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UNITED
NATIONS
A

        General Assembly
Distr.
GENERAL
A/45/84
26 January 1990

ORIGINAL: ENGLISH

Forty-fifth session


REPORT OF THE SPECIAL COMMITTEE TO INVESTIGATE ISRAELI PRACTICES
AFFECTING THE HUMAN RIGHTS OF THE PALESTINIAN PEOPLE
AND OTHER ARABS OF THE OCCUPIED TERRITORIES
Note by the Secretary-General


The Secretary-General has the honour to transmit to the members of the General Assembly the attached periodic report covering the period from 25 August to 30 November 1989, which was submitted to him, in accordance with paragraphs 20 and 21 of Assembly resolution 44/48 A of 8 December 1989, by the Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices Affecting the Human Rights of the Population of the Occupied Territories.

CONTENTS

Paragraphs
Page
LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL
4
I.
II.
INTRODUCTION
INFORMATION RECEIVED BY THE SPECIAL COMMITTEE
1 - 2
3 - 295
5
5
A.General situation
3 - 105
5
1.
2.
General developments and policy statements
Incidents linked with the uprising of the Palestinian population against the occupation
(a) List of Palestinians killed by troops of Israeli civilians
(b) List of other Palestinians killed
(c) Other incidents linked with the uprising
3 - 19
20 - 105
..
20
20
21 - 105
5
9
..
10
22
31
B.Administration of justice, including the right to fair trial
106 - 159
43
1.
2.
Palestinian population
Israelis
106 - 146
147 - 159
43
48
C.Treatment of civilians
160 - 268
51
1.General developments
160 - 240
51
(a)
(b)
(c)
Harassment and physical ill-treatment
Collective punishment
Expulsions
160 - 170
171 - 236
237 - 240
51
53
60
2.Measures affecting certain fundamental freedoms
241 - 265
61
(a)
(b)
(c)
(d)
Freedom of movement
Freedom of expression
Freedom of association
Freedom of education
241 - 249
250 - 254
255
256 - 265
61
62
63
63
3.Settlers' activities affecting the civilian population
266 - 268
64
D.
E.
F.
Treatment of detainees
Annexation and settlements
Information concerning the occupied Syrian Arab Golan
269 - 283
284 - 294
295
65
67
69



LETTER OF TRANSMITTAL
10 January 1990

Sir,

The Special Committee to Investigate Israeli Practices Affecting the Human Rights of the Population of the Occupied Territories has the honour to transmit to you herewith, in accordance with paragraphs 20 and 21 of General Assembly resolution 44/48 A, a periodic report updating information contained in the twenty-first report, which it adopted and presented to you on 25 August 1989 (A/44/599). The present periodic report has been prepared in order to bring to your attention, and to the attention of the General Assembly, updated information on the human rights situation in the occupied territories.

The present periodic report covers the period from 25 August 1989, the date of the adoption of the twenty-first report, to 30 November 1989. It is based on written information gathered from various sources among which the Special Committee has selected relevant excerpts and summaries, which are reflected in the report.

Accept, Sir, on behalf of my colleagues and on my own behalf, the assurances of our highest consideration.

Daya R. PERERA
Chairman of the Special Committee to
Investigate Israeli Practices Affecting
the Human Rights of the Population
of the Occupied Territories

His Excellency
Mr. Javier Pérez de Cuéllar
Secretary-General of the United Nations
New York



I. INTRODUCTION

1. By its resolution 44/48 A of 8 December 1989, the General Assembly
2. The Special Committee held a series of meetings from 8 to 10 January 1990. At these meetings, the Special Committee examined information and communications on developments in the occupied territories between 25 August and 30 November 1989. The Special Committee also heard the testimony of persons who had been expelled from the occupied territories and who provided information on their own experiences and on the human rights situation in those territories. The Special Committee also examined the present report, which it adopted on 10 January 1990.

II. INFORMATION RECEIVED BY THE SPECIAL COMMITTEE


A. General situation

1. General developments and policy statements


3. On 28 August 1989, it was reported that 644 Palestinians were killed since the beginning or the uprising. (Al-Fajr, 28 August 1989)

4. On 28 August 1989, it was reported that, as at 1 September 1989, the Israel Defence Forces (IDF) would appoint a chief military prosecutor in the territories. This was reportedly a new post, whose creation was decided by the Judge Advocate-General's office following the setting up of military courts of appeals in the territories. R/S (Major) Yaron Levy would be appointed to the new post. (Ha'aretz, 29 August 1989)

5. On 30 August 1989, Al Hamishmar and Ma'ariv reported that the IDF were creating special units called "occupied territories units". Soldiers were encouraged to join this unit instead of serving in the border guards corps. Yediot Aharonot added in its 31 August issue that 8 per cent of the IDF was presently in the occupied territories to curb the uprising, i.e. about 13,600 soldiers according to the Strategic Studies Institute in Tel Aviv. (Al-Tali'ah, 7 September 1989)

6. On 31 August 1989, it was reported that since the appointment of Yitzhak Mordekhai as the new Central Region Commander, on 4 August 1989, 254 Palestinian villages were raided according to the policy of "attacking all locations showing a sign of intifadah". Villages located away from main roads were no more spared. This policy had resulted in the injury of 1,434 persons and 34 deaths, including 15 children under 16. Thirty-four houses were also demolished and 122 released prisoners were given "green identity cards", which bars them from entering Israel or travelling abroad. Radio Israel was reported to have said that MK Dedi Zucker sent a note to the Israeli Defence Minister, Yitzhak Rabin, about the existence of a "collaborators' cell". He said that the cell, operating from Yabud, organized raids by night against Palestinian residents. These attacks were carried out under the protection of the IDF. (Al-Tali'ah, 31 August 1989)

7. On 1 September 1989, it was reported that since the appointment of Aluf (Major-General) Matan Vilnay as the new Southern Region commander, two months earlier, there was a sharp increase in the number of casualties (dead and wounded) in the Gaza Strip. According to IDF sources, 12 Gaza Strip residents were tilled by IDF personnel in July and 160 were injured. The data for August were 14 killed and 135 injured. These figures were approximately twice as high as those for the two months preceding Aluf Vilnay's appointment. According to Arab sources, 29 Gaza residents were killed in July and August, and 400 were injured. These figures did not include killings of suspected collaborators. (Ha'aretz, 1 September 1989)

8. On 3 September 1989, a source in the Defence Ministry told reporters that, according to their statistics, among the suspected collaborators killed by Palestinians since the beginning of the uprising nearly 80 per cent were killed in 1989. (Ha'aretz, 4 September 1989; Jerusalem Post, 3 September 1989)

9. On 5 September 1989, Chief of Staff Dan Shomron told the Knesset Foreign Affairs and Defence Committee that since the beginning of the uprising troops had killed 469 Palestinians and a further 21 deaths were "unclear". Another 100 Arabs were killed by fellow Palestinians for alleged collaboration. No figures were given regarding Arabs killed by Israeli civilians. The Chief of Staff further told the Committee that security forces were hunting 700 Palestinians, many of the masked assailants, believed to be the hard core of the uprising. The wanted men were members of strike committees who attacked other Arabs for suspected collaboration and distributed leaflets with orders from the uprising's leaders. Shomron also reported that the civil administration had issued 65,000 identity cards to residents of the territories and that about 2,000 had been seized by masked youths in the Gaza Strip. (Jerusalem Post, 6 September 1989)

10. On 12 September 1989, Chief of Staff Dan Shomron sent IDF soldiers serving in the West Bank and Gaza a letter in which they were told not to use force as a means of punishment and to refrain from abusing suspects or from intentionally inflicting serious injuries. Force may be used to break up a violent demonstration, to overcome resistance to arrest and during pursuit after rioters and suspects, within the context of the time and place of a violent incident, but not after such a mission has been achieved. "In any situation where force is used, one must take care to use reasonable force. One should avoid, as much as possible, hitting a person on the head or any other sensitive part of the body". Soldiers were ordered to behave respectfully towards representatives of the Red Cross and other official bodies, and to allow them to function, within the law, without hindrance. In any event, ambulances and other medical personnel should not be unnecessarily delayed, nor should the administering of medical care to injured people be hindered. In a related development, it was reported on 14 September 1989 that the IDF had issued new open-fire orders to soldiers serving in the territories. Under the new order masked individuals are considered as suspects who can be shot at with live
ammunition even if they are unarmed. Previously only masked persons armed with knives, axes, metal bars and other weapons were considered automatically to be suspects. (Ha'aretz, 13 September 1989, Jerusalem Post, 13 and 14 September 1989)

11. On 20 September 1989, Defence for Children International (DCI), an international non-governmental organization, reported that, since the beginning of the uprising, 126 children under the age of 16 had been killed: 121 by gunfire, 3 when objects exploded in their hands, one by being fatally beaten and one by being thrown off a moving jeep. Speaking at a press conference, Dr. Menahem Horovitz, Chairman of the Israel branch of DCI, also drew attention to the increasing proportion of children among the casualties which passed from 15-20 per cent up to the beginning of 1989, to 28 per cent in the first six months of 1989. In August 1989, 46 per cent of the dead in the territories were children. It was also reported that the proportion of infants (aged 0 to 12) among the casualties was rising sharply. In 1988 it was 5-6 per cent of the casualties, and in 1989 it reached 11.5 per cent. In the first 19 days of September 1989, 18 people were killed in the territories, including six children under 16. Regarding prison conditions of minors from the territories, it was alleged that gaols were overcrowded and that children were subjected to strong pressure during their interrogation. On 21 September 1989, the Judge Advocate-General T/A (Brigadier-General) Amnon Strashnow ordered the military police to give top priority to the investigation of cases involving death of children in the territories. (Ha'aretz, 21 September 19891; Jerusalem Post, 21 and 22 September 1989)

12. On 25 September 1989, the Justice Minister, Dan Meridor, said in an interview that collective punishment measures such as the demolition of homes and curfews were not desirable, but sometimes there was no other choice. He described the Palestinian uprising as a war that Israel had to win and added that during a period of war a greater deterrence was needed. (Jerusalem Post, 26 September 1989)

13. On 28 September 1989, the Islamic movement Hamas was declared an illegal organization in the West Bank, Gaza Strip and Israel. Anyone "who continued to be a member of Hamas, rendered it a service or participated in any of its meetings would be subject to detention and prosecution. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 29 September 1989; Al-Fajr, 2 October 1989)

14. On 17 October 1989, a report by the Israeli human rights body Betzelem affirmed that, since the beginning of the uprising in December 1987, 125 Palestinian children under 16 were killed. According to one of the spokesmen for the organization, the stiffest penalty imposed on an Israeli soldier following the killing of a Palestinian child was two months in gaol with six-month suspended term. It was also reported by the same source that 20 Palestinians had been shot dead by the IDF in the first 2 weeks of October, the largest number of fatalities in the fortnight since the uprising began. Fifteen were killed in the West Bank and five in the Gaza Strip. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 17 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 23 October 1989)

15. On 18 October 1989, the IDF Judge Advocate-General. Amnon Strashnow, said that soldiers in the territories were now allowed to fire live ammunition at the legs of masked youths if they ignored calls to halt, and warning shots in the air. He added that the new rules were not "a licence to kill". Strashnow said that the new rules had been approved by the Justice Ministry. In another matter, he rejected charges that he had been negligent in prosecuting senior officers for abuses in the territories, while lower-ranking soldiers were put on trial. He said that since the beginning of the uprising 86 soldiers and officers had been put on trial for offences such as causing death, violating open-fire orders, assaults and damaging property. Another 500 to 600 soldiers had been summoned to disciplinary hearings for less serious offences. In 25 per cent of cases involving the killing of Palestinian children, charge-sheets had been submitted to military courts. Referring to the number of Palestinian detainees, Strashnow said that since the beginning of the uprising over 40,000 Palestinians had been arrested, including 8,400 in administrative detention. About 600 of the latter had their detention extended for various periods. Currently, there were 1,889 Palestinians in administrative detention. About one third of the appeals against administrative detention orders had been accepted, resulting in releases or reduction of prison terms. At present there were 9,600 Palestinian prisoners in IDF gaols and 4,000 convicts in Prison Service gaols. As regards the newly established military appeals court, 78 appeals had so far been lodged. Some 25 cases had been heard: 15 defence appeals and 7 prosecution appeals had been accepted. Three were rejected. (Jerusalem Post, 19 October 1989)

16. On 30 October 1989, the number of Palestinians killed since the beginning of the uprising reached 706, according to Arab sources. (Al-Fajr, 30 October 1989)

17. On 2 November 1989, data gathered by the Betzelem Information Centre for Human Rights in the Territories were published on casualties in the territories during the month of October 1989. According to these data, 30 Palestinians were killed by security forces during that period: one was shot dead. probably by an Israeli civilian, two were killed by collaborators and one died when he fell from a roof during a chase by troops. Five of those killed were minors, including three under 12, all from the Gaza Strip. Twenty-four of those killed were aged 17 to 24. In 13 of the cases those killed were reported to be masked or to be in the company of masked people. Since the beginning of the uprising until 31 August 1989, 593 Palestinians were killed in the territories by troops or Israeli civilians. Some 559 of them were killed as a result of gun shots, including by rubber and plastic bullets. Thirty-four were killed as a result of beating or burns. During the same period 19 Israelis were killed in the territories: 8 IDF soldiers and 11 civilians, including 3 children. According to Associated Press, 138 Palestinians were killed for alleged collaboration since the beginning of the uprising until the end or October 1989. According to Palestinian sources 25 pregnant women had a miscarriage during October 1989 as a result of inhaling tear-gas. Some 1,602 Gaza Strip residents were reportedly injured during that month from tear-gas, live ammunition, rubber or plastic bullets and beatings. Some 500 charge sheets were filed, of which 225 were tried and led to convictions and prison sentences ranging from 8 months to 10 years. (Ha'aretz, 2 November 1989)

18. On 2 November 1989, it was reported that the Central Region Commander, Yitzhak Mordekhai, had decided that an IDF reserve company made up of settlers would serve in Hebron shortly. The decision was reportedly approved by Defence Minister Rabin, and it followed a period of six years in which no units made up of settlers served in the territories, following clashes between them and local residents. The company concerned belonged to regional defence units whole members came from settlements in the Ramallah area. It was decided that they would not serve in the immediate vicinity of their homes. According to one report, the settlers would not be sent to the Hebron area but to the Jericho area, considered an easy area from the viewpoint of operational activity. On 3 November 1989, an official military source said that the decision was still being examined at the top echelons of the IDF and the Defence Ministry. On 9 November 1989, it was reported that the decision was suspended, following sharp public criticism, but it was also reported that the settlers' company was called up and sent to the Jericho area, which was the "quietest, as far as the uprising was concerned". (Ha'aretz, 2, 3 and 9 November 1989; Jerusalem Post, 2 November 1989)

19. On 9 November 1989, the Co-ordinator of activities in the territories, Shmuel Goren, accused the United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) operating in the territories of overriding its mandate, by trying to interfere with the activity of the IDF. He said that UNRWA employees were following IDF patrols and added that it was inadmissible. He said that the army had decided to file a complaint through the Foreign Ministry. An unofficial UNRWA source dismissed the allegations and said the agency was carrying out its tasks in the territories in accordance with its mandate. The source added that troops were confronting UNRWA employees who were trying to help to achieve calm in the refugee camps. (Ha'aretz, 10 November 1989)

2. Incidents linked with the uprising of the Palestinian population against the occupation

20. The following tables provide details concerning Palestinians killed between 25 August and 30 November 1989 in the occupied territories and the circumstances of their death as reported in various newspapers. The following abbreviations of the names of newspapers are used in the tables:

