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Recherche de règlement/Cessez-le-feu/Jérusalem/Réfugiés - Rapport du Secrétaire général en application de la résolution 331 (1973)

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UNITED
NATIONS
S

        Security Council
Distr.
GENERAL
S/10929
18 May 1973

ORIGINAL: ENGLISH

REPORT OF THE SECRETARY-GENERAL UNDER SECURITY COUNCIL
RESOLUTION 331 (1973) OF 20 APRIL 1973
CONTENTS
Paragraphs
INTRODUCTION
1
I. UNITED NATIONS EFFORTS TO DEAL WITH PARTICULAR ASPECTS OF THE MIDDLE EAST SITUATION
2-24

A. Status of the cease-fire
3-13
B. Situation in the occupied territories
14-11
C. Question of Jerusalem
23-34
D. Palestine refugee problem
35-42
II. THE SEARCH FOR A SETTLEMENT
43-115
Adoption of Security Council resolution 242 (1967)
43-44
Activities of the Special Representative from December 1967 to May 1968
45-58
Activities of the Special Representative from May 1968 to June 1970
59-63
Attempt to hold discussions under the Special Representative's auspices (June-September 1970)
64-67
General Assembly debate of October-November 1970
68-69
Resumption of the discussions
70-72
Discussions under the Special Representative's auspices (January-March 1971)
73-88
Further developments (March-November 1971)
89-97
Discussion at the twenty-sixth session of the General Assembly
98-99
Further attempts to reactivate the Jarring Mission
100-110
Discussion at the twenty-seventh session of the General Assembly
111
Situation since the adoption of General Assembly resolution 2949 (XXVII)
112-113
III. OBSERVATIONS
114-118
ANNEXES

I. QUESTIONS SUBMITTED IN MARCH 1969 BY THE SPECIAL REPRESENTATIVE TO THE GOVERNMENTS CONCERNED AND THEIR REPLIES

II.AIDE-MEMOIRE PRESENTED TO ISRAEL AND THE UNITED ARAB REPUBLIC BY AMBASSADOR JARRING ON 8 FEBRUARY 1971

III. AIDE-MEMOIRE PRESENTED TO AMBASSADOR JARRING BY THE UNITED ARAB REPUBLIC ON 15 FEBRUARY 1971

IV. COMMUNICATION PRESENTED TO AMBASSADOR JARRING BY ISRAEL ON 26 FEBRUARY 1971

INTRODUCTION

1. The present report is submitted in pursuance of Security Council resolution 331 (1973) of 20 April 1973 in which the Council requested the Secretary-General to submit to it as early as possible a comprehensive report giving a full account of the efforts undertaken by the United Nations pertaining to the situation in the Middle East since June 1967. The Security Council also decided to meet following the submission of the Secretary-General's report to examine the situation in the Middle East and it requested the Secretary-General to invite his Special Representative, Ambassador Gunnar Jarring, to be available during the Council's meetings in order to render assistance to the Council in the course of its deliberations.

I. UNITED NATIONS EFFORTS TO DEAL WITH PARTICULAR ASPECTS
OF THE MIDDLE EAST SITUATION

2. Although the main purpose of this report is to apprise the Security Council of the efforts undertaken by the United Nations since 1967 in the search for a peaceful settlement of the Middle East problem and in particular of the activities of the Jarring mission, it may be useful first to recall briefly the efforts made by the Organization to deal with particular aspects of the situation in the Middle East.

A. Status of the cease-fire

3. Shortly after the outbreak of the hostilities on 5 June 1967, the Security Council adopted two resolutions calling for an immediate cease-fire (resolution 233 (1967) of 6 June and resolution 234 (1967) of 7 June 1967). Following the adoption of those resolutions, the Governments of Jordan, Israel, the United Arab Republic3/ and Syria successively announced their acceptance of the cease-fire. Fighting stopped on the United Arab Republic and Jordanian fronts by 8 June and on the Syrian front on 10 June. At the cessation of hostilities the Israeli forces had reached the east bank of the Suez Canal, except for the Port Fuad area at the northern tip, in the United Arab Republic; they also occupied the West Bank in Jordan and the western part of the Golan Heights in Syria. No fighting took place between the Israeli and Lebanese forces and the 1949 armistice demarcation line between Israel and Lebanon has remained unaltered.

4. In order to make the cease-fire effective between the Israeli and Syrian forces, the Security Council passed two further resolutions on 9 and 12 June respectively (resolutions 235 (1967) and 236 (1967)). On the basis of these resolutions and after obtaining the agreement of the two parties concerned, the Secretary-General established a United Nations operation for the observation of the cease-fire in the Israel-Syria sector. A similar operation was later set up in the Suez Canal sector in pursuance of the consensus approved by the Security Council on 9-10 July 1967 and with the agreement of both parties concerned. Much later, at the request of the Lebanese Government and after the Security Council consensus of 19 April 1972, a third observation operation was set up in the Israel-Lebanon sector, but on the Lebanese side only. There is no machinery for the observation of the cease-fire in the Israel-Jordan sector. On several occasions the Secretary-General has drawn attention to the fact that in the absence of a decision by the Security Council no such machinery could be established.

5. The responsibility for the cease-fire observation operations has been entrusted to the Chief of Staff of the United Nations Truce Supervision Organization in Palestine (UNTSO) and the United Nations military observers assigned to that mission. At the same time, UNTSO has continued to maintain the machinery for the supervision of the 1949 General Armistice Agreements, but as Israel no longer recognizes those Agreements, UNTSO has been unable to carry out those of its functions and duties relating to them.

6. Where cease-fire observation operations exist, United Nations military observers are stationed in the cease-fire sectors on both sides in the Suez Canal and Israel-Syria sectors and on one side only in the Israel-Lebanon sector. The United Nations observers do not carry arms and have no enforcement power. Their main function is to observe the situation in the cease-fire sectors and report to the Security Council, through the Secretary-General, on violations of the cease-fire that they have observed, such as firing, exchanges of fire, overflights and forward military movements (see the supplemental information reports in the S/7930/Adds. series). They may also receive complaints from the parties, and, when the latter so request, they may carry out inquiries on those complaints. It should be noted that they can only observe developments within the observation range of the observation posts. Air attacks and raids carried out by armed forces against targets far behind the forward defended localities cannot be observed. When guerrilla activity takes place in a cease-fire sector, United Nations observers are generally unable to observe or identify the irregular forces involved.

7. Nevertheless, despite these shortcomings, the reports of the observers have proved to be useful as an independent and impartial source of information for the assessment by the Security Council of the situation in the cease-fire sectors. It may also be pointed out that the presence of United Nations observers in an area can be helpful in preserving the cease-fire in ways other than reporting. The mere fact of their watchful presence can be something of a deterrent to military activity, and in dealing with the parties concerned they can use their influence to defuse dangerous situations. When fighting does break out, they can quickly intervene on the spot with opposing local commanders to arrange immediate cease-fires. The Chief of Staff of UNTSO and the observers may also use their good offices to facilitate operations of a non-military nature in the cease-fire sectors. For example, when a leak occurred in an oil pipeline between the Israeli and Syrian forward defended localities in November 1969 arrangements were made, through the good offices and safe conduct of UNTSO, for the necessary inspection and repairs to be carried out by technical personnel of the oil company (S/7930/Add.57).

8. Since June 1967, three observers have died in line of duty. One observer was killed near Kuneitra during the hostilities of June 1967 and the other two in the Suez Canal sector in July 1969 and July 1970, respectively. In addition, 13 observers were injured in varying degrees while performing their duties.

9. I have been following the situation in the cease-fire sectors very closely and have endeavoured through the exercise of my good offices and appeals to the parties to reduce tension and prevent escalation. In this connexion I should mention the efforts I made in close co-operation with the President of the Security Council for the release of the Syrian and Lebanese military and security personnel abducted by Israeli armed forces from Lebanese territory on 21 July 1972. Those efforts, initiated in June 1972 in the exercise of my good offices, were later specifically endorsed by the Security Council in its resolution 317 of 21 July 1972. They have not as yet proved successful.

10. When serious incidents break out, the parties themselves generally bring them to the attention of the Security Council, giving, of course, their own versions of them. In the most serious cases, one or both parties concerned often - but not always - request a meeting of the Security Council to consider the matter. A full account of the consideration of the various incidents by the Security Council may be found in the Council's own records and need not be repeated here. However, for reference purposes, a list of the various meetings held by the Security Council on cease-fire matters since June 1967, the complaints of the parties brought before it and the decisions it has taken on them is given below:

(a) 1365-1366 meetings (8-9 July 1967):

Subject matter

United Arab Republic complaint concerning Israeli violationse-fire
in the Suez Canal sector on 8 July 1967 and Israeli complaint concerning United Arab
Republic violations on the same day.

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