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E/1983/72/Add.1 - Addendum

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UNITED
NATIONS
E

        Economic and Social Council
E/1983/72
24 May 1983

Second regular session of 1983
Item 22 of the provisional agenda*

IMPLEMENTATION OF THE DECLARATION ON THE GRANTING OF INDEPENDENCE
TO COLONIAL COUNTRIES AND PEOPLES BY THE SPECIALIZED AGENCIES AND
THE INTERNATIONAL INSTITUTIONS ASSOCIATED WITH THE UNITED NATIONS

Assistance to the Palestinian people
Report of the Secretary-General

CONTENTS
Paragraphs
Page
INTRODUCTION

INFORMATION RECEIVED FROM ORGANS AND ORGANIZATIONS OF
THE UNITED NATIONS SYSTEM
1 - 3


4 - 132
3


3
A.United Nations
1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

7.

8.


9.
Economic Commission for Western Asia

United Nations Conference on Trade and Development

United Nations Industrial Development Organization

United Nations Centre for Human Settlements (Habitat)

United Nations Children's Fund

United Nations Development Programme

World Food Programme

United Nations Relief and Works Agency for
Palestine Refugees in the Near East

United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees
4 - 7

8 - 13

14 - 27

28 - 29

30 - 44

45 - 53

54


55 - 65

66
3

4

6

9

9

12

13


14

16
B.Specialized agencies
1.

2.


3.


4.

5.

6.

7.

8.

9.

10.

11.
International Labour Organisation

Food and Agriculture Organization of the
United Nations

United Nations Educational, Scientific and
Cultural Organization

International Civil Aviation Organization

World Health Organization

World Bank

Universal Postal Union

International Telecommunication Union

World Meteorological Organization

World Intellectural Property Organization

International Fund for Agricultural Development
67 - 71


72 - 78


79 - 102

103

104 - 111

112 - 114

115 - 117

118 - 121

122 - 123

124 - 130

131 - 132
17


18


19

22

22

24

24

25

25

25

26


INTRODUCTION

1. In its resolution 2026 (LXI) of 4 August 1976, the Economic and Social Council invited the United Nations Development Programme, the specialized agencies and other organizations within the United Nations system to intensify their efforts in identifying the social and economic needs of the Palestinian people. It also requested those agencies and organizations to consult and co-operate with the Palestine Liberation Organization with a view to establishing and implementing concrete projects to ensure the improvement of the social and economic conditions of the Palestinian people.

2. The Council, in its resolution 2100 (LXIII) of 3 August 1977, called once more upon the United Nations Development Programme, the specialized agencies and other organizations within the United Nations system to continue and to intensify, as a matter of urgency and in co-ordination with the Economic Commission for Western Asia, their efforts in identifying the social and economic needs of the Palestinian people, and urged those agencies and organizations to consult and co-operate closely with the Palestine Liberation Organization, the representative of the Palestinian people, with a view to establishing and fully implementing concrete projects to ensure the improvement of the social and economic conditions of the Palestinian people. It also called upon agencies and organizations within the United Nations system that had not taken the necessary action in conformity with Council resolution 2026 (LXI) to do so as a matter of priority, and urged the executive heads of the organizations and agencies concerned to formulate and submit to their respective governing and/or legislative bodies concrete proposals for ensuring, in co-operation with the Palestine Liberation Organization, the effective implementation of the above provisions of the resolution. Finally, it requested the Secretary-General to submit an annual report to the Council on the action taken by the agencies and organizations concerned and the results achieved.

3. The present report contains information received from organizations on the action taken by them to implement the above resolutions. Information received from other organizations at a later date will be issued as an addendum to the present document.

INFORMATION RECEIVED FROM ORGANS AND ORGANIZATIONS
OF THE UNITED NATIONS SYSTEM
A. United Nations
1. Economic Commission for Western Asia

4. The Economic Commission for Western Asia (ECWA) adopted, at its ninth session, resolutions 108 (IX) and 109 (IX) on, respectively, assistance to the Palestine Liberation Organization, and a census of the Palestinian Arab people. In resolution 108 (IX) which was sponsored by the United Arab Emirates, Lebanon and Yemen, the Commission requested the Executive Secretary of ECWA, upon receiving requests for assistance from the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO), to be guided by the scale on which the Commission provided assistance to the least developed countries of the region, a priority area dealt with in the work programme and priorities for the period 1984-1989. As regards the census of the Palestinian Arab people, the ECWA secretariat submitted to the Commission, at its ninth session, a document in which three alternative proposals were made regarding the implementation of that project. The third alternative, which was accepted by the PLO, refers to the assumption of the responsibility by the Palestinian Central Statistics Bureau for the implementation of the project, with the provision that ECWA would extend the technical assistance available to the Commission in the same way that it is provided by the Commission to other member countries at their request. For the implementation of this project by the PLO, an estimate of $50,000 was needed, in addition to the technical services extended by ECWA free of charge.

5. In paragraph 3 of its resolution 109 (IX), the Commission urged States which were hosting the Palestinian Arab people to allow the PLO to make the necessary arrangements and to take measures to carry out the census operation in a manner that was compatible with the regulations and laws in force in the States concerned. Recently, a consultant of the United Nations Centre for Human Settlements (Habitat) visited ECWA and was provided with relevant information on the living conditions of the Palestinian people which is to be incorporated in the report of the Secretary-General on that subject, requested by the General Assembly in its resolution 37/222 of 20 December 1982.

6. In accordance with ECWA resolutions 27 (III) and 88 (VIII) on the economic and social situation and potential of the Palestinian people, the Executive Secretary took immediate action in April 1981 by signing a contract with Team International (TEAM), an engineering and management consultant firm, to complete the project within 16 months. Owing to the invasion of Lebanon in mid-1982, the schedule of implementation of the project suffered some setbacks. The project was, however, completed and submitted to the ECWA secretariat in March 1983. It consisted of a final report, a statistical abstract and 21 monographs covering various aspects of the economic and social situation and potential of the Palestinian Arab people in the region of Western Asia.

7. A summary of the project and its findings was submitted to the Western Asian Regional Preparatory Meeting for the International Conference on the Question of Palestine, held at Sharjah, United Arab Emirates, from 25 to 29 April 1983. An extensive synthesis of the project and its conclusions will be submitted to the Commission at its tenth session, to be held at Baghdad from 7 to 11 May 1983, and subsequently to the International Conference on the Question or Palestine scheduled to be held in Paris in August 1983.

2. United Nations Conference on Trade and Development

8. The activities of UNCTAD with regard to assistance to the Palestinian people are essentially undertaken in pursuance of resolution 109 (V) of 1 June 1979, adopted by the United Nations Conference on Trade and Development at its fifth session, and the follow-up resolution 239 (XXIII) adopted by the Trade and Development Board at the first part of its twenty-third session, held from 28 September to 12 October 1981.