AF - Al-Fajr

AT - Al-Tali'ah

H - Ha'aretz

JP - Jerusalem Post


(a) List of Palestinians killed by troops or Israeli civilians


Date
Name and age
Place or residence
Remarks and source
26 Aug. 1989Samah Ajaj (17)Deir al-Sudan,
near Ramallah
Killed by an IDF officer during a clash.
(H, JP, 27 Aug. 1989)
27 Aug. 1989Bassel Khaled Salman (21)Beit Safafa,
East Jerusalem
Killed by policemen during a clash. The police opened an inquiry.
(H, 28 Aug. 1989; AT, 31 Aug. 1989; AF, 4 Sept. 1989)
28 Aug. 1989Jamal Nimer Abu Safaka (58)TulkarmKilled by troops after he was seen holding a metal bar.
(H, 29, 30 Aug. 1989)
28 Aug. 1989Ali Sha'aban Mahmud (20)Jabaliya, GazaDied in hospital of wounds sustained during a clash three days earlier. (H, JP, 29 Aug. 1989; AT, 31 Aug. 1989; AF, 4 Aug. 1989)
28 Aug. 1989Bayiha Najar Nawaj'a (32)HebronKilled in the centre of Hebron, allegedly by Israeli settlers, in unclear circumstances. (H, 29 Aug. 1989)
29 Aug. 1989Ibrahim Abu Zayed (27)
(or Abu Jiyyad)
Deir el-BalahKilled by troops during a clash. Was a leader of the Shabiba movement. (H, JP, 30 Aug. 1989)
30 Aug. 1989Ahmed Abdallah al-Agha (19)Khan YounisDied of injuried after being allegedly beaten by border policemen on 27 Aug. 1989. The IDF was investigating the case. (H, JP, 1 Sept. 1989; AF, 4 Sept. 1989; AT, 7 Sept. 1989)
2 Sept. 1989Amer Kalbuna (19) and Iman Jamus (24)NablusBoth were killed during an IDF raid on a house in Nablus in which a cell of five wanted men were hiding. Both were suspected of several serious offences, including murder of Israelis and Palestinians. (H, JP, 3 Sept. 1989)
2 Sept. 1989Mona Ibrahim al-Taman (14)NablusShot and killed by troops during severe rioting following the above-mentioned raid. (H, JP, Sept. 1989; AT, 7 Sept. 1989; AF, 11 Sept. 1989)
2 Sept. 1989Mustafa Taher al-Dabar
(37)
Kadura, RamallahDied in hospital of injuries sustained one week earlier when his car was hit by a rock, allegedly thrown by settlers of the Etzion Bloc. (H, 3 Sept. 1989)
5 Sept. 1989Ahmed al Batir (12 or 16)Khan Younis campDied in hospital of injuries sustained on 30 Aug. 1989 when he was shot by troops during a clash. (H, JP, 6 Sept. 1989; AT, 7 Sept. 1989; AF, 11 Sept. 1989)
7 Sept. 1989Abd al-Latif Kassem (14)Akaba, near JeninKilled by troops during a clash. (H, JP, 8 Sept. 1989; AF, 11 Sept. 1989)
8 Sept. 1989Akram Zaki Hamdan (11)Khan YounisKilled by troops during a clash. (H, JP, 10 Sept. 1989; AF, 11 Sept. 1989)
10 Sept. 1989Samer Rumaneh (19)NablusWas shot by troops, allegedly as he was trying to throw a petrol bomb. (H, JP, 11 Sept. 1989; AF, 18 Sept. 1989)
10 Sept. 1989Muhamad Salim Shorab (17)Khan YounisWas killed by two bullets in the stomach, probably by civilians. (H, JP, 11 Sept. 1989; AF, 18 Sept. 1989)
10 Sept. 1989Atallah al-Mashwakhi (20)RafahKilled by troops during clashes. (H, JP, 11 Sept. 1989)
10 Sept. 1989Maher Ahmed Kassem Khaliliya (19)Jaba', near JeninKilled by troops during clashes. (H, JP, 11 Sept. 1989; AF, 18 Sept. 1989)
10 Sept. 1989Muhammad Ahmed Saba'na (17)Kabatiya, near JeninKilled by troops during clashes. (H, JP, 11 Sept. 1989; AF, 18 Sept. 1989)
10 Sept. 1989Zuheir Abd el-Karim Obeid (28) and Fahed Shtawi (20)Kadum, east of KalkilyaBoth were shot and killed by troops during a raid on the village. (H, JP, 12 Sept. 1989)
14 Sept. 1989Mohammed Arafat al-AgraDeir el-Balah refugee campThis wanted man was shot by Israeli soldiers from a special unit at his home. (AF, 19 Sept. 1989)
15 Sept. 1989Tarek Tufah (12)NablusShot in unclear circumstances while he was walking in the street. The shooting followed stone-throwing incidents. (H, JP, 17 Sept. 1989)
15 Sept. 1989Attah Yunis Shehadeh (19)NablusShot by troops during Tufah's funeral. (H, JP, 17 Sept. 1989; AF, 18 Sept. 1989)
16 Sept. 1989Samir Mahmud al-Aghbar (45)NablusShot by troops while he was trying to prevent troops from beating his son. (H, JP, 17 Sept. 1989; AF, 25 Sept. 1989)
16 Sept. 1989Bassam Yussuf Abu Tamam (18)Tulkarm campShot by troops during clashes. (H, JP, 17 Sept. 1989; AF, 25 Sept. 1989)
19 Sept. 1989Jaber Ahmad Mansur (21)Daraj, GazaShot by troops while he was inside a mosque, following stone throwing at the patrol cars. (H, JP, 20 Sept. 1989; AF, 25 Sept. 1989)
24 Sept. 1989Bassam Faruk al-Jabari (18)Khan YounisShot by troops during a clash. (JP, 25 Sept. 1989; AF, 2 Oct. 1989)
28 Sept. 1989Bilal Inab (20)NablusShot by troops during a clash. (H, JP, 29 Sept. 1989)
30 Sept. 1989Abdallah Muhammad Rabai'a (27)Maithalun, near JeninShot by troops during a clash. (H, JP, 2 Oct. 1989)
30 Sept. 1989Silham Mabrukah (17)NablusShot by troops after a patrol was ambushed in the casbah. (H, JP, 2 Oct. 1989)
1 Oct. 1989Iyadal Haraz (17) (or Imad)NablusKilled by troops during a clash. (H, JP, 2 Oct. 1989)
1 Oct. 1989Muhammad Khalil Abu Ziad (17)Arrabeh, near JeninKilled by troops during a clash. (H, JP, 2 Oct. 1989; AF, 9 Oct. 1989)
1 Oct. 1989Khalil Zreineh al-Ik (32)Aida camp, near BethlehemKilled by troops during a clash. (H, JP, 2 Oct. 1989; AF, 9 Oct. 1989)
1 Oct. 1989Nidal (or Nabil) Sadam (17)Nuseirat, GazaAccording to Palestinian sources, was killed by troops as he was fleeing from a clash. Military sources said he was shot as he was trying to throw a large rock at a soldier. (H, JP, 2 Oct. 1989; AF, 9 Oct. 1989)
2 Oct. 1989Mahmud Odeh (22)His body was discovered in the village of Tammun, near Nablus. Odeh, who was stabbed, had been sought by Israeli military authorities for a long time. (AF, 9 Oct. 1989)
4 Oct. 1989Maher Mahmud al-Makadma (18)Bureij camp, GazaWas killed by troops, who opened fire at masked youths painting slogans. (H, JP, 5 Oct. 1989; AF, 9 Oct. 1989)
4 Oct. 1989Mahmud Abu Shamla (22)Bureij camp, GazaKilled by troops during clashes that erupted following al-Makadma's death. (H, JP, 5 Oct. 1989; AF, 9 Oct. 1989)
5 Oct. 1989Khaled Abu Id (20)Bidu, near JerusalemKilled by troops during a clash. According to Palestinian sources he was shot in the heart from a distance of two metres when soldiers opened fire at youths manning a barricade. (H, JP, 6 Oct. 1989; AF, 9 Oct. 1989)
6 Oct. 1989Muhammad al-Shami (17)Batir, near JerusalemDied of injuries sustained the previous day during a clash. (H, JP, 8 Oct. 1989; AF, 9 Oct. 1989)
8 Oct. 1989Nidal al-Habash (22)NablusKilled by troops when masked youths defied a curfew and incited others to demonstrate. On 25 Oct. 1989, it was reported that an Israeli-Palestinian doctors' human rights group charged that he was shot dead from a short distance, after he was wounded and could not escape, and that the troops prevented an ambulance from evacuating him. The IDF affirmed that the shooting was carried out according to the rules. (H, 10, 25 Oct. 1989; AF, 16 Oct. 1989)
9 Oct. 1989Ghassan Saadi al-Hudhud (32)NablusKilled by troops during a clash with masked men. (H, JP, 10 Oct. 1989; AF, 16 Oct. 1989)
9 Oct. 1989Ahmed Abd el-Fatah Sarawan (75)NablusDied after a tear-gas canister landed at the entrance of his home, following clashes. Suffered from asthma. (H, JP, 10 Oct. 1989; AF, 16 Oct. 1989)
12 Oct. 1989Yassin al-MasriAskar campKilled by troops during heavy clashes. (H, JP, 13 Oct. 1989; AF, 16 Oct. 1989)
12 Oct. 1989Omar al-Kaddumi (17)NablusKilled by troops during a chase after stone-throwing masked youths. (H, JP, 13 Oct. 1989; AF, 16 Oct. 1989)
12 Oct. 1989Mujahed Shihdeh (20)Jenin campKilled by border policemen after he allegedly tried to hurl a block at them. According to reports, he was masked and was wearing a black uniform. (H, JP, 13 Oct. 1989; AF, 16 Oct. 1989)
12 Oct. 1989Abdallah Taha (17)Beit Sira, near RamallahKilled by troops during a clash. IDF sources said soldiers had not been in the village at the time of the shooting. (H, JP, 13 Oct. 1989; AF, 16 Oct. 1989)
12 Oct. 1989Ali Mattar (21)Shati, GazaKilled by troops during a clash in Sheikh Radwan neighbourhood. (H, JP, 13 Oct. 1989; AF, 16 Oct. 1989)
12 Oct. 1989Abdallah Mustafa Abu Safia (17)Beit Sira, near RamallahAccording to Arab sources, was killed by a settler who opened fire at stone throwers. (H, 15 Oct. 1989)
13 Oct. 1989Salah Jamil Jawaresh (21) and Azmi Fathi Mahmud Abu Diab (18)Beit Jala
Kalkilya
Killed by troops who opened fire at masked youths who were allegedly trying to incite the population. According to Palestinian sources, the two were shot and killed from a short distance, when they failed to stop, as ordered by the troops. (H, JP, 15 Oct. 1989; AF, 16 Oct. 1989)
14 Oct. 1989Radwan Kawasme (18)HebronKilled by troops who, according to Palestinian sources, shot him at short range after he was wounded. (JP, 16 Oct. 1989; AF, 23 Oct. 1989)
15 Oct. 1989Attiya al-Firyani (3) (or al-Ghorani)Shati campDied in hospital after he was hot in the head two days earlier. An inquiry was under way to establish whether troops were involved in the shooting. (H, JP, 16 Oct. 1989; AF, 23 Oct. 1989)
16 Oct. 1989Bassam Abdallah Abu Labade (8)Khan YounisDied in hospital of injuries sustained on 13 Oct. 1989 during clashes with troops. The case was being investigated. (H, 17 Oct. 1989; AF, 23 Oct. 1989)
20 Oct. 1989Nidal Suleiman Hajaj (18)Sajai'ya, GazaKilled when troops opened fire at masked youths who failed to stop when ordered to do so. (According to one source, was killed while he was writing graffiti on a wall.) (H, JP, 22 Oct. 1989; AF, 23 Oct. 1989)
20 Oct. 1989Iyad Tawfik al-Azi (17)Khan YounisKilled when he allegedly tried to snatch a gun from a soldier. (H, JP, 22 Oct. 1989; AF, 23 Oct. 1989)
22 Oct. 1989Sana Abu Zaina (16)Bal'a village, near NablusKilled when troops raided the village. (AF, H, JP, 23 Oct. 1989)
22 Oct. 1989Sami Abu Laila (18)NablusDied in hospital of injuries sustained the previous day during a clash. (H, JP, 23 Oct. 1989; AF, 30 Oct. 1989)
23 Oct. 1989Muhammad Abu Libdeh (19)Tulkarm campKilled by troops during a clash. (H, JP, 24 Oct. 1989; AF, 30 Oct. 1989)
24 Oct. 1989Diya Zahi Abu HayaKhirbet Abu Falah, near RamallahKilled by troops during a clash, when an IDF force carried out a raid in the village. (H, JP, 25 Oct. 1989; AF, 30 Oct. 1989)
24 Oct. 1989Atallah Abu Araj (12)Deir el-Balah, GazaDied in hospital of wounds sustained on 19 Oct. 1989 during a clash with troops. (H, JP, 25 Oct. 1989; AF, 30 Oct. 1989)
26 Oct. 1989Adel Mahmud Abu Salim (19)Jabaliya, GazaKilled by troops who opened fire at masked youths. According to Arab sources four soldiers in civilian clothes had entered the camp in a civilian car and opened fire at the youths, killing one and injuring another. (H, JP, 27 Oct. 1989; AF, 30 Oct. 1989)
26 Oct. 1989Karim Da'amseh (18)Al-KhaderKilled by policemen during a car chase in Beit Jala after he failed to obey an order to stop. According to an eyewitness, a policeman shot the youth at point-blank after he surrendered. The police opened an inquiry. (H, JP, 27 Oct. 1989; AF, 30 Oct. 1989)
28 Oct. 1989Jihad al-Ghneimat (18)Surif, near HebronKilled by troops during a clash, when the troops carried out a raid. (H, JP, 29 Oct. 1989; AF, 6 Nov. 1989)
28 Oct. 1989Muhammad Mahmud Zalat (22)TulkarmDied in hospital of injuries sustained the previous day when he fell off a roof as he was being chased by troops, after a stone-throwing incident. (H, JP, 29 Oct. 1989; AF, 6 Nov. 1989)
30 Oct. 1989Hassan Zahran (25)Far'a campDied in hospital of injuries sustained earlier during a clash. (H, JP, 31 Oct. 1989; AF, 6 Nov. 1989)
2 Nov. 1989Nasser Halim Sweiti (18)Beit Awa, near HebronKilled by troops as he was setting fire to tyres while masked. (H, JP, 3 Nov. 1989)
2 Nov. 1989Hawda Ali Salam al-Dib (28)Jabaliya campAccording to Arab sources, he was hit by a military jeep. The case was under investigation. (H, 3 Nov. 1989)
5 Nov. 1989Mufid Muhammad Jamil Hizboun (20)JeninDied in hospital of wounds sustained on 3 Nov. 1989 when he had been shot by soldiers. He had been wanted by security forces since July 1988. (H, JP, 6 Nov. 1989)
6 Nov. 1989Wa'el al-Haj Hassan (20)KalkilyaKilled by troops as he was trying to cross the border into Jordan. Had been wanted by the security forces since the beginning of the uprising. (H, JP, 7 Nov. 1989)
7 Nov. 1989Mu'awiya al-Haj Hassan (13)KalkilyaShot by border police during heavy clashes. Was the cousin of the youth killed the day earlier. (H, JP, 8 Nov. 1989)
9 Nov. 1989Iman Muhsein Said Ruzeh (23)NablusShot by troops during a raid on a house in which six members of a cell calling itself the Red Eagle, and affiliated with the PFLP, were hiding. Was the leader of the cell. (H, JP, 10 Nov. 1989)
9 Nov. 1989Raja al-Lidawi (25)NablusKilled by troops during heavy clashes that broke out following the raid and capture of members of the Red Eagle cell. (H, JP, 10 Nov. 1989)
14 Nov. 1989Odeh ZayidKalandiyaKilled by troops after he defied a curfew. (H, JP, 15 Nov. 1989)
14 Nov. 1989Manwa Bakri (48)NablusDied in hospital of wounds sustained on 9 Sept. 1989 when she was shot by troops. According to Arab sources, she was hit by a bullet inside her home when soldiers in a look-out post opened fire during a curfew. (H, JP, 15 Nov. 1989)
14 Nov. 1989Nasr Hamad (17)Kalandia campWas shot in the same incident as Odeh Zayid. His body was found near the camp on 17 Nov. 1989. (H, JP, 19 Nov. 1989)
18 Nov. 1989Issa Sbeih (29)Al-Khader, near BethlehemDied in hospital of wounds sustained on 24 Oct. 1989 when his car was stoned, apparently by passengers of an Israeli bus, on the Jerusalem-Hebron road. (H, JP, 19 Nov. 1989)
23 Nov. 1989Muhyi Nazi Mahmud Hassuna (21)Beit Imrin, near NablusKilled by troops who shot him after a stone-throwing clash.
(H, JP, 24 Nov. 1989)
27 Nov. 1989Bassam al-Sha'ir (21)RafahDied in hospital (in Cairo) of wounds sustained on 23 April 1989 during a clash with troops. (JP, 28 Nov. 1989)
29 Nov. 1989Nader Hamoudi (19) and Samir HamoudiAl-Ram, north of JerusalemTwo brothers. Killed by troops after they stoned cars on the Jerusalem-Ramallah road. Both wore masks during the incident.
(H, JP, 30 Nov. 1989)
(b) List of other Palestinians killed
Date
Name and age
Place or residence
Remarks and source
26 Aug. 1989Assem Abd Darwish al-Thayem (26)KalkilyaKilled by unidentified masked men after being kidnapped, interrogated and beaten. Had a reputation for being a collaborator. (H, JP, 27 Aug. 1989)
28 Aug. 1989Ragheb al-Kasas (55)NablusDied in hospital after being beaten by masked Palestinians. Was a suspected collaborator. (H, JP, 29 Aug. 1989)
29 Aug. 1989Hussein Barahna (40) (or Hillal)JerichoDied in hospital after unidentified assailants threw a petrol bomb at him and beat him, for alleged collaboration. (H, JP 30 Aug. 1989)
30 Aug. 1989Burhan Izat al-Badawi (34)AwartaKilled by unidentified assailants. His body was found in a vegetable cart in the Nablus market. The cause of the murder was alleged collaboration. (H, JP, 1 Sept. 1989)
1 Sept. 1989Muhammad Bulbul (38)RafahKilled by unidentified assailants who attacked him with knives and axes. Was suspected of collaboration. (H, JP, 3 Sept. 1989)
1 Sept. 1989Jamal Othman Saleh KhakenGazaWas murdered in Ketziot detention camp by fellow inmates, for alleged collaboration. Was Abu Iyad's cousin. (H, JP, 3 Sept. 1989)
1 Sept. 1989Muhammad Hirshi (45)Kaffin, near TulkarmKilled in unclear circumstances. Was suspected of collaboration.
(H, JP, 3 Sept. 1989)
2 Sept. 1989Abd al-Rahman Abu Shuluf (37)Rafah campShot and killed by unidentified assailants, for alleged collaboration. (H, JP, 3 Sept. 1989)
3 Sept. 1989Riad Abus Salam Nasrallah (30)Daraj, GazaBeaten to death by four masked youths, for alleged collaboration. (H, JP, 4 Sept. 1989)
3 Sept. 1989Naim Afana (28)RafahKilled by masked people for alleged collaboration. (H, JP, 6 Sept. 1989)
7 Sept. 1989Jasser al-Kirnawi (24)Al-Mughazi, GazaHis body was found in a dry well after he had been missing for three weeks. Four Arab suspects were arrested. (H, JP, 10 Sept. 1989)
7 Sept. 1989Nu'man Abu Sa'alub (30)RafahWas suspected of collaboration. His body was brought to hospital with bruises and cigarette burns. (H, JP, 10 Sept. 1989)
9 Sept. 1989Yussuf Milhem (45)KalkilyaWas the Kalkilya municipal secretary. Was shot and killed by two masked assailants. Was suspected of collaboration. (H, JP, 10 Sept. 1989)
10 Sept. 1989Mustafa Afana (28)Al-Tel, near NablusWas stabbed to death for alleged collaboration. (H, 11 Sept. 1989)
11 Sept. 1989Mahmud Hasnin (27)Daraj, GazaWas stabbed and beaten to death. Had been missing for four days. His body was found in an orchard. Was suspected of collaboration. (H, 12 Sept. 1989; AF, 18 Sept. 1989)
13 Sept. 1989Jabara Abu Taha (38)Khan YounisStabbed to death for alleged drug dealing and collaboration.
(H, JP, 14 Sept. 1989)
19 Sept. 1989Isam Shafi (20)JerusalemWas strangled to death in Ashkelon prison by his cellmate. The background to the murder was not clear. (JP, 20 Sept. 1989)
22 Sept. 1989Karim Abd Rabo (23)Tufah, GazaWas killed in the Ketziot detention camp by other inmates who suspected him of collaboration. (H, JP, 24 Sept. 1989)
22 Sept. 1989Said Ismail Abu Jazer (36)RafahBeaten to death by unidentified assailants for suspected collaboration. (H, JP, 24 Sept. 1989)
22 Sept. 1989Salah Abd el-Hadi (22)KalkilyaWas suspected of collaboration. Was kidnapped 45 days earlier by masked men. His body was found in a well near Kalkilya. (H, JP, 24 Sept. 1989)
24 Sept. 1989Mahmud al-Najawi (30)RafahWas killed by masked assailants, for alleged collaboration.
(H, JP, 25 Sept. 1989)
24 Sept. 1989Abdel Abu Shuluf (36)RafahWas killed by masked assailants, for alleged collaboration.
(H, JP, 25 Sept. 1989)
25 Sept. 1989Said Sabah Abu Muhsein (42)Shabura, GazaWas beaten to death in Rafah by masked assailants, for alleged collaboration. (H, JP, 26 Sept. 1989)
26 Sept. 1989Hani Salfiti (30)NablusWas found dead after being kidnapped by masked people. Was suspected of collaboration. (H, JP, 27 Sept. 1989)
29 Sept. 1989Shehadeh Abu Ter (65)AbassanA former policeman. Killed by masked youths for alleged collaboration. (JP, 2 Oct. 1989)
3 Oct. 1989Hamis Zaki Salameh Barabah (30)Khan YounisKilled by unidentified people for alleged collaboration.
(H, JP, 4 Oct. 1989)
4 Oct. 1989Salab Jalita (49)JerichoWas killed by unidentified persons. His body was found in a well. Was known as a collaborator. (JP, 5 Oct. 1989)
4 Oct. 1989Ahmed Basharat (28)JeninA prisoner in Ketziot detention centre. Was killed by another inmate, Imad Abu Sharakh of Dhahiriya, for suspected collaboration. (H, JP, 5 Oct. 1989)
5 Oct. 1989Yussuf Dwek (55)Daraj, GazaA guard at an UNRWA school. Was killed for suspected collaboration. (JP, 6 Oct. 1989)
6 Oct. 1989Adel Fares Bader (38)Beitunia, near RamallahWas kidnapped by a group of masked youths on 4 Oct. 1989. His body was found two days later, with the hands and legs cut off. Was accused of "immoral behaviour" by pretending to raise money for the uprising. (H, JP, 17 Oct. 1989)
9 Oct. 1989Said Ikhlekawi (16)Fawar campKilled in a clash with Palestinians reputed to be collaborators.
(JP, 10 Oct. 1989; H, 11 Oct. 1989; AF, 16 Oct. 1989)
11 Oct. 1989Nuzha Mabruka (35)NablusKilled for suspected "immoral behaviour". (JP, 13 Oct. 1989)
13 Oct. 1989Fatma Abu Shaker (39)Shabura, RafahKilled by seven youths for alleged collaboration. (H, JP, 15 Oct. 1989)
15 Oct. 1989Abd Rabu Salem Karim Abu Amra (24)RafahShot and killed by a group of masked Palestinians for alleged collaboration. (H, JP, 16 Oct. 1989)
20 Oct. 1989Taher Atu Saleh (26)NablusStabbed to death by unidentified assailants, for alleged collaboration. (H, JP, 22 Oct. 1989)
20 Oct. 1989Hareb Odeh 'Isse (41)Bureij camp, GazaKilled by unidentified assailants for alleged collaboration.
(H, JP, 22 Oct. 1989)
24 Oct. 1989Salah Abu al-Wafa (43)JeninStabbed to death by a group of masked men for alleged collaboration. (H, JP, 25 Oct. 1989)
25 Oct. 1989Said Abdallah Suheil (29) (or Sakhwel)Beit Hanun, GazaKilled after being abducted by masked men; reportedly for alleged collaboration. (H, JP, 26 Oct. 1989)
25 Oct. 1989Faiza Said Daoud (38)Mughazi, GazaStabbed to death, for alleged collaboration. (H, JP, 26 Oct. 1989)
26 Oct. 1989Sawfan Abu al-Hussein (25)Khan YounisA nurse. Was stabbed to death by masked men, for alleged collaboration. (H, JP, 27 Oct. 1989)
28 Oct. 1989Rasiya al-Banna (42)NablusStabbed to death for alleged collaboration. (H, JP, 29 Oct. 1989)
31 Oct. 1989Suriya Ahmed al-Kadi (22)Khirbat al-Adas village, near RafahStabbed to death by masked men for alleged collaboration. Her sister Sumiya, aged 19, was seriously injured. (H, 1 Nov. 1989)
1 Nov. 1989Jaber Ahmad Khader (36)GazaA detainee in Ketziot, was killed by another inmate, Samir Abd al-Jihad, for alleged collaboration. (JP, 3 Nov. 1989)
3 Nov. 1989Naima Faruk Ja'ara (35)NablusKilled by masked people for alleged collaboration. (H, JP, 5 Nov. 1989)
5 Nov. 1989Mahmud Salman (36)Sheikh Radwan, GazaKilled by masked people for alleged collaboration. (H, JP, 6 Nov. 1989)
7 Nov. 1989Muhammad Falaneh (24)Safa, near RamallahStabbed to death in a confrontation between Fatah and Popular Front activists. (H, JP, 8 Nov. 1989)
7 Nov. 1989Nabil al-Samahan (32)NablusStabbed to death by masked youths for alleged collaboration.
(H, JP, 8 Nov. 1989)
8 Nov. 1989Haref Mahmud Mansur (25)RafahStabbed to death for alleged collaboration. (H, 9 Nov. 1989)
10 Nov. 1989Samir Mahmud Afaneh (37)Shabura, RafahKilled by masked people for alleged collaboration. (H, 12 Nov. 1989)
12 Nov. 1989Abd el-Hamid al-Tumeizi (45)Idna, near HebronStabbed and hacked to death by masked people for alleged collaboration. (H, JP, 13 Nov. 1989)
12 Nov. 1989Ahmed Jamil Shehadeh (25)Jabaliya, GazaKilled for alleged collaboration. His body was found tied to an electricity pole. (H, JP, 13 Nov. 1989)
17 Nov. 1989Attiyat al-Najar (40)RafahBeaten to death by masked people for alleged collaboration.
(H, JP, 19 Nov. 1989)
22 Nov. 1989Muhammad Mustafa Nazal (67)JeninStabbed and hacked to death by masked people. Was a former "village leagues" member and was known as a collaborator.
(H, JP, 23 Nov. 1989)
22 Nov. 1989Hussein Akilla (42)RamallahA burnt body with stab wounds was found in a garbage dump. Palestinian sources said it was the body of Mr. Akilla, a suspected collaborator. (H, JP, 23 Nov. 1989)
23 Nov. 1989Haniya Abd el-Rahim al-Hafi (or Sweisseh) (45)NablusShot to death by members of the Red Eagle group, for alleged collaboration and prostitution. (H, JP, 24 Nov. 1989)
23 Nov. 1989Firyal Abdel Nabi (35)Askar campAccording to local sources, Sadek Bileh, from al-Funduk, opened fire after his car was stoned, killing the woman, a passer-by. Sadek Biley was known as a collaborator. (H, JP, 24 Nov. 1989)
27 Nov. 1989Mahmud Abu Su'ud (22)NablusDied after being beaten and hacked by masked men the previous week, for alleged corruption and immoral behaviour. (JP, 28 Nov. 1989)
30 Nov. 1989Mamun al-Masri (17)Beit Iba, near NablusKilled by masked people after being mistakenly believed to be a collaborator. When the error was discovered, he was declared to be a "martyr". (H, JP, 1 Dec. 1989)
30 Nov. 1989Ribhi Bader (33)Beit LikyaDied in hospital from injuries sustained several days earlier when he was hit by a petrol bomb. Was known as a collaborator.
(H, JP, 1 Dec. 1989)


