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UNITED
NATIONS
A

        General Assembly
Distr.
GENERAL
A/58/637
18 December 2003

Original: English

Fifty-eighth session
Agenda item 145 (b)
Financing of the United Nations peacekeeping forces in the Middle East: United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon


Performance report on the budget of the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon for the period from 1 July 2002 to 30 June 2003

Report of the Secretary-General

Contents

Paragraphs
Page
I.Introduction
1
3
II.Mandate performance
2–5
3
III.Resource performance
7
A.Financial resources
7
B.Other income and adjustments
8
C.Contingent-owned equipment: major equipment and self-sustainment
8
D.Non-budgeted contributions
9
IV.Analysis of variances
6-15
9
V.Actions to be taken by the General Assembly
16
11



I. Introduction

1. The budget for the maintenance of the United Nations Interim Force in Lebanon (UNIFIL) for the period from 1 July 2002 to 30 June 2003 was set out in the report of the Secretary-General of 1 April 2002 (A/56/893) and amounted to US$ 112,376,000 gross ($108,401,200 net) inclusive of voluntary contributions of $333,500. It provided for 3,513 military contingents, 144 international staff and 339 national staff. On the basis of the recommendation of the Advisory Committee on Administrative and Budgetary Questions contained in paragraph 15 of its report of 5 April 2002 (A/56/887/Add.7), the General Assembly, by its resolution 56/214 B of 27 June 2002, appropriated an amount of $112,042,500 gross ($108,401,200 net) for the maintenance of the Force for the period from 1 July 2002 to 30 June 2003. The total amount appropriated has been assessed on Member States.

II. Mandate performance

2. The mandate of the Force was established by the Security Council in its resolutions 425 (1978) and 426 (1978). The mandate for the performance period was provided by the Council in its resolutions 1391 (2002), 1428 (2002) and 1461 (2003).

3. The Force is mandated to help the Security Council achieve an overall objective, namely, to maintain international peace and security.

4. Within this overall objective, UNIFIL, during the performance report period, has contributed to a number of expected accomplishments by delivering related key outputs, shown in the frameworks below. These frameworks are grouped by components: operations and support. The components reflect, rather than determine, the common programmatic nature of the expected accomplishments and outputs contained therein.

5. The frameworks represent a shift towards a results-based budgeting approach. The 2002/03 budget did not include standard frameworks for planned results, which would have been the baseline against which performance would be measured and reported. Therefore, the Force’s mandate performance is presented in a transitional format showing the actual indicators of achievement and actual outputs during the 2002/03 period for which information was available. The expected accomplishments would lead to the fulfilment of the Security Council’s objective within the time frame of the mission and the actual indicators of achievement show a measurement of progress towards such accomplishments during the performance period. The actual outputs represent the contributions made by the mission towards the expected accomplishments during the performance period.


Component 1: Operations
Expected accomplishments Actual indicators of achievement
1.1 Greater compliance with the integrity of the Blue Line and Lebanese territorial sovereignty1.1.1 Serious Blue Line violations reduced from five in 2001/02a to two in 2002/031.1.2 80% reduction in air violations (255 in 2001/02a compared to 51 in 2002/03)

1.1.3 Fourfold increase in firing incidents (35 in 2001/02a compared to 176 in 2002/03)

Actual outputs
    • 127,750 mobile patrol days (5 troops per patrol, 2 patrols each from 35 operational positions)
    • 127,750 troop-manned observation post days (5 troops per position in two shifts at 35 operational positions)
    • 424 air patrol hours along the Blue Line
    • Two reports of the Secretary-General to the Security Council
Comments
The ground and air violations are results of external factors mainly due to the volatile regional security situation.

a Statistics for the period 2001-2002 reflected in A/57/662 and Corr.1 were erroneous.
Expected accomplishments Actual indicators of achievement
1.2 Normalization of the authority of the Government of Lebanon in southern Lebanon 1.2.1 47% increased presence of Lebanese security personnel in southern Lebanon (805 in 2001/02 compared to 1,185 in 2002/03) 1.2.2 No border security positions yet established along the Blue Line
Actual outputs
    • 246 liaison meetings convened
    • 37 high-level liaison meetings convened
    • 68 mediation efforts that helped avert escalation of the situation
    • 144 meetings to coordinate development/humanitarian/mine action efforts in southern Lebanon
Comments
More liaison meetings were conducted between UNIFIL and the parties concerned to avert escalation of the situation and to keep communications open.