9. The Conference, in resolution 109 (V), requested the Secretary-General of UNCTAD, within the context of the International Development Strategy for the Third united Nations Development Decade, to initiate studies, within the competence of UNCTAD, as regards those peoples and countries still living under colonial domination or foreign occupation, among which it specified the people of Palestine. The studies were to be undertaken in collaboration with the respective national liberation movements recognized by regional intergovernmental organizations. As was reported to the Economic and Social Council at its second regular session of 1982, in pursuance of that resolution a report was prepared, with the assistance of consultants, on the review of the economic conditions of the Palestinian people in Israeli-occupied territories 1/ and was submitted to and discussed by the Trade and Development Board at its twenty-third session. 2/

10. On that occasion, the Trade and Development Board adopted resolution 239 (XXIII) of 9 October 1981 in which it, inter alia, requested the Secretary-General of UNCTAD, within the context of the International Development Strategy for the Third United Nations Development Decade, to prepare a comprehensive and in-depth survey of the state of the economy of the Palestinian people in the occupied Palestinian territories, as well as an elaborate analysis of the potential for its development in the various sectors, and to formulate proposals for alternative development strategies in collaboration with the Palestine Liberation Organization. In paragraph 3 of the same resolution, the Board further invited the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) to make available to UNCTAD additional resources, with a view to achieving those objectives.

11. In compliance with paragraph 3 of the resolution, the UNCTAD secretariat contacted UNDP with a view to securing the additional resources required for the preparation of the survey. So far, it has not been possible to secure UNDP financial support for this purpose.

12. Also in pursuance of the resolution, the UNCTAD secretariat initiated work early in 1982, including consultations with the representative of the Palestine Liberation Organization, on the scope and modalities of execution of the contemplated survey which, it is envisaged, will be aimed at providing a comprehensive analytical framework whereby alternative development strategies can be translated into a concrete programme of action. As a first step, work also commenced in the latter part of 1982, with the assistance of consultants, for the Preparation of a report, the immediate objective of which is to evaluate the Potential for, and constraints to, the economic and social development of the Palestinian people, as well as to provide a framework and direction of the in-depth sectoral studies that would need to be undertaken for the preparation of the Comprehensive survey. This report is expected to be finalized in time for Submission to the Conference at its sixth session, to be held at Belgrade.

13. The UNCTAD secretariat also held consultations with the secretariat of the United Nations Industrial Development Organization which, in compliance with its own mandate, is preparing a study on the industrial sector of the Palestinian economy. It is hoped that the results of this study will provide an important input to the contemplated survey.

3. United Nations Industrial Development Organization

14. Pursuant to the adoption of Economic and Social Council resolutions 2026 (LXI) of 4 August 1976 and 2100 (LXIII) of 3 August 1977, the secretariat of the United Nations Industrial Development Organization (UNIDO) has responded to requests for technical assistance for the Palestinian people through the Permanent Observer of the Palestine Liberation Organization (PLO) to the international organizations at Vienna. These requests were for:

(a) A survey of the manufacturing industry in the West Bank and Gaza Strip;

(b) Training in industrial development.

The requests were endorsed by the Industrial Development Board at its twelfth session. 3/

15. The inter-agency task force, established in response to General Assembly resolution 33/147 of 20 December 1978 on assistance to the Palestinian people, identified five new areas for assistance in addition to the two above-mentioned proposals, namely:

(a) A feasibility study for a cement plant in the West Bank;

(b) A feasibility study for a canning plant for citrus fruits;

(c) Assistance to the plastics industry;

(d) Assistance to the pharmaceutical industry;

(e) Assistance to small-scale industries and workshops.

16. These requests for technical assistance were endorsed by the Industrial Development Board at its fourteenth session. Of the seven requests, only one training in industrial development - could be implemented. The concurrence of the Israeli Government for access by UNIDO to the West Bank and Gaza Strip to enable it to implement the remaining six projects has not been granted.

Ways and means of implementing projects approved by the Industrial Development Board

17. The Board, at its sixteenth session, urged the UNIDO secretariat to continue its efforts and to take all possible measures to implement the seven projects approved by the Board and to increase technical assistance to the Palestinian people.

18. The UNIDO secretariat had detailed discussions with the PLO observer to the Board at its sixteenth session on ways and means of implementing the seven projects. The action plan described below was agreed upon.


(a) Project 1. Survey of the manufacturing industry in the West Bank and Gaza Strip

19. It was decided to carry out the survey without direct access to the West Bank and Gaza Strip. The project was approved by UNIDO with a financial allocation of $US 56,000 from the United Nations Industrial Development Fund (UNIDF). As agreed with UNCTAD, this survey will be part of the development survey for Palestine to be prepared by UNCTAD, and covers the following:

(a) Industrial growth dynamics and industrial structure;

(b) Appraisal of industrial operations;

(c) Positive factors favouring industrial development;

(d) Constraints on industrialization;

(e) Strategy for industrialization;

(f) Criteria for the identification of opportunities for industrial development;

(g) Selection of industrial priorities;

(h) Possibilities for the implementation of the industrial development plans;

(i) Methodology for monitoring the implementation and evaluation of the industrial plans;

(j) Institutional framework for industrial planning and industrial development;

(k) Promotion of industrial investments;

(l) markets for industrial products.

20. The survey was to be completed around April/May 1983. It may also identify new technical assistance requirements of the Palestinian people in the industrial sector.

(b) Project 2. Training in industrial development

21. A list of UNIDO group training programmed was reviewed and those of interest to the Palestinian participants were identified. UNIDO is awaiting the response to the invitation for qualified Palestinian candidates to participate in those training programmes.

22. In addition, the following three group training projects for Palestinians were approved, financed from UNIDF:

(a) UF/PLO/82/060. Group Training Programming on Industrial Project Identification, Preparation, Evaluation, Financing and Contracting, to be organized at Vienna in July 1983. Number of participants, 15; project cost, $US 79,665;

(b) UF/PLO/82/062. In-Plant Group Training Programme in the Field of Industrial Co-operatives, organized in Poland, in April 1983. The subsectors likely to be covered are garments, woodworking, carpentry and leather. Number of participants, 15; project cost, $US 88,800;

(c) UC/PLO/83/005. Programme for Orientation and Techniques of Small-Scale Industry Development (India), organized at Hyderabad, India, in May 1983. Number of participants, 15; project cost, $US 64,270.

(c) Project 3. Assistance to small-scale industries and workshops

23. The assistance to small-scale industries and workshops will be provided through an organization knows as SAMED, located at Beirut and Damascus, which runs workshops employing Palestinian orphans. A large-scale project will be prepared after the mission of UNIDO high-level staff to Damascus at the end of January 1983, and will be submitted to potential donors for financing.

(d) Project 4. Assistance to the plastics industry

24. UNIDO received the required background information recently and a project document was prepared accordingly to cover a consultation mission to identify problems and to make recommendations with particular emphasis to capacity utilization.