(c) Other incidents linked with the uprising

21. On 25 and 26 August 1989, several raids on West Bank villages were reported. In continuing clashes between youths and security forces one was killed (see table) and 10 were injured. Several petrol bombs were thrown in East Jerusalem, both at Israeli targets and/or the property of Palestinians suspected of collaboration. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 27 August 1989; Al-Tali'ah, 31 August 1989)

22. On 27 August 1989, rioting was reported in Beit Safafa, near Jerusalem. Police used tear-gas and rubber bullets. One villager was killed. In the Jenin area, armed Palestinians known to be agents of the Israeli authorities were reportedly involved in violent acts against youths involved in attacks on collaborators. About 10 people were shot and injured in clashes with troops, in Tulkarm, Nablus and the Gaza Strip. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 28 August 1989, Al-Tali'ah, 31 August 1989)

23. On 28 August 1989, a general business strike was observed in the West Bank in protest over the expulsion of five activists the previous day. In Gaza, 10 people were wounded, 5 of them by stones thrown at soldiers. In the West Bank several people were shot and injured. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 28 August 1989; Al-Fajr, 4 September 1989).

24. On 29 August 1989, clashes were reported in Rafah; 11 people, including a 55-year-old woman, were shot and injured. Several other people were injured in incidents in Khan Younis and Gaza. In Beit Safafa, 61 people were arrested over the previous 48 hours. Twenty-one, including some minors, were already released. Some people were slightly injured in the clashes, which erupted during the funeral, two days earlier, of a local youth. (Beit Safafa is located on the Green Line, which until 1967 divided it between a Jordanian sector and an Israeli sector). (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 30 August 1989; Al-Fajr, 4 September 1989)

25. On 30 August 1989, widespread rioting was reported in the Gaza Strip, principally in Khan Younis. Two IDF soldiers and 35 Palestinians were injured. In the West Bank, troops shot and wounded five people in Surif, after villagers attempted to prevent the destruction of four houses. A nine-year-old child was shot and injured in Far'a camp, in clashes between stone throwers and youths. (Al-Tali'ah, Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 31 August 1989)

26. On 31 August 1989, serious clashes were reported in Khan Younis and Rafah. Thirty people were shot and injured, three were in serious condition. In the West Bank, several villagers were injured from beatings when troops raided the villages of Tamun and Karawat Bani-Hassan. An Israeli civilian, Gideon Zaken, 32, died of his injuries, sustained a fortnight earlier when a petrol bomb was thrown at the car of tax collectors in Ramallah. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 1 September 1989; Al-Fajr, 4 September 1989)

27. On the weekend of 1 and 2 September 1989, the city of Nablus was the focus of tension following a raid by the IDF in which two wanted Palestinians were killed (see table) and three others wounded. Widespread rioting erupted following the raid and a curfew imposed by the troops was largely ignored. A girl was killed in the clashes (see table) and 11 were injured. In the midst of the protests the IDF raided the Al-Ittihad hospital and closed it for several hours. Medical personnel were allegedly beaten, ambulances were confiscated and one wounded youth was arrested. Rioting was also reported in the Gaza Strip, where some 30 people were injured. Attacks on suspected collaborators resulted in four killings (see table). Clashes were also reported in Ramallah, Tulkarm and Bethlehem. In Tulkarm, Abd el-Kader Yussuf Mahluf, 20, was shot in the chest by passengers of an Israeli car that was attacked by stones. He was reported in serious condition. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 3 September 1989; Al-Fajr, 11 September 1989)

28. On 3 September 1989, several clashes and shooting incidents were reported in Shati camp, Gaza, Halhul, Bethlehem, Silwan and Silat al-Daher. Several people were injured. Attacks on suspected collaborators escalated, resulting in one person killed in Gaza (see table) and others badly injured. These included Riad al-Husseini, 18, from Gaza, Rasmiya Musran, 45, from Rafah, Sadi al-Saba', 30, from Jabaliya and Daud Abu Sa'lik, from Khan Younis camp. An Israeli reserve soldier, Haim Sharabani, 38, died in hospital after being hit by a stone three weeks earlier. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 4 September 1989; Al-Fajr, 11 September 1989)

29. On 4 September 1989, serious clashes were reported in several West Bank towns and villages. Sixteen people, including six children aged 9 to 12, were shot and injured. some seriously. In Arabeh, near Jenin, clashes erupted when troops ambushed a wanted youth, Majdi Atari, 22. Four people were injured in the clashes. In Kalkilya, Tarek Mansur, 13, was shot in the chest and another boy was injured when troops opened fire at masked youths. Other children were injured in Kabatiya, Tulkarm and Hebron. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 5 September 1989; Al-Fajr, 11 September 1989)

30. On 4 September 1989, in Bethlehem, Israeli bus passengers shot at Palestinian students after their bus was stoned. Reports said that between 6 and 14 students were injured during the incident. Several Palestinians were reported shot and injured in the Gaza Strip, among them a number of children. (Al-Fajr, 11 September 1989)

31. On 5 September 1989, rioting continued in many West Bank localities. Seven people were shot and injured. Rioting erupted in Nablus when the curfew in force in the town for several days was temporarily lifted. Many men were detained in the town's main square and systematically beaten by troops. Raids on villages were reported. Rioting was also reported in the Gaza Strip, and principally in Khan Younis, following the death of a young boy (see table). Twelve people, including three children, were injured. In Sabra, a youth named Mahmud Ibrahim was shot and seriously injured. Fathi Abu Khadra, 35, from Rafah, was beaten and hospitalized. More suspected collaborators were attacked. One died (see table) and several were severely beaten. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 6 September 1969)

32. On 5 September 1989, the IDF shot and injured many children in the Gaza Strip, including Ibrahim Bakr, 11, and Fama Bakr, 10, in Khan Younis; Nasser Abu Al-Fahm, 6, in Jabaliya; Hazim Al-Kafarna, 10, in Beit Hanun and Khalil Aby As'us, 14, in the Sabra quarter. A one-year-old boy, Ahmed Abu Nada, was exposed to gas fumes in the Zeitun quarter in Gaza. (Al-Tali'ah, 7 September 1989)

33. On 6 September 1989, widespread clashes were reported. Twenty-one residents of the Gaza Strip and eleven West Bank residents were shot and injured. The most serious clashes occurred in Tulkarm camp (19 injured), Awarta (2 injured) and several Gaza camps. (Al-Tali'ah, Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 7 September 1989)

34. On 7 September 1989, in a serious clash in Akaba village, near Jenin, a boy was shot dead by troops (see table) and six villagers were injured. Other clashes where people were shot and injured were reported in Tu1karm camp, where a baby of eight months was hit with a rubber bullet, Hebron, Dhanaba (a 15-year-old boy injured) and several Gaza camps. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 8 September 1989)

35. On 8 and 9 September 1989, a general strike was observed in the territories to mark 22 months since the beginning of the uprising. Widespread clashes were reported in which a boy was killed (see table) and 16 people were injured, principally in the Gaza Strip. Many people were injured from beatings and many arrests were carried out. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 10 September 1989; Al-Fajr, 18 September 1989)

36. On 10 September 1989, violent clashes were reported in Nablus and in Rafah camp. Five Palestinians were killed (see table) and 15 others were shot and injured, including a 16-months-old girl, Wala Hizazi. Other incidents resulting in fatal shootings were reported in Khan Younis, Rafah and Jaba' village, near Jenin (see table). (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 11 September 1989; Al-Fajr, 18 September 198'J)

37. On 11 September 1989, in continuing clashes in the territories 24 Palestinians were shot and injured. A serious incident was reported in Kadum, east of Kalkilya, following a raid by troops. The IDF force reportedly arrived in the village in a van with Nablus licence plates and shot at random. Two were killed (see table). Other injuries were reported in Tamun, Dheisheh and Beit Jala. In Khan Younis, troops opened fire at masked youths, seriously injuring Jihad Hamad Salama, 18. The incident sparked off serious disturbances in which six people were shot and injured. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 12 September 1989; Al-Fajr, 18 September 1989)

38. On 12 September 1989, troops shot and wounded 22 people in Gaza and the West Bank in continuing clashes. In Ein Beit al-Ma camp, troops entered homes and beat residents. This led to widespread protests and to shooting by troops. Several women were injured. Serious clashes were reported in the Gaza Strip: 16 were shot and injured. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 13 September 1989; Al-Fajr, 18 September 1989)

39. On 13 September 1989, in scattered clashes in the Gaza Strip 11 were shot and injured, including a nine-year-old boy from Rafah. Dozens of wanted youths were arrested in Nablus, as the curfew, in force for 13 days, was about to be lifted. Attacks against Palestinians suspected of collaboration continued. One person was murdered (see table) and another, Suleiman Hassan, 32, from Shabura camp, was stabbed and seriously injured. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 14 September 1989; Al-Fajr, 18 September 1989)

40. On 14 September 1989, 29 Palestinians were shot and injured in clashes, principally in the Gaza Strip. In Nablus, residents complained of beating and harassment by troops. Over 100 people were beaten, at least 50 needed medical treatment. Troops allegedly beat Muhammad al-Aqhbar, 19, during a raid on his family's home, and broke his arm before arresting him. His father Samir, 45, was shot in the stomach when he tried to prevent his son's detention. Elsewhere in the West Bank two three-year-old children in Aida camp were shot and wounded during a clash. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 15 September 1989; Al-Fajr, 18 September 1989)

41. On 14 September 1989, Israeli soldiers from a special unit were reported to have shot dead a wanted man, Mohammed Arafat al-Agra, at his home in Deir el Balah refugee camp. He was shot twice in the head. In Nablus, Israeli soldiers in a helicopter shot and injured a Palestinian in the abdomen. The family of the injured youth said he was standing on the roof of the home when a helicopter arrived, because there were clashes in the area, and shot at him. Israeli military sources denied that soldiers shot from the helicopter. (Al-Fajr, 18 September 1989)

42. On 15 and 16 September 1989, serious clashes were reported during the week-end, principally in Nablus, where two youths were shot and killed and a third man died of injuries sustained earlier (see table). Eight people were injured in clashes in the West Bank, and 31 in the Gaza Strip, where the most serious clash occurred in Rafah. Several elderly persons were among those injured when troops shot steel marbles and beat people. A 15-year-old boy, who was shot and injured several days earlier, had his left eye taken out. A 35-year-old woman, Souad Abd el-Rahim Abu Ubad, from Rafah, was severely beaten and hospitalized. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 17 September 1989; Al-Fajr, 25 September 1989)

43. On 17 September 1989, a general strike was observed in the Gaza Strip, on the Sabra and Shatila Day. In clashes throughout the region 17 people were shot and injured. Three IDF soldiers were also wounded. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 18 September 1989; Al-Fajr, 25 September 1989)

44. On 18 September 1989, strikes and marches were reported in many localities. Troops carried out raids in several villages, making arrests and removing Palestinian flags and graffiti. Thousands of people remained under curfew, in some places for the seventeenth day. (Jerusalem Post, 19 September 1989; Al-Fajr, 25 September 1989)

45. On 19 September 1989, serious clashes were reported, principally in the Gaza Strip. One person was killed (see table) and 11 were injured. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, , 20 September 1989; Al-Fajr, 25 September 1989)

