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Débat général de 66e GA//Demande d’admission de la Palestine à l’ONU//Déclarations - Communiqué de presse de l’AG Français
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Source: Department of Public Information (DPI)
24 September 2011

General Assembly
GA/11152

        Department of Public Information • News and Media Division • New York

Sixty-sixth General Assembly
Plenary
22nd, 23rd & 24th Meetings (AM, PM & Night)


EXAMINATION OF MEDIATION VERSUS MILITARY INTERVENTION TO ASSIST REGIONS WRACKED

BY CONFLICT FOCUS OF GENERAL ASSEMBLY DEBATE AS IT ENTERS FOURTH DAY


Leaders Can No Longer Use Sovereignty as ‘Wall to Violate Rights of Citizens’,
Some Say; Others Say Mediation Less Costly, Saves Lives, Aligns with UN Charter


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Background

The General Assembly met today to continue its annual general debate.

Statements

PAKALITHA B. MOSISILI, Prime Minister of Lesotho, ...

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Turning to other matters, he stressed that the good office of the Secretary-General should be strengthened through sufficient human and other resources in order to better undertake early mediation for conflict prevention. He also encouraged that office’s mediation efforts towards realizing a free and independent Western Sahara. In addition, he urged all parties involved in the Palestine question to resuscitate negotiations between the State of Palestine and Israel. ...

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IGOR LUKŠIĆ, Prime Minister of Montenegro, ...

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An Israel-Palestine peace agreement in their mutual interest was a priority, he said. “If both sides refrain from violent actions, room will be created for confidence-building and a comprehensive solution to the Middle East issue, making Israel a safe country, to the benefit of both internationally recognized sides, and creating prerequisites for Palestine to establish a stable state,” he said. ...

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MANMOHAN SINGH, Prime Minister of India, said it was a time of “great uncertainty and profound change”, pointing to the global economic slowdown and unprecedented social and political upheaval in West Asia, the Gulf and North Africa. The unresolved Palestinian question was also a source of great instability and violence. India supported Palestine’s request for full United Nations membership. ...

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CARLOS GOMES JÚNIOR, Prime Minister of Guinea-Bissau, ...

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He then welcomed the Palestinian Authority’s decision to request recognition of the State of Palestine as a full member of the United Nations. ...

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RALPH E. GONSALVES, Prime Minister of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines, ...

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...His Government had no doubt that Palestine’s membership application would resuscitate the moribund negotiating process between it and Israel. ...

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NAVINCHANDRA RAMGOOLAM, Prime Minister of Mauritius, ...

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He looked forward to a more all-inclusive United Nations system that could effectively address issues of international security with the admission of Palestine as a Member State. The United Nations and the international community had a duty to restore to the Palestinian people their dignity and right to statehood and security, he said. He welcomed the statement by President Mahmoud Abbas that Palestine extended its hands to the Israeli government and Israeli people for peacemaking and for building cooperative relations between the States of Palestine and Israel. He also welcomed the emergence of South Sudan as an independent and sovereign State and its admission to the United Nations.

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WINSTON BALDWIN SPENCER, Prime Minister of Antigua and Barbuda, ... Turning to the Middle East, he recalled that last year, he had urged the implementation of the two-State solution, which would see Israel and Palestine living side by side in peace and security. Yet, that solution had not been realized. Fully supporting the two-State solution, he joined others that had recognized the State of Palestine, believing that such recognition would help create lasting stability in the region.

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FREUNDEL STUART, Prime Minister of Barbados, ...

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... Turning to the protracted Israel-Palestinian conflict, he said Israel had the right to exist and live in security. The Palestinians also had the right to their own sovereign State. It was time for the Holy Land to become a symbol not of humanity’s divisions, but of its unity. That state of affairs would only ensue when the “disgracefully long” wait of the Palestinians for a homeland was brought to an end.

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LAWRENCE GONZI, Prime Minister of Malta, ...

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... As the people of the Middle East and North Africa embarked on a path of freedom and prosperity, it was necessary to help fulfil the long-sought aspirations of the Palestinian people. The dramatic events unfolding in the Arab world made progress on the Israeli-Palestinian track even more urgent. “No effort should be spared” to bring both sides back to the negotiating table. Agreement on the parameters for negotiations would clearly be a step in the right direction. He fully supported the European Union’s efforts to make that happen. The conclusions of the European Union’s Foreign Affairs Council provided balanced parameters to resume talks.

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MOHAMED KAMEL ALI AMR, Minister of Foreign Affairs of Egypt, ...

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Turning to the question of Palestine, which remained unanswered after two full decades of fruitless negotiations, he said the world had witnessed another failure yesterday by the Quartet to come up with a balanced vision to achieve the goal that everyone knew and of which they all approved. It had become “totally absurd” to continue talking about a peace process while Israel continued to construct settlements on Palestinian territory in the West Bank, to alter the features of occupied East Jerusalem, to use violence against civilians and its blockade of Gaza. For its part, Egypt was, and would remain, committed to the goal of achieving a just and comprehensive peace. It would also continue its efforts to end Israeli occupation of the Occupied Palestinian Territory and to reach a solution on all final status issues in a specific, agreed upon and internationally guaranteed time frame.

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PEDRO PASSOS COELHO, Prime Minister of Portugal, ...

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... At the same time, Portugal hoped to see “success” characterize the Middle East peace process. After 60 years, there was no time left for advances and retreats, nor for the status quo or unilateral actions that were prejudicial to negotiations. His Government believed Europe had the opportunity to speak with one voice, to build bridges and to facilitate compromises in the context of the Quartet. “It should be clear that, as the creation of a Palestinian State is a promise to be honoured, so too the security of Israel must be firmly guaranteed by the international community,” he said, arguing that Palestine’s admission as a United Nations Member State must be the logical outcome of negotiations. He voiced Portugal’s support for granting Palestine strengthened status within the Organization.