(e) Project 5. Assistance to the pharmaceutical industry

25. UNIDO is waiting to receive from the PLO Permanent Observer the background information required to prepare a project document.

(f) Project 6 and 7. Feasibility study for a cement Plant in the West Bank and
feasibility study for a canning plant for citrus fruits

26. At the request of the PLO Permanent Observer, it was agreed to keep these proposals pending until a way was found for their execution.

UNIDO participation in the international conference on the Question of Palestine

27. UNIDO has actively participated in ad hoc inter-agency meetings on the International Conference on the Question of Palestine and will be represented at the Conference which will be convened at the UNESCO headquarters in Paris, from 16 to 27 August 1983.

4. United Nations Centre for Human Settlements (Habitat)

28. Pursuant to economic and Social Council resolution 2100 (LXIII) on assistance to the Palestinian people and at the request of the Palestine Liberation Organization which was communicated to the Centre on 22 October 1982, the United Nations Centre for Human Settlements (Habitat) approved the provision of nine middle-level training fellowships to qualified Palestinians to be trained in the field of human settlements. The fellowships are for the biennium 1983-1984, for courses in suitable specialized institutes, and for durations of up to six months each. The following subjects will be considered, depending on the level of education of the potential candidates

(a) Human settlements policies and strategies;

(b) Urban data management;

(c) Settlements planning (national and regional);

(d) Settlements planning (local);

(e) Shelter, infrastructure and services;

(f) Housing co-operatives;

(g) Building materials and technologies;

(h) Building economics;

(i) Land surveying;

(j) Human settlements institutions and management.

29. Information on the fellowships, together with the required fellowship application forms, was communicated to the Palestine Liberation Organization on 23 December 1982 and a response is expected in the near future.
5. United Nations Children's Fund

Assistance to Palestinian children and mothers during 1982

30. During 1982, the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) continued its assistance to Palestinian children and mothers in Jordan, Lebanon, the Syrian Arab Republic and the West Bank and Gaza as part of the programmer approved by the UNICEF Executive Board at its 1980 session, as summarized below. In addition, throughout the hostilities in Lebanon, UNICEF undertook relief operations aimed at alleviating the suffering of all women and children in Lebanon, as well as Lebanese and Palestinian women and children temporarily sheltered in the Syrian Arab Republic.

(a) Assistance to Palestinian children and mothers in Jordan

31. UNICEF co-operation included assistance to the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) for the extension of its immunization campaign and the upgrading of preventive health services in the refugee camps. Around 25,000 children were vaccinated and 10,000 families benefited from the preventive services of the health centres run by UNRWA.

32. A joint effort was undertaken by the Family Welfare Association, UNICEF, UNRWA and the municipality of Amman to plan and implement a health education campaign in the Al-Wahadat refugee camp. Around 50 women leaders and volunteers in this camp were given refresher training in child health, personal hygiene, health education and environmental sanitation. The camp will be divided into zones and specific tasks will be assigned to trained women to run the campaign with the help of experienced field supervisors.

33. Support was provided for Palestinian philanthropic associations and active non- governmental organizations for the implementation of pre-vocational activities, such as knitting, sewing and typing. Kindergarten classes in two camps and in the Haya recreational children's centre for Al-Ashrafiye were supported with audiovisual aids and play equipment. A weekly meeting is held at the Haya centre for parents to discuss different aspects relating to the welfare of their children.

34. The Nazzal Community Development Centre which is located in a poor slum area in which a majority of the inhabitants are Palestinians was supported with sewing and knitting machines, typewriters, audio-visual aids, play equipment and children books. Around 100 children and 50 women are benefiting from the services of this centre.

(b) Assistance to Palestinian children and mothers in Lebanon

35. UNICEF co-operation prior to the emergency operations included assistance to UNRWA for the upgrading of its preventive health services through the provision of oral rehydration salts, vaccines, medical supplies and drugs for 20 health/maternal and child health centres. Furthermore, throughout the hostilities in Lebanon in 1982, UNICEF undertook relief operations aimed at alleviating the suffering of all women and children.

36. Emergency assistance was extended by providing supplies and services: the provision of food, medical and other essential supplies to the affected parts of Lebanon, indicated below, and the maintenance of critical water supplies to the besieged residents in the west Beirut area and neighbouring camps.

37. Emergency supplies airlifted or shipped into Lebanon or purchased locally in Beirut, Qana and Damascus, included the following items: baby food, milk powder, infant and children's clothing, tinned food, cooking oil, therapeutic food, blankets, towels, bedding, soap, candles, water tanks and containers, water purification tablets, oral rehydration salts for infant diarrhoea, drugs and dispensary sets, antibiotics and other medical supplies.

38. The distribution of these supplies was made through the Government's High Relief Committee which included local relief committees in all the affected areas of Lebanon, the General Union of Palestinian Women, the Red Cross and the Red Crescent Societies, and religious and village leaders in south Lebanon. Distribution was also made through UNRWA channels, since UNRWA was a member of the United Nations inter-agency working group on emergency assistance to Lebanon that was responsible for emergency assistance to all Palestinians during the 1982 hostilities.

39. In Lebanon, emergency supplies reached Palestinian and Lebanese children and mothers in the three main areas of UNICEF emergency assistance the Beirut area, south Lebanon and the Bekaa Valley (where displaced families took shelter in unoccupied schools and open fields).

40. In the Sabra and Chatila camps outside Beirut, UNICEF undertook to ensure a continuing supply of water to the Palestinian survivors by trucking in water, providing mobile generators to pump water from wells, clearing rubble and providing sanitation services to prevent disease.

41. Current post-emergency activities supported by UNICEF include the following areas of general benefit to Palestinian, as well as Lebanese women and children: the restoration of basic services and the repair and rebuilding of water supply networks. In addition, in the last quarter of 1982, a number of working sessions have been held with officials of Palestinian Red Crescent Society, the General Union of Palestinian Women and UNRWA which resulted in formulating a work plan with the main emphasis on the rehabilitation of services for Palestinian children in the fields of health, education and social services.

(c) Assistance to Palestinian children and mothers in the Syrian Arab Republic

42. UNICEF co-operation included assistance to UNRWA for the extension of its immunization campaign and upgrading of preventive health services in the refugee camps, mainly through the provision of vaccines and medical equipment for the health centres. Furthermore, Palestinian philanthropic organizations, two residential care institutions, namely Saad Ibn El Aas and Abdel Kader El-Husayni, were supported with basic furniture, audio-visual aids, miscellaneous equipment and a bus. A vocational training centre for girls was also upgraded through the provision of equipment.

43. In early July 1982, the UNICEF office at Damascus, in co-operation with the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), assisted the Government of the Syrian Arab Republic by providing emergency supplies for Palestinian and Lebanese women and children temporarily sheltered in the Syrian Arab Republic as a result of the hostilities in Lebanon.

