Question of Palestine home || Permalink || About UNISPAL || Search

About the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People

Follow UNISPAL RSS Twitter

Source: Division for Palestinian Rights (DPR)
Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People (CEIRPP)
31 July 1997


July 1997


Volume XX, Bulletin No. 7



Contents

Page
I.
    Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People
    hears reports on regional meetings; considers Secretary-General’s report
1
II.
    General Assembly holds resumed emergency session;
    considers report of the Secretary-General; adopts resolution
1
III.
    Secretary-General, Security Council and General Assembly President
    issue statements on bombing in Jerusalem
5
IV.
    Economic and Social Council adopts two resolutions and
    a decision relating to the question of Palestine
6
V.
    UNRWA launches $11 million emergency appeal for assistance
    to Palestine refugees in Lebanon in 1997-1998
7
VI.
    Excerpts from final document of the twelfth ministerial conference
    of the Movement of Non-aligned Countries
8
This bulletin, and back issues,
can be found in the Lotus Notes-based
United Nations Information System
on the Question of Palestine (UNISPAL) at:
http://domino.un.org/unispal.nsf




I. COMMITTEE ON THE EXERCISE OF THE INALIENABLE RIGHTS OF THE PALESTINIAN
PEOPLE HEARS REPORTS ON REGIONAL MEETINGS; CONSIDERS
SECRETARY-GENERAL’S REPORT

The Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People held its 231st meeting on 1 July 1997. The Chairman reported on the United Nations Seminar and NGO Symposium on the Question of Palestine, held at Jakarta from 4 to 7 May 1997, the United Nations Seminar on Assistance to the Palestinian People, held at Amman from 20 to 22 May 1997, and the United Nations North American NGO Symposium on the Question of Palestine, held at United Nations Headquarters, New York from 9 to 11 June 1997. The Chairman also reported on the Ministerial Meeting as well as the Summit Conference of the Organization of African Unity held at Harare from 24 May to 6 June 1997, which he attended representing the Committee.

The Committee also considered the report of the Secretary-General (A/ES-10/6-S/1997/494 and Corr. 1 and Add. 1) which was submitted pursuant to General Assembly resolution ES-10/2. The report stated that owing to restrictions imposed by the Government of Israel on the scope of the proposed mission of the Secretary-General’s envoy, it had not been possible to dispatch an envoy to Israel and the occupied territories. The report was therefore based on sources available to the United Nations at Headquarters and in the field.

At the same meeting, the representative of the Department of Public Information reported on the United Nations-sponsored seminar for journalists on the question of Palestine held at Athens on 26 and 27 May 1997 entitled “The Peace Process: The Challenges Ahead” (see GA/PAL/765).

II. GENERAL ASSEMBLY HOLDS RESUMED EMERGENCY SESSION; CONSIDERS
REPORT OF THE SECRETARY-GENERAL; ADOPTS RESOLUTION

At the request of the Group of Arab States (see A/ES-10/8) as well as the Acting Chairman of the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People (see A/ES-10/10), the General Assembly resumed its tenth emergency special session on 15 July 1997. The Assembly considered the illegal Israeli actions in occupied East Jerusalem and the rest of the occupied Palestinian territory on the basis of the report of the Secretary-General submitted in accordance with its resolution ES-10/2. The Chairman of the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People made a statement (A/ES-10/PV.4), the text of which is reproduced below:

It is a great pleasure to see you, Mr. President, leading the deliberations of the resumed tenth emergency special session of the General Assembly.

On 25 April 1997, at its emergency special session, the General Assembly adopted resolution ES-10/2 by the overwhelming majority of 134 votes to 3, with 11 abstentions. In that resolution the Secretary-General was requested to monitor the situation and to submit a report on, in particular, the cessation of the construction of the new settlement in Jebel Abu Ghneim, as well as on all other illegal Israeli actions in occupied East Jerusalem and the rest of occupied Palestinian territory.

The Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People deeply regrets that, owing to the restrictions imposed by the Israeli Government on the Secretary-General’s mission, restrictions considered unacceptable by the United Nations, it was not possible for the Secretary-General to dispatch his Special Envoy to Israel and the occupied Palestinian territory and thus to discharge in a fully satisfactory manner the mandate entrusted in him by the General Assembly in resolution ES-10/2.

I would like to take this opportunity, on behalf of the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People, to express to the Secretary-General our deepest appreciation for his efforts in the preparation of the important report before us.