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TUILAEPA SAILELE MALIELEGAOI, Prime Minister and Minister of Foreign Affairs of Samoa, ...

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... Welcoming South Sudan as the United Nations’ newest Member, he said that a year ago he had spoken of the hope that progress would come in the process to bring peace to the people of Israel and Palestine. The goal of a Palestinian nation living side by side with a secure Israel remained elusive. Direct negotiations must start. Solutions must be decided by the two parties and not imposed from the outside. Visionary leadership on both sides was needed. ...

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MELTEK SATO KILMAN LIVTUNVANU, Prime Minister of Vanuatu, said carrying out the general debate’s theme — the role of mediation in the settlement of disputes — would require all countries to be more creative and forward-looking. Settlement of disputes by peaceful means was central to the work of the United Nations, and he encouraged Israelis and Palestinians to continue peaceful negotiations towards a settlement that “will ensure regional and global stability”. ...

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DANNY PHILIP, Prime Minister of the Solomon Islands, ...

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Turning to the conflict in the Middle East, he said his country supported the work of the Quartet. Noting that two thirds of the United Nations Member States recognized the State of Palestine, he added that the international community must have the “strength and stamina” to act decisively and build on the two-State solution. ...

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LORD TU’IVAKANO, Prime Minister and Minister for Foreign Affairs of Tonga, ...

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Welcoming South Sudan as the newest United Nations Member, he said Tonga had long supported efforts to find a comprehensive, just and enduring peace in the Middle East. This was a moment of truth for those with genuine hope for a secure Israel and viable Palestine. ...

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GILBERT FOSSOUN HOUNGBO, Prime Minister of Togo, ...

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... Turning briefly to the situation in the Middle East, he urged similar peaceful negotiations to comprehensively settle the situation between Palestinians and Israelis.

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MICHAEL SPINDELEGGER, Vice-Chancellor and Federal Minister for European and International Affairs of Austria, ...

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Further, focus should be kept on the Middle East peace process. That region had taken centre stage this week at the Assembly, and the international community should build on trust and foster the belief among Israelis and Palestinians that a negotiated settlement could be achieved. That would entail a sustainable solution based on two States living side by side in a secure and peaceful neighbourhood within mutually recognized borders. “We have no choice but to return to direct negotiations between the two parties,” he said, voicing support for the Quartet’s statement of 23 September as a way forward with concrete timelines. “There is no time to lose,” he warned.

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JEAN ASSELBORN, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Foreign Affairs of Luxembourg, ...

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Turning to the Middle East, he said a solution to the Israeli-Palestinian conflict, which had poisoned the entire region, must be achieved through recognition of the right of both parties to live in a sovereign, viable State. Despite the hope raised last year by the United States President, there had been neither a stop to the illegal construction of settlements nor a lifting of the embargo on the Gaza Strip. He could only hope that the appeal by Palestinian Authority President Mahmoud Abbas for recognition of his people’s right to a State would be heard.

But such an appeal on its own would not suffice, he said, stressing that direct negotiations between the parties must restart as soon as possible. He also fully supported the proposal made yesterday by the Quartet for a strict timetable of not more than a year to reach a comprehensive agreement. ...

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STEVEN VANACKERE, Deputy Prime Minister and Minister for Foreign Affairs and Institutional Reforms of Belgium, ...

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In the Middle East, he said, it was not acceptable that no solution had yet been reached to the long-standing conflict. The parameters of a sustainable solution were well known. Both the Palestinian and Israeli people had legitimate aspirations, and it must be possible to satisfy both legitimate needs. Over the past few months, the European Union had spared no efforts to start the negotiation process. “There is no alternative to negotiations, however risky this path might be,” he stressed. It was his sincere hope, therefore, that the steps proposed by the Quartet the previous day would be fully implemented. It could not be ignored that the Palestinian Authority had successfully progressed on the road to statehood.

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TRINIDAD JIMÉNEZ GARCÍA-HERRERA, Minister for Foreign Affairs and Cooperation of Spain, ...

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... The recent revolutions and uprisings had deep consequences, including for Palestinians, whose legitimate aspiration to enjoy freedom could not be left aside in the wave of change. The Assembly’s sixty-sixth session could be remembered as the one in which non-member Observer State status was granted to Palestine, a decision that Spain could support, as a solution to the Palestinian-Israeli conflict required the existence of two States — Israeli and Palestinian — living side by side in peace in security. Indeed, after more than 60 years of conflict, the global community should send a clear signal to Palestinians underlining its desire to see the creation of a Palestinian State. Palestinians could find in that new status a stimulus for the prompt resumption of negotiations.

While Spain had always given political, economic and moral support to the Palestinians, its relations with the Jewish people dated back centuries. “Spain’s identity cannot be understood without its Arab and Jewish heritage,” she said, underlining its commitment to Israel, a country that had suffered from terrorism against its civilians. Israel’s security was essential and the best way to preserve it was through a peace treaty that included the establishment of a Palestinian State along 1967 lines, with agreed swaps and Jerusalem as a shared capital. While some had raised concern that new democracies could provide grounds for political groups with extremist ideologies, she said democracy was an open and fair system of political participation which must be able to defend itself from such threats. The Alliance of Civilizations, which promoted intercultural dialogue and cooperation, could help prevent such situations.

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For information media • not an official record

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