(d) Assistance to Palestinian children and mothers in the West Bank and Gaza

44. The main emphasis of UNICEF assistance to Palestinian children and mothers in the West Bank and Gaza during 1982 was on the strengthening and expanding of immunization activities and other preventive health services conducted by the UNRWA health centres. To achieve this, UNICEF provided those centres with vaccines, disposable syringes and needles, cold boxes, medical and laboratory equipment, drugs and audio-visual aids.

6. United Nations Development Programme

45. Through its regional programme for the Arab States, the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP) financed activities in which Palestinian trainees have participated. All regional projects for which the Arab League specialized agencies are regional implementing agencies benefit the Palestinian people. This applies to the following projects: assistance to the Arab Maritime Academy, the Arab Organization for Administrative Sciences, and the regional co-operation programme for the development and promotion of fertilizer production and utilization in Arab countries.

46. A second example of indirect benefit for Palestinian trainees and scholars is represented by the Regional Institute for Training and Research in Statistics at Baghdad and the Arab Planning Institute in Kuwait. Both of these institutes, which continue to receive UNDP assistance, provide training and research facilities for Palestinian students and scholars.

47. During 1982, UNDP continued to give special attention to the implementation of Governing Council decisions 79/18 of 26 June 1979 and 81/13 of 23 June 1981 concerning the provision of assistance to the Palestinian people. Those decisions by the Governing Council were adopted as a result of various resolutions by the General Assembly and the Economic and Social Council on that subject. In addition, at its twenty-ninth session in June 1982, the Governing Council adopted decision 82/13 of 18 June 1982, in which it endorsed the approach that had been taken by UNDP in its activities designed to assist the Palestinian people, and expanded this activity by authorizing the Administrator to draw up to $4 million from Special Programme Resources during the remainder of the third programming cycle (1982-1986) for the implementation of projects to help meet the economic and social needs of the Palestinian people. In that decision, the Governing Council also appealed to Governments and intergovernmental organizations to provide at least an additional $8 million during the third programming cycle in order to fully fund an estimated programme of $12 million for that period.

48. By the end of 1982, the initial $3.5 million allocated by the UNDP Governing Council in June 1979 by its decision 79/18 had been fully committed for projects designed to assist the Palestinian people in a variety of sectors, including pre-primary education, technical and vocational training, health manpower development, housing, industrial development, and children's and youth institutions. In addition, the parties directly concerned had indicated their strong desire to continue to enlarge the programme, both in terms of expanding activities in sectors in which projects were already under way, as well as in new fields of activity.

49. On the basis of the regular consultations which have taken place during 1982 between the Administrator, represented by a Senior Advisory specifically responsible for UNDP work in this field, and the parties directly concerned, it was possible to develop, for the West Bank and Gaza, a "pipeline" of new project proposals by the end of 1982. Those proposals were selected on the basis of the following criteria

(a) Activities that were reflective of the true needs of the Palestinian people and that could be implemented in a manner that would ensure continuation of the activities after the termination of UNDP participation;

(b) Activities that would receive the support of all parties concerned and attract the interest of potential contributors;

(c) Activities that had a relationship to those initially endorsed by the UNDP Governing Council in 1979. The proposals have a far greater private sector involvement than projects heretofore implemented, such as assistance to community centres, specialized training for the glass and ceramics industry, assistance to private medical institutions etc.

50. It is expected that these new proposals will be further formulated in early 1983. The project implementation process will be aided considerably by the agreement, reached in 1982, for UNDP to assign to Jerusalem a staff member from the UNDP Office for Projects Execution.

51. Aside from one project, already under implementation by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) in the Syrian Arab Republic, all project activities currently under way or envisaged for the future are located in the West Bank and Gaza. The flexibility available to UNDP in carrying out its responsibilities in this area of activities will, however, permit the initiation of activities in other locations, whenever events so indicate.

52. While it has not been possible to establish executing arrangements for projects in the West Bank or Gaza by organizations of the United Nations system other than UNDP (Office for Projects Execution), it has been possible to utilize the services of experts of the International Labour Organisation (ILO) in their individual capacities, and efforts are under way to involve the United Nations Environment Programme (UNEP) in a particularly important sanitation project in Gaza.

53. During the latter part of 1982, the Administrator initiated contacts with potential contributors in order to facilitate the pledging of special contributions in support of the projects being planned for the third programming cycle.

7. World Food Programme

54. An estimated 14,000 people from war-torn Lebanon, many of them women and young children, sought refuge in the Syrian Arab Republic after June 1982. About one half of these refugees, who entered the country clandestinely on foot and by night, were not covered by UNRWA assistance for registered Palestinian refugees. At the request of the Government of the Syrian Arab Republic, the World Food Programme (WFP) supplied 340 tons of food (wheat-flour, dried skim milk, edible oil and sugar) to provide the basic rations for 7,000 persons for 90 days. Distribution was completed in October 1982 and the total cost to the Programme was $142,700.


8. United Nations Relief and Works Agency for
Palestine Refugees in the Near East


55. Since May 1950, the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) has been providing education, health and relief services to Palestinian refugees. On 31 December 1982, 1,941,791 refugees were registered with UNRWA, of whom 1,570,168 were eligible for some or all of the Agency's services.

56. Although there has been no census of Palestinians, the registered refugees are believed to be more than one half of the total Palestinian people. Consequently, UNRWA is a major provider of education, health and welfare services to the Palestinian people. These services have evolved over the years in direct response to the needs of the refugees and the Agency's financial ability to meet them. By the end of 1982, about $2.2 billion had been expended by UNRWA on assistance to Palestinian refugees. The education services were operated in co-operation with the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) and the health services in co-operation with the World Health Organization (WHO).

57. Immediately after the Israeli invasion of Lebanon in June 1982, UNRWA organized an emergency assistance Programme to aid those Palestinian refugees directly affected. Emergency relief was not restricted to the Palestinian refugees registered with UNRWA but was extended to all Palestinian refugees in need of assistance. At the end of December 1982, 175,390 refugees in Lebanon and 8,154 refugees who had fled to the Syrian Arab Republic (including 6,460 refugees in Lebanon not registered with UNRWA) were being provided with food, blankets, clothing, kitchen kits and tents, or with cash to repair their damaged shelters. UNRWA has cleared camp sites of rubble, repaired damaged sewers, laid new water pipes and provided new road beds in existing camp sites. Schools have been reopened and the enrolment is almost at the pre-invasion level. In the case of Ein el-Hilweb camp, Sidon, this includes classes operating on a triple-shift basis in large tents. A special emergency health programme has been implemented in the affected areas, including the repair of damaged health facilities and their gradual re-activation, the provision of milk and hot meals to the vulnerable groups, and the rehabilitation of damaged sanitation facilities in camps.