46. On 20 September 1989, in scattered clashes 17 Palestinians, including a boy aged 11, were shot and injured. The boy was shot by Israeli civilians in the Gaza Strip. An Israeli soldier, Reuven Schwartz, 30, from Jerusalem, was seriously injured when he was hit in the head by a stone near Beit Jala. He was hospitalized. Beit Jala and nearby camps were placed under curfew. Petrol bombs were thrown at military vehicles near Beit Jala. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 21 September 1989)

47. On 21 September 1989, scattered clashes were reported in the Gaza Strip and in the Bethlehem area. Twelve Palestinians were injured. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 22 September 1989; Al-Fajr, 25 September 1989)

48. On the weekend of 22 and 23 September 1989, a general strike was observed on 22 September 1989 and in clashes in the Gaza Strip some 20 people were injured. Several suspected collaborators were killed in different places in the territories (see table). Several others were badly beaten. It was reported that Rafid Hamed Assaliya, 18, from Jabaliya, and Rafik Mahmud Sha'in, from Shati, were hospitalized after being beaten by troops in the "Beach detention centre" in Gaza. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 24 September 1989; Al-Fajr, 25 September 1989)

49. On 24 September 1989, 15 Palestinians were shot and injured in clashes with troops. Ghassem Sirhan, 17, was hospitalized in Nablus in serious condition. Amjad Abu Salha, 18, from Nablus, was also shot and seriously injured. One Khan Younis youth was killed by troops (see table) and two Rafah men were killed by masked assailants (see table). IDF troops reportedly raided homes in Rafah, beating residents and arresting several people. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 25 September 1989)

50. On 25 September 1989, in scattered clashes, mainly in the Gaza Strip, 15 people were shot and injured. Several were injured from tear-gas. In Jalazun camp, a six-year-old child, Ahmed Hanis Abu Halaf, was shot in the leg. Clashes
were also reported in Nablus. Further attacks were reported against suspected collaborators. One was killed (see table). A raid was carried out on Kalkilya and five wanted youths were arrested. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 26 September 1989; Al-Fajr, 2 October 1989)

51. On 26 September 1989, in Hebron, troops shot at school-children who threw stones at them, slightly injuring two. In the Gaza Strip three persons were shot and injured, as well as an Israeli soldier who was hit by a stone. A suspected collaborator from Nablus was killed (see table) . (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 27 September 1989; Al-Fajr, 2 October 1989)

52. On 27 September 1989, in scattered clashes in the territories 16 people were shot and injured. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 29 September 1989; Al-Fajr, 2 October 1989)

53. On 28 September 1989, clashes were reported, mainly in the Gaza Strip. One youth was killed in Nablus (see table) and another was wounded. Some 20 people were shot and injured, 2 seriously. (Ha'aretz, September 1989; Al-Fajr, 2 October 1989)

54. On 29 and 30 September 1989, in what was described as one of the bloodiest week-ends of the uprising, troops shot and killed six Palestinians, and two alleged collaborators were killed. The most violent clashes were reported in Nablus. Three soldiers were slightly wounded from stone throwing in the Gaza Strip. In Nablus, after troops shot and killed Silham Mabrukah, 20, in the casbah, protest marches were organized, leading to further violent clashes. Several youths were seriously injured. According to Palestinian sources, 54 people were injured over the week-end in the Gaza Strip. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 2 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 9 October 1989)

55. On 1 October 1989, the IDF raided several villages and refugee camps and closed four schools in the village of Halhul. In Arrabeh, soldiers accompanied by a number of collaborators raided the village. The IDF was attacked with bottles. Soldiers retaliated by shooting at youths, killing Abu Ziad (see table). (Al-Fajr, 9 October 1989)

56. On 2 October 1989, six youths were shot and injured in the West Bank and eight in the Gaza Strip in clashes with troops. Others were injured from beating, tear-gas and rubber bullets. The most serious clashes were reported in Nablus and nearby camps. (Ha'aretz, 3 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 9 October 1989)

57. On 3 October 1989, Beit Sahur, Dheisheh and Aida were placed under curfew and the IDF banned foreign reporters from entering the Nablus area. (Ha'aretz, 4 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 9 October 1989)

58. In 4 October 1989, serious clashes were reported in the Gaza Strip following the shooting of two masked youths who were painting slogans (see table). Thirty-five people were injured, Bethlehem was sealed off to non-residents and a tax-collecting operation was under way in Tulkarm. Confrontations were also reported in Jenin, Tulkarm, Kalkilya, Azun and the village of Abu Dis when tax collectors tried to force people to pay taxes. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 5 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 9 October 1989)

59. On 5 October 1989, in clashes in the territories, one youth was killed in Bidu, near Jerusalem, and 13 were injured. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 6 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 9 October 1989)

60. On 6 and 7 October 1989, one youth was shot and killed in Battir, near Jerusalem (see table) and 22 were injured in clashes over the week-end. Serious clashes were wore reported in the Gaza Strip camps. The IDF carried out arrests of masked youths. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 8 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 9 October 1989)

61. On 8 and 9 October 1989, two youths were killed in Nablus, in clashes over the Yom Kippur holiday (see table). Violent clashes were reported in Nablus, Tulkarm and Jenin. A five-year-old girl from Tulkarm comp, Ulfat Nasser, was critically injured when hit by 6 bullet in the head. A business strike was observed in the West Bank. Two soldiers were injured when two petrol bombs were thrown at their jeep in Nablus. A curfew was imposed on the town. During the unrest in Nablus troops allegedly raided homes and beat occupants. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 10 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 16 October 1989)

62. On 10 October 1989, 10 people were injured in clashes in the Gaza Strip and a 10-year-old boy from Rafah was critically injured. In Jenin, residents clashed with Israeli soldiers and collaborators as the IDF conducted tax raids on houses in the town. At least two people, including an 11-year-old girl, were injured. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 11 October 1989, Al-Fajr, 16 October 1989)

63. On 11 October 1989, clashes were reported in the Gaza Strip after curfews were lifted and the five-day general strike was over. Troops reportedly threw tear-gas canisters into a mosque in Gala, injuring the Imam and a child. Two soldiers were slightly injured when a bottle of acid was thrown at their jeep in Hebron. The town was placed under curfew. Nablus remained under curfew and searches were carried out following the killing, several days earlier, of two local youths, who according to local residents were killed in cold blood, at close range. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 12 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 16 October 1989)

64. On 12 October 1989, serious clashes were reported in the Gaza Strip and in Nablus. Five were killed and 25 were injured. A three-year-old baby, Nazer al-Furani, from Shati, was critically injured in the head by a plastic or rubber bullet. Two cousins, Idab and Ali al-Khatib, aged 13 and 14, were allegedly arrested in Sajai'ya "on suspicion of wearing masks"; they were taken to a military base, questioned and later released, but according to Palestinian sources they were missing. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 13 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 16 October 1989)

65. On 13 and 14 October 1989, two youths were killed and 16 were shot and injured in violent incidents over the week-end. Riots were reported in several refugee camps in the West Bank. Curfews were imposed on Askar, Jenin and Aida camps. Several people were injured. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 15 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 23 October 1989)

66. On 15 October 1989, seven people were injured in clashes, including a 12-year-old child, Hassan Matluk, who was seriously injured. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 16 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 23 October 1989)

67. On 16 October 1989, four people were injured in clashes in several Gaza Strip camps. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 17 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 23 October 1989)

68. On 17 October 1989, some 20 people were injured in clashes, including an 18-year-old youth from Si'ir who was critically injured in the chest, a 16-year-old youth from Turmus Aya who was seriously wounded in tho head, a 7-year-old boy from Askar who was shot and wounded in both legs and a 6-year-old girl from Deir el-Balah. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 18 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 23 October 1989)

69. On 18 October 1989, troops raided two UNRWA centres in the Gaza Strip, questioned staff and collected documents. Several employees who resisted the confiscation of documents were allegedly beaten. Military sources later confirmed the incident and said that the raid was due to information that anti-IDF activity was being carried out in the UNRWA offices. Such activity, which was said to be in contradiction with the Agency's mandate, included financial support for families of security prisoners, recruitment of released security prisoners to work in the UNRWA offices and gyving support to residents who were not refugees. Other clashes were reported in several Gaza Strip camps. The IDF carried out raids in many West Bank villages. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 19 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 23 October 1989)

70. On 19 October 1989, 12 people were injured in clashes, mainly in the Gaza Strip and in Nablus. Muhammad Zaki Mansur, 12, from Balata, was seriously injured in the head by a rubber bullet. Abd el-Karim Masri, 17, from Tamun was also injured in the head by a rubber bullet. Abdallah al-Zara, 21, and Nimer Hamami, 19, from Nablus, were hospitalized after being badly beaten. Abdallah al-Aresh, 12, from Deir el-Balah, was critically injured in the head by a live bullet. Mahmud Ayed Abdallah, 8, was also injured in the head from a live bullet. A 30-year-old woman from Shati was reportedly injured after inhaling tear-gas and later had a miscarriage. (Ha'aretz, 20 October 1989)

71. On 20 and 21 October 1989, 2 youths were killed (see table) and 21 were injured in clashes over the week-end. Several people were injured from beatings and a general strike was observed in the territories. Several attacks on alleged collaborators were reported in the Gaza Strip. Serious clashes were reported in Khan Younis following the killing of a local youth by soldiers (see table). Another violent incident was reported in Ansar 2 gaol when a young visitor attacked a soldier. Troops used tear-gas to disperse the demonstrators, injuring two visitors. Riots were reported in the Tul Sultan and Brazil neighbourhoods of Rafah, where arrests were carried out and many people were beaten. Balal mosque was closed following rioting. Several people were injured in the Nablus area. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 22 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 23, 30 October 1989)

72. On 22 October 1989, a young girl was shot dead (see table) and nine others were shot and injured in clashes. Sixteen wanted activists were arrested in raids carried out in Zawiya, near Nablus, and Danaba, near Tulkarm. Clashes were also reported in Gaza Strip camps. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 23 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 30 October 1989)

73. On 23 October 1989, serious clashes were reported in Tulkarm camp. One youth was killed (see table) and three were shot and injured. Violent clashes also took place in Nablus. The army used large quantities of tear-gas and many people needed medical treatment. A commercial strike was observed in Gaza. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 24 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 30 October 1989)

74. On 24 October 1989, one youth was shot dead (see table) and eight others were injured in clashes. Talal Kitaneh, 17, from Nazla Sharkiya, near Tulkarm, was critically injured in the head by a plastic bullet during a raid. A 12-year-old boy, Abd al-Karim al-Imam, was seriously injured in a clash in the Gaza Strip. According to Palestinian sources, five Arab drivers were wounded in Halhul when their cars crashed after being stoned by settlers. Another similar incident occurred when passengers of an Israeli bus that had been stoned got off and stoned Arab cars. One car crashed into a pole and another fell into a ravine. Three passengers were critically injured. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 25 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 30 October 1989)

75. On 25 October 1989, 19 people were injured in clashes, including several children, in various Gaza Strip localities. Clashes were also reported in Hebron, Jenin and nearby Burkin, and in Nablus, where Israeli soldiers shot and wounded a 15-year-old boy. Zakiya Awad, 36, from Tulkarm, was shot in the chest. Two alleged collaborators were killed (see table). (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 26 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 30 October 1989)

76. On 26 October 1989, one youth was shot dead (see table). The killing sparked heavy clashes in Jabaliya, in which three people were injured. Issa Sbeih, 29, of Khader, was in critical condition after being hit by a rock thrown at his car two days earlier near Al-Aroub camp, apparently by passengers of an Israeli bus that had been stoned. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 27 October 1989)

77. On 27 and 28 October 1989, 2 persons were killed (see table) and 20 injured in clashes over the week-end. Serious clashes were reported in the Gaza Strip, where 15 people were injured. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 29 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 6 November 1989)

78. On 29 October 1989, a general strike was observed in the territories. Serious clashes were reported in the Gaza Strip, where 10 people were hospitalized with gunshot and steel-marble wounds. Two schools were ordered closed in Rafah and Gaza. Several incidents were reported in East Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 30 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 6 November 1989)

79. On 30 October 1989, clashes took place in several Gaza Strip localities. Five Palestinians, including a 15-year-old boy, were injured. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 31 October 1989)

80. On 31 October 1989, four people were injured in scattered clashes in the Gaza Strip. The IDF carried out raids on several villages in the West Bank and Balata remained under curfew. Stone-throwing incidents took place in Jerusalem's Old City. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 1 November 1989)

81. On 1 November 1989, in scattered violent incidents in the Gaza Strip five local youths were shot and injured, including a 15-year-old boy from Sheikh Radwan who was seriously injured in the head. Troops reportedly intensified the campaign against masked youths, detaining three in the Gaze Strip. In the West Bank, clashes between troops and pupils were reported in Kalkilya and the Jenin and Kalandiya camps. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 2 November 1989)

82. On 2 November 1989, a general strike was observed in the territories. Incidents were reported in several Gaza Strip localities. Five people were shot and wounded. Curfews were imposed in Tulkarm, Far'a and Al-Amari camps. Tu1karm camp remained under curfew (for the twelfth day). (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 3 November 1989)

83. On 3 and 4 November 1989, scattered incidents were reported over the weekend. In violent clashes in Gaza Strip camps five persons were shot and injured. Serious clashes were reported in Nablus, in which a youth was shot dead (see table). Clashes were also reported in Hebron and nearby Surif. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 5 November 1989)

84. On 5 November 1989, five people were shot and injured in clashes in Gaza and nearby camps, as well as in Shati, Jabaliya and Rafah. In Beit Sahour troops shot and wounded a masked youth who was trying to set up a road-block and ignored a call to stop. Several people were injured in clashes in Nablus and Tulkarm camp. Far'a camp remained under curfew. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 6 November 1989)

85. On 6 November 1989, clashes were reported in Hebron, Nablus and the Gaza Strip. Some 10 people were injured. An attack on an alleged collaborator was reported in Jenin, where Aluned Ahmed 43, was stabbed and seriously injured. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 7 November 1989)

86. On 7 November 1989, heavy clashes were reported in Kalkilya. One youth was killed (see table) and at least 25 people were hospitalized with rubber-bullet and gas injuries. Eight masked youths were arrested. The town was placed under curfew. Seven people were shot and injured in clashes in the Gaza Strip and in Hebron. Attacks were reported on alleged collaborators (see table). (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 8 November 1989)

87. On 8 November 1989, in violent clashes in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip 15 people were shot and injured. Incidents involving shooting were reported in Hebron (two injured), Jenin (two), Kalandiya (one), Nablus (five) and Rafah (five, including a five-year-old boy). Most of the people were teenagers and were injured by rubber or plastic bullets. In Ijinsinya, a village north of Nablus, unidentified people killed a local girl, aged 9, in circumstances that were not clear. It was also reported that six policemen who were allegedly involved in the killing of Karim Da'amseh, 18, from Al-Khader, near Beit Sahur, on 26 October 1989, were dismissed from the police and immediately arrested (see also sect. 2 on the administration of justice). (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 9 November 1989)

88. On 9 November 1989, a general strike was observed to mark the second anniversary of the uprising. Serious clashes took place in Nablus following a raid on an abandoned house in Jneid neighbourhood that served as a base for a group called the Red Eagles, described as the most dangerous cell operating in the area, and affiliated to the PFLP. The group's leader was shot dead (see table) and the other members were arrested. Clashes were also reported in the Gaza Strip. Incidents were also reported in Kafr Al-Dik and in Tulkarm camp. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 10 November 1989)

89. On 10 and 11 November 1989, at least 22 people were injured in clashes over the weekend. Two masked youths were shot at by troops and were seriously injured: Hamida Ayn Abussi, 17, from Tubas and Hamad Jaber, 24, from Nablus. In the Gaza Strip 12 people were injured in clashes. Clashes were also reported in Belt Furik (three injured), Balata (one) and Hebron. Troops carried out many "preventive arrests", principally of youths aged 17 to 20. (Ha'aretz, 12 November 1989)

90. On 12 November 1989, the IDF continued carrying out arrests in advance of the anniversary of the Palestinian declaration of independence. Fourteen people were shot and injured, including a 13-year-old boy from Khan Younis, who was seriously injured in the head. Incidents were also reported in Hebron (three injured) and Mazra'at al-Sharkiya (one). Two were killed (see table) and a resident of Awarta was stabbed and injured. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 13 November 1989)

91. On 13 November 1989, in Gaza, three unidentified people armed with an assault rifle ambushed an army jeep, shooting and killing Corporal (Res.) Israel Trechtenboit, 42, and seriously injuring Ze'ev Traum, 43, who later died of his wounds. The area of the attack was placed under curfew and widespread searches began. The Gaza Strip was sealed off following the attack. Seven people were injured in clashes in the Gaza Strip. Some 120 people were arrested in the West Bank. A serious clash was reported in Kalandiya, which was under curfew. One person was killed (see table). In Ras el-Aya, Nablus, several people were injured from beating. Over a quarter of a million of Palestinians were under curfew. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 15 November 1989)

92. On 15 November 1989, the anniversary of the declaration of independence passed with few violent clashes. Six people were shot and injured in the Gaza Strip and a girl was wounded in the Shufat camp. Increased troop presence in the major towns and continuing curfews prevented celebrations and demonstrations. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 16 November 1989)

93. On 16 November 1989, scattered clashes were reported and stone-throwing incidents were reported in East Jerusalem. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 17 November 1989)

94. On 17 and 18 November 1989, in scattered clashes over the week-end 24 people were injured in the Gaza Strip and three in the West Bank. Several serious attacks on alleged collaborators continued: a woman was killed (see table), and two men, Anwar al-Tati, from Rafah, and Awad Ibrahim Lali, 39, from Mughazi camp, were seriously injured. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 19 November 1989)

95. On 19 November 1989, a general strike was observed. Army raids were reported in several villages and soldiers arrested wanted youths. In Tulkarm camp, two people were shot and injured by rubber bullets during a clash. An alleged collaborator, Nawaf Mardawi, 45, from Habla, was seriously injured by masked men. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 20 November 1989)

96. On 20 November 1989, in scattered clashes 13 people were shot and injured, including two boys, aged 3 and 12, in Zeitun neighbourhood, Gaza. Many army operations were reported in West Bank villages. In Bal'a and Sur villages, in the Tulkarm area, helicopters were used and 24 wanted youths were arrested. Two alleged collaborators, Mustafa Mahmud al-Haj, 19, and Nasser Bishawi, 24, from Nablus, were seriously injured by masked people. A petrol bomb was thrown at an army truck in Nablus and one soldier was hurt. The soldiers opened automatic fire, injuring a 13-year old girl in the hand. A 19-year-old youth was later hospitalized with injuries caused by beating. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 21 November 1989)