Component 2: Support
Expected accomplishments Actual indicators of achievement
2.1 Effective and efficient logistical and administrative support to the mission 2.1.1 The percentage of total inventory value awaiting write-off and disposal was reduced from 22% as at 30 June 2002 to 11% as at 30 June 2003 2.1.2 Reduction in the procurement cycle from 94 days between the date of placing a requisition and receiving goods and services in 2001/02a to 72 days in 2002/03

2.1.3 Number of hours of wide area network/local area network (WAN/LAN) downtime reduced from 60 hours in 2001/02 to 36 hours in 2002/03

2.1.4 Vehicle off-road ratio reduced from 7% in 2001/02 to 5% in 2002/03

Actual outputs
Service improvements
    • Inventory management: General Services Section interacted with asset managers on a daily basis, held Local Property Survey Board meetings frequently and coordinated expeditious processing of cases referred to Headquarters Property Survey Board
    • Procurement cycle: integration of the acquisition plan with the budgetary process, including a joint monthly review of requirements with self-accounting units; expedited acquisition process by avoiding redundancies; use of templates for contracts and agreements and establishing long-term agreements for frequently purchased goods and services
    • Information technology networks (WAN/LAN) downtime: installed surf-control software, maintained back-up servers and power supplies, effected prompt troubleshooting of the network and installed reliable hubs and switches
    • Vehicle off-road ratio: replaced old vehicles in a timely manner; ensured preventive maintenance of vehicles in a timely manner, trained drivers on safe driving and maintenance and ensured prompt repair of vehicles
Military personnel
    • Rotated 3,735 troops in and 3,946 troops out
    • Rations and petrol, oil and lubricants supplied to and stored at 44 military positions for 2,463 troops (average per month)
Civilian personnel
    • 527 civilian staff contracts administered
Facilities and infrastructure
    • Maintained and repaired 40 military positions comprising 1,000 prefabricated and 160 solid accommodations
    • Maintained total of 25 km of access roads to various military positions
    • Repaired helipads at 18 locations
    • Refurbished 4 offices
Ground transportation
    • 448 light and 184 heavy vehicles plus 51 trailers maintained at 4 locations
    • 66 armoured personnel carriers maintained at 2 locations
Air transportation
    • 658 hours of helicopter flights
Communications
    • Supported 1 VSAT system at 1 location
    • 10 telephone exchanges supported for 1,395 users
Information technology
    • Supported 580 desktops, 75 laptops, 315 printers and 41 scanners at 8 locations
    • Wide-area network for 60 users supported
Medical
    • Four level I, 1 level II and 2 basic-level hospitals providing services to 40,046 patients
Comments
Downsizing of the mission was completed by 31 December 2002. Relocation of civilian international staff from Nahariya, Israel, to Tyre, Lebanon, took place from August to October 2002.


III. Resource performance

A. Financial resources

(Thousands of United States dollars. Budget year is from 1 July 2002 to 30 June 2003.)

Variance
Apportionmenta
Expenditure
Amount
Percentage
Category
(1)
(2)
(3) = (1) - (2)
(4) = (3) ÷ (1)
Military and police personnel
Military observers
Military contingents
53 585.0
51 098.7
2 486.3
4.6
Civilian police
Formed police units
Subtotal
53 585.0
51 098.7
2 486.3
4.6
Civilian personnel
International staff
23 131.5
20 711.3
2 420.2
10.5
National staff
11 157.4
14 123.7
(2 966.3)
(26.6)
United Nations Volunteers
Subtotal
34 288.9
34 835.0
(546.1)
(1.6)
Operational costs
General temporary assistance
52.7
52.7
0.0
0.0
Government-provided personnel
Civilian electoral observers
Consultants
Official travel
472.9
426.0
46.9
9.9
Facilities and infrastructure
8 778.5
7 788.5
990.0
11.3
Ground transportation
6 740.9
6 041.2
699.7
10.4
Air transportation
1 339.6
1 538.6
(199.0)
(14.9)
Naval transportation
Communications
1 210.3
1 140.8
69.5
5.7
Information technology
1 424.8
1 494.3
(69.5)
(4.9)
Medical
871.7
721.4
150.3
17.2
Special equipment
548.5
542.0
6.5
1.2
Other supplies, services and equipment
2 728.7
1 917.7
811.0
29.7
Quick-impact projects
Subtotal
24 168.6
21 663.0
2 505.6
10.4
Gross requirements
112 042.5
107 596.8
4 445.7
4.0
Staff assessment income
3 641.3
4 520.2
(878.9)
(24.1)
Net requirements
108 401.2
103 076.6
5 324.6
4.9
Voluntary contributions in kind (budgeted)
333.5
333.5
100.0
Total requirements
112 376.0
107 596.8
4 779.2
4.3
a Reflects adjusted distribution of approved resources between military and police personnel and operational costs categories of expenditure.