58. The regular programmes are fully described in the annual reports of the Commissioner- General of UNRWA. An account of the Programme in 1982 is contained in the report covering the period from 1 July 1981 to 30 June 1982. 4/ In brief, in the 1981/1982 school year, 338,386 children received elementary and preparatory (lower secondary) education in 645 UNRWA schools, 7,092 pupils were assisted with their secondary education at local government or private schools, 5/ some 5,188 trainees followed vocational or teacher training courses at eight UNRWA centres, 351 students were awarded scholarships for university study, modest programmes of pre-school, youth and women's activities and adult craft training were conducted, and professional in-service training was provided for medical and education personnel. Medical services were made available to about 1.6 million refugees, as well as supplementary feeding for such vulnerable groups as young children, pregnant women and nursing mothers. In the camps, UNRWA provided environmental sanitation and assistance, including repairs to housing of families in special need. Special assistance, including basic food items, was given to the most needy families. The total cost of financing the services in 1982 was $234.7 million. In this total sum, the extraordinary costs for the Lebanon emergency, which amounted to $51.8 million, are included, accounting for 22 per cent of the total expenditure. The programmes were carried out by 16,782 employees, mostly teachers, all but a handful of whom are themselves Palestinian refugees, under the direction of 120 international staff. 6/

59. The prime determinant of the Agency's ability to meet the needs of the refugees is the level of its financial resources. Given the funds, there are many projects which the Agency would implement to enhance the opportunities for refugees to become self-supporting, to improve the quality of services and to cater for the special needs of those with particular handicaps. Unfortunately, as the Agency has pointed out repeatedly over the years, its income is insufficient to maintain even the minimum services at the established levels. In 1982, the Agency's income fell $66.4 million short of the budget of $248.3 million. A related problem is that the level of income is not known sufficiently far in advance to permit smooth planning.

60. The shortfall in cash income has repeatedly threatened the Agency's education programme. The General Assembly, in its decision 36/462 of 16 March 1982, called upon Governments and organizations making contributions in the form of commodities either to give cash instead or to allow UNRWA to sell them for cash. With this change in prospect, the decision was taken to phase out the basic ration programme which no longer had the priority it once had. Education and health services are more important to the Palestinian refugees of today, apart from emergency situations, such as that which has arisen in Lebanon where the emergency distribution of foodstuffs was implemented. UNRWA continues, however, to attach value to its special programmes for feeding mothers and small children, poverty-stricken families. the disabled and trainees on residential courses.

61. Nevertheless, within the financial constraints, a limited number of improvements were possible, of a nature to enhance the efficiency with which services met the refugees' needs or to enrich an existing programme. The information given below, although not exhaustive, illustrates the work carried out by UNRWA.

62. In 1982, expenditure on the education programme increased by 6 per cent over 1981, from $104.5 million to $110.5 million, accounting for 47.1 per cent of total expenditure. The major item of additional outlay was on the school programme which expands each year to cater for the growing school population. In 1981/1982, the new intake included 3,000 pupils more than in 1980/1981 and some 142 additional teachers were appointed. Most UNRWA school buildings are operated on a double-shift basis to cope with the number of pupils. Some of the buildings urgently require replacement. During 1982, $3.8 million were allocated to construct 130 class and administrative rooms and 22 specialized units to replace some of the most unsatisfactory rented school premises. In addition, $524,000 were provided to construct 29 classrooms and one specialized room to avoid triple shifts. The significant developments in education referred to in previous reports continued to be implemented in the 1981/1982 school year.

63. Health services accounted for $33.9 million, or 14.4 per cent of total expenditure, an increase of 8 per cent over 1981. The quality of the medical and dental services provided at the health centres is under continuing review. Specialist clinics treat tuberculosis, diabetes, cardiovascular disorders, dermatological and rheumatic complaints and eye diseases. An additional number of small clinical laboratories attached to health units were equipped to perform biochemical tests previously referred to central laboratories. Special attention was focused on the level of nutrition among infants and young children and their mothers. In response to the high prevalence of diarrhoeal diseases among small children, particularly in the summer, the Agency operates 55 nutrition rehabilitation clinics.

64. Elsewhere in its area of operations, the Agency has been able to participate to a limited extent in self-help camp sanitation projects carried out by the refugees to construct drains and pathways in camps, to connect sewerage systems to local networks, and to continue the provision of private water connections and latrines to those families still without them. The schemes have been undertaken with the co-operation of the local municipal and governmental authorities.

65. The third category of service, the relief programme, involved expenditure in 1982 of $31.3 million, compared with $36.4 million in 1981, accounting for 13.3 per cent of the total expenditure. The assistance provided by the relief programme comprises shelter and welfare assistance. The latter is concentrated on the most needy sector of the refugee populations widows, orphans, the aged, the physically and mentally handicapped etc. This category of refugees, known as "special hardship cases", has been provided with rations in Jordan, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip since 1978. In 1981, the Programme was extended to Lebanon and plans were laid to extend it to the Syrian Arab Republic in 1983. By the end of 1982, some 42,000 persons were benefiting from this food programme.

9. United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees

66. According to paragraph 7 of its mandate, the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) is not responsible for providing assistance to Palestinian refugees who are already assisted by the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East. However, UNHCR has provided international protection and/or assistance to certain refugees of Palestinian origin outside the UNRWA area, whenever it has been requested to do so.

B. Specialized agencies
1. International Labour Organisation


67. The International Labour Organisation (ILO) is endeavouring to contribute to the UNDP programme of assistance to the Palestinian people, within the framework of the principle concerning the direct implementation by UNDP of technical assistance projects in the occupied territories, including Jerusalem. The ILO offered the services of its experts in implementing the UNDP projects, and the agreement of the parties concerned wee obtained in this respect. Of the six projects falling within the competence of the ILO which were identified by the inter-agency task force in 1979, two projects were selected for implementation during the first programming cycle of UNDP, namely the promotion of vocational and technical education, particularly for women, and specific training in industrial management. As a first step and in accordance with the agreement, an ILO expert joined the UNDP team which visited Israel and the occupied territories in December 1982. The purpose of the ILO expert's consultancy mission was to review and assess the present activities of the Palestinian women's institutions and community development centres and to formulate work plans and project designs for the promotion of vocational training opportunities for women. The expert's recommendations for technical assistance will be included in the overall UNDP programme of assistance in the West Bank and Gaza.

68. The Director-General of the ILO assigned a preparatory mission in November-December 1981 to hold discussions with governmental, employers' and workers' circles of the Syrian Arab Republic and Jordan and with the Palestinian bodies at Damascus, Amman and Beirut, about the situation of the Arab workers in the occupied territories. This was followed by an ILO mission in February 1982 to Israel and the occupied territories to examine, on the spot, the economic and social conditions of the Arab workers in the occupied territories. The report of the mission, which was published as an appendix to the report of the Director-General to the International Labour Conference at its sixty-eight session in 1982, dealt with: (a) the general employment and development situation in the occupied Arab territories and the effect thereon of the Israeli settlements) (b) vocational training and trade union rights and the specific problems posed by employment in Israel' and (c) tech- nical co-operation for the benefit of the population of the occupied Arab territories.