97. On 21 November 1989, two wanted youths were shot and injured in Anin, near Jenin. One of the youths, Ishan Ma'ani, 20, was in critical condition. Several other youths were injured in Nablus and Beit Furik. (Jerusalem Post, 22 November 1989)

98. On 22 November 1989, a general strike, called by the Hamas movement, was observed. In several clashes, mainly in Gaza camps, 13 people were injured, including a boy aged 5. In one serious incident troops shot and seriously injured Haitham Abu Jaafar, 18, of Nakura. Two were killed (see table) and several others were injured. A settler from Efrat suffered a fractured skull when a rock hit his car near Dheisheh. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 23 November 1989)

99. On 23 November 1989, several attacks on alleged collaborators were reported. Two women were killed (see table) and a Rafah resident, Ali Mustafa, 36, was seriously injured. One youth was killed in Beit Imrin (see table) and several others were shot and injured, principally in the Gaza Strip. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 24 November 1989)

100. On 24 and 25 November 1989, IDF troops launched a large-scale operation in the Tulkarm area and arrested 72 persons, most of them wanted youths. Axes, knives and sharpened metal poles were confiscated. Several clashes were reported elsewhere. Nine persons were shot and injured, including a 17-year-old youth in Nablus who was shot in the eye and was reportedly in very serious condition. Several masked youths were arrested in Gaza. Twenty-four people were shot and injured in the Gaza Strip in several clashes. An alleged collaborator was seriously injured in Rafah. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 26 November 1989)

101. On 26 November 1989, in a small number of clashes, principally in the Gaza Strip, 14 people were injured, including Aisha Mater, aged 10, from Shati, and a 3-year-old girl from Jabaliya, Tahrir Salah Afana, who was shot in the eye with a rubber bullet. Two soldiers were wounded by stones in Rafah. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 27 November 1989)

102. On 27 November 1989, two children were shot and injured in the Gaza Strip, including Naffin Loth, a girl aged 4, who was hit in the head by a steel marble. (Jerusalem Post, 28 November 1989)

103. On 28 November 1989, a partial strike was observed in the West Bank and a total one in the Gaza Strip. In a small number of violent clashes five persons were injured in the Gaza Strip, including two children from Shati, Ahmed Abu Haya, 10, who was shot and seriously injured, and Said Falah, 13. In a clash in Balata camp, Abd al-Muati Mansur, 13, was shot and injured. In Nablus, following arrests of wanted youths by troops, members of the Black Panther gang, a Palestinian group affiliated to Fatah, armed with rifles and pistols, imposed a curfew on parts of the casbah, confiscated telephones and interrogated residents. Several local residents were seriously beaten. Dheisheh camp and two villages, Bidya and Al-Khader, were placed under curfew. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 29 November 1989)

104. On 29 November 1989, a general strike, called by the Hamas movement, was observed in the territories to mark the forty-second anniversary of the United Nations resolution to partition Palestine. In a small number of incidents, principally in the Gaza Strip, 10 Palestinians and 2 soldiers were injured; an 8-year-old boy from Sajai'ya was among those injured. (Ha'aretz, 30 November 1989)

105. On 30 November 1989, 13 people were shot and injured in scattered clashes in the Gaza Strip and one in the West Bank. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 1 December 1989)

B. Administration of justice, including the right to a fair trial

1. Palestinian population


106. On 27 August 1989, Fahida Kafarna, 17, of Beit Hanun, was sentenced by the military court of the Gaza Strip to 12 months' imprisonment, with a 17-month suspended term, for attempting to stab the commander of an IDF patrol. (Ha'aretz, 28 August 1989; Al-Fajr, 4 September 1989)

107. On 28 August 1989, the military court in the Gaza Strip passed prison sentences of nine and five years on two Khan Younis residents who were convicted of throwing petrol bombs at IDF patrols in August 1988, causing injuries to two soldiers, setting up a popular committee in the Khan Younis camp, setting fire to cars and other property of persons who violated a strike, and participation in disturbances. The court passed a prison sentence of four years on Jawad Oweid, 22, from Sheikh Radwan, Gaza, for membership of Fatah's Force 17 group, and for attacking suspected collaborators. Four Beit Hanun residents were sentenced to 52 months' imprisonment for setting fire to a truck that took Arab workers to Ashkelon. (Ha'aretz, 29 August 1989)

108. On 30 August 1989, the Israeli military court in Gaza placed Adnan Hamadeh, 23, and Sami Foda, 24, under administrative detention for one year. The two were detained 15 days earlier. (Al-Fajr, 11 September 1989)

109. On 31 August 1989, Al-Quds newspaper reported that 85 per cent of Palestinians who had been placed under administrative detention had been arrested for a second time. (Al-Fajr, 11 September 1989)

110. On 1 September 1989, Kamel al-Afqhani, from Balata refugee camp, was placed under administrative detention for one year. (Al-Fajr, 11 September 1989)

111. On 5 September 1989, the Beersheba district court imposed two life sentences on Abd al-Rahman Shehab, 21, of Jabaliya, who was convicted of killing two inmates in the Ketziot detention camp. The court also imposed a life sentence on Abd el-Razek al-Gharbawi, 24, of Gaza, who was convicted of torturing and killing another Ketziot inmate. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 6 September 1989)

112. On 7 September 1989, the military court in Ramallah sentenced Khaled al-Shini, 25, of El-Bireh, to life imprisonment after he was convicted of killing an Israeli student, Ziva Golodovski, 18, of Holon, in El-Bireh, on 10 August 1988. Al-Shini has confessed to the killing and explained that he did it because he believed the girl was an Israeli agent. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 8 September 1989; Al-Fajr, 18 September 1989)

113. On 14 September 1989, the Israeli District Court sentenced Samer Ghassan Ayub, 15, from Jerusalem, to one and a half years in prison, with a one-year suspended term, on the charge of throwing stones at Israeli vehicles in Beit Hanina, near Jerusalem. (Al-Fajr, 25 September 1989)

114. On 17 September 1989, the Tel Aviv district court handed down prison sentences of 17 years on three Arabs who, in August 1987, tried to murder two 14-year old Israelis, near Herzliya. The three, Sahel Ismail Abu-Daka, 24, Adel Suleiman Abu-Mustafa, 27, and Majdi Ahmed Abu Mustafa, 25, pleaded guilty and explained they had acted out of ideological motives. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 18 September 1989; Al-Fajr, 25 September 1989)

115. On 21 September 1989, the Israeli Magistrates Court sentenced Khadra Mubarak Oudah, 14, from Deir Jerir village in the Ramallah area, to eight months in prison and a fine of NIS 500. The court accused her of throwing stones and stabbing an Israeli police officer with a knife when he was arresting her in Jerusalem two months earlier. An Israeli military court fined Imad Nafe Ayesh, from Sanour village in the Nablus area, NIS 70 (35 dollars) on claims that he was late in arriving at the civil administration headquarters in Jenin after being summoned to report there. (Al-Fajr, 2 October 1989)

116. On 22 September 1989, it was reported that the military authorities had announced new procedures to ensure that families in the territories would be informed immediately about the detention of their relatives. This followed an appeal to the High Court of Justice by the Association of Civil Rights in Israel. Under the new procedures, the commander of any detention facility would be required to ensure every day that all new detainees send postcards to their families. The commanders would also be required to send a daily list of detainees to the regional civil administrators and to post the list in a public place. Within a month of the implementation of the new procedures the military authorities would establish a control committee to see that the regulations were being followed. (Jerusalem Post, 22 September 1989)

117. On 27 September 1989, it was reported that five Palestinians in Jabaliya and Gaza journalist Ibrahim Abu Sheikh had been placed under administrative detention for a full year in the Ketziot detention camp. In another development, it was reported that the Beersheba district court had, on 26 September 1989, imposed two life sentences on Izat Mahmud Sha'aban, 22, of Jabaliya, who confessed to killing two Palestinian inmates in Ketziot in August 1989. (Jerusalem Post,
27 September 1989; Al-Fajr, 2 October 1989)

118. On 29 September 1989, it was reported that Khaled al-Kidra, 56, the deputy Chairman of the Gaza Bar Association, who had been detained since 10 September 1989 on suspicion of organizing popular committees and of transmitting money to finance their activities, had recently been remanded for a further two weeks. On 19 October 1989, the military court in Gaza extended his detention. (Jerusalem Post, 29 September 1989; Ha'aretz, 20 October 1989)

119. On 3 October 1989, the military court in Gaza sentenced Osama Abu Samra and Afin Mahmud, from Deir el-Balah, to 20 and 14 years' imprisonment, respectively. They were convicted of activating road-side mines in April 1988, throwing petrol bombs at troops and participation in disturbances. No one was hurt in the explosion of the mines. The court also passed prison sentences of six years on two persons convicted of activity against the security forces. (Ha'aretz, 4 October 1989)

120. On 5 October 1989, the IDF arrested Palestinian attorney Shaher Arouri, 33, or Ramallah. Arouri is a member of the Arab Lawyers Committee and deputy of the Freedom Defence Committee in the West Bank. (Al-Fajr, 16 October 1989)

121. On 10 October 1989, the Israeli military court in Beersheba sentenced Jihad al-Najar, 25, of Jabaliya refugee camp, to 30 years in prison for the killing or a detained collaborator in Ansar 3 detention camp in July 1989. In a separate development, the Israeli authorities placed Bassam Abdel Rahim Walweil, 28, of Kalkilya, under administrative detention for six months. Walweil, a lecturer at Al-Najah University, was arrested on 13 September 1989. (Al-Fajr, 16 October 1989)

122. On 11 October 1989, it was reported that the military court in Ramallah rejected. in a pre-trial inquiry, claims by three residents of a refugee camp near Jericho that their confessions to the throwing of petrol bombs at an Israeli bus had been extracted under beatings, pressure and threats. The three, Ahmed Takhuri, Muhammad Abu Harbish and Juna Ibrahim Adam. were arrested soon after the incident in which an Israeli woman and her three children, and an Israeli soldier, were burnt to death. They confessed to having thrown the petrol bombs and their homes were demolished by the security forces. The inquiry was held following claims by their lawyer, Adv. Ahlam Hadad, that their confessions should be declared inadmissible. The reasons for the court's decision to reject the claim would be given at the same time as the verdict in the main trial. (Ha'aretz, 11 October 1989)

123. On 13 October 1989, it was reported that the military court in Gaza sentenced Daoud Dweibi and Mahmud Abu Zar, from Jabaliya camp, to 25 months' imprisonment and a 25-month suspended term each for leading a group of masked people, who, on 5 September 1989, attacked Arab workers who were about to leave for their jobs in Israel, in defiance of an order by the leadership of the uprising. They were also fined NIS 2,500 ($1,250) each. They were arrested by four armed soldiers in civilian clothes who were among the workers. (Ha'aretz, 13 October 1989)

124. On 16 October 1989, 16 people were arrested in the Tulkarm district on the grounds that they were members of popular committees. (Al-Fajr, 23 October 1989)

125. On 17 October 1989, the IDF raided the village of Kuffin in the Jenin district and arrested about 70 people. (Al-Fajr, 23 October 1989)

126. On 17 October 1989, a report by the Israeli human rights body Betzelem affirmed that since the beginning of the uprising in December 1987 125 Palestinian children under 16 were killed. According to one of the spokesmen for the organization, the stiffest penally imposed on an Israeli soldier following the killing or a Palestinian child was two months in gaol and a six-month suspended sentence. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 17 October 1989; Al-Fajr. 23 October 1989)

127. On 18 October 1989, it was reported that the military court in Gaza had sentenced Sair al-Kurd, 18, to 15 years' imprisonment, Hassan Naufal, 18, to 12 years and Jihad Ghuneim, 19, to eight years in gaol, for having thrown petrol bombs. The homes of the three had been demolished one month earlier. The Lod military court sentenced Othman Mohammed Maragha, 23, from the village of Silwan, near Jerusalem, to 27 years in prison for throwing 27 Molotov cocktails at Israeli targets. (Jerusalem Post, 18 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 23 October 1989)

128. On 23 October 1989, the military court in Gaza sentenced Mahmud Odeh Suleiman al-Abzal, 23, of Rafah, to nine years' imprisonment. with a three-year suspended term, for throwing petrol bombs at cars, including IDF vehicles. (Jerusalem Post, 24 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 30 October 1989)

129. On 24 October 1989, the Beersheba district court sentenced Muezin Haim Nabiya, an inmate in Ketziot, to life imprisonment for the murder of another inmate, Jamal Halaf, of Daraj, Gaza. In another development, the military court in Ramallah for the first time convicted three businessmen from Beit Sahur for refusing to pay taxes. The two were given a suspended sentence of 6 months and a fine of NIS 6,000 ($3,000), or 180 days in prison, each. A third man was sentenced to 80 days in prison and fined NIS 2,500 ($1,250). Seven other businessmen were remanded until the end of their trial for failing to submit reports to the tax authorities. Three others were released on bail of NIS 10,000 to 35,000 ($5,000-17,500), but had to remain in custody until the end of their trials owing to the exorbitant amount of the bail. Sixty Beit Sahur businessmen were reportedly being detained, awaiting the filing of charge sheets and trials. The military court in Ramallah also convicted two Hebron youths of inciting shop-owners to close their shops. They were sentenced to one year in gaol and fined NIS 1,000 ($500) each. (Ha'aretz, 25 October 1989)

130. On 25 October 1989, the Tel Aviv district court sentenced Ahmed Ibu Basin Shukri, 26, from Ramallah, to life imprisonment and another 20 years in prison. He was convicted of the murder of Michael Ashtamkar, an Israeli construction worker who had worked with him on a Tel Aviv construction site. He was also convicted of attempting to drive an Israeli bus off the Jerusalem-Tel Aviv highway. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 26 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 30 October 1989)

131. On 26 October 1989, it was reported that the security forces had uncovered a large Islamic Jihad network operating in the Gaza Strip. Dozens of activists had been arrested and more arrests were expected. The leader of the network was reported to be Fawzi Abu Shaher, 26, from Gaza. Four of the activists arrested reportedly confessed to having planted explosive charges in the Gaza Strip in February 1988 and February 1989. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 26 October 1989)

132. On 30 October 1989, the Jerusalem district court sentenced Abed al-Mahdi Ghaneim, from Nuseirat camp, Gaza, to 16 life imprisonment terms, and to 24 terms of 20 years, to run concurrently. Ghaneim was convicted, on the basis of his confession, of causing the death of 16 people and causing serious injuries to others, when he forced an Egged bus, on 6 July 1989, off the Jerusalem-Tel Aviv highway, plunging it over 100 metres into an abyss where it burst into flames. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 31 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 30 October 1989)

133. On 31 October 1989, the military court in Gaza sentenced 23-year-old Jamal Abdallah Kassab, of Deir el-Balah refugee camp, to 10 years in prison, with a 5-year suspended term, for throwing two Molotov cocktails at Israeli patrols.
(Al-Fajr, 6 November 1989)

134. On 1 November 1989, it was reported that the military court in Gaza had sentenced Dalal Bassam, 22, from Deir el-Balah, to 10 years' imprisonment, with a 5-year suspended term. He was convicted of throwing petrol bombs at IDF patrols. (Ha'aretz, 1 November 1989)

135. On 5 November 1989, the military court in Lod sentenced Fahd el-Haj, 29, from Bir Zeit, to two years' imprisonment, with a two-year suspended term. He was convicted of receiving 183,000 Jordanian dinars from Dr. Sari Nusseibeh and transferring it to Fatah activists in the territories. It was also reported that three Palestinians, aged between 25 and 37, from a village near Tulkarm were sentenced to life terms for terrorist acts committed in 1986 and 1987 that left 17 persons injured. (Jerusalem Post, 6 November 1989)

136. On 6 November 1989, a charge sheet was filed with the military court in Gaza against Advocate Khaled al-Kadri, 54, from Khan Yunis, Vice-Chairman of the Gaza Strip Bar Association. He was charged with maintaining contacts with a PLO official in Jordan and receiving a large sum of money from that official. (Jerusalem Post, 7 November 1989)

137. On 8 November 1989, charge sheets were filed with the military court in Gaza against 17 alleged members of popular committees and shock committees led by Miar Abu Samdani. In another development, it was reported that, as at 8 November 1989, traffic offenders in the Gaza Strip were to be tried by military courts and not by the local civilian courts. A decision to that effect was taken after it appeared that the civilian courts were imposing very light fines.
(Ha'aretz, 9 November 1989)

138. On 8 November 1989, troops carried out operations in several West Bank areas, and conducted "preventive" arrests before the second anniversary of the uprising. Eleven people were arrested in Halhul and 10 in al-Bazan, near Nablus. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 9 November 1989)

139. On 9 November 1989, charge sheets were filed with the military court in Gaza against 200 members of the Hamas movement, including the movement.s leaders, Sheikh Ahmed Yassin, Salah Shehadeh, Yahya Suanar, Ismail Abu Shanab and Nadir Abdallah. (Ha'aretz, 10 and 12 November 1989)

140. On 13 November 1989, the military court in Gaza sentenced Mahmud Mussa, 18, from Jabaliya, to 12 years' imprisonment, with a 3-year suspended term, for throwing explosive charges and petrol bombs at IDF patrols. Majis Mahmud Ahmed, 22, from Zeitun, was sentenced to eight years' imprisonment and a seven-year suspended term for throwing petrol bombs at troops. (Ha'aretz, 14 November 1989)

141. On 19 November 1989, 10 youths, aged 15, from Nablus, were each sentenced to 6 months' imprisonment and fined NIS 350 ($175) after being convicted of throwing stones at troops. (Ha'aretz, 20 November 1989)

142. On 21 November 1989, it was reported that the military court in Gaza had sentenced Mahed Id, 24, from Nuseirat, to 12 years' imprisonment, with a 5-year suspended term, for throwing stones and petrol bombs at troops. (Jerusalem Post, 21 November 1989)

143. On 23 November 1989, it was reported that Nayef Sweitat, a journalist with the newspaper Al-Sha'b and resident of Jenin, had been placed in administrative detention for one year. In another development, it was reported that the High Court of Justice had ordered the authorities to pay the court costs of three Palestinians who petitioned the court regarding the failure of the IDF to notify them for a month and a half of the arrest of their relatives. It was further reported that the authorities had dropped legal proceedings against a 13-year-old boy from Beit Sahur, Jiryis Rishmawi, suspected of stone throwing, and against his parents, after the latter petitioned the High Court of Justice challenging the legality of the requirement that they pay NIS 1,000 ($500) bail for their son's release. The boy was reportedly beaten by soldiers of the Golani Brigade on 2 August 1989 after they suspected him of throwing stones at the bus in which they were travelling. The parents withdrew their petition after the Justice Ministry decided not to take any action against the boy or his parents. (Jerusalem Post, 23 November 1989)

