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UNITED
NATIONS
E

        Economic and Social Council
Distr.
GENERAL
E/CN.4/2005/SR.4
26 August 2005

ENGLISH
Original: FRENCH

COMMISSION ON HUMAN RIGHTS

Sixty-first session

SUMMARY RECORD OF THE 4th MEETING

Held at the Palais des Nations, Geneva,
on Tuesday, 15 March 2005, at 10 a.m.


Chairperson: Mr. WIBISONO (Indonesia)

later: Mr. ESCUDERO
(Vice-Chairperson) (Ecuador)

CONTENTS


...

STATEMENT BY THE SECRETARY-GENERAL OF THE ORGANIZATION OF THE ISLAMIC CONFERENCE

STATEMENT BY THE COMMISSIONER FOR HUMAN RIGHTS OF MAURITANIA

...

STATEMENT BY THE MINISTER FOR FOREIGN AFFAIRS OF INDONESIA

...


The meeting was called to order at 10. a.m.

...

STATEMENT BY THE SECRETARY-GENERAL OF THE ORGANIZATION OF THE ISLAMIC CONFERENCE

21. Mr. IHSANOGLU (Organization of the Islamic Conference) (OIC) ...

...

28. Since its inception, the Commission on Human Rights had been monitoring closely a tragic case of human rights violations, namely, the question of Palestine. The Palestinian people had been denied its right to self-determination and Israel continued to occupy its territory, engaging in illegal practices, some of which were classifiable as war crimes and State terrorism. Commission members unanimously acknowledged that forcible occupation of territory was one of the most vicious forms of denial of human rights, and hundreds of international resolutions called for the Palestinian people to be granted its right to self-determination. By flouting those resolutions, Israel was impeding the application of international law, prolonging the suffering of the Palestinian people and creating an atmosphere of tension and violence that jeopardized peace and security throughout the region. Extrajudicial killings, the demolition of Palestinian homes, army blockades, the confiscation of land, the construction of the separation wall and the deliberate exacerbation of the Palestinian people’s plight were all issues which fell within the Commission’s mandate and should weigh on the conscience of its members.

...

STATEMENT BY THE COMMISSIONER FOR HUMAN RIGHTS OF MAURITANIA

34. Mr. OULD MEIMOU (Mauritania) said that any reform of the Commission should be approached carefully, objectively and without undue haste. Although there was consensus on the importance of human rights and the priority to be given to their attainment, greater attention should be given to ways of removing obstacles to their enjoyment both at the national level, by promoting democratic societies based on the rule of law, and at the international level, by guaranteeing peace and security and creating an economic climate conducive to development of developing countries. Recent events in the Middle East looked hopeful and the international community should actively support the peace process which the Palestinian and Israeli sides had pledged to revive.

...

STATEMENT BY THE MINISTER FOR FOREIGN AFFAIRS OF INDONESIA

62. Mr. WIRAJUDA (Indonesia) ...

...

63. Indonesia had won its independence after a centuries-long struggle against colonial rule. It found it unacceptable that the Palestinian people was still being denied its right to independence and hoped that the recent positive developments in the Middle East would soon lead to the establishment of an independent Palestinian State living alongside Israel in peace and security.

...


The meeting rose at 1 p.m.



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