69. The mission had indicated to the Israeli authorities that the Director-General of the ILO was prepared to send an expert to study, on the spot, the existing training facilities and to draw up recommendations about ways to strengthen the existing autonomous institutions, such as the Polytechnic Institute of Hebron, and to develop technical skills at the intermediate level. In December 1982, the ILO submitted the candidature of an ILO adviser in the field of vocational training to carry out that study: the agreement of the Israeli authorities is still awaited.

70. In the 1982-1983 biennium, an additional credit from the ILO regular budget has been allocated to finance specific technical assistance projects for the population of the occupied territories, including the award of training fellowships. Unfortunately, no fellowships were implemented in 1982 but action is now being taken to reactivate the fellowship component of ILO assistance to the Palestinian people. In December 1982, in a letter addressed to the Director of the Polytechnic Institute of Hebron, the ILO offered to finance a number of training fellowships and internships at the International Centre for Advanced Technical and Vocational Training at Turin for the teaching staff and high-level professors of the Institute.

71. The ILO is also considering providing technical assistance to Palestinian production workshops, located outside the occupied Arab territories, which engage in activities in various fields (foodstuffs, clothing, plastics, leather, printing etc.) that are aimed at providing training and jobs for young Palestinians. The possibilities of furnishing assistance to these units, in co-operation with the Centre at Turin, are currently being examined.

2. Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations

72. During the period 1982-1983, assistance provided by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO) to the Palestinian people took the form of projects designed (a) to improve the technical skills of Palestinian refugee students in specialized agricultural fields, and (b) to improve agricultural training facilities in two Palestinian refugee camps in the Syrian Arab Republic. The details of these projects are set out below.

Specialized training in agricultural development

73. This is a project of the FAO Technical Co-operation Programme and has a budget of $US 84,000. It provides for the award of three fellowships for university graduates over a 23-month period ending in September 1983.

74. The objective of the project is to provide the required means for improving and updating the technical skills of three university graduates in animal husbandry, soil science and plant protection by means of intensive training programmes. Only the fellowship in soil science has been taken up so far. Commencement of the other two fellowships has been postponed twice because the nominees have been unable to proceed. Replacement nominees have been requested.

75. This project is similar to another project which provided three fellowships in botany, food technology and agricultural engineering. Those training courses were completed in September 1982.

Agricultural Training Centre

76. FAO is the executing agency of the project which has a budget of $US 356,000 provided from the UNDP Programme Reserve.

77. The project document was signed on 7 May 1982 but activities has been delayed pending the appointment of Co-ordinator. This is expected to be done in the near the commencement of a National Project future.

78. The project has a duration of two years. Its objective is to assist the Palestinian families at the Gilline and Ramadan refugee camps in the Syrian Arab Republic to improve production and the efficiency of crop and livestock farmers and producers by providing facilities, knowledge, skills, material input and technical leadership for demonstration and training work.

3. United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization

79. General Assembly resolution 37/134 of 17 December 1982 is to be brought to the attention of the Executive Board of the United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO) at its one hundred and sixteenth session (25 May-July 1983).

80. Raving heard the oral report of the Director-General and other available information concerning the events that had taken place in Lebanon since June 1982, the Executive Board adopted, at its one hundred and fifteenth session (8 September-October 1982), decision 5.1.1 in which it condemned the massacre of Sabra and Shatila (part IV) and the destruction and plunder of Palestinian educational and cultural institutions in Lebanon (part III). In part III of the resolution, the Board requested the Director-General, by agreement with the Government of Lebanon and in collaboration with the other competent organizations of the United Nations system, especially UNRWA, to send a mission to assess the extent of the destruction of Palestinian educational and cultural institutions in Lebanon and to determine their priority needs within the sphere of competence of UNESCO. To that end, the Director-General, on 20 October 1982, wrote to the Minister of Foreign Affairs of Lebanon requesting the agreement of the Government of Lebanon and requested the Secretary-General of the United Nations and the Commissioner-General of UNRWA for their co-operation (letters of 6 November and 14 December 1982 and 4 January 1983). The Commissioner-General of UNRWA assured the Director-General of his organization's assistance and co-operation. UNESCO has not yet received the answer of the Government of Lebanon.

81. The secretariat is at present studying a request submitted by the Permanent Observer of the Palestine Liberation Organization concerning assistance to some of these institutions.

Assistance through UNRWA

82. Described below are new developments in the assistance provided by UNESCO to the Palestinian people, additional to those described in the report of the Secretary-General to the General Assembly at its thirty-seventh session (A/37/214 and Add.1).

83. UNESCO continues the activities foreseen under the approved programme and budget for 1981-1983, in accordance with the agreement signed between the two organizations under which UNESCO assumes the technical responsibility for the education programme for Palestinian refugees and UNRWA the administrative responsibility, including the financing of the Programme that is carried out in Jordan, Lebanon, the Syrian Arab Republic and the occupied Arab territories. This programme is comparable in scope to a national education system.

84. The Director-General has been following with deep concern the serious financial difficulties of UNRWA after the Israeli military intervention in Lebanon and the destruction of UNRWA facilities in southern Lebanon and at Beirut, and on 30 August 1982 received the Commissioner-General of UNRWA with whom he discussed in particular this matter.

85. In his oral report to the Executive Board, the Director-General called upon member States and voluntary organizations to contribute financially to the resumption of the programme in Lebanon.

86. The Executive Board, by part III of its decision 5.1.1, emphasized the need for the international community to make the necessary effort in that respect.

87. In communicating the decision on 4 January 1983 to member States and voluntary organizations, the Director-General called once again upon their generosity.

Assistance at the request of the Palestine Liberation Organization

88. Thirty-five fellowships have so far been granted under the regular programme 1981-1983, nine under the participation programme and six under the special account.

89. The assistance of a consultant was also approved to advise the PLO Literacy Council for Palestinians.

90. Furthermore, a selection of poems by the poet Mahmoud Darwish has been translated and is in the process of being published in the UNESCO collection of representative works.

Educational and cultural institutions in the occupied Arab territories

91. The Director-General continued his action in accordance with the mandate given to him since 1974 by the General Conference and the Executive Board on this question.