144. On 27 November 1989, the military court in Gaza sentenced Ali al-Din Kort, 17, from Deir el-Balah, to two and a half years' imprisonment, with a two-and-a-half year suspended term, and fined him NIS 10,000 ($5,000) for stone throwing. The sentence was described as unusually severe. (Ha'aretz, 28 November 1989)

145. On 28 November 1989, the military court in Gaza sentenced two residents of Khan Yunis to 28 months' imprisonment each, and a third person to 15 months' imprisonment for membership in popular committees. (Jerusalem Post, 29 November 1.989)

146. On 30 November 1989, the Tel Aviv District Court sentenced Muhammad Hawari, 26, from Kalkilya, to 14 years' imprisonment, with a 7-year suspended term, for setting fire to a car belonging to an Israeli civilian on 28 August 1988. The judge said that, since no explanation was given by the defendant as to the reason for his act, "it was possible that he did it on nationalistic grounds". (Ha'aretz, 1 December 1.989)

2. Israelis

147. On 28 August 1989, Rabbi Moshe Levinger, appearing in the Jerusalem district court on charges of manslaughter and causing serious bodily harm in Hebron in September 1988, pleaded not guilty. The incident occurred on 30 September 1988, when Levinger, three of his children and a granddaughter were driving through the centre of Hebron. A stone smashed through the windshield, slightly injuring Levinger and one of his sons, who was driving. The son continued driving until they reached an army road-block. While there, they came under another attack. At that point Levinger walked up the street, firing two or three shots in the air, then turned back and, although the stoning had stopped, walked down the street shooting at shop windows. At one point he was firing straight ahead, at a mere 12 metres from a shoe store outside which the victim, Kaid Hassan Abdul Aziz Salah, the shop-owner, and the customer who was injured, Ibrahim Bali, were standing. Levinger then continued down the road, overturning fruit and vegetable stalls, Levinger later claimed he had acted in self-defence, as he was surrounded by a threatening crowd of Arabs. According to the defence brief he had acted "reasonably. . . as he had no other alternative". Levinger stressed he had no part in the killing or the injury attributed to him. The trial was adjourned for two weeks. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 29 August 1989)

148. On 11 September 1989, the Beersheba district court sentenced Yigal Pales, a soldier, to six months' imprisonment with a one-year suspended term, after he was convicted of throwing stones at Arab cars near the Gaza Strip. Four of the six months would be served by working "for the benefit of the public" in a hospital in Beersheba. The soldier, together with two minors, on 3 June 1989 threw stones at Arab vehicles, breaking the windshields or four cars. In one case a stone hit an Arab woman, Farial Jafir, who was seriously injured. (Ha'aretz, 12 September 1989)

149. On 24 September 1989, it was reported that the Jerusalem magistrates court had acquitted a General Security Service agent of "charges connected with the death of Awad Hamdan", a 23-year-old Palestinian detainee who died in Jenin prison in July 1987. The court decided that it could not prove "beyond a reasonable doubt" that the reason for Hamdan's death was suffocation, as claimed in the charge sheet. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 24 September 1989)

150. On 25 September 1989, the Northern Region military court acquitted three soldiers of the Golani brigade, Eliahu Shriki, Yehoshu Suissa and Shimon Amoyal, of charges of ill-treating all Arab detainee. They had been charged with beating Khader Tarzi on the head and other parts of the body on 8 February 1988. In the course of the trial that charge sheet was amended, and the name of "Khader Tarzi" was replaced by "an unidentified person". Khader Tarzi was beaten by soldiers and later died in Shifa hospital, Gaza, but those responsible were not discovered. The president of the court, AIM (Colonel) Peled, decided to acquit the three on the basis of testimonies by officers who confirmed that the three had acted in accordance with orders given by their superiors. A military doctor involved in the same incident was reprimanded, after it was proved that he had neglected to check the Arab detainee who was brought to him and examined him only one and a half hours later. (Ha'aretz, 27 September 1989)

151. On 26 September 1989, the Beersheba district court gave a 7-month suspended sentence to Shimon Yifrah, of Neve-Dekalim settlement in the Gaza Strip. He was convicted of causing death by negligence for shooting a 14-year-old schoolgirl from Deir el-Balah, Intisar el-Attar, on 10 November 1987. The girl's death provoked serious rioting in Gaza the following day and, according to Palestinian sources, contributed to the outbreak of the uprising. The judge said in passing sentence that Yifrah had been "in a state of anguish and acted without being able to correctly weigh the consequences". He said a penally had to be imposed because of the tragic result, but that under the circumstances (Yifrah's car was stopped at a road-block of stones and Arab pupils were throwing stones at it), the normal criteria for punishment did not apply. On 24 October 1989, it was reported that State Attorney Dorit Beinish had appealed to the Supreme Court against the light sentence imposed on Shimon Yifrah. According to the State Attorney, a seven-month suspended sentence did not express the severity of the crime. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 27 September 1989; Al-Fajr, 2 October 1989; Jerusalem Post, 24 October 1989)

152. On 2 October 1989, it was reported that the Southern Region Commander, Aluf Matan Vilnay, had reduced the prison terms of three soldiers of the Givati brigade who had been sentenced to prison terms for beating Hani al-Shami, from Jabaliya camp. The man died as a result of the beating. Staff-Sergeant Yitzhak Adler and Privates Ron Hakhel and Yitzhak Kabudi had their terms reduced from nine to six months and were released. Aluf Vilnai barred the soldiers from returning to the Givati brigade, saying they did not deserve the honour of serving in a combatant brigade of the IDF. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 2 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 9 October 1989)

153. On 15 October 1989, the Central Region military court sentenced Samal (Sergeant) Ilan Arev, 25, a reservist, to two years' imprisonment for killing two residents of Bani Naim in May 1988. He was also sentenced to a one-year suspended term. The court convicted Arev of causing death in aggravated circumstances and said that the principles of the sanctity of life made no distinction between Jews and Arabs. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 16 October 1969)

154. On 8 November 1989, six policemen, who were allegedly involved in the killing on 26 October 1989 in Belt Jala of a Palestinian youth, Karim Daamseh, 16, of Al-Khader village, were dismissed from the police, arrested and brought before a magistrates court in Jerusalem. They were released on bail of NIS 20,000 ($10,000) each until the police internal investigations division completed the criminal inquiry into the incident. All six policemen were reportedly Arabs from Galilee who had not been in the police force for long. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 9 November 1989)

155. On 12 November 1989, a charge sheet was filed with the Central Region military court against Samal Gilad Shemen, a paratrooper, who was charged with manslaughter following an incident in May 1989 in which he opened fire, killing a 15-year-old girl from Shati camp, Amal Hassan, who was standing on a roof. The military prosecution accused the soldier of "manslaughter, illegal use of plastic bullets and opening fire contrary to the rules". (Ha'aretz, 13 November 1989)

156. On 20 November 1989, the Tel Aviv district court convicted Raphael Solomon, 23, a student at Joseph's Tomb Yeshiva in Nablus, of aggravated assault, in the shooting of two Gaza residents in June 1989. In a plea bargain, charges of attempted murder and fleeing arrest were dropped. In the incident, which occurred on 20 June 1989, just after the funeral of murdered settler Frederick Rosenfeld, the defendant shot a sub-machine gun at a group of Arabs standing at a bus-stop in central Israel. Mahmud Romana and Mahmud Rashaga were injured. (Jerusalem Post, 21 November 1989)

157. On 28 November 1989, a charge sheet was filed with the Tel Aviv district court against Gershon Masika, secretary of the Eilon Moreh settlement, for setting fire to a house in Deir el-Hatab, shooting and assault in aggravated circumstances. The incident occurred on 7 April 1988 when Masika and others saw Palestine flags on top of a house in the village. They entered the village in jeeps, opened fire, forced two residents to remove the flags and set fire to the house. They also beat one person. (Ha'aretz, 29 November 1989)

158. On 28 November 1989, the Beersheba district court sentenced a resident of Kiryat Gat to three months' imprisonment and ordered him to pay NIS 400 ($200) compensation to a Gaza resident whose car he had stoned. (Jerusalem Post, 29 November 1989)

159. On 29 November 1989, the Beersheba district Court sentenced Michael Maman, from Ashkelon, to 15 months' imprisonment with a 15-months' suspended term, for throwing a petrol bomb at an Arab car. The incident occurred a day after the discovery of the body of an Israeli soldier, Avi Sasportas. (Ha'aretz, 30 November 1989)

C. Treatment of civilians


1. General developments


(a) Harassment and physical ill- treatment

160. On 28 August, 1989, Zabi Nuweiser, of Nablus, charged that soldiers had stripped his son Roberto, aged 13, beat him and burnt his neck with cigarettes, after the boy rushed into a building when a military patrol was passing by. The boy was subsequently treated at Al-Ittihad hospital and sent home. An IDF spokesman said the army had no information on the incident, but the authorities would investigate any official complaint from the family. Also on 28 August 1989, a lawyer from Tulkarm, Leila Kuzmar, complained that a guard at the military government house in that town beat her for no reason when she came to visit some of her clients who were held in the detention centre located there. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 29 August 1989)

161. On 29 August 1989, it was reported that inhabitants of Zeitun neighbourhood in Gaza alleged that an IDF patrol had tied a 13-year-old boy in front of their jeep and forced him to run in front of them while they were patrolling the area for about half an hour. After he was released the boy was in a state of shock and had to be hospitalized. Reports from Ahli hospital in Gaza confirmed that the boy had indeed been hospitalized. An IDF spokesman said the case was being investigate. (Ha'aretz, 29 August 1989 )

162. On 7 September 1989, data gathered from UNRWA and various health organizations showed that between 9 December 1987 and 15 August 1989 132 Palestinians suffered total or partial blindness during clashes in the occupied territories. (Al-Tali'ah, 7 September 1989)

163. On 17 September 1989, it was reported that the Peace Now movement had transmitted to the Defence Minister serious complaints regarding the interrogation of injured persons before they were given any medical treatment, and searches being conducted in operating theatres during surgical operations and childbirths. Members of the movement heard evidence during a visit they made to the Nablus hospital. In its cable to Defence Minister Rabin, Peace Now also asked him to comment on an allegation that, during a recent curfew in Nablus, kindergarten children and school-children were held for an hour and a half at an IDF road-block, after a military command car collided with a minibus transporting the children, and that soldiers slapped the children. (Ha'aretz, 17 September 1989)

164. On 19 September 1989, a report, recently published by the Israel Medical Association, was presented by its chairman, Dr. Ram Yishai. The report concerned the situation of the health services in the Gaza Strip and concluded that allegations made by Israeli and Palestinian doctors that the health services in the territories had severely deteriorated were groundless. Dr. Yishai had travelled to Gaza and had long talks with doctors and administrators of three hospitals: Shifa, the Children's Hospital and the Ophthalmological Hospital, The report affirmed that, while medical treatment in Gaza still lagged behind that of Israeli hospitals, there was a constant improvement. The hospitalization budget for Gaza had not been cut and the number of Gaza doctors working for the civil administration rose from 250 in 1987 to 320 at present out of a total of 850 in the Strip. Dr. Yishai added that soldiers may not enter Gaza hospitals without the written approval of a senior army officer. Renovation work was under way in Shifa Hospital. The 1,750 employees in health services had special permits enabling them to move freely during curfews. Allegations that doctors had been detained deliberately were false. Doctors who were arrested were held because they were suspected of security violations, and not in order to prevent them from treating patients. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 21 September 1989)

165. On 21 September 1989, it was reported that the security authorities had made an "unprecedented concession" to families of two Nablus residents, Ayman Jamus and Amar Kalbuna, who were killed three weeks earlier during a military operation in Nablus. The two men were at first buried in a cemetery near Jericho, known as the "terrorists' cemetery", but following an appeal to the High Court of Justice and heavy public pressure in Nablus, the authorities agreed to allow the families to see the bodies at the Tel Aviv Forensic Institute, following rumours that vital organs had been taken from the bodies for transplant operations in Israel. The authorities later allowed the families to rebury the two men in Nablus. (Jerusalem Post, 21 September 1989)

166. On 9 October 1989, a report by UNRWA affirmed that 392 Gaza Strip residents were shot and injured by live ammunition during the month of September 1989. UNRWA said the figure was 100 more than the casualties in the Gaza Strip during the previous month and the highest since May. The rising number of gunfire casualties indicated an increasing tendency on the part of the Israeli army to use fire-power rather than curfews in the Gaza Strip, according to Israeli press assessments. (Al-Fajr, 9 October 1989)

167. On 10 November 1989, it was reported that, according to affidavits and testimony sent to the IDF by the Association for Civil Rights in Israel, soldiers at the Ein Beit al-Ma refugee camp near Nablus had ordered camp residents to sweep the streets during the night. Mustafa Ma'aruf, 65, and Mahmud Taha, 53, whose affidavits were attached to the letter, said they had been forced to carry out cleaning tasks at least 20 times, most recently on 2 and 3 November 1989, when two officers, including a colonel, were present. (Jerusalem Post, 10 November 1989)

168. On 16 November 1989, an Israeli lawyer, Avraham Gal, said he had seen dozens of residents of the Bethlehem area held for hours the previous day at the local military government building to which they had been summoned, ostensibly for a meeting with a civil administration officer. (Jerusalem Post, 16 November 1989)

169. On 17 and 18 November 1989, according to Arab sources, two pregnant women in the Gaza Strip had miscarriages as a result of inhaling tear-gas. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 19 November 1989)

170. On 24 and 25 November 1989, several women were hospitalized after inhaling gas when troops dispersed a women's march in Nablus. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 26 November 1989)


(b) Collective punishment

( i ) Demolition of houses

171. On 25 August 1989, the security forces in the Gaza Strip demolished four houses belonging to persons suspected of killing suspected collaborators, membership in strike committees and activity against the IDF. (Ha'aretz, 27 August 1989; Al-Tali'ah, 31 August 1989)

172. On 29 August 1989, the military authorities demolished two houses and sealed six others in the West Bank. Some of the houses belonged to families of wanted youths and others to persons suspected of throwing petrol bombs. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 30 August 1989; Al-Fajr, 4 September 1989)

173. On 31 August 1989, it was reported that five houses were demolished during the last week of August. The houses belonged to Mohammed Taha Matar and Mohammed Rashmeywi in Shajera refugee camp; Ibrahim Hassan Al-Nawar in Khan Younis; Mohammed Amr in Beit Lid; and Mohammed Asfur in Absan Al-Kebira. (Al-Tali'ah, 31 August 1989)

174. On 1 September 1989, the IDF sealed two houses, in Nablus and in Beit Furik. The IDF also demolished two houses in Jabaliya, that of Mustafa Abu Ata, 22, and that of Ahmed Abad, 23. Bot were members of a strike committee, and were suspected of attacks on alleged collaborators. The security forces also sealed three streets in the Rafah camp following stone throwing and rioting. (Ha'aretz, 3 September 1989; Al-Fajr, 4 September 1989 )

175. On September 1989, the IDF demolished several houses in the Hebron area on the allegation that they were built without permits. (Al-Fajr, 11 September 1989)

176. On 7 September 1989, 11 houses were demolished in Surif, Nuba, Jabaliya, Halhul and Yata. (Al-Tali'ah, 7 September 1989; Al-Fajr, 11 September 1989)

177. On 8 and 9 September 1989, the security forces in the Gaza Strip demolished three houses in Jabaliya camp belonging to suspected popular committee leaders in the regions. (Ha'aretz, 10 September 1989)

178. On 13 September 1989, five houses were demolished in the West Bank because they were allegedly built without permits. (Al-Fajr, 18 September 1989)

179. On 14 September 1989, it was reported that the IDF handed an order to the family of Ayeb Mahmud Siham, in Zeitun neighbourhood, Gaza, telling them to leave their home within 48 hours, since the house was slated for sealing. Siham was arrested 15 days earlier on suspicion of membership of a popular committee. (Ha'aretz, 14 September 1989)

180. On 19 September 1989, the house of Yussef Ahmed al-Rafati, 48, in Rafat village in the Ramallah area, was demolished on the pretext it was built without a licence. Rafati was released from prison in the 1985 prisoner exchange between Israel and the PFLP. (Al-Fajr, 25 September 1989)

181. On 20 September 1989, the High Court of Justice upheld orders for the demolition or sealing of three houses belonging to the families of youths who were involved in setting fire to the military government house in Kalkilya and throwing a petrol bomb at an Israeli bus. (Ha'aretz, 21 September 1989; Al-Fajr, 25 September 1989)

182. On 27 September 1989, two houses were sealed in Gaza. They belonged to Abd el-Salem Krayem and Ihab Mahmud Hamuda. The military sources also reported that the house of Abd al-Hasser Krayem (Abd el-Salam's brother) was recently demolished. The two Gaza residents were members of strike committees suspected of attacks on alleged collaborators. Both were under arrest. In Bidya, near Nablus, two houses were demolished for having been built without a permit. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 28 September 1989)

183. On 27 September 1989, the Israeli Information Centre on Human Rights in the Territories, Betzelem, charged in a report it issued that demolition and sealing of houses in the territories was often arbitrary. According to the report, since the beginning of the uprising 173 houses had been demolished in the West Bank and 63 in the Gaza Strip. Some 79 homes have been sealed in the West Bank and 19 in the Gaza Strip. In most of the cases the homes belonged to people suspected of murder or attempted murder, but people suspected of stone throwing or incitement were also among the victims of such practices. In addition, at least 300 homes were demolished in the territories over the past year for being built illegally. According to the data, criteria for demolition of homes were more strict in the Gaza Strip than in the West Bank. In Gaza, only homes of people suspected of the most serious offences were demolished. Reacting to the report, the IDF spokesman said the law in force in the territories authorized senior commanders to order the demolition and sealing of homes. Decisions were said to be made at the highest official levels after a careful inspection of each case. (Ha'aretz, 28 September 1989; Jerusalem Post, 28 September 1989)

184. On 28 September 1989, the civil administration demolished nine houses in the Hebron district, on the grounds that they had been built without a permit. Six houses were in Hebron, two in Idna and one in Si'ir. (Ha'aretz, 29 September 1989)