The Committee considers that the report provides the General Assembly with a comprehensive document containing substantive proof concerning the Israeli Government’s illegal policies and practices, especially with regard to Jerusalem and illegal settlement activities having harmful consequences for the future of peace in the region. The report also corroborates valuable information that our Committee has received from various reliable sources on the ground.

As indicated in the Secretary-General’s report, the Israeli authorities have not ceased their construction of the new settlement at Jebel Abu Ghneim. The report emphasizes in detail the serious political, geographic, demographic and economic effects of the establishment of this new settlement, as well as its negative effects on the peace process.

Settlement activities - including the construction of new settlements, the expansion of existing settlements, the construction of bypass roads, the confiscation of lands adjacent to settlements and other activities in violation of Security Council and General Assembly resolutions - have continued unabated throughout the occupied Palestinian territory.

Israel has published plans for the creation of new housing for settlers in the West Bank and the Gaza Strip. It has been reported that Israel confiscated 30,000 dunums of Palestinian land in the West Bank in 1997 for the expansion of settlements. External support for settlements and their economic infrastructure continued during 1997, including through private support from foreign companies and individuals.

The Israeli Government continues to take illegal measures in Jerusalem aimed at altering the city’s character, legal status and demographic composition, including attempts to treat Palestinian Jerusalemites as “resident immigrants” subject to immigration controls. This practice reduces the Arab presence in Jerusalem and now threatens some 60,000 to 80,000 Palestinian Jerusalemites.

The report notes that the Government of Israel has not accepted the de jure applicability of the Fourth Geneva Convention of 1949 to all territories occupied since 1967, contrary to the obligations of all High Contracting Parties.

The principle of territorial integrity, which was enshrined in the Declaration of Principles, has been thwarted by operations to seal off areas and by severe Israeli restrictions on the movement of persons and goods. Israeli restrictions have also been imposed on United Nations officials and materials for projects, safe passages have not been established, and arrangements for the Gaza seaport and airport have not been agreed upon. The report deals with a range of other important issues, especially Israeli violations of international law, such as the detention and torture of Palestinians, the Israeli decision to limit the long-delayed redeployment and the systematic demolition of Palestinian dwellings.

The past few years gave rise to the earnest hope that the new international climate conducive to the resolution of long-standing regional conflicts and the unanimous desire of the peoples of the region for peace and an end to violence and bloodshed would finally make a settlement of the question of Palestine possible. The mutual recognition between Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization, the signing of the Declaration of Principles and subsequent agreements, including on the withdrawal of Israeli forces from the Gaza Strip and some areas of the West Bank, and the establishment of a democratically elected Palestinian Authority have been historic milestones on the road towards peace in the region, a peace that the international community has encouraged and supported by all means at its disposal.

The Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People considers that developments in the situation over the past few years have shown that peace in the region is possible and attainable. The parties must engage in honest and serious negotiations based on the agreements concluded and show the will to resolve the conflict. This will to negotiate must prevail over all else, for the growing tension and violence of recent months, if unabated, could throw the entire region into a renewed cycle of hatred and bloodshed.

While condemning all resort to violence, particularly against civilians, the Committee wishes to recall above all that the peace process progressed because both parties agreed to the basic principle of land for peace, as provided for in Security Council resolutions 242 (1967) and 338 (1973) and included in the Declaration of Principles of 1993 and later agreements. The international community has overwhelmingly supported this principle, which on the one hand recognizes the right of all States in the region, including Israel, to live in peace within secure and internationally recognized boundaries, and on the other hand reaffirms the inadmissibility of the acquisition of territory by war and recognizes the legitimate rights and claims of the Palestinian people. It also makes provisions for negotiations between the parties on the fundamental issues. We believe that this principle, which has brought the most significant progress in the peace process and which has been formally accepted by the parties as the basis for their negotiations, provides the only solution to this problem.

The Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People deplores the decision taken by the Government of Israel not to cooperate with the United Nations on the basis of resolution ES-10/2. This is why the Committee has supported the resumption of the tenth emergency special session of the General Assembly. the Committee believes that determined action by the international community is necessary in order to restart and reinvigorate the peace process.

On behalf of the Committee, I would like to express the earnest hope that this resumed emergency session will succeed in sending a clear message to Israel to stop its settlement policy and illegal measures, in the interest of peace in the region. The Committee remains convinced that stopping construction and expansion of the settlements, and Israel’s ending of provocative measures and obstruction, will restore a climate of confidence in which the negotiations between the two parties could be resumed in good faith and tranquility.

On the same day, by a vote of 113 in favour to 3 against, with 14 abstentions, the General Assembly adopted a resolution, the text of which is reproduced below. On 16 July 1997, the President of the General Assembly transmitted the text of the resolution to the President of the Security Council, requesting that the contents be brought to the attention of the members of the Council (see S/1997/555).

ES-10/3. Illegal Israeli actions in Occupied East Jerusalem and the rest
of the Occupied Palestinian Territory


The General Assembly,

Having received with appreciation the report of the Secretary-General,1/

Recalling all relevant United Nations resolutions,

Reaffirming its resolution ES-10/2 of 25 April 1997,

Having been informed in the report of the Secretary-General that, inter alia, the Government of Israel, as of 20 June 1997, has not abandoned its construction of the new Israeli settlement at Jebel Abu Ghneim and that settlement activity, including the expansion of existing settlements, the construction of bypass roads, the confiscation of lands adjacent to settlements and related activities, in violation of Security Council resolutions on the matter, continues unabated throughout the Occupied Palestinian Territory, and also that the Israeli Prime Minister and other representatives of the Government continue to reject the terms of the General Assembly resolution requiring a cessation of those activities,

Aware that, in the light of the position of the Government of Israel, as indicated in the report of the Secretary-General, the General Assembly should once more consider the situation with a view to making additional appropriate recommendations to States Members of the United Nations, in accordance with General Assembly resolution 377 A (V) of 3 November 1950,

1. Condemns the failure of the Government of Israel to comply with the demands made by the General Assembly at its tenth emergency special session in resolution ES-10/2;

2. Strongly deplores the lack of cooperation of the Government of Israel and its attempts to impose restrictions upon the intended mission of the Special Envoy of the Secretary-General to Israel and the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including Jerusalem;

3. Reaffirms that all illegal Israeli actions in Occupied East Jerusalem and the rest of the Occupied Palestinian Territory, especially settlement activity, and the practical results thereof cannot be recognized irrespective of the passage of time;

4. Reiterates the demands made in resolution ES-10/2, in particular for the immediate and full cessation of the construction of a new settlement at Jebel Abu Ghneim, to the south of Occupied East Jerusalem, and of all other Israeli settlement activities, as well as of all illegal measures and actions in Jerusalem;

5. Demands that Israel, the occupying Power, immediately cease and reverse all actions taken illegally, in contravention of international law, against Palestinian Jerusalemites;

6. Recommends to Member States that they actively discourage activities which directly contribute to any construction or development of Israeli settlements in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including Jerusalem, as these activities contravene international law;

7. Demands that Israel, the occupying Power, make available to Member States the necessary information about goods produced or manufactured in the illegal settlements in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including Jerusalem;

8. Stresses that all Member States, in order to ensure their rights and benefits resulting from membership, should fulfil in good faith the obligations assumed by them in accordance with the provisions of the Charter of the United Nations;

9. Emphasizes the responsibilities, including personal ones, arising from persistent violations and grave breaches of the Geneva Convention relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War, of 12 August 1949;

10. Recommends that the High Contracting Parties to the Geneva Convention relative to the Protection of Civilian Persons in Time of War convene a conference on measures to enforce the Convention in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, including Jerusalem, and to ensure its respect, in accordance with common article 1, and requests the Secretary-General to present a report on the matter within three months;

11. Calls for the reinjection of momentum into the stalled Middle East peace process and for the implementation of the agreements reached between the Government of Israel and the Palestine Liberation Organization, as well as for the upholding of the principles of the process, including the exchange of land for peace, and calls upon the two sides to refrain from actions that impede the peace process by pre-empting permanent status negotiations;

12. Stresses the need for actions in accordance with the Charter, to continue to ensure respect for international law and relevant United Nations resolutions;

13. Decides to adjourn the tenth emergency special session of the General Assembly temporarily and to authorize the President of the most recent General Assembly to resume its meetings upon request from Member States.


___________
1/ A/ES-10/6-S/1997/494 and Corr.1 and A/ES-10/6/Add.1-S/1997/494/Add.1.
2/ United Nations, Treaty Series, vol. 75, No. 973.



III. SECRETARY-GENERAL, SECURITY COUNCIL AND GENERAL ASSEMBLY PRESIDENT
ISSUE STATEMENTS ON BOMBING IN JERUSALEM

On 30 July 1997, the following statement was issued by Secretary-General Kofi Annan (see SG/SM/6292):

I am shocked and horrified by the carnage in Jerusalem today. At least 18 innocent lives are lost and over 150 people injured in apparent twin suicide attacks.

I express my heartfelt condolences to the Government and people of Israel, and especially to the families of the victims. And I condemn this act
of terror unreservedly, as I condemn terrorism from whatever quarter. Violence of this kind can never advance the cause of peace.

This is a crucial time in the quest for peace in the Middle East. I appeal to all concerned to reject violence and pursue their aims through dialogue, at the negotiating table.

On 30 July, the following press statement was issued on behalf of the Security Council (see DH/2444):

Members of the Security Council have expressed their shock and outrage at Wednesday’s bombing incident at the Mahani Yehuda market in Jerusalem during which some 18 people lost their lives and over 150 people were injured. In a statement read out to journalists at United Nations Headquarters in New York, Council President Ambassador Peter Osvald of Sweden said Council members sent their deepest condolences to the families of all those killed and injured in the tragedy.

The Council members condemned terrorism and the individual or groups who sponsored and perpetrated the act. Noting that the bombing occurred just after the resumption of bilateral negotiations between Israel and Palestinian officials had been announced, the Council members reiterated their support for the Middle East peace process and urged all parties to work for peace.

On 31 July 1997, the following statement was made by General Assembly President Razali Ismail (Malaysia) (see GA/9287):

As President of the General Assembly, I must express shock and horror over the deaths and injuries as a result of the bombing in Jerusalem. Our heart must go to the bereaved and we extend our condolences.

Our time is too often punctuated with violence and acts of extremism and destruction. We need to reach out for peace and reconciliation.



IV. ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL COUNCIL ADOPTS TWO RESOLUTIONS AND A DECISION
RELATING TO THE QUESTION OF PALESTINE

At its substantive meeting of 1997, held at Geneva from 30 June to 25 July 1997, the Economic and Social Council had before it a report of the Secretary General on the economic and social repercussions of the Israeli settlements on the Palestinian people in the Palestinian territory, including Jerusalem, occupied since 1967, and on the Arab population of the occupied Syrian Arab Golan (A/52/172-E/1997/71), prepared by the Economic and Social Commission for Western Asia. Another report of the Secretary-General provided an overview of the programme of assistance to the Palestinian people (A/52/159-E/1997/69). On 25 July, the Council adopted two resolutions(E/1997/67 and E/1997/16) on economic and social repercussions of the Israeli occupation and on Palestinian women, as well as a decision (1997/309) on economic and social repercussions of Israeli settlements. The texts of both resolutions and the decision will be included in the August 1997 bulletin.


V. UNRWA LAUNCHES $11 MILLION EMERGENCY APPEAL FOR ASSISTANCE
TO PALESTINE REFUGEES IN LEBANON IN 1997-1998

On 10 July 1997, UNRWA issued the following press release (see PAL/1839):

Geneva, 10 July (United Nations Information Service) - Over 350,000 Palestine refugees in Lebanon are on the brink of despair as they are forced to cope with a growing social and economic crisis which can only be averted by the quick action of the international community. Launching the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestine Refugees in the Near East's (UNRWA) Special Emergency Appeal for Assistance to Palestine Refugees in Lebanon at a press conference today, 10 July, in Geneva, UNRWA Commissioner-General Peter Hansen called for $11 million in additional contributions from the international community for 1997-1998 to meet the need.

"We are launching an appeal at this time because thousands of Palestine refugees in Lebanon desperately need help. Over the years, UNRWA has been a lifeline, but rising needs among the refugees, combined with the Agency's severe financial constraints, are a recipe for frustration and misery. At this critical juncture in the peace process, it is important to demonstrate to the Palestine refugees in Lebanon that their status is not at risk and that the international community, through its support to UNRWA, has not abandoned them", Mr. Hansen said.

Stressing the urgency of the appeal for special funds and the need for prompt action by the international community, Mr. Hansen said that UNRWA was virtually the sole provider of health, education and relief and social services to the 356,000 Palestine refugees registered with the Agency in Lebanon. At the same time, the socio-economic conditions of the Palestine refugee population have worsened despite the relative stability in Lebanon in recent years. At least 40 per cent of Palestine refugees in Lebanon are unemployed since they face restrictions in the local job market. Unlike their compatriots in Jordan or the Syrian Arab Republic, they have no access to public health facilities, including hospitalization services. Palestine refugees have practically no access to public schools at all levels as priority is given to Lebanese citizens. Remittances from family members working in Gulf countries were drastically reduced after the Gulf war.

"A volatile situation has developed in Lebanon in recent months, with campaigns being organized to protest the Agency's perceived inability to meet the refugees' basic needs", Mr. Hansen said. "Additional funds are crucial to help ease the socio-economic crisis facing Palestine refugees living in Lebanon and to cover basic needs arising from their particular circumstances, such as health services, in particular hospitalization, housing and education."

The difficulty of mobilizing sufficient contributions for the Agency's General Fund has made it increasingly difficult for UNRWA to maintain adequate services for the Palestine refugees in Lebanon. Over 10 per cent of refugees in Lebanon are enrolled in the Agency's special hardship programme, the highest proportion in the Agency's five fields of operations (Jordan, Lebanon, the Syrian Arab Republic, the West Bank and the Gaza Strip). In addition, there are an estimated 15,000-20,000 non-registered Palestine refugees in Lebanon who are not entitled to UNRWA services, but who nevertheless are in urgent need of assistance.

The Commissioner-General said that the health needs of the refugee community in Lebanon were especially acute in the absence of public facilities accessible to Palestinian due to their refugee status. The Agency's austerity measures have affected payments for hospital care. Mr. Hansen appealed for $6.9 million to hold the line on the Agency's health services, including funds to maintain the current level and volume of hospitalization services, to reduce the financial burden on the poorest refugees and to ensure timely admission to hospital for emergency and lifesaving cases.

Since Palestine`refugees rely almost entirely on UNRWA educational facilities and tuition fees at private schools are very high, the Agency also appealed for $2.7 million to respond to urgent needs in the education sector.

Many refugee families who live at or below the poverty line do not meet the restricted criteria of UNRWA's special hardship assistance programme. The Agency appealed for $1.4 million to assist Palestine refugees in Lebanon who suffer the greatest socio-economic disadvantage. Funding is required to provide assistance to these refugees who, without support, would find it difficult to survive.

The Commissioner-General told journalists that now was the time to reinforce UNRWA's role by ensuring sufficient funding for its core services within its General Fund. "This will enable the Agency to fulfil its obligations, to improve the living conditions of the refugees, to prepare them for the challenges ahead and to reinforce UNRWA's role as a stabilizing factor in the region", he said.

Earlier today in Geneva, Mr. Hansen met the High Level Working Group, which included ambassadors accredited to the United Nations in Geneva, to outline the details of the appeal and to request the support of their Governments.

The full text of the appeal, including the details of the specific contributions requested to assist Palestine refugees in Lebanon, are available from UNRWA.

For more information contact UNRWA Public Information Office, UNRWA HQ (Gaza), P.O. Box 371, Gaza City, tel. (+972 7) 677 7333, 677 7526; fax (+972 7) 677 7555, 677 7697.


VI. EXCERPTS FROM FINAL DOCUMENT OF THE TWELFTH MINISTERIAL
CONFERENCE OF THE MOVEMENT OF NON-ALIGNED COUNTRIES

The Movement of Non-Aligned Countries held its Twelfth Ministerial Conference at New Delhi on 7 and 8 April 1997, and adopted a final document, excerpts from which are reproduced below (see A/51/912-S/1997/406):

Palestine

98. Recalling the Cartagena Declaration, the Ministers reaffirmed their full support for the legitimate struggle of the Palestinian people to secure their inalienable rights, including the right to return to their homes and property and to self-determination and the establishment of their independent State on their national soil. They reiterated their demand for the withdrawal of Israel from all Palestinian and other Arab lands, including Jerusalem, occupied since 1967. The Ministers reaffirmed all Security Council and General Assembly resolutions relating to Jerusalem as an integral part of the occupied Palestinian territories and demanded their implementation, especially Security Council resolutions 252 (1968), 465 (1980), 478 (1980), and 1073 (1996) and General Assembly resolution 223/51, and considered the Israeli measures aimed at altering the legal, geographic and demographic character of Jerusalem and other actions, contrary to these resolutions, as null and void.

99. The Ministers welcomed the elections, last year, in the West Bank and Gaza and the ensuing constitution of the Palestine Legislative Council in January 1996 and President Arafat's assumption of the office of President of the Palestinian National Authority. The Ministers called upon States to support the efforts of the Palestinian people and the Authority to rebuild their economy and national institutions.

100. They considered the persistence of the Government of Israel in its policies of establishing and enlarging existing Jewish settlements in the occupied Palestinian territory, particularly in and around Jerusalem, such as the recent decision to confiscate Palestinian land and establish a Jewish settlement in Jabal Abu Ghnaim, as illegal and constituting a violation of the relevant international resolutions and a breach of contractual binding agreements, commitments and guarantees between the parties concerned. They, furthermore, considered that such violations by Israel constitute a threat to peace and to the ongoing peace process in the Middle East. They recalled that the current peace process is based on the principles and terms of reference of the Madrid Conference of 1991, namely: the implementation of Security Council resolutions 242 (1967) and 338 (1973) and the principle of "land for peace". While they supported the ongoing peace process, they expressed their grave concern that the Government of Israel has failed to abide by its obligations and its commitments to implement the terms of the agreements on the agreed scheduled time, and that Israel has failed to respect and carry out the relevant decisions of the Security Council.

101. The Ministers recalled that the Security Council, because of the lack of unanimity of the permanent members, has failed to exercise its responsibility for the maintenance of international peace and security. They recalled that the purpose of the United Nations is, inter alia, to take effective collective measures for the prevention and removal of threats to peace. They decided to call for an emergency special session of the General Assembly to consider the situation in the occupied Palestinian territory including Jerusalem, with a view to making appropriate recommendations to members for collective measures as prescribed in General Assembly resolution 377 (V) of 3 November 1950.

102. They requested the Secretary-General to take the necessary steps to convene such an emergency special session. They decided to communicate to the Secretary-General their concurrence to convene such an emergency special session.

103. The Ministers reaffirmed their commitment to respect and ensure respect for international humanitarian law in all circumstances. In this context they affirmed their obligation to ensure respect by Israel, the occupying Power, for the Fourth Geneva Convention of 1949 relative to the Palestinian territory, including Jerusalem, occupied by Israel since 1967.

Lebanon

104. The Ministers expressed full support and respect for the independence, sovereignty and territorial integrity of Lebanon. They expressed again their condemnation of the continued occupation by Israel of parts of South Lebanon and the Western Bekaa, and reaffirmed their full support for Lebanon's efforts directed towards the liberation of these territories. They expressed their deep concern with regard to the repeated Israeli aggressions against Lebanon and its citizens, as well as the hardships and sufferings inflicted on Lebanese citizens detained in Israel's jails and prison camps. They reaffirmed the need for a speedy and unconditional implementation of Security Council resolution 425 (1978) as a prerequisite for peace and security in the region, and for the release of all Lebanese detainees held by Israel.

Syrian Golan

105. The Ministers affirmed that all measures and actions taken, or to be taken by Israel, the occupying power, such as its decision of 14 December 1981, that purport to alter the status of the occupied Syrian Golan, are null and void; constitute a flagrant violation of international law, the fourth Geneva Convention of 12 August 1949 and United Nations resolutions, and have no legal effect. They called upon Israel to comply with Security Council resolution 497 (1981) and to withdraw from the occupied Syrian Golan, to the lines of 4 June 1967, in implementation of Security Council resolutions 242 (1967) and 338 (1973).

The peace process

106. The Ministers affirmed their support for the Middle East peace process, and the implementation of all agreements signed within its framework between the concerned parties, as well as the commitments and pledges made in accordance with the basis and terms of reference of the Madrid Conference, and United Nations resolutions, in particular Security Council resolutions 242 (1967), 338 (1973) and 425 (1978) and the principle of "land for peace", which guarantees Israel's total withdrawal from all occupied Palestine and the Arab territories to the lines of 4 June 1967, including the city of Jerusalem, the Syrian Golan, as well as the south of Lebanon and the Western Bekaa, occupied since 14 March 1978; they called upon Israel to reaffirm its adherence to its commitments given during the negotiations, and resume the talks on the Syrian track from the point they stopped at. They also called for the restoration of the inalienable rights of the Palestinian people; including their right to return, to self-determination, and to the establishment of their independent State on their national soil, with Jerusalem as its capital.

107. The Ministers considered the Israeli persistence in its settlement policies in Jerusalem and the rest of the occupied Palestinian and Arab territories, to be inconsistent with all international treaties, conventions and resolutions, particularly the Fourth Geneva Convention of 1949, and to constitute a serious threat to the peace process.

108. The Ministers noted with appreciation the commendable efforts exerted by the Syrian and Lebanese Governments, in order to open up possibilities for achieving progress in their full commitments to peace in the Middle East, and to resume the talks from the point they stopped at, and demanded that Israel totally withdraw from the occupied Syrian Golan and Lebanese territories, in implementation of relevant Security Council resolutions, and in accordance with international law, and the principle of inadmissibility of the acquisition of territory by force.


-----

Follow UNISPAL RSS Twitter