92. In pursuance of resolution 14.1 adopted by the General Conference at its twenty-first session, in which the Director-General was invited to keep a permanent watch on Israel's implementation of the resolutions and decisions of the General Conference and the Executive Board relating to educational and cultural institutions in the occupied Arab territories, including Jerusalem, and to send for this purpose such missions as he may deem appropriate, the Director-General sent a mission headed by the Deputy Assistant Director-General for General Operational Activities. The mission was composed of 5 members and visited the occupied Arab territorial from 21 March to 6 April 1982. The mission's task was to determine the educational needs of the population of the occupied Arab territories that were not being satisfied and to formulate suggestions concerning measures to be taken in that respect. Its duties were also to includes redefining technical and vocational teaching qualifications and making suggestions as to the curricula best calculated to meet the needs arising from working conditions in modern societies; drawing up a detailed list of serving teachers' qualifications and proposing measures for retraining those found to be inadequately qualified; formulating suggestions with a view to improving the status of the lowest paid teachers) determining the requirements of each higher education establishment in respect of teaching staff, textbooks, reference works and equipment, and suggesting ways and means of satisfying them; and making a study of the situation of cultural institutions in those territories and proposing measures designed to generate activities that would meet the population's needs and would accord with its cultural identity.

93. The Director-General submitted a report on the action taken by him to the Executive Board at its one hundred and fourteenth session (5-21 May 1982). The Board adopted decision 5.1.2, in which it invited the Director-General (a) to continue his action on behalf of the cultural institutions in the occupied Arab territories, in particular by providing technical and financial assistance to the universities and scientific and technological institutions in accordance with such procedures as he might judge necessary; (b) to undertake any action necessary for the proper functioning of the educational and cultural institutions in the occupied Arab territories, including Jerusalem and the Golan Heights; (c) to continue his efforts to enable the mission designated by him to fulfil its mandate without any restriction; and (d) to communicate to the Executive Board any information and suggestions which would enable it to take, at its one hundred and sixteenth session, such measures as it deemed necessary.

Protection of cultural property at Jerusalem

94. In accordance with the mandate given to him by the General Conference in 1968, and renewed since by several resolutions and decisions of the General Conference and Executive Board, the Director-General used all means at his disposal to give effect to those resolutions and decisions and in particular, entrusted a personal representative to visit Jerusalem on many occasions for the protection of the cultural heritage of the Holy City.

95. The Director-General submitted a report on the action taken by him to the Executive Board at its one hundred and fourteenth session (5-21 May 1982). The Board adopted decision 5.4.2, in which it recommended to the World Heritage Committee that it speed up the procedure for including the Old City of Jerusalem and its walls in the list of World Heritage in Danger and invited the Director-General to continue his efforts to enable a mission to be sent to study the situation in occupied Jerusalem on the spot in order that a report on the subject could be submitted to the Executive Board at its sixteenth session.

96. As requested by that decision, the Director-General will submit a report on that subject to the Executive Board at its one hundred and sixteenth session (25 May-1 July 1983). Further, the World Heritage Committee decided, at its sixth session (13-17 December 1982), to include the Old City of Jerusalem and its walls in the list of World Heritage in Danger.

Decisions taken by organs and organizations of the United Nations system of
relevance to the work of UNESCO

97. The recent decisions are being brought to the attention of the Executive Board at its one hundred and sixteenth session.

98. UNESCO, when requested, contributed to the different reports of the Secretary-General to the General Assembly at its thirty-seventh session and welcomed and briefed United Nations officers or consultants who visited UNESCO headquarters. A consultant will be visiting the UNESCO secretariat on 21 and 22 March 1983 to collect information related to the living conditions of Palestinian people.

99. Described below is the action taken by UNESCO in accordance with some of these decisions.

(a) International Conference on the Question of Palestine

100. UNESCO has been co-operating fully with the secretariat of the International Conference on the Question of Palestine and has put at the disposal of its organizers all facilities for the holding of the Conference at UNESCO headquarters from 16 to 26 August 1983. UNESCO also participated in the inter-agency meeting for the preparation of the Conference, held at Geneva from 19 to 21 January 1982, and will participate in the regional meetings.

(b) International Day of Solidarity with the Palestinian People

101. In accordance with General Assembly resolution 32/40 B of 2 December 1977, the International Day of Solidarity with the Palestinian People was observed at UNESCO headquarters on 29 November 1982.

102. The representatives of the group of Arab States to UNESCO organized the ceremony in which a representative of the Director-General, a representative of the League of Arab States, the Doyen of the Arab Diplomatic Corps in France, the Chairman of the Group of 77, the Chairman of the Group of Non-Aligned Countries, the Chairman of the regional groups, as well as a representative of the Palestine Liberation Organization, participated.

4. International Civil Aviation Organization

103. In accordance with resolution A22-8 of the Assembly of the International Civil Aviation Organization (ICAO), the Palestine Liberation Organization is entitled to participate as an observer in the Assembly's sessions and work, as well as in other international conferences convened under the auspices of ICAO and in the regional meetings dealing with its territories. In this respect, the PLO has been invited to attend the 24th session of the Assembly which will be held in September/October 1983. Furthermore, ICAO continues to be willing to co-operate, within its mandate, with ECWA and UNDP in the implementation of Economic and Social Council resolution 2100 (LXIII).

5. World Health Organization

104. In response to Economic and Social Council resolution 2100 (LXIII), the following action has been taken by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 1982. It will be noted from certain of the activities mentioned below that WHO has maintained its close collaboration with UNRWA.

105. In June 1982, a member of the WHO staff, competent in the field of maternal and child health, visited the West Bank and Gaza to identify risk factors in women during pregnancy and childbirth and to evaluate the impact of oral rehydration on the nutritional status of children aged 6-23 months attending the Gaza clinics. A follow-up visit is expected to start shortly to discuss further the proposed study of the effectiveness of maternal care services provided by the UNRWA maternal and child health (MCH) centres in Gaza and the West Bank, and to extend the risk approach in maternal and child health/family planning to other UNRWA clinics. WHO made a financial contribution to launch a training programme for traditional birth attendants in Gaza and the West Bank. A supply of 100,000 doses of tetanus toxoid and 85,000 disposable syringes were also made available for the prevention of tetanus neonatorum.

106. With regard to the control of diarrhoeal diseases, WHO has continued to support a study of the effect of mass use of oral rehydration on the reduction of mortality in children under five years of age in Gaza. The results of the study are being analysed and will be published shortly. WHO has agreed to sponsor the training of 10 physicians and nurses from UNRWA staff in oral rehydration and it is hoped that this training will take place during 1983.

107. In connection with the WHO expanded programme of immunization, during the period June-August 1982 one WHO consultant visited UNRWA camps to improve the cold chain system in the area and another took up an assignment to promote the school health programme of UNRWA.

108. WHO has awarded fellowships to UNRWA staff in the fields of public health nursing and maternal and child health.

109. WHO allocated an annual grant to the PLO as has been done in the past, to assist with the payment of salaries for the health technicians, medical specialists and administrators employed by the Palestinian Red Crescent Society; an additional sum was provided to meet the cost of emergency medical supplies and equipment for Lebanon. WHO also sent a staff member and a consultant nurse to the area to assist in the maintenance of health services.

110. The Special Committee of Experts, appointed by the World Health Assembly to study the health conditions of the inhabitants of the occupied territories in the Middle East, visited the territories again in April 1982. The Committee visited health and other infrastructures that have an influence on the health of the populations and submitted a detailed report to the World Health Assembly. Certain of the recommendations made by the Committee have received careful consideration by WHO and it is hoped that action will be taken shortly to implement them.

111. The Director-General was requested by the Thirty-fifth World Health Assembly to establish health centres in the occupied Arab territories, under the direct supervision of WHO. This project is currently under consideration.

6. World Bank

112. As indicated in previous communications to the United Nations on this subject, there are policy constraints which limit the World Bank's ability to assist in implementing the resolution in question. In particular, the Bank's Articles of Agreement require that loans be extended to or guaranteed by member Governments, thereby precluding consideration of assistance to entities, such as national liberation organizations, which are not member Governments of the Bank. Moreover, projects supported by the World Bank entail substantial financial commitments on the part of the borrowing Governments and can only be undertaken at their requests therefore, the Governments themselves must bear primary responsibility for determining to what extent such projects will benefit particular population groups.

113. Notwithstanding the above, the Bank has been placing special emphasis on direct measures to alleviate poverty, focusing in particular on the most disadvantaged population groups. Hence, improvement in the standard of living of the Palestinian people is a matter of obvious concern to the Bank. In fact, some of the projects that the Bank has helped to finance in member countries in which Palestinian people reside have benefited Palestinians, although the extent of these benefits would be difficult to quantify. For example, living conditions have been improved in urban areas, including areas in which Palestinian people are concentrated.

114. As mentioned in previous communications on this subject, the Bank is ready, in consultation with and at the request of the member Governments concerned, to help prepare and finance development projects which meet the usual criteria of the Bank and which would be of particular benefit to the Palestinian people.

7. Universal Postal Union

115. As in 1979, 1980 and 1981, assistance provided by the Universal Postal Union (UPU) in 1982 was related to training activities for the benefit of two nationals of the Palestinian people. The two fellowships granted by the UPU Executive Council in 1979 were renewed in 1981 and 1982 and their amounts increased to enable two Palestinians to receive long-duration training (1979-1983) at the Arab Postal Faculty, Damascus.

116. In addition, UPU participated, as in 1981, in the International Day of Solidarity with the Palestinian People, for which a ceremony was held at the Palais des Nations, Geneva, on 29 November 1982.

117. UPU is still prepared to ensure the implementation of the project relating to the training of five other Palestinians, if the financial resources are made available for that purpose (see E/1979/61).

8. International Telecommunication Union

118. The Secretary-General has been informed by the International Telecommunication Union (ITU) that no allocation of funds has so far been made, within the special UNDP programme for the Palestinian people, for proposals concerning telecommunications.

119. Discussions took place in 1982 between the Permanent Observer of the PLO at Geneva and the ITU Technical Co-operation Department to explore ways and means for a concrete application of Economic and Social Council resolution 2100 (LXIII), particularly by means of specially designed training projects in Arab hosting countries (Lebanon and the Syrian Arab Republic).

120. The ITU Plenipotentiary Conference, held at Nairobi in 1982, adopted resolution No. 31 which concerns the training of refugees. This resolution provides an appropriate framework for action by the ITU Technical Co-operation Department, particularly within the existing training centres in the region.

121. The PLO was, as is standard practice, invited to attend the ITU Seminar on Regional Maintenance, organized at Khartoum in March 1982, within the framework of the MEDARABTEL project. Two participants from the PLO attended by means of MEDARABTEL fellowships.

9. World Meteorological Organization

122. The World Meteorological Organization (WMO) is implementing projects designed to assist the meteorological and hydrological services in developing member countries and provides assistance to Palestinians in so far as they are assimilated into the government-operated services in their countries of residence.

123. The Eighth WMO Congress held in 1979 considered the possibility of WMO assistance to the Palestinian people and it was decided that Palestinian refugees could benefit from the fellowships made available to refugees by WMO. No requests have been received so far for the use of such fellowships.

10. World Intellectual Property Organization

124. The Director-General of the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) drew the attention of the governing bodies of WIPO, at their November 1981 sessions, to Economic and Social Council resolution 2100 (LXIII), entitled "Assistance to the Palestinian people".

125. Under the 1982 WIPO Training Programme, one fellowship was awarded in the field of industrial property to a candidate selected from a group of nine Candidatures submitted by UNRWA.

126. An invitation to propose candidates for the 1983 WIPO Training Programme in the fields of copyright and industrial property was sent to the Permanent Observer of the PLO at Geneva, and to the Commissioner-General of UNRWA and the Secretary of the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People.

127. The Director-General of WIPO was represented at the first ad hoc inter-agency meeting on the International Conference on the Question of Palestine, held at the United Nations Office at Geneva from 19 to 21 January 1983, and WIPO intends to be represented at the Conference which will be held in Paris in August 1983.

128. The Director-General of WIPO was represented at the meeting held at the Palais des Nations at Geneva, on 29 November 1982, to commemorate the International Day of Solidarity with the Palestinian People.

129. The International Bureau of WIPO has informed the Permanent Observer of the PLO that it remains at his disposal for further discussions concerning the establishment and implementation of concrete projects to ensure the improvement of the social and economic conditions of the Palestinian people, and that it looks forward to continued co-operation with the PLO.

130. The International Bureau of WIPO has kept the secretariat of ECWA informed of its activities for the benefit of the Palestinian people and will welcome any suggestions concerning the co-ordination of efforts, as mentioned in paragraph 1 of Economic and Social Council resolution 2100 (LXIII).

11. International Fund for Agricultural Development

131. Under its Agreement, the mandate of the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD) is confined to the financing of agricultural development projects in its developing member States. Projects and programmes are approved by the Executive Board of IFAD in response to requests of developing member States.

132. Consequently, IFAD, as a specialized agency of the United Nations, has noted with due interest and concern Economic and Social Council resolution 2100 (LXIII) which, inter alia, is addressed to relevant agencies in the United Nations system.

Notes

1/ TD/B/870.

2/ TD/B/876, paras. 252-302.

3/ Official Records of the General Assembly, Thirty-third Session, Supplement No.16 (A/33/16), para. 50.

4/ Official Records of the General Assembly, Thirty-seventh Session, Supplement
No. 13 (A/37/13).

5/ In Lebanon and the Syrian Arab Republic; elsewhere, all refugee pupils enrolled in government secondary schools receive their education free of charge.

6/ At the end of December 1982, there were 135 approved international staff posts, of which 15 were vacant. Twenty-one posts (including one post reimbursable by the Japanese Government) are loaned by UNESCO to provide technical guidance to the education programme, 5 by WHO to provide technical guidance to the health programme, 88 are financed from the United Nations budget and 11 by UNRWA itself. Special non-governmental contributions financed 10 posts on a temporary basis for UNRWA emergency programmes in Lebanon (two social workers funded by Save the Children Fund, Norway, one nurse funded by Save the Children Fund, United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland, and seven truck drivers funded by Save the Children Fund, Sweden).

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