185. On 6 October 1989, it was reported that troops had blown up the home of Adnan Alwan, 23, in Beit Lahiya, and sealed the home of Ibrahim Habil, 27. Alwan was suspected of killing an alleged collaborator. Habil was suspected of belonging to a strike force in Beit Lahiya that was believed to have killed an alleged collaborator. (Jerusalem Post, 6 October 1989)

186. On 18 October 1989, troops demolished or sealed houses of people suspected of several "terrorist," acts in the Kalkilya area. The demolitions were carried out after an appeal by the suspects' families was rejected by the High Court of Justice. One of the families involved demolished a room in its house, under a special agreement with the army. Members of the Abu Shuhdem family demolished the third-floor dwelling of Bashar Abu Shuhdemn, 19. The three men whose houses were demolished or sealed were arrested eight months earlier on suspicion of belonging to local strike forces. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 19 October 1989)

187. On 8 November 1989, it was reported that the IDF had sealed homes in Jericho belonging to families of four Palestinians arrested on suspicion of membership in a local strike force responsible for killing an alleged collaborator.
(Jerusalem Post, 8 November 1989)

188. On 23 November 1989, troops sealed the home of Ismail Hamad Said Sha'aban, from Beit Lahiya, Gaza, who was suspected of killing another Beit Lahiya resident, Mahmud Abu Darad, for alleged immoral behaviour. (Ha'aretz, 24 November 1989)

189. On 29 November 1989, troops sealed the home of Mahmoud Ali Nasman, 25, from Sheikh Radwan, Gaza, leaving 25 people homeless, and the home of Maher al-Khadi, 26, in Shati, leaving 17 people homeless. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 30 November 1989)

190. On 30 November 1989, troops demolished the home of Muhammad Abd el-Ati Abu Sharakh, 23, from Shati , who allegedly ran over an Israeli soldier and a security man on 13 October 1989. The security man subsequently had both legs amputated. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 1 December 1989)


(ii) Imposition of curfews, sealing off or closing areas

191. On 1 and 2 September 1989, curfews were imposed in Nuseirat and Darai, and lifted in Deir el-Balah (all localities are in the Gaza Strip). (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 3 September 1989; Al-Fajr, 11 September 1989)

192. On 8 and 9 September 1989, in Nablus, 120,000 persons remained under curfew for the eighth consecutive day and people were complaining of shortage of fresh food. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 10 September 1989; Al-Fajr, 18 September 1989 )

193. On 12 September 1989, many clashes were reported in and around Nablus despite the curfew, which had been in force for 11 days. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 13 September 1989; Al-Fajr, 18 September 1989)

194. On 15 and 16 September 1989, during the week-end, most camps in the Gaza Strip were placed under curfew. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 17 September 1989; Al-Fajr, 25 September 1989)

195. On 17 September 1989, in the West Bank, most of the refugee camps were placed under curfew and military presence was stepped up. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 18 September 1989; Al-Fajr, 25 September 1989)

196. On 18 September 1989, curfews remained in force in many parts of the West Bank and Gaza Strip, including four refugee camps in the Nablus area that had been under curfew for 17 days. In the Gaza Strip, at least 22 Palestinians were injured during violent confrontations with Israeli soldiers. (Al-Fajr, 25 September 1989)

197. On 3 October 1989, Beit Sahur, Dheisheh and Aida were placed under curfew and the IDF banned foreign reporters from entering the Nablus area. (Ha'aretz, 4 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 9 October 1989)

198. On 5 October 1989, curfews were imposed on eight refugee camps in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip. (Al-Fajr, 9 October 1989)

199. On 6 and 7 October 1989, many areas, including the entire Gaza Strip, were sealed off, on the eve of the Jewish Yom Kippur holiday. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 8 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 9 October 1989)

200. On 8 October 1989, it was reported that most of the West Bank and Gaza Strip had been declared "closed military areas" over the week-end, and access to reporters and delegations of left-wing Israelis was prohibited. Among the towns that were closed to the media were Nablus, Hebron, Tulkarm, Gaza, Bethlehem and Beit Sahur, and many refugee camps. (Ha'aretz, 8 October 1989)

201. On 11 October 1989, curfews were maintained in the refugee camps of Far'a, Tulkarm and Nur Shams. Dheisheh refugee camp was sealed off following an incident in which a fire bomb was tossed at a military vehicle. A night curfew was also imposed on Jenin and its refugee camp. (Al-Fajr, 16 October 1989)

202. On 23 October 1989, Nablus was declared a closed military zone. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 24 October 1989)

203. On 27 and 28 October 1989, a curfew was imposed on Balata camp after a bomb was thrown at a border police jeep. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 29 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 6 November 1989)

204. On 1 November 1989, curfews remained in force in Far'a camp (for the third consecutive day) and Tulkarm camp (for the eleventh day), where people had been complaining about food shortages. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 2 November 1989)

205. On 3 and 4 November 1989, curfews were imposed in Nablus and several camps nearby: Balata, Bin Beit al-Ma, Askar, and in Far'a and Beit Anan, near Ramallah. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 5 November 1989)

206. On 9 November 1989, Nablus and four nearby camps were placed under curfew. Curfews were also imposed in Kalkilya and Kalandiya. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 10 November 1989)

207. On 10 and 11 November 1989, curfews remained in force in several West Bank areas, including Nablus and the nearby camps and Kalkilya. Bureij camp in the Gaza Strip was also placed under curfew. (Ha'aretz, 12 November 1989)

208. On 12 November 1989, curfews remained in force in Nablus, Kalandiya, Tubas and El-Bireh. In Kalkilya the curfew was lifted. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 13 November 1989)

209. On 13 November 1989, curfews were in force in Nablus and the surrounding camps, Kalandiya, Jalazun, al-Amari, Dheisheh and Aida camps, El-Bireh and most of the Gaza Strip camps. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 15 November 1989)

210. On 15 November 1989, curfews were in force in 16 camps, in Nablus, Tubas and parts of Ramallah and El-Bireh, as well as in sections of Gaza. The Gaza Strip remained sealed off. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 16 November 1989)

211. On 16 November 1989, curfews were in force in Nablus, Kalandiya camp and Gaze Strip camps (Nuseirat and Rafah) and neighbourboods (Sheikh Ajlin and Sabra). The Gaza Strip remained sealed off for the third consecutive day as searches continued for the Palestinians who ambushed and fatally wounded two earlier in the week. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 17 November 1989)

212. On 17 and 18 November 1989, the sealing off of the Gaza Strip was lifted. Kalandiya camp remained under curfew for the tenth day. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 19 November 1989)

213. On 19 November 1989, Kalandiya camp remained under curfew for the eleventh day. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 20 November 1989)

214. On 21 November 1989, curfews were imposed in Sheikh Ajlin village and in the Zeitun and Sabra neighbourhoods in Gaza. (Jerusalem Post, 22 November 1989)

215. On 22 November 1989, curfews remained in force in three Gaza neighbourhoods, Sabra, Zeitun and Sheikh Ajlin. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 23 November 1989)

216. On 24 and 25 November 1989, Tulkarm was declared a closed military zone. Shati camp was placed under curfew. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 26 November 1989)


(iii) Imposition of economic sanctions

The operation against the tax revolt in Beit Sahur

217. On 22 September 1989, it was reported that tax authorities, escorted by a military force, continued for the second day an operation to confiscate private and commercial property from dozens of Beit Sahur residents. It was alleged that no prior notice, not receipts were given. On 26 September 1989, it was reported that the confiscation operation in Beit Sahur continued for the fifth day running, and that local residents complained of exaggerated valuations decided arbitrarily, confiscation of property worth much more than the sums owed and of the brutal and humiliating attitude of the confiscators. A spokesman for the civil administration said the operation was being carried out "in keeping with the law, after lengthy preparatory work and with close legal consultation". (Ha'aretz, 26 September 1989;
Jerusalem Post, 22 September 1989 )

218. On 25 September 1989, tax raids continued in the West Bank, particularly in Beit Sahur, where many goods and private property were confiscated from people who refused to pay the taxes imposed on them. (Al-Fajr, 2 October 1989)

219. On 3 October 1989, it was reported that Beit Sahur had been under nightly curfew from 6 p.m. to 4.30 a.m. for over a week and under a total curfew over the Jewish New Year holiday, reportedly in order to prevent unrest. Troops were carrying out raids on homes and shops, emptying their contents and, in some instances, beating residents. Troops set up tax collection headquarters in tents inside the town. It was reported that the raids, which had entered their second week, included extensive confiscation of merchandise and household goods worth more than NIS 1 million. The Al-Haqq organization in Ramallah reportedly alleged that the raids were being carried out with "exceptional manifestations of savagery and violence". The organization further alleged that two of the confiscation operations carried out in private homes resulted in the hospitalization of the women who lived there. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 3 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 9 October 1989)

220. On 6 October 1989, the IDF prevented a group of foreign consuls from visiting Beit Sahur. The area commander told the consuls of Belgium, France, Greece, Italy, Spain, Sweden and the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland that the town had been declared a closed area "for operational reasons'. It was reported that over NIS 1,5 million worth of goods had so far been confiscated, including furniture, household appliances and the entire contents of workshops. A senior military source said there was no intention to renounce and give in to the residents who refused to pay taxes to the civil administration, as the eyes of the entire West Bank and Gaza Strip were focused on that town. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 8 October 1989)

221. On 10 October 1989, Defence Minister Yitzhak Sabin, speaking at the Knesset Foreign Affairs and Defence Committee, warned that "We shall teach [the Beit Sahur residents] a lesson ... even if it takes one month, we shall break them. We shall not let this civil disobedience campaign succeed". (Ha'aretz, 11 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 16 October 1989)

222. On 11 October 1989, the IDF again raided Beit Sahur and carried out massive arrests, parallel to the tax collection operation. The town reportedly remained a closed military area, as dozens of residents suspected of organizing the civil disobedience, or simply residents who refused to pay taxes were being arrested. (Ha'aretz, 12 October 1989; (Al-Fajr, 16 October 1980)

223. On 12 October 1989, for the first time since the tax strike in Beit Sahur began, four local businessmen were brought before the military court in refugee camp. The president of the court decided to hold the trial at a later date and ruled that the defendants must be released on bail of NIS 300,000 ($15,000) or remain in custody. The Central Region Commander, Yitzhak Mordekhai, denied allegations that the property confiscated was worth far more than the residents' debts. He said the operation was being carried out "by a dialogue with the residents, and those who refuse to pay have their property confiscated". He expressed confidence that Beit Sahur will finally learn that the right way is to live peacefully and keep an orderly and proper relationship with the authorities". (Ha'aretz, 13 October 1989)

224. On 15 October 1989, it was reported that the civil administration had proposed that residents pay their debts in instalments. Several people reportedly paid their debts, but the overwhelming majority continued to defy the authorities. More tax raids and arrests were reported. (Jerusalem Post, 15 October 1989)

225. On 19 October 1989, the IDF distributed leaflets in Arabic calling on Beit Sahur residents to stop their tax strike and warning them of the consequences of their strike. A second group of local merchants were brought before a military court in Ramallah. Some told the court that they did not submit the tax reports because of pressure by youths. The seven merchants were told they could be released on bail of NIS 15,000 ($7,500), but it was reportedly doubtful that they could pay such a sum. (Ha'aretz, 20 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 16 October 1989)

226. On 27 October 1989, it was reported that the Greek Orthodox, Armenian and Latin patriarchs were prevented from entering Beit Sahur. The area commander explained that the town was a closed military area and that they should have co-ordinated their visit with the military authorities. He proposed that they enter the town accompanied by the IDF, or travel in one car, but they refused. Earlier, the ecclesiastics issued a statement criticizing the raids.
(Jerusalem Post, 27 October 1989; Ha'aretz, 29 October 1989)

227. On 29 October 1989, the IDF allowed the Greek Orthodox patriarch of Jerusalem, Diodoros I, to officiate at a Sunday service at Beit Sahur. Journalists were barred from entering the town. During the service, tax collectors continued confiscating property from homes and shops. (Jerusalem Post, 30 October 1989)

228. On 30 October 1989, civil administration sources said that the tax-collecting operation in Beit Sahur was to be over the next day. According to official explanations the campaign was ending because the civil administration had finished collecting its debts by attaching property of residents who refused to pay taxes. Over NIS 3 million ($1.5 million) worth of property bad been seized and about 60 local merchants had been arrested, some of whom were facing trial for failing to file tax reports. During the operation, which lasted for six weeks, the town was closed to outsiders, placed under intermittent curfew and had all telephone lines cut off. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 31 October 1989)

229. On 21 November 1989, 13 Beit Sahur businessmen - the last group of local businessmen to be arrested for failing to pay taxes - were convicted, on the basis of their confessions, and fined. Since all announced they refused to pay the fines imposed on them they would have to serve prison terms of two to four months. The merchants had reportedly been detained 40 days earlier and held in Anata detention centre in harsh conditions. (Ha'aretz, 22 November 1989)


Other economic sanctions

230. On 7 September 1989, Palestinian farmers complained of higher taxes and duties and new obstacles affecting the poultry industry in the occupied territories. For example, permits for the import of fodder and chicks from Israel were not issued. (Al-Tali'ah, 7 September 1989; Al-Fajr, 11 September 1989)

131. On 23 October 1989, troops uprooted 60 trees in the area where a Netivot resident was injured the previous day by stone throwing. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 24 October 1989)


(iv) Other forms of collective punishment

232. On 19 September 1989, it was reported that the village of Bani-Naim, near Hebron, had been cut off from the water network for over a year, because the villagers failed to pay their water bills. (Ha'aretz, 19 September 1989)

233. On 27 September 1989, electric power was cut off to half of Nablus and to all the nearby refugee camps, owing to the municipality's failure to pay NIS 500,000 (about $250,000) to the Israel Electricity Company. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 28 September 1989)

234. On 11 October 1989, it was reported that telephone links to Ramallah and Bethlehem had been cut off for a week, also affecting hospitals. The lines were connected again the next day. (Jerusalem Post, 11 October 1989; Ha'aretz, 12 October 1989)

235. On 8 November 1989, Nablus residents reported that the IDF had confiscated 15 cars from West Bank residents who happened to be in the town. When the car-owners came to get back their cars, in the evening, they were told to come back the next day. (Ha'aretz, 9 November 1989)

236. On 17 November 1989, Palestinians alleged that troops had kept over 100 residents of Askar camp outside, in heavy rain, as punishment for "independence festivities" held in the camp. (Ha'aretz, 17 November 1989)


(c) Expulsions

237. On 27 August 1989, five West Bank residents were deported, four to Lebanon and one to France. Those sent to Lebanon were Majed Labadi, 29, of Abu Dis; Odeh Ma'ali, 31, of Kafr Nima; Bilal Shakhashir, 37, of Nablus (all three activists of the DFLP); and Muhammad Matur, 39, of EI-Bireh, a Fatah activist. The fifth deportee, Taysir Aruri, 44, a Bir Zeit University professor of physics and member of the Palestine Communist Party, was granted his request to be expelled to France. All five were considered leaders of the uprising. The deportations were carried out after the High Court of Justice had rejected their petitions against the deportation. (Al-Fajr, Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 28 August 1989; Al-Tali'ah, 31 August 1989)

238. On 27 August 1989, 18 women and children were expelled to Jordan on the rounds that they did not have a family reunification permit. The women were from Deir Abu Masha'al, Arura and Beit Ur al-Tehta. On 7 September 1989, it was reported that another 14 women were expelled to Jordan during the previous week for the same reason. The women were from Rantis, Badw, Bani Saleh and Deir Nizam (in the Bethlehem area). According to Israeli officials, 74 residents, men and women, were expelled during the past weeks on the grounds that they did not have a family reunification permit. On 28 September 1989, 5 Palestinian women and their 12 children were expelled from the villages of Karawat Bani Zeid and Kafr Ain in the Ramallah area, allegedly for not having residency permits. On 27 September 1989, four women from Deir Amar were expelled to Jordan, after their permit to remain in the West Bank expired. One of the women was a mother of three. (Al-Tali'ah, 31 August and 7 September 1989; Al-Fajr, 11 September and 2 October 1989; Ha'aretz, 28 September 1989)

239. On 23 October 1989, the military authorities were reported to have issued an expulsion order against a family of five claiming that the family lacked a permission to reside in the occupied territories. Najla' Mousa Mustafa, 45, and her four children had lived in Usserin village, near Nablus, for 17 years. (Al-Fajr, 23 October 1989)

240. On 2 and 3 November 1989, it was reported that Manal Nabulsi, a woman of Jordanian nationality, who was married to a Nablus resident and the mother of a one-month-old baby, had been ordered to leave the West Bank without her child, because she did not have a local residence permit. She had been consistently refused a family-reunification permit and since she had no Israeli-issued IDF card, her baby was registered in her husband's card. This prevented her from taking the baby with her to Jordan. Her husband, Muhammad Nabulsi, alleged that the authorities offered to grant his wife a reunification permit if he agreed to work for the security services. Defence sources refused to comment on the case. (Ha'aretz, 2 November 1989; Jerusalem Post, 3 November 1989)

2. Measures affecting certain fundamental freedoms


(a) Freedom of movement

241. On 30 August 1989, it was reported that the Chairman of the Citrus Growers' Association in the Gaza Strip, Hashem Ata al-Shawa, was prohibited from going to the Netherlands to participate in a meeting of the European Community in September 1989. On 2 October 1989, it was reported that the most important citrus exporter in the Gaza Strip, Rajeb Murtaja, was barred from going to Egypt in a delegation of Gaza public figures who left on 30 September 1989. Murtaja was reportedly suspected of illegal activity and was restricted to the Gaza Strip. (Ha'aretz, 30 August 1989; 2 October 1989)

242. On 4 September 1989, it was reported that the Israeli authorities prohibited residents of Kufr Abush from travelling after an Israeli gold merchant was abducted and hidden in a dry well in the village. (Al-Fajr, 4 September 1989)

243. On 7 October 1989, Mahmud Abu al-Rad, head of the Economics Department at Al Najah University, was banned from travelling to Vienna to attend a United Nations conference. (Al-Fajr, 16 October 1989)

244. On 9 October 1989, it was reported that, for the seventh consecutive month, residents of Askar, near Nablus, were banned from travelling over the bridge to Jordan. (Al-Fajr, 9 October 1989)

245. On 14 October 1989, Al Nahar reported that the Israeli authorities prohibited all Nablus residents under 45 from travelling abroad for the second consecutive month. (Al-Fajr, 23 October 1989)