B. Other income and adjustments
Category
Amount (Thousands of US dollars)
Interest income
6 637
Other/miscellaneous income
1 603
Voluntary contributions in cash
Prior-period adjustments
(68)
Savings on or cancellation of prior-period obligations
3 171
Total
11 343

C. Contingent-owned equipment: major equipment
and self-sustainment
Category
Expenditure
(Thousands of US dollars)
Major equipment
2 987.4
Self-sustainment
Catering (kitchen facilities)
111.3
Office equipment
97.1
Electrical
117.3
Minor engineering
70.5
Laundry and cleaning
358.0
Miscellaneous general stores
177.7
Communications
63.4
Medical services
281.7
Explosive ordnance disposal
86.9
Observation
328.9
Subtotal
1 692.8
Total
4 680.2


Mission factors
Percentage
Effective dateLast review date
A. Applicable to mission area
Extreme environmental condition factor
0.5
9 November 1998No review date
Intensified operational condition factor
2.3
9 November 1998 No review date
Hostile action/forced abandonment factor
9 November 1998No review date
B. Applicable to home country
Incremental transportation factor
• Fiji
4.5
• Ghana
2.0
• India
1.0
• Ukraine
0.25

D. Non-budgeted contributions
Category
Actual value

(Thousands of US dollars)

Status-of-forces agreement a
1 478.6

a Inclusive of rental costs of UNIFIL headquarters in Naqoura ($441,200), UNIFIL House in Beirut ($333,500), which had previously been reported under voluntary contributions in kind (budgeted), and military positions ($703,900) provided by the Government of Lebanon.

IV. Analysis of variances 1
Variance
Military contingents
$2,486.3
4.6%
1 Resource variance amounts are expressed in thousands of United States dollars.


6. The reduced requirements are mainly attributable to savings under travel on emplacement, rotation and repatriation. The estimate had been based on the rotation of 5,054 military personnel (twice the average number of troops (2,527)) at $1,000 per person per rotation. Actual average troop strength for the period under review was 2,457, and repatriation based on 4,923 military personnel at $753 per person per rotation.

Variance
International staff
$2,420.2
10.5%

7. The reduced requirements are mainly attributable to lower than expected expenditures related to the relocation of civilian international staff from Israel to Lebanon in the period from August to October 2002. Some UNIFIL staff were in other missions on temporary duty.

Variance
National staff
($2,966.3)
(26.6%)

8. The additional requirements are mainly attributable to a salary increase effective 1 August 2002, with consequent higher expenditures for national staff salaries, common staff costs and staff assessment.

Variance
Official travel
$46.9
9.9%

9. The reduced requirements are mainly attributable to the cancellation of travel plans by staff from Headquarters due to the regional security situation.

Variance
Facilities and infrastructure
$990.0
11.3%

10. The reduced requirements are mainly attributable to the decision not to purchase large capacity generators, as spare parts were made available from the field reserve. Adequate power supply was ensured by repairing the old generators.

Variance
Ground transportation
$699.7
10.4%

11. The reduced requirements are mainly attributable to the lower than anticipated costs of repair and maintenance services for vehicles and armoured personnel carriers, as a result of the reduction in the fleet size from 750 to 695 vehicles, while retaining newer cars.

Variance
Air transportation
($199.0)
(14.9%)

12. The additional funding requirement is attributable to the increase in third-party insurance premiums.

Variance
Communications
$69.5
5.7%

13. The reduced requirements are mainly attributable to the fact that the cost of spare parts had been overestimated.


Variance
Medical
$150.3
17.2%

14. The reduced requirements are mainly attributable to the lower utilization of medical supplies due to a reduction in medical incidents in the UNIFIL area of operations.

Variance
Other supplies, services and equipment
$811.0
29.7%

15. The reduced requirements are mainly attributable to the fact that the anticipated compensation to landlords was higher than the actual claims negotiated.

V. Actions to be taken by the General Assembly

16. The actions to be taken by the General Assembly in connection with the financing of UNIFIL are:

(a) To decide on the treatment of the unencumbered balance of $4,445,700 with respect to the period from 1 July 2002 to 30 June 2003;

(b) To decide on the treatment of other income/adjustments for the period ended 30 June 2003 amounting to $11,343,000 from interest income ($6,637,000), other/miscellaneous income ($1,603,000) and savings on or cancellation of prior-period obligations ($3,171,000), offset by prior-period adjustments of $68,000.


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