrangements (para. 21).The UNDOF administration brought this issue to the attention of the UNDOF Force Commander with a view to introducing new arrangements that would be acceptable to the Advisory Committee and the Fifth Committee. As regards the preparation of a procurement plan, the mission had developed a draft plan and would formalize the policy on this issue with a finalized procurement plan to be available for the budget period 2002/03, upon approval of the cost estimates.

As regards the issue concerning the Logistics Branch, the mission would like to inform the Advisory Committee that, under the direction of the Force Commander, the initial integration of some of the military and civilian components of the Force headquarters began in late November 2001 as part of the Force’s modernization programme. One of the arrangements is that the Chief Logistics Officer now reports for operational matters to the Chief of Staff and to the Chief Administrative Officer for administrative matters.

It is anticipated that with the start of integration in some areas, the disadvantage referred to by the Committee will eventually be overcome.

With regard to training programmes, the Committee notes from the budget report that it is proposed that 40 staff members attend such programmes (A/55/778, annex II.A, item 20). The Committee was informed that the previous budget submission had provided for 18 staff members to attend training programmes. Thus, in a two-year period, 58 staff members are to have been trained. The Committee points out that the number of people attending training programmes is quite high in comparison to the number of established posts (38 international staff and 89 local staff). In this connection, the Advisory Committee cautions that training programmes should be carefully identified to meet the needs of the mission. Furthermore, as the Committee has mentioned in other reports (e.g., A/54/841, para. 39), care should be taken, in selecting personnel for training, to confirm the staff member’s future availability for mission service (para. 22).UNDOF advised that the Department of Peacekeeping Operations had promulgated the addition of some courses for the 2001/02 budget period. Of the 40 staff members who would take part in the training programmes, some would attend more than one training course during the year. For example, for some information technology courses, it is required that the staff member attend the different levels of a given course.

The international staff nominated for training courses in the communications/information technology fields are identified by the Department of Peacekeeping Operations. The movement and rotation of Field Service staff is controlled by the Field Administration and Logistics Division and as such UNDOF is unable to confirm the staff member’s future availability for mission service.

During the meetings held on 22 and 23 February 1996 on the financing of UNDOF and UNIFIL, the Advisory Committee had requested that information be provided on the estimated cost to the United Nations Truce Supervision Organization of direct support to UNDOF and UNIFIL. Since then, the Secretariat has been providing such information on a regular basis. The table below provides the requisite information for the biennium 2002-2003.

United Nations Truce Supervision Organization: estimates of direct support provided to the United Nations Disengagement Observer Force for the period from 1 January 2002 to 31 December 2003

(Thousands of United States dollars)

Posts
1 844.7
Other staff costs
5 345.3
Travel
1 171.0
General operating expenses
344.1
Supplies and material
264.9
Equipment
19.2
Total
8 989.2

Annex IV

Organization chart

a Administrative Officer, Camp Ziouani.



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