246. On 23 October 1989, the High Court of Justice issued an order nisi asking the commander of IDF forces in the West Bank to show cause within 30 days why he should not cancel travel bans against residents of three villages, Abush, Danabe and Burkin. (Jerusalem Post, 24 October 1989)

247. On 23 October 1989, the Reverend Riyad Abu al-Assal, 52, a prominent figure among Nazareth's Anglican community and a Palestinian activist, was barred from travelling abroad. (Al-Fajr, 23 October 1989)

248. On 13 November 1989, it was reported that the Head of the Gaza civil administration, Brig.-Gen. Arieh Shifman, had informed Dr. Ahmad el-Yaziji that the security forces had decided to ban him from travelling abroad. (Jerusalem Post, 13 November 1989)

249. On 21 November 1989, it was reported that, according to affidavits cited by the Betzelem information centre, Palestinians under travel bans had obtained permits to go abroad by paying persons known as collaborators. Villagers from Batir had been prevented from travelling abroad for the past three months and a similar ban was in force until recently on Taluza. In Kafr Malik and Kabatiya, travel bans lasted for over one year. (Jerusalem Post, 21 November 1989)


(b) Freedom of expression

250. On 27 August 1989, the IDF command and the civil administration in the Gaza Strip issued a new order prohibiting the use of facsimile facilities for the transmission of news and documents. It was explained that the PLO in Tunisia had been using facsimile machines to transmit instructions to the territories. It was also used by the leadership of the uprising. Arab sources said that the people most seriously affected by the new order were journalists and public figures. (Ha'aretz, 28 August 1989)

251. On 29 August 1989, Majed Abu Arab was placed under administrative detention for six months. Abu Arab is the Nablus correspondent for the Arabic newspaper Al-Sha'b and was arrested two weeks earlier. (Al-Fajr, 4 September 1989)

252. On 21 September 1989, the Israeli High Court turned down the petition by Hatem Abdel Kader against the order issued by the Israeli Defence Minister placing him under administrative detention for six months. Abdel Kader, managing editor of Al-Fajr, was detained on 21 August 1989. (Al-Fajr, 2 October 1989)

253. On 3 October 1989, the authorities declared an area of East Jerusalem a closed military zone in order to block a press conference on the tax revolt in Beit Sahur. The order, signed by Central Region Commander Yitzhak Mordekhai, covered an East Jerusalem hotel where the press conference was scheduled to take place and adjacent streets. The press conference was organized by Faisal Husseini. As he was prevented from holding the press conference, Mr. Husseini improvised a conference outside the closed area. The closure measure was criticized by the Mayor of Jerusalem, Teddy Kollek. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 4 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 9 October 1989)

254. On 16 November 1989, the security forces ordered a three-day ban on the printing and distribution of the East Jerusalem daily Al-Nahar for allegedly publishing inflammatory material and for censorship violations. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 17 November 1989)


(c) Freedom of association

255. On 11 October 1989, the High Court of Justice ordered that the closure order issued against the Association for the Palestinian Woman (In'ash al-Usrah), based in El-Bireh, be reduced from two years to one year. The State claimed that the Association was deeply involved in hostile activity connected with the uprising. The closure order was issued on 19 June 1988. The director of the Association, Samiha Khalil, had in the past received town arrest orders restricting her to El-Bireh. The Association provided employment to 4,800 women. (Ha'aretz, 12 October 1989)


(d) Freedom of education

256. On 6 September 1989, several schools were closed in Hebron, Khader and Kalandiya, bringing the number of closed schools in the West Bank to 17. (Al-Tali'ah, Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 7 September 1989)

257. On 7 September 1989, 21 schools were reported to be closed in the West Bank. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 8 September 1989)

258. On 19 September 1989, in Bethlehem, the Israeli authorities ordered the secondary school for boys closed for one week. The closure order of three other schools was also extended for one more week. (Al-Fajr, 25 September 1989)

259. On 25 September 1989, in the town of Beit Jala, four schools were ordered closed until further notice. The following day, four more schools were also ordered closed in Gaza. (Al-Fajr, 2 October 1989)

260. On 4 October 1989, two schools were ordered closed in Hebron. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 5 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 9 October 1989)

261. On 13 and 14 October 1989, four schools in Tulkarm camp were ordered closed for one month. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 15 October 1989)

262. On 16 October 1989, violent disturbances were reported in East Jerusalem, mainly in and around the Rashidiya high school. Some 40 pupils were arrested, of whom 11 remained in custody until late in the evening. Some 15 pupils had to receive treatment for rubber-bullet injuries or tear-gas inhalation. Several policemen were slightly injured by stones. The school was ordered closed for one week. According to police sources the disturbances were linked to activity by Jewish extremists known as the Temple Mount Faithful, who had tried to organize a ceremony of laying a cornerstone for the Third Temple on the Temple Mount, but were barred access to the area by the police. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 17 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 23 October 1989)

263. On 17 October 1989, a second East Jerusalem school was ordered closed for one week. It is the Sawahra school in Jebel Mukabar neighbourhood. The measure was taken after pupils, aged 8 to 10, stoned residential apartments in a nearby Jewish neighbourhood. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 18 October 1989; Al-Fajr, 23 October 1989)

264. On 23 October 1989, in Nablus, two schools were ordered closed indefinitely following clashes. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 24 October 1969; Al-Fajr, 30 October 1989)

265. On 30 November 1989, it was reported that UNRWA had decided to reopen its schools in the West Bank on 11 December 1989, despite a military order that ended the school year on 1 November 1989. The civil administration said it would close the schools if UNRWA reopened them and had informed UNRWA that classes would only be allowed to resume on 10 January 1990, when the new school year began. (Jerusalem Post, 30 November 1989)

3. Settlers' activities affecting the civilian population

266. On 31 August 1989, Al-Quds reported that Israeli settlers from Shavei Shomron had taken over land belonging to Al-Nakura village in the Nablus area. The seven-and-a-half dunam plot was planted with almond and olive trees. (Al-Fajr, 11 September 1989)

267. On 26 September 1989, It was reported that eight settlers from the West Bank had been questioned by police over the previous two days on suspicion that they had staged stone-throwing and petrol-bomb attacks on Israeli cars earlier in the year in order to incite settlers and draw attention to security problems in the West Bank. (Jerusalem Post, 26 September 1989)

268. On 29 November 1989, it was reported that, according to a complaint submitted to Police Commissioner David Kraus by the Ramallah-based human rights group Al-Haqq, two settlers wearing army trousers and carrying sub-machine-guns had beaten passers-by and opened fire randomly in central Ramallah, 12 days earlier, wounding a local man in the leg. Military sources, who confirmed the incident, said the two settlers were immediately taken for questioning by an officer. (Jerusalem Post, 29 November 1989)

D. Treatment of detainees

269. On 30 August 1989, Leah Tsemel petitioned the High Court of Justice to compel the authorities of the Ketziot detention camp to allow her client, convicted prisoner Muhammad al-Nubani from Ramallah, to meet with her. The prisoner was reportedly held in solitary confinement and her requests to meet with him have been rejected by the camp commander. According to Adv. Tsemel, the rights of Ketziot detainees to meet privately with their attorney had been violated with increasing frequency. Lawyers and clients had to talk across two fences that were 70 centimetres apart. Any document to be signed by the detainee had to be transferred via the guard, who could read it. On 19 October 1989, it was reported that lawyer Tamar Poleg had charged that detainees' rights to consult privately with their attorneys were being denied in the Ketziot detention camp, where two fences had been erected, separating detainees from their attorneys. On 18 October 1989, Judge Advocate-General Amnon Strashnow had told a press briefing that the fences had been put up to prevent lawyers from passing forbidden information to their clients. (Jerusalem Post, 31 August 1989 and 19 October 1989)

270. On 8 September 1989, it was reported that, upon the instructions or the Southern Region Commander, Matan Vilnay, it was decided in the IDF to open an additional detention facility in Ketziot. The new wing would be built to house 1,300 inmates. In a related development, it was reported that, according to a Palestinian just freed from Ketziot camp, the facility had recently been expanded to accommodate another 1,200 detainees. He said that this was done by putting up extra tents. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 8 September 1989)

271. On 12 September 1989, some 1,000 inmates in Ketziot camp went on hunger strike. An IDF spokesman acknowledged the fact, but claimed the strike was over after one day. Gaza Strip lawyers who visited the facility said there was a dispute between the leadership of the inmates and the camp authorities, owing to the latters' demand that tent-flies be kept up day and night. The inmates opposed that demand, arguing that this would leave them exposed to cold weather during the night, and heat during the day. The dispute reportedly led to a demonstration by inmates, which was quelled with tear-gas. An IDF spokesman denied the report and said there was no rioting in Ketziot, (Ha'aretz, 13 September 1989)

272. On 18 September 1989, it was reported that Muhammad Amin, 20, a Bir Zeit University student, had alleged that he was tortured and denied medical care while he was held in the Dhahiriya detention camp, south of Hebron. (Jerusalem Post, 18 September 1989)

273. On 22 September 1989, it was reported that inmates of the Gaza prison had complained to their lawyers that prison authorities forced them to strip, presumably for a body search, before each visit by a family member or lawyer.
(Jerusalem Post, 22 September 1989)

274. On 13 October 1989, it was reported that Maha Musaklim Nasser, a physics teacher in the Lutheran High School in Ramallah, had gone on hunger strike immediately after she was arrested on 4 October 1989. She had already been detained earlier, in July 1988, while her husband was serving a six-month administrative detention term in Ketziot. She reportedly alleged to her lawyer, Adv. Leah Tsemel, who visited her at the Russian Compound in Jerusalem that she was being subjected to physical and psychological pressure. (Ha'aretz, 13 October 1989)

275. On 15 October 1989, it was reported that the Al-Haqq organization of Ramallah alleged that one of its employees, Sha'aban Jabarin, from Si'ir, near Hebron, who had been arrested the previous week, had been severely beaten in custody and had had to be hospitalized. On 14 October 1989, following an inquiry by a senior officer, military sources reported that Sha'aban Jabarin had indeed been detained for questioning in Hebron. "Since he offered resistance to being detained, reasonable force was used against him. As he complained that he was not feeling well he was admitted to Hadassan Hospital in Jerusalem, was discharged the next day and was transferred to the Dhahiriya detention centre, as he was found to be fit for detention." (Ha'aretz, 15 October 1989)

276. On 19 October 1989, several dozen relatives of security prisoners held a demonstration in the Gaza Strip. They claimed that the inmates were being held in solitary confinement for long periods and that they could not visit them, send them letters or take food to them. They asked the Red Cross representative in Gaza to intervene. (Ha'aretz, 20 October 1989)

277. On 2 November 1989, Adv. Felicia Langer approached the Minister of Police and requested that an immediate inquiry be conducted into allegations made by a 12-year-old boy from Beit Safafa, near Jerusalem, that he was severely beaten while in police custody. The boy said in an affidavit that he was detained on 29 October 1989, taken into a police van, ordered to kneel down and then three policemen kicked him on the head and back. He was taken to the Russian Compound where seven people interrogated him and beat him with a truncheon, asking that he inform about activities of other children. He was later again slapped and beaten, until he confessed to participating in three demonstrations. A medical certificate submitted to the Jerusalem magistrates' court confirmed the existence of marks of blows on the head. (Ha'aretz, 3 November 1989)

278. On 7 November 1989, it was reported that security prisoners in Ashkelon gaol complained, in a letter smuggled from that prison the previous day, that prisoners held in solitary confinement in Ramla gaol were suffering from lack of medical treatment and from restrictive and humiliating measures, such as having their hands and feet tied when they met with visitors, lawyers or Red Cross delegates. Family visits were only allowed once every two months. Prisoners were under television surveillance for 24 hours a day and food was of bad quality and insufficient quantity. There was no hot water and sanitary conditions were poor. In another development., it was reported that lawyers in the Gaza Strip alleged that the IDF did not permit them to meet with detainees in the new detention centre recently opened in Khan Younis, known as Ansar 4. Palestinian sources said some 200 detainees were being held there, but there was no information as to their identity and the charges against them. Red Cross delegates were reportedly also barred from visiting the facility. Detainees were held in tents equipped with 25 mattresses for 60 people. Detainees under interrogation were allegedly held in solitary confinement and subjected to harsh treatment, including many hours with their hands tied behind their backs and hoods covering their heads. There were also allegations of beating by soldiers. It was alleged that children under 14 were also held in the camp and that a nine-year-old boy, Ali al-Inshasi, was detained for five days and beaten by an officer known as Captain Yoram. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 7 November 1989)

279. On 8 November 1989, Red Cross delegates visited the Khan Younis detention camp for the first time since it was opened several months earlier, but lawyers were reportedly still refused entry to the facility. Adv. Samir Daher and Mohammad al-Attar said they were refused entry on 7 November 1989. (Jerusalem Post, 9 November 1989)

280. On 20 November 1989, some 1,000 of the 4,500 security prisoners held in Israel and the territories held a one-day hunger strike to protest against harsh prison conditions in which security prisoners, particularly women, were held in Hasharon gaol. Another objective of the strike was to express solidarity with security prisoners held in solitary confinement in Nitzan gaol in Ramla. Most of these prisoners were members of the "Hamas" movement. Sources in the Prison Service rejected complaints about harsh prison conditions and said that conditions were "reasonable", considering the overcrowding in all prisons in Israel. (Ha'aretz, 21 November 1989 )

281. On 24 November 1989, it was reported that Adv. Nazem Aweida charged that his client, Zahra Dahal, 35, from Sabra camp in Gaza, had been detained since 3 November 1989, upon returning from a visit to Jordan. No reason for her detention was given. Her eight-month-old baby, who was still nursing, had been taken away from her and given to its father. Since then, the lawyer said, the baby had become very weak, despite intravenous glucose supplements to his diet. On 23 November 1989, the lawyer was prevented by the security services from seeing his client. An IDF spokesman said he could not comment on the case, which involved the civil administration. (Jerusalem Post, 24 November 1989)

282. On 26 November 1989, it was reported that lawyers were permitted to visit clients in the Khan Younis detention camp for the first time since it was opened. Three lawyers who visited their clients on 23 November 1989, said that conditions in the facility were improved before it was opened to visits, but detainees continued to complain of: harsh interrogations by security forces. (Jerusalem Post, 26 November 1989)

283. On 26 November 1989, a scuffle broke out outside the Ramallah military court when a bus-load of prisoners arrived for hearings. Soldiers severely beat some 16 detainees with clubs and rifle butts. (Ha'aretz, Jerusalem Post, 27 November 1989)

E. Annexation and settlement

284. On 31 August 1989, a new settlement, Ofarim, was inaugurated. It was located north-west of Ramallah, and was one of the eight settlements whose setting up was agreed upon by the Labour Party and the Likud, as part of the coalition agreement. Six families were staying there, in old temporary structures, but 40 families had registered to move to the new settlement as soon as housing was available. The settlement disposed of large land reserves (4,000 dunams) and, according to the plans, it would consist of 200 housing units. It was also reported that three more settlements would be set up shortly, also under the coalition agreement: Dugit, in the Katif Bloc, Reihan 5, in the northern West Bank, and Ramat Kidron, in the Judean mountains. At present, 2,000 housing units were under construction in the West Bank and 80,000 Jewish settlers lived in the territories. (Ha'aretz, 1 September 1989)

285. On 2 October 1989, it was announced that construction work was to begin shortly on the site of a new settlement in the Katif Bloc, called Nisanit. It was located close to the industrial zone and the Erez check-point, in the Gaza Strip. Fifteen families were occupying the temporary site at that time. (Ha'aretz, 3 October 1989)

286. On 4 October 1989, an emergency communication centre was inaugurated in the Muslim Quarter of Jerusalem's Old City to serve the 30 Jewish families living in the quarter. The exchange was located in the same building where Industry Minister Sharon had bought a flat. Every Jewish family living in the Muslim Quarter received a communication set that could be used in case of emergency. The exchange would function around the clock, manned by students of the nearby Yeshiva. (Ha'aretz, 5 October 1989)

287. On 4 October 1989, several land-owners in Hebron were handed notices by the military authorities informing them that a new street would be opened between the settlement of Kfar Etzion in the Beit Sahur region and the settlement of Kiryat Arba. (Al-Fajr, 9 October 1989)

288. On 9 October 1989, the IDF started building residential units in the Haftsim settlement, on the west side of Shifat village, in the Tulkarm area, on previously confiscated land. (Al-Fajr, 16 October 1989)

289. On 16 October 1989, a ceremony was held in Kfar Darom, in the Katif Bloc, in which the settlement was declared a permanent settlement. Industry Ministry Ariel Sharon declared that Israel was telling the whole world that it intended to stay there for ever and to continue and develop the region by building more settlements and expanding the existing ones. (Ha'aretz, 17 October 1989)

290. On 17 October 1989, it was reported that the Housing and Construction Ministry had recently begun building 75 housing units in three settlements, 25 in Talmon, near Ramallah, 25 in Tzoref, in the Etzion Bloc, and 25 in Kfar Darom, in the Katif Bloc. The Ministry has also recently finished the construction of 300 housing units in the Orthodox Jewish settlement of Beitar, west of the Etzion Bloc. A further 200 housing units would be built there shortly. (Ha'aretz, 17 October 1989)

291. On 23 October 1989, Housing and Construction Minister David Levy promised, at a visit to the Alfei-Menashe settlement, that his ministry would build 80 new housing units there next year. He participated in the inauguration ceremony of a new quarter in the settlement, which would shortly house 100 families. (Ha'aretz, 24 October 1989)

292. On 30 October 1989, the military authorities confiscated 12 dunams of cultivated land in the village of Ein Yabrud in the Ramallah area in order to expand the borders of the neighbouring O'ra settlement. The following day, 600 dunams of planted land were confiscated in Si'ir village in the Hebron area for "military use". (Al-Fajr, 30 October and 6 November 1989)

293. On 1 November 1989, it was reported that the IDF, together with the civil administration in the Gaza Strip, had expropriated 170 dunams and uprooted 2,620 trees for the construction of a new road south of Gaza, which would pass between Rafah and Beit Hanun. The road would also pass through Jabaliya, Sajai'ya, Bureij, Mughazi and Deir el-Balah. (Ha'aretz, 1 November 1989)

294. On 12 November 1989, the Government, in its weekly meeting, approved the establishment of a new settlement, Dugit, in the northern Gaza Strip. (Ha'aretz, 13 November 1999)

F. Information concerning the occupied Syrian Arab Golan

295. On 1 November 1989, it was reported that a new settlement, Had-Nes, had been inaugurated the previous day in the southern Golan Heights. (Ha'aretz, 1 November 